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Full text of "Variety (September 1921)"

!!?•<• 



ice 
MS 



MARCUS LOEW NUMBER 



Price 

20 
Cents 




Publlahed Weekly »t 154 Wcat 4Clh St.. New York. N. T.. by Variety. Inc. Annual aubacrlptlon $7. Single coplea,~ 20 cents. 
Entered ■• i<<>cond clau matter December 22. 1905. at the Poet Offlce at New York. N. Y.. under the Act of March S. 1S7». 



>L.LXIV. NO. 2 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1921 



64 PAGES 



URLESQUE 

^ 4^ 




OUG AND MARY PASS UP ALL :- 
■• STAGE OFFERS DEFINITELY 



mid Have "Written Own Contract'' For Piece to 
Open Harry CarrolPs New Theatre — Fairbanks to 
Return to Coast For Filming "Virginian/' 



«^ 



The speaking stage is nev«r to be 
iced again by the presence of Doug- 
Fairbanks or Mary Picjcford. 
DoQf. stated so emphatically on Tues- 
liy afternoon. Not that he doesn't 
•till hanker after the theatre that was . 

the scone of his first success, but t)e- 
cause he believes that the speaking 
♦tfcge and the 'Silent' drama bear the 
•Wit relationship as constant work 
lathe ring does to the yugiistic chom- 
pion. Fairb&nks stated that not only 
hecauRe of picture contracts was it' 
ioiposslblc for him to consider a 
aking stage engagement for himself 
d his wife, but because of the fact 
t he believed that it would be a 
erous experiment for either of 
nrto make. 

fiarl Carroll approached the stars 
oujth their attorney, Dennis F. 
Rrien, with a proposition that they 
star in a play that would be the 
♦pcning attraction at the new Earl 
<5arroU theatre ia January. Mr. Car- 
roll informed Mr. O'Bnen that the 
JJ^tB could "write their own ticket'* 
'tD^ "^ould consider a contract. 

JY*" *^* Carroll theatre opens it 
^ be ab'e to handle « gross capacity 
•f tbout $22,000 a week. The man- 
MJIJ" figured that an arrangement 
gjW be made with the Fairbanks- 
"«ford combination whereby they 
(Continued on page 10) 



ail 



UOHTWIN' ** m 1895 



Portland, Ore., Aug. 31. 

The Oregon Jonrant, daily, here, 

'jromcmorated the closing of Bacon*a 

Td season in "Lig htnin* " in New 

f^by reprodacinc <fce picture of 

Karon stock com^ny taken her© 

^HOr> to mark th« celebration of 

^ «Oth conaccutiYe performance at 

fwdray's theatre km^ 

Bacon then plar^jBi original wr- 



EQUITY THREATENS 
CONTRARY MEMBERS 



Official Organ Says Any 
Member Defying Organ- 
ization Will Regret 
^ Action 



The official publication called 
"Equity," a monthly or thereabouts 
issue, put forth by the Actors' Equity 
Association, in the August number 
under the heading of 'Storm Warn- 
ing," said: 

"Wa have every confidence that 
our members will help us enforce our 
policies for the coming season. 

"We would not envy the lot of any 
member who would defy the rules 
and try to sign up on any oontract 
other than the one ordered by the 
Council. The temper of our people 
is such that he would probably be 
condemned to live in Coventry for 
the rest of his life/' 

The title page of "Equity" says it 
is the official organ of the A. E. A. 
The paper is supposed to be edited 
by Frank Oilhnore, executive secre- 
tary and treasurer of the society. 



WHEELS' OPEH 

SHOP FIGHT 

SETTLED 



Union Crews to Work at 
Old Scale — "Yellow 
Card" System Waived 
For Three Months. 



OPENING OF LOEW'S STATE 
TRllMPH OF SHOWMANSHIP 

Historic Assemblage of Stage Notables and Celebrities 
From Other Fields Marks Climax of Manager's 
Career. 



MEDIATION WINS 



The open shop battle that has been 
waging for two months between the 
bnrlosqnc interests and the stage 
IkiiuIh and luuHieians unions was set 
tied at a conference held Wednesday, 
in the Columbia Theatre Huilding 
l)etwcon executives of the C/oIumbia 
(Continued on page 10) 



MANCHESTER DUKE 
TO ACT IN FILMS 



-<^ 



Services to Be Offered 

Producers Here by 

Jenie Jacobs 



4,000 U. S. CHURCHES 
HAVE MACHINES 



Kansas City Clergyman 

Makes Statement — Says 

Effect Must Be Felt 



$14,000 FOR CONCEBT 

McCormack Takes Reccrd at Ocean 
Grove 



John McCormack broke the house 
record at the huge Auditorium, Ocean 
Grove, 'Thursday, 4)>ay'nK to $I4,(HH) 
for a single concert. The attendance 
included 1,100 standeea. 

The Auditorium will close Jjabor 
Day with Jfa^Bchuman-Heink the 



»•*■••■ •••^ 



Kansas City, Aug. 31. 

The Rev. Hurris Jenkins, who, in 

addition to his duties as pastor of one 

of the leading churches here, is also 
editor of the Kansas City Post, says 

editorially: 

"While most miniHters are still de- 
bating the matter and some are ac- 
tively hostile to the innovation, 4,000 
churches in the United Htatea nrc op- 
erating moving picture machines. Just 
what effect this will have upon the 
commercial movien is prohlomutiral. 
It would seem inevitable that the ef- 
fect should be felt in niany communi- 
ties in a decreased patronage of the 
commercial houses. Many of the 
churches that employ this method are 
^UoniU.^ Meth9^i»t. 9^^^. P'/^cj- 



Tlie Duke of Manchester, who 
m.irricd Mis.s Zimmerman of Cinoin- 
atli and lias written considerably for 
the 'Icarst ncwspapcra, will sail 
shortly for America to start work 
a.s an actor for the screen. He has 
placed himself under tlw* nianaRcment 
of Jonio Jacobs, who will offer his 
.servieea to American producers. 

The (luke'.s mother was nn Am- 
eriran woina:i and the title <is an old 
and di.stinRuishcd one. He hinis<'lf 
han spent much time in this country 
and is i)oi)ular with Ameriran.s, ()iil 
his position at hoaie is such he ^vou1d 
have difficulty doing what he i.s about 
to do if the Queen had not lifted her 
bnn ngainst Kuch activity by the Kn;;- 
lish nobilty. 

Thf» Queen first put her foot <lown 
when Lady Diana Manners, daughter 
of the Duke of Rutland, *>gnifi(Ml her 
intention of starring. Later she lift- 
ed it and the 4>uches8 of Weslmin- 
Hler promptly said she wanted to 
work in pictures. She has been fol- 
lowed by a host of lesser lights. 
Significant f the change of attitude 
were the facilities given cameramen 
to photo(?raph the Prince of Wales, 
scenes from whose world tour arc 
now being eiihibited. 



The greatest turnout of tnlent and 
Broadway notables ever assembled 
under one roof helped to dedicate 
Loew's State Theatre. No benefit, ex- 
travagantly advertised as having the 
most marve'ous collection of stars in 
history, even approached it, and no 
premiere in the annals of American 
theatredom has brought together such 
n complete or daazling concentration 
of names and personnages on the creot 
of aum.sement life. 

Loew's popularity, while not sur- 
prising, was proven stupendous, though 
ho in identified with popular the- 
atricals, he drew the outspoken and 
demonstrative personal support of his 
competitor.s, the executives of all 
other branches of the industry and 
arts, stars and celebrities from every 
avenue and lane of entertainment, 
public officials, financial luminaries 
and his clubmatcs, • associates and 
neighbors. 

Tliaif were no forma] ceremonies. 

The stars, when called upon, with- 
out exception either acknowledged by 
rising in their scats and 'facing the 
audience.* or by taking the stage for 
((continued on page 2) 

WIDOW ON PAYROLL 



LOEW PAYS $1,000 

Frank Fay closed contracts Mon- 
dsy to play f^oew'a State week of 
Sept. 12. at |1.0(M) for the week. 
Arthur S. I>.y(mir his representative, 



Boston, Aug. 31. 

The salary of the late James Gor- 

mon, stage manager for "The O'Brien 

Girl," who died suddenly two weeks 

ago while he was rehearsing new 

principals and chorus, will be contin- 
ued for the "run of the show." 

Manager Jake Uosenthal has W^ji 
ordered by C'ohan to send the weettji 
salary check indefinitely to Gormad*8 
\>idow. 

The Rtory wa.s not given out to the 
local press under orders from Cohan, 
who told the TrenH>nt Theatre press 
agent that he "never had and never 
would stand for that ^nci of pub- 



2 



VAKIETY'S LONDON OFFICE 

26 HANWAY 8T OXFORD ST W. I. 



CABLES 



- Friilay, September 2, 1021 



cz:^ 



FAMODS PLAYERS SHORTS HIT; 
PAYJIP, THEN RENEW ATTACK 



|M> 



0^4 



$7,000,000 of Common Change Hani?8 in Record 
Dealings — ^Talk of Anli-Trust Action by U. S. In- 
spiration for New Drive. 



More than $T,000,000 of Famoos 

■'laycrH* common atock c)iens<^d hands 

'luring the aix businesa scsiiiona up to 

Vcdncsday. In that tini* the qnotii- 

ons made a round trip from 54 1-2 to 

1 and back to 54 3-4. Thin move- 

icnt represented the complete vic- 

)ry of inside company bulla over the 

rofesaional shorts who were hurrled- 

/ "run in" and compo'lcd to cover all 

'le -way from 55 to 01. 

Tlie covering movement b«fan Iftat 

'riday and the squeeze continued uil- 

I the second hour Monday, irh«B tht 

ii majority of the bears having 

' >ught their way out at a price, news 

<gan to seep through the finaiiokil 

Htrict that the Federal Trade Com- 

iasion was about to proceed afiinst 

\imous Players on charges ^of Tioll- 

' )n of the anti-trust laws, and a new 

'flilMrfgii of filing broke out. 

The covering of .shorts bad run the 

.-ice up from under 55 to 61, at which 

• vel the beara apparently had cov- 

■ rtid. In the natural order of events 

'e wiping out of the short account 

>uld have invited x^fim oelling anjr- 

ty and the reports from Washington 

ere made to order for the bear jside. 

'>ey made the moat of them for mar- 

t propaganda, and by Wednesday at 

' m quotations were off about 7 

ints from the high with prices rul- 

; around 5«'i. 

Selling Thaatre? 

Hear traders sought to make capi- 
I out of rumors that Famous Play- 
-. had switched its policy and in- 
.id of buying into more theatre 
)perties, wns preparing to sell out 
' theatre holdings it already has. 
course ,in connection with the re- 
ts of federal action against the 
•ipany, the inference was that Fa- 
ns IMuyers* managers were scok- 
' to clear their skirts before the 
imission's investigation got under 
y. 

This interpretation apparently made 

-le heodway as reflected in the price 

•vement downward, but trade au- 

k >rities in touch with affairs within 

P > industry take on altogether dif- 

f ont view of thhi reported theatre 

"mg program. 

/'^amous Players is supposed to have 

"ontroUing interest in about 400 

•atres. This equity in theatres puts 

> producing and distributing concern 

the position of exhibitors in com- 

♦ition with the independent thentro 

ners with whom Famous Players 

R business as a renter of films, and 

M situation has given rise to a good 

1 of bitter feeling toward the cnm- 

\y on the part of exhibitor organ- 

tiors a feeling that might easily be 

tly sinco Famous Players must do 

^Iness with independent showmen. 

Half.Way Position 

"■our hundred theatres of its own is 
'' tniffioient ns an oiitlot for produo- 
is to make Famous riayors indo- 
idont of the outsido exhibitor, as 
Icncod by tho action of Adoli.li /ii- 
in liis' ofFortH to roiicili.'itr i\\r pro- 
fing Thentro Owners of Auierira b.v 
vin^ rr Ptitiition of lossos to in- 
dual exbibifors flnimed as nrisinj; 
\ prodiiorr-distiibulinR compoti- 

'ui*^. in tho opinion of the trndo. 
':or;f;c- monlionod. l'\'inuMis- IMiiy- 

is' ii* T) ii:vlrs:r:!b'f' lii'.'f \N:ty y>o- 

■in. It inif^'it work itself out in 

r (lir<M'lli>n |iv itiiToiijin.^ it'^ 

iii^s to tlio poirt wlirro it would 

(ult i.rr'.driit iM" t1i<' conrr:'l oxliih- 

: lirM by i.:i\iii:: lis own- outlf^t, 

ly rrotliru* rid <.f it ■ tbr.-itrc liolil- 

^ ruul ooir-(Mi' !-;itii:;^' nil th(^ buiiri' '- 

riiLilii: l.iiu'^ ;<' tl!i> wliolc tr.'iib'. 

iiT coiir^-''* WMiiIl imprMV(^ its [o 

■\ n;' a jircd. !'<■;■. v.iii'r> the prf- 

'^it ui'.ti'Mi. jt.'irt. cxhilKtMr aii'l ['riil 

r 'o iji.lcpt injcril '^. ''1)1 -• two w:;y.-. 

(frrs ajii'nrfuf ly bclu vc tl,.:t n 

: is ;i r< ( vi 



prosperity. The move might b« bet- 
ter interpreted as a shrewd maneuver 
to better the company's position. * . 

This la not the first time a com- 
pany's buainees policy hag inspired 
short selling, while at the same tinic 
it made the company's atock atronger 
and worth more money. 

In the roeh to cover Famous Play- 
era short contnicta late last week it 
was reported that Jesse Liv^rmorc 
had retired from bis bear position. 
He was reputed to have been a beav^' 
(Continued on page 0) 




OPENING OF MEW'S STATE 



(Continued from page 1) 



^ 



i« 



DOMINO*' FOE CANADA 



New Syndicate Stiitof Orl«l8al Oast 
to Do«Mo« 



> ' - ■ 

London, Ang. 81. 

WUUam J. Wilson** prodactkm of 
"The LUae Dtaiino'* nils (or a tonr 
of CanidiBi catly In Octot^t, under 
the auspices of the newly formed 
Britsh -Canadian lyndicate. 

The company will comprise prac- 
tically the original cast, including 
Josephine Earle. Clara Butterworth, 
who wtis the prima donna of the com' 
patiy here, will not be with the or- 
ganization. 



I love to read the Artists' Furum. 
It fives mt a grojat kick; but if I 
ever get started on the fellers that 

SIA 4n me. Georn hi. Cohan can't 
a eatfttfh for me for giving him the 
Mea of Yankee' Doodle Dandy and 
DaiM Beiasco phons me daily, just 
bvcBoae 4t was me that pat Mm wise 
U WaHIdd when "Wnrry*'^ and I 
were dalikg a double and Mr. Albee 
calls on mc daily, jttOt because I put 
him wise to the little string of housea 
that he** rot. Itfs got so now that 
I have ta leave word that if it's Kd- 
die Pm ont. Edison Is on Ay neck 
constantly-^won't do a thing aniaas 
I Miy ''It's t>. K. Tommy, go ahead.** 
And Qua Sna wires me nine times a 
day waold I open Blkina, W. Va., 
Monday, split with Wheeling— **wira 
cotnfirmingT IsnH that rjkht Kr. 
Qollagbcr? Absolntdy, Mr. Hheaa. 

FRANK VANHOVEN. 



HBTTT KINQ 



$1,500 



CONFLICT AT MLARIONY 

Paris, Aug. 31. 
Abel Deval Is an object of criticism 
within the municipal council which 
leased to him the Marigny, Champs 
Elyseea at a yearly rental of 45,0l)() 
francs. It is alleged he transferred 
his interests, in violation of the agree- 
ment, for UOO.OOO francs which is con- 
sidered excessive, and the authorities 
are considering the possibility of can* 
celling. 



Eaiiiah SfBgla Camlaf Over 
8hibert9 — Bogaany Traapa 
$1,000 Weakly. 



far 



CIRQUE PARIS OPSNS 

• Paris, Ang. 31. 
The Cirque Paris began Aug. 2Cth 
successfully with Orlando's eighteen 
horses featured. Robichon wns ap- 
pointed musical chief and ringmaster. 



lionden, Aug. 31. 

The engagement of Hetty King 
for Shubert vaudeville in the States 
is for 20 weeks at $1.r)00 weekly. 
Mlas King is shortly sailing for your 
side. Shb played over there some 
years ago. 

Another English turn booked by 
the Shuberts fs the .Toe Boganny 
Troupe of acrobats. Their salary is 
$1,000 a week. 



Baby Miaa Revival 

Paris, Aug. 31. 
The French version of Baby Mine 
(Mon Bebe), will be renewed at the 
Theatre des Nouveautes in September 
by Max Dearly, with Paulettc Noizcus 
as Maggie Scott. 



Croisset*s Revival 

Paris, Ang. 31. 
Francois de Croisact's comedy, "liC 
Coeur Di.spose," will be shortly re- 
nuscitatcd os the vehicle for reopening 
the Theatre Kdouard VII, with Andre 
Brule and Madeleine Lely. 



NEW FIRM 

London, Ang. 24. 
A new play producing firm has been 
formed. THie principal directors arc 
Captain John Hare, George and 
Harry Foster, theatrical agents. Ar- 
rangements for exchange are being 
made with an American firm. Harry 
Foster sailed last week on the Olym- 
pic . • 

All productions will be under the 
supervision of William J. Wilson. 



oc^mpaalats, and dreubed uud made 
up for the footlights. 

Will Morrissey officiated as the 
clown. He ran up and down aisleM, 
broke up several acts and burst in at 
apropos anri Indlcrously misfit mo- 
ments with a nmnlng aeries of hokum 
that always seemed to hit. He led 
the orchestra with atraina of familiar 
tunes to punctuate affairs, haDyhooed, 
and all but broke up Loew*a earnest 
speech. At . one time he cried out 
"Hurry ap, liarcus; there's a caatom- 
er in the store.*' He did a stage tarn 
of hia own, a topical song with Jioew 
and his new house aa the subject, get- 
ting hearty lai«hter. 

Flo Ziegfield*B contrftatkn was one 
of almost unprecedented gradonsness. 
Sending the entire 'Tolliea** beauty 
ensemble, and moat ef hia principals, 
he ^rr^nr the surprise of the night for 
a harrah finole. Loew and Wart^p^ 
both **worked" with the **Foltie«*' 
choiva behind them. WariBeld had )ed 
numhera wkh pretty nearly as beauti- 
ful ( Ib hia aaiiri^ daya, bat to 
Ijoew it waa at least an wnfiainiar 
sensstioa. 

B. r. Albee aertaadaJ the front of 
the hoaae thMogh hia Keitb*s Boys* 
Band, tlao * thought pi a ffte d by the 
highest eaorttay^ 

LobW*i ipeecfa #i8 dlgnllled, plhaa- 
aat and-atncere. Hrmade Httie of the 
financial magnitade of the event, bvt 
treated it aa the realiaatlo& of a aentt- 
■lental dream and viewed It with pride 
abd Joy ftoi* the aaglaa of what it 
had brOBght Um Omt money conld 
aot^vy. He apoka with faaHig tboot 
Nick Scheack, Da>rid Warfleld, the 
Lambs, Albee and the Motion Pictnjre 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Several of tht stars and near-atars 
who performed vrere Loew acts of 
earlier days, and toward these, too, he 
ezpreaaed hia gratltade, as well as to 
the world at large, which had treated 
fim projection it Is Ideal. *rhe or- 

The theatre looked beautiful, t'or 
fil mprojection It Is ideal. The or- 
chestra is large and well organised, 
and the organ Is a masterpiece. For 
vaudeville shows the State will prove 
a little bard in some cases. The 
acoustics are good, but the house i^ 
Very long and th~ere Is n vast area 
of main floor under the Iwlcony over 
hang. 

However, turns which remember 
that they must reach and act in ac- 
cord with that knowledge, and those 
who know how to find a pitch and 
focus for their voices, will have no 
trouble. It will prove, like the equal - 
}y enormous State-Lake in Chicago, to 
be a house where acts that get to the 
corners get Over bigger than they ever 
will anywhere dse, spd those who 
fail to make the distance will perish. 

There was every outward Indication, 
in addition to the enthuoiastic spirit 
of the opening audience, that the 
State would be a quick and substantial 



INCIDENTS OF THE OPENING 

Joe Leblang and l.ee Shubert went over the house *>j?ethep and 
when their tour of inspection was completed both aaid "This is ab- 
tolutely the last word in theatres." 



RIgolettos In Paris. 

Paris, Aug. 31. 
Rigolctto Bros., recently barred by 
Knglisli variety artists, and tho Sisters 
Swausoii appir.'irtrd al tlie Aiuaiiilirii 
Aug. 2Gth and went ovor nicely.. 



Gultry aiid Caryll 



aiid caryii 

PiV^is. Aup. 31. 
?artia Oiiitry 1s collal>ointiiip on an 
opciM'tta with Yv;in ('ar^il <lue for tin 
Thontrn KdouanI VII with (Juitiy 
himsrir and Yvonno l*ristoinps in the 
N'ads. Carjil sails Sept. 1 lili for Now 
York. 



The hou.se attaches had hard work keeping the small time agents 
from leaping into the lobby fountain and copping the gold flsh. 

The "Clown Conier" In the lobby of the State has already been 
selected and christened. It Is the divan on the right side of the lobby 
as one enters the theatre. Earl Carroll selected the spot and held 
court there until the show broke up when he triumphantly bore Le- 
noro Ulrir away on his arm, first, however, presenting her with a 
bouquet of rosea that he filched from one of the floral tributes on 
display in the lobby. 



Maro Klaw at Dieppe 

I*aris. Apg. 31. 
^I:irf K'nw fs stoppinj: a>. Dioppo 
for a few il.iNM prior to goiti^ to lion- 
dou. 



Marciif* Loew held the center of the stape In tho lobby during the 
early part -of the evening flunked on ono side by David Warfleld and 
6n -the othor by John J. Murdock. Both Mr. Warfleld and Mr. Mur- 
dock roseni])lo each other as far as hirstue adornment Is concerned 
when viewed from tho rear and more than one confiding MIsg had 
tho Keith mr.r, pointed r,ut to her by her escort as tho Belasco star. 
Tt's funny what a uiop of white hair will do for some men. 



specialty performances. A numbcr'^f 
them came properly prepared, with 
success, the crowning achievement of 
the amazing Loew career. 

— ^- •■ ^ 

State Last Word in 

Theatre Designing 

la the inner lobby stood Marcus 
Loew, paflng a cigar. The cigar, 
apparently, was the only thing of 
any consequence to Loew at the mo«j 
ment. Api)roaehed by a Variety re 
resentative, and asked if he was sa 
istie<l with his new house, 4)e repli 
laconicji 

*'If we get thje buHiuosH I'll 
satisfied. I thhak I got what I we' 
after in the way of a theatre 
now can only, hop^ .for the best." 

Tho re|ik>rter asked what it wi^ 
that Loew weat after and was 
fcrred to G. J. Fleischmann, 
Fleischmaan Broa^ Iwilders of 
edifice. 

**Qu8" FleischmanQ.ha^ little 
for interviewing. Jie bad been 
all Sunday night and worked rii 
through Monday looking after n^; 
d^'•'^ On the approach of 
acquaiataBce he furtively drew h: 
aaide •^••^ ...quired |f he had anyth 
on'hia hip. *^U8" Was fagged 
and needed a little stimulant 
carry him through the evening, 
aaid:... 

Laaw't laatricllMia. 

*^arcua. aaid ta .Tbii Lamb,, 
architect, and aa: HSoya, glre me 
finest there la asd apare ao expen 
We worked on the plana with La 
for aix iMnthaand eosaider the 
atre the llMet In tha cavntry. Housed 
may h% mare onate and em/jts 
more, bat we regard the State as. th||, 
finest house in the world. And a»« 
other thing, we finished it on tim% 
the delay in apening hot being dna 
to ns. There li not a aingle violatioii, 
of any kind.'* 

Asked how many theatres thit: 
Fleischmsnns had built, O. J. saii^ 
he didn*t know exactfy — somewhere 
between 100 and ITA), » . ;, 

Thomas J. Lamb, the architect* 
upon being oaked his. opinion, modeat«., 
ly regarded it as "a very niee house.'* 

''Is it the »be8t (king you've eveii* 
done?" he was asked, to which ha, 
responded: "I think it is." 

Other theatre builders were presr 
cat St the premiere and were called 
upon for theJr opinions. Lee Shur* 
bert said: 

**It is the finest house In the counf 
try from every angle. Of course yoa 
couldn't play small dramas in it, but 
It would be great for big spectacles." 

"Do you consider. it finer than tik6\ 
Capitol r 

Saccassar to Hip? ^' 

"The Capitol can only be utiliz 
for pictures, bat -Uii*- Is a theatre. 
Some day it will take the place of 
the Hippodrome." 

B. ft. Moss suJd^ ^^ la as fine as 
anytl)iii|; in the cnuutry. Some n'»V^ 
think other houses are nicer, but that 
is a matter of- )>erV^hul; taste. It 
like building yoiir oWti' home, loa 
might think your home the finest* 
ever, while others would regird It' 
as atrocious." '^ 

B. K. Uimber^r''^! can't see an^ 
chance for improvement. It is the 
list word in tlr^a.tVe' building." 

William Brandt/ pt^esldent of th4l 
Theatre Owneirs,' CUtimlJer of Com-" 
merce of Greater ^V'ew .York: *'H«^a 
markable! It ija a monument tQ 
Marcus Loew." \ , 

lieuhen San'iuct^i-insurance hrokctjj ; 
who jilaoes all the insurMnoc for the 
Loew houses, said:' ""The lowest in* 
.'•-iiPiinro rate' on 'ft'ny piil>rii* Iniildinjfli 

Marcus Loexv stateft tliat with the 
completion of the new State he i' 
through building theatres. f>f course 
he doesn't mean that for he is still' 
building a hig hi^use In liOH Anpolcs, 
however, ho undohbtedly does moan 
that he will not take on any noTV 



Tlio 

» » w* o . 1 



foHoNviti 
H 



I 



it of f 1 ; o r y 1 1 ' ! I ! ; ' r . . 
;■• ;ir'] :i si^ii of \V(>;.1 






r.v.i)\.^ ri;i\ (M•.■■ 



Mnl a <1<' 



Mcrr'c 



ni- 



PEGGY O'NEIL 

SAVOY THEATRE, 
. LONDON 



SAILINGS 

: siiili:i^r^ v»^re ar 
IV.ul Ta;r if; ond Pnn: 
(I'aris for Now YorW^^ 
Vv.iri (':n'\ll. 

S(>fit. It (I.nni!(i:i to New York) — 
; M: •. H.'MTv (IrroTi (Olytnj-ic). 

S-M '. 10 (lI;ii;iLii!- to Nc'.v York) 

i An (:;ili 1 ) 

I .\,: '. 'j;- (Pjriit for New York). 
AViU llilv,-;ir(l>. 

^■A'^^ 'JO i:!o;ii;or Trlikaa (SS. 

Aii^r. 'jr, -Parifh and IVrn (Celtic). 
Aug. 21— r.rssic Uempcl (SS. 



, Tho first coraplaint that Pat Cnsey will receive from Mr. Loew 
ho a charge that tho Palace is trying to lift material from the new 

tlieatro. ■ Wult«T Kinpsloy tried to convince the best looking usher huildinK proincts. The aiv^^wrr in that 
?^irl in the crew that "llie amall time waa no place for her and she 
belonged on tho 11^; tinic." 



One of tho stroamcis on a hucre floral offering blazoned forth In 
pjold leLtors {ho fact, that .Tacob Rosenthal was the donor. It held a 

, idaco of honor in lh»! lobby, 

Tho^e that were niisjiod, who wore much concerned In the early 
Loew (:ir( wit days were Jon Wood, Joe Shay, .lack Goldberg, Ernie 
William., and last but uol least, for ho has since been laid to rest, 

Loiil.s Wcsb-y. 



Nil;^ (Jrnntlnnd manacod to pot a real line on who was In the hou^e 
l>y rlJi^in/T hinisf'lf oh tho platform <intsido the house with the weekly 
cani" r;i men and spottin'j: the arriviihi. He managed to place his info 
to good u.'^o later when ho stnrtfd to announce celebritlea from the 
sta^o for the Impromput entertainment which followed the regular 
bill. To (irantlund a full measure of credit must be given for his 
work for pulling the mob In front of the house with the picture tak- 



ing 4ituul 



;i 



the Ivoew Circuit now has 101 liousos 
that it obsohitely emitrols. Thoro is 
opportunity for enlarging the circuit 
and adding heuaei^ Witlwnit poiii^ to 
the trouble of biilltlhlg". A deal is notf 
on whereby lioew 'has* hern jisft«'d fo' 
fiirnisb vnuilpville' 'to 'n ' nuinbor of 
theatres on a ir«<l*(^rit}tKe basis. Tins 
niMy be undertaken during tin* n'xt ?*'* 
moMtliH. . ' 

(Conrinu^^fl o>i p«feo <'.)) 



MARIE LOHR PRODUCES 

. ♦London. Aii^. '^I- 
Rofore sailing ior ('iin;nl.<. wh-ro 
she will phiy f()r,,^)i iitfnit^i.'*. .Murio 
Lohr arrauRod /"or, tUe,'^i^fo<lvcii"Ti "J 
the (Jlobe of a ;^\f;»j^li»y, by .Mi'i;""' 
Morton, entitled^,! ">\;p|uaji to '*'^"- 
man." The Iradi^f i^l^ l^Ul be i>'nvcJ 
by Willettc Kershaw, .^ 



r 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



VAUDEVILLE 



IINESE RESTAURANTS PART 
OF NEW CABARET CHAIN 

Jbterchange of Shows Feature of Business Revival of 
Dining Place Entertainments — New Revues in 
the Making. 




Denpite the differing opinions by 

4ke cabaret men as to the betterment 

•f the business or otherwise (the ma- 

jsrity TOting optimiHtically), sctiritics 
Isr the new season are going on 
fiipace. There art at least three caba- 
ret rirr in the process of forma- 
tion with plans fairly well set, calling 
for the interchange of shows at stated 
periods. Other independent shows are 
b'.bo being readied for immediate 
gMoiiiKN, and the organisation of the 
Knerican-Cliincse Theatrical Corpo- 
ration, capitalised at $15,000, intro- 

es another new phase to the busi- 
The company is l^ing up all 

Chiuc.^c restaurants and installing 
s Slid orehestras. Y. S. lit, an 

lental, negotiated the dealn be- 

een the American and Chinete eada. 

'The new Strand Roof show, alated 
is open next Monday (Sept. 5>» will 
j^y alaTen wtaks there and then in- 
troduce the shew tlMt will haTe been 
■bowing at the Parkway Palace, In 
Brooklyn, the past ten weeks. T^e 
latter is scheduled to open one week 
^ter. The same producing unit, tea- 
tstively known as the Arte Amuse- 
iient Co., also eperstes the Waltoa 
Beof and AdelphI Itoof shows la 
fhiladolphia. and these two places 
are also indnded in the general 
idieroe of Interchanging shows. 
*- Henry Fink'a Shelbume Hotel re- 
iit§ is sUted t* travel around sisal- 
Hrly, and the Walter Windsor At- 
hrsrtions has a line-up of ten restan- 

eits snd cafes in which to phiy their 
»ws at sis weeks' interrsls in each 
c«. 
'The cabaret men look to the cou- 
jttt charge as their sslration, al- 
though all concur that some of the 
hlfg^r places will have difficu'ties 
withfMit the "selling" pririlege. 
''* Some of the big Broadway places 
can get sway with what might be 
termed a "'gyp*' couvert charge rang- 
ing from a dollar to twice that sum. 
because of the stel'ar orchestra snd 
entertainer attractions, but the opti- 
mistic cabaret men, figuring con- 
iS^trativcIy on a fifty cents tsMe 
'^ck," estimste a fair house per- 
eentas^. The figures sverage about 
$500 weekly for ^he show and $300 
ffor the band. The gate is estimated 
to be more than enough to corer 
that expense. 



PANTAGES OPENS 
NEW KANSAS HOUSE 



SUES 8A1IUELS 



iBttty Oster Wants $25,000, Alleging 
Breach of Promlie 

Arthur Bnmucis (professionally 

known .is Sidney Valentine), who at 

.eue time was pianist for Anna 

^ (^handler in vaudeville, has been sued 

for breach of promise by Betty Oster, 

•f Net^ York. Alex. Sidney Roscn- 

.thal it) representing the plaintifF. who 

.allecps that she met Samuels while he 

Was living at the St Andrews Hotel 

with a woman named Fay Powers as 

nan ami wife. He told her that he 

was not married to the Powers wom* 

•a, and then introduced her to hit 

■Mother as the girl that he intended to 

•trry. 

Mijis Oster further ntntes thot Sara- 
WU sclocted the date for the cere- 
■•ny, but failed to appcnr. Her at- 
J^ney is SHking $2ri,0(K) damages for 
w humiliation. Samuels in addition 
»• bis vaudeville earnings also owuh 
w« tcxi onbfl which operate from an 
•Pper Hroadway stand. 



Cost $900,000, Seats 2,- 

200— Ambler Bros. 

First Act on Stage 

Kansas City, Aug. .11. 
Kansas City's newest theatre, the 
Pantagcs, had its formal opening Aug* 
27 and welcomed over 10,(KM) guests. 
The first evening performance was by 
inritations. 

The performance started promptly 
and ran smoothly until after the 
fourth act when Hr. Pantages was 
introdueed. He responded briefly, 
thanking theae present for their ap- 
preciation in the undertakiBf and 
hoped that the hooae, aiad entertain- 
ment to be preaented, would continue 
to live up to their expeetatioas. 

The Ambler Brothers, cqnillbrista, 
have the honor oi being the first act 
to appear on the stage ef the new 
house. The balance of the bill was 
composed of Lee Morse, Jarrls and 
Harrisoa, Viola Oakley, LnyU Gerlof 
and company, Joe Roberts, and Nat 
(Chick) Haynes and company. Paul- 
ine Frederick'a picture ^'SaWage" mf • 
the featured flbn. 

The opening was under the per- 
sonal direction of J. J. Cluxton, gen- 
eral manager for Alezandr- Pantages, 
who has been here for a couple of 
weeks superrising the finishing 
touches. 

The new house (m of the Uensis- 
sance type of architecture and was 
designed hj B. Ifarcus Priteca, of 
Sesttle. The entrance is on Twelfth 
street, Kanaas City's *'White Way" 
with the foyer and lobby running 
bsck 130 feet to the body of the 
theatre. The tower over the en- 
trance is 180 feet high, of white terra 
cotta and marble. On the pinnacle 
is s revolving electric sign spellinc 
the name of the house, *'Psntagcs. 
The house has a seating capacity of 
twenty-two hundred and is the fourth 
theatre of the same sise that has been 
completed and turned over to Mr. 
Pantages in the last year. Continuous 
performances from ont till eleven, 
with vsudevile and feature pictures 
will be the policy, with the prices 
Rcoled St 40 cents top for week day 
matinees and 60 cents top for nights 
and holidays. 

The cost of the Kansas City house, 
according to the .. -hitects, was 
$000,000. 

OROPPEB PRODUCINO 

Milton H. Oropper, author of The 
Charwoman," in which Sarah Paddeu 
is appearing, bos entered the produc- 
ing field. The first act that he will 
offer will be **Mother Heart," in which 
Jean Moss, of "Potash and Pearliuut- 
ler" fame, will be featured. His sec- 
ond offering will be the presentation 
of Hamilton Christie and two beou- 
ties in "Superstition.*' 



NEW COMMITTEE FOR 
KEITH EXCH. BOOKS 

Samuels and Darling Say 
Final Word on Routes 



A booking committee with super- 
visory and arbitrary iiower was cre- 
ated thiti week by the Keilh circuit. 
It will ruiiKist of I'lddit* Darling, 
Keith booking thief, and T. U. Saiti- 
tiel.s with supervisory powers who 
will be aKHiHted by the re.it of the 
booking men. 

The new order will leave the book- 
ing situation un(;hanged, with liCon 
Morrison, former assist :nt to Sam- 
uels in- booking the Alhauibra, Co- 
lonial and Hamilton, now in charge 
of those hooks. 

Willism McCalTery will assist Jack 
Dempsey in the booking of the mid- 
dle western territory formerl> 
handled by Arthur Hlondell whilo Pat 
Woods will retsin his books of the 
Itiverside. Itoyal, Orpheuni tnd Hush- 
wick. McCo^ery who has been as- 
sistant to K. C. Lauder, an execu- 
tive of the Keith Circuit, will also 
act an a ''scout** for new material. 

The new order is expecte<l to con- 
solidate the bookings, eliminating the 
necessity for nn act to be "caught" 
by each Individual booker in order to 
get consecutive booking. The ap- 
proval of either Darling or Samuels 
will Insure a route. In addition tbs 
"committee" will supervise the lay 
ing out of the ahown over the entire 
circuit making such changes as neces- 
sary or rearranging bills nt their dis- 
cretion. 

All of the big time bookings are 
affected by the new system which In 
many respects resembles the present 
system of the Loew Circuit where 
Jake TiUbin is empowered to 
"blsnket" an act for the entire 
"time." 



VAUDEVILLE SEASON IN N. T. 
FORECASTS EXCELLENT START 



Colonial Only Metropolitan Keith House Dark Next 
Week — Royal Goes Back to Big Time Policy — 
Other Out of Town Openings 



SHUBERTS BAN FILMS 

Springfield, Mass., Aug. 31. 

The Capitol theatre did not open 
Sunday, as was first snnounced, Lee 
Shubert refusing to allow pictures to 
be shown prior to the start of the 
Shubert vaudeville sesson. Abraham 
Ooodside of Portland, Me., leased 
the theatre to the Shuberts for tsu- 
deville, but did not think that they 
would have any objection to the pre- 
sentation of pictures until September 
19, when the two-a-day is expected to 
get under way. 

The Shuberts vetoed the plan, 
however, and the electric sign which 
had blaxoned "I'he Capitol will open 
Sunday" was changed to read "The 
Cspitol will open Koon." It is be- 
lieved that the New York firm was 
desirous of identifying the theatre 
with thoir vaudeville and did not wish 
Springfield people to get the idea it 
was to continue os a picture house. 
Walter M. Merkel remains as man- 
ager of die theatre for the Shu- 
berts. 



ORPHEUM "NAMES^' 

ARE REPLACED 



Trying Out Strong Com- 
edy Acts Top and Bot- 
tom of Bills 



Booking men of the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit are experimenting with a view 
to eliminating the former **nan\)e" 
acts considered essential on out-of- 
town bills. 

Two strong comedy sets are being 
given the top and bottom billing and 
strong spots. One of the duo that 
will trsTcl the drcuit together are 
WiUiama and Wolf and MiUer and 
Mack. 

If the team v'llls business as 
strongly as expected the "revne*' and 
*'name*' acts will be cut down to a 
minimum and the money saved thare- 
by inrested in strong comedy and 
feature turns. 



YIDDISH HOUSES 



Naw York and BraoUyn Htvt Vaiida- 
villa Thtatrat witk Yiddltli Bills 



Greater New York has two Yiddish 
vaudeville houses, one in Bfanhattan 
(The Grand on Grand street, down- 
town) and the other In Brooklyn 
(Hopkinson, East New York district). 
The Grand in addition plays three 
English acts booked by the Keith 
family time office, playing split weeks 
with a more or leas permanent line- 
up of Yiddish vaudevillians who 
change their repertoires every so 
often. liouis Kramer is the manag- 
ing director and author of the Yid- 
dish sketches snd is also not unknown 
to English vsudeville os a skit author. 
Julius Nsthanson is the chief come- 
dian at the Grand. 

The Ilopkinson plays straight Yid- 
dish vaudeville and English pictures 
with Ssm Ijesvenworth and Klinetsky 
and Zwerling as the standard single 
and double set sttractions. 



BEACH PLACE PASSES 



Brighton Btach Music Hall to Be 
Torn Down. 



DINE MIKE LEVY 

Chicago, Aug. 31. 

A dinner was tendered to Mike 
Levy, formerly of Kramer and Levy, 
on the eve of his departure for New 
York, where he is to enter into busi* 
ness with Charles J. Frecmnn, under 
Ihe agency of Freeman &, licvy. 

Practically ali of the Chicago agentu 
and bookers were present at the 
Toast to wish "Mike" well in his new 
(ield. 



The Brighton lleach IIote\ which 
is one of the landmarks of this vicin- 
ity, is soon to be torn down and a 
bungalow colony is to be built in its 
stesd. With the testing down of the 
old hostelry also comes the demolish- 
ment of the old Brighton Beach Mu- 
sic Ilal'. 

The Music Ilnll has housed every- 
thing from s prise fight down. The 
Brooklyn Realty Associates has leased 
the property. There will be a large 
private bathing beach adjacent to (be 
colony. 



WOAL PAYS. IN SKETCH 

Syracuse, Aug. 31. 
Booking has be«n inailr of Harold 
^"•O Salter, leading man with the 
*Wckorbockcr Players durng the sea- 
^n just closed, ond Ralph Murphy. 
•w«p director of the company, in a 
*I[ "•^<*tch written by th<> latter. 
♦K- I ^^^" Syracuse favorites, plus ;i 
«»fd. Margaret Cusack. are pre- 
I •rnted as the Keith headliner this 
I **■• t'oming in 'Lpos Snrn-ndrr.' 

BACK TO 1914 PRICES 

_,^ Chirago. Aug. 31. 

The New Tremont Hotel, on South 
"*«rborn Street, is the first of the 



tV 



t» hotels cotering to the the- 
«' profession to bring its rstes 
Jo a pre-war basis. 




Labor Day the vsudeville houses 
will start the new season In bsnnei 
style, sccortling to present pisns s.nd 
expectations. The local Keith and 
Moss houses are anticipating capacity 
business, despite a return of the hot 
spell. 

The Co'onial is the only Keith 
house in Greater New York that will 
be dark beginning Monday. At the 
Palace Theatre Building it was said 
that the opening of the Colonial was 
delayed by alterations that have not 
been completed on time. 

The loca line-up ia about the aame 
as last sesson, with Loew*s State 
sn added starter, snd B. S. Moss' two 
new vsudeville houses, the Franklin, 
a new 3,000-seater, at rrospect and 
Westchester avenuea (Bronx), and 
the Biviera, in the Bedford section 
of BrooUxn, due for esrly openings. 

Several switches of policy wil' be 
notiof>nhV with the BOW seaaon, Moas*, 
Broadway and Jefferson, going in for 
continuoua vaudeville and plctsrea. 
One act will do four diows, which wfl' 
work out 8 acta to a ahow, three 
timea dai>. With the pictnms, thla 
meana continuous perfforaiuico froii 
11 a. m. to 11 p. m. Lnsk aeaaon the 
Jefferson was a Mf time week on the 
Keith circuit. 

Keith's Hamatan, at 145th street 
and Broadway, will revert to its Mgu- 
lar big time, full-week poUiey after a 
change to thrice dally apUt-waek over 
the Bummer. Keith'a Royal, despite 
ta*k of a change in policy, will atart 
the sesson with the big time policy of 
the psst 

Other openings include: 

Keith's, Indisnspolls, Sept. 1? Da- 
vis, Pittsburg, Sept 5: Keith's, tt^rm- 
cuse, Sept. 6; ITipp, Cleveland, Sept 
S; Hipp, Youngatown, Sept. 5. 



WAGE SCALE OOMHITTKE 

At the monthly meeting of The- 
atrical Protective Union No. 1, at 
Bryant Hall Sunday night, a raoo- 
lution waa adopted placing the mat- 
ter of arranging new acales with the 
vaudeville, legitimate and picture 
houses in the hands of the executive 
board, with that body having full au- 
thority to act in the matter. 

The contract of the local stage 
hands with the vaudeville and legiti- 
mate interests expired Sept. 1. 



HOLD ACT TO BOOKINGS 



V. M. P. A. Awsrds Lloyd's Commis- 
sion to Agent Fallow. 



The complaint of Sam Fallow, tht 
agent, against the Casting Lloyds for 
alleged breach of contract, was set- 
ted this week by the .Toint Complaint 
Rureau of the V. M. P. A. in favor of 
Fallow. 

The agent holds an agreement with 
the act guaranteeing it 35 weeks ot 
a stipulated salary during the coming 
season and placed it with I^oew for a 
route. Upon informing the act that 
he had secured the Ijocw bookings, 
Lloyd notified Fallow that they had 
already signed Pantages contracts and 
ooud not accept the time he had 
booked. Notice of the committee's 
decision was sent out by Pat Casey 
with the act to take up the Loew 
route. 



FLORA FINCH'S ACT 

Flora Finch, the pioneer screen 
roinodienno. who ro-Hf^'rcd w'th .lohM 
r»iinny in the old Itiograph pictures, 
will debut in vaudeville this fall. 



MARCUS LOEW 



John Bertram Moves to Salt Lake 

Memphis, Aug. 31. 
The Orpheum, Salt Lake City, wilJ 
be managed by John Ilertraro, whose 
similar post at the local Orpheum hss 
been taken over by Vannah Taylor. 
Mr. Taylor was the Orpheum's press 
man. 



Marion Harkins Leaving Vandevllla 

Marion ILirkins (Jim and Marion 
Harkins) is in Davenport. Ia., taking 
a course in chiropractic. She will re- 
lire from the stage. 



Bessie McCoy Returnlag la Act 
IlcHsie Mrl'oy returns to vaudeville 
shortly in a dancing turn with three 

people. 



FLEA8ANTVILLE, N. J. 



VAUDEVILLE 



IViAiy, ^ • p t wfcw r % 1^1 



I 



J. H. LU6IN, GEN. BOOKER 



Tk« feKMkisf offict villi a pvoeh. S5 per cent ef the Locw thcatrcH ur« 

opeu tbe >ear round, the booJiing of- 



TLat i>houId be tUe Marcus Loc w^ 
booking office catch line. It is tlie" ***^ 



oul> booking office wberc one muB 
cua paHP ou an net for the entire 
time. Anjione who has hud dealinsti 
with eAces where nany bookers and 
many iuaim;;er9 have to be iOiiHiiIted 
1)0 lore u proper route cau be laid 
out will appreciate that condition. A 
booking office la an exception to the 
"two heads are better than one" argu- 
mtuL 

J. H. (Jake) Lubin has for 
the past two years carried the wal- 
lop lor the Loew bookiagH. ^reced- 
u)g that time Jos. M. Sihenck held 
tUi' «hair for almost fourteen years 
which t-nrricM the office back to its 
orij<;tii. Jt is many more years than 
two, liowcYcr, since Mr. SScbenck lir»t 
boRan to vast his eyes teward pr- 
iuivn jiiid it was from tkat time on 
thut Jake coiuaieiK'od looking after 
the books although kis official post 
of (icuerni Booking Manager dates 
from lf)l!>. 

Uuuning a vaudeville booking of- 
fice has its many sides. Merely t>e- 
ing a jtidge of an act is net suffi- 
cient to insure good ikowa and a 
beatthy •tmo.'ipberc. 

A bookiag office like any other 
biiniiwss refleeti tkaae at >la bead 
mn4 if the leading tpivit Is Bowid, tbe 
rank and file will faltow m fise. 

Tbe present booking of the Loew 
Cireait is a different propoaition tban 
when Mr. Lul>in flrat came into the 
a((ice. Then there were akeat 15 
wei'kN in all. There was no Loew 
southern time and no coast time^ ^- 
fhougb tbe old SuKliTan-Conspdine 
koii!re!f were booked out of the offiee 
for a short while. There was one 
kotne m Canada. The iRitMTe west 
hoitsea, which hoeiuded tbe Joneji,, 
fiinick & Schneffer string were book- 
ing ifldepemlcBtly. The Loew Circuit 
has since included seTcral theatres in 
Canada, Ike middle west Rnk and a 
I'oniptcte tour to tbe coast whicli has 
brought the totAt of hoaK<»s handled 
nut of the Loew office, fro« 80 to 

Th^re io no other mstaace on rec- 
ord where t>ue man haodlrs the book- 
ings entirely for anywhere near that 
Momber of TandeviUe theatres. More 
tban *Xt per cent, ot these houses are 
controlled ottlut^yety by the Ia)cw 
interests. The bookinf^ office has had 
many overtures to handle indepemlrnt 
houses bat only in cases where the 
parties* were will'ng to allow entire 
dikvection in the matter of kandlint; 
tho bookin£;s, have they been giveu 
con.<Yidrration. If the intent were 
merely to burtd up a booking ofriec 
Ibe JjOow booker eoutd easily be root- 
ing nets for f»0 weeks vrithout a re- 
pent. Now it can -giye an net fmm 
40 fo 45 weeks witkoat phiying the 
some house twive. 

Tho Locw rooting syatem has beew 
so simpli,l>ed one Man prueticalty look<Y 
after the entire time. Of course tJ»;>vp 
are asaistantn who attend to unnic of 
Ihf iletailH. There is a sepnrnte book 
for the Hovith (nvl coast time ami for 
the n>i<hlTr west and Canada. How- 
ever, all thcBo nltows are O. K.'d by 
tbe bead efflro befofe the booUiiil 
shorts are sent owt. 

Reports ore filed ret"pi(nisTy in the 
nfficc amt while n)ony people «pirs- 
ti«)i> the ndv.'sahiiity of (trpending upoit 
reports Mr. Lubiu takes the sensi- 
ble view nnd maintains that it i« the 
onfv way in which the office can keo" 
a line f^n what the acts are doVnjr. 
Re.'ilizin:; niiy net may have it<< b.nH 
townn. in thr Ri»n*»ral raw of report?.*. 
he believes the office may secnre a 
pretlv good idea of an act'* value to 
fhc t me. The report hooks in the 
Fiocw offii*e are a sight m tlicin- 
seives. The yearx of hnndliiif^ have 
mrdc them hmfc lfh» the mnke-Hi> ♦>f 
a bwrlesnoe *^how'R tramp ennied'nu. 
Krsirfcj^ kr^pinir o racorrd of how the 
aHs are doing or wh.tt thev have 
done.'thp repArt hiO>ks ««erve to aid 
the hookers ns tf. what acts are re- 
pe.nfw. what the former salary was. 
and any chanpfs made in the bus! 
ness or personnef. 

;^notl'er f|nesf?/>n in connection 
with a hooking off'ce oecmw fo hove 
been ^n^)pj}r overcome by .Take !<»» 
bin Tliat is \hr matter of booking 
nct< direet In this msttrr the inter- 
'-lewer was rather startled fo fiml 
that 2.T ner cent of th»» sets played 
by the "t-oew e'rrnit :*rr hooked di- 
rect. All hook in* offiees make s 
strong pretenso of he*<ng ready nnd 
wiIT>«' at nil times "to do husine'*-- 
dfrect" with the actor. Actors wH 
ttV Ton how nnsneeessfiiltv th k 
method '^*oves wJfh mo«t hookinr of 
fW». >fr Luh'n. however, ndver 
tise-1 fh-^f he ^"Tl »;re ert««rH }>«'fi^ri*i< 
certni" hourp ''nrimr tl'" dn'- nnd hr 
recT ♦V>em? Tlie nro*»f thnt he does 
•fv' th«t re»n1fs obtained a'-e Rhowtt 
*♦» the t:ri^'\t nnmher of acts that book 
dirct wth the eirenit. 

All 'his mielit Ic'd to i^o inrirev 
«'oM the Loew hooV?n«» offle" iv n 
onr-mn'"* eoneern. hut it is pot Tit'" 
#'rtni^i )inve twrn no proMovtio^n' 
•■ml the '^'■•'iniy'^tion so we'l knit fh'if 
♦*»lr(ir« rl'de «lo"«r «^'the'<t •> hiteli 
Thr msitT iHle "iprrm" ihni iirr 
tinr'^lt" on ♦in tn n hookini; office »»»'o 
wToMfd am» the man at the helm 
t'^de t»mc to take s A^r of rtrrrn- 
^^ tme^ pn a while, though ;,.. e 



V* • zAwzrys v.- a r k : ug 

Tbe Loew booking v'fice baa bad 
bat two heads in it 4 at any and niar- 
voloua years. They are Meb^ra. 
Hcheack and Lubin. Both have held 
an enviable reputation anioug the 
agents who have booked through the 
olfice. To Correctly gauge a vaude- 
ville hooking man find out what the 
agents think of him. Agents deal 
most intimately with the bookers. A 
booking man may kill along actors for 
an impresflioB, but ho can't find it m 
bin system to kid an agent, the man 
who does bnainess witk him daily. 
The agents pronoitnce J«ke Lubiiv 
the fairest man they ever have done 
business with; the agents proaounred 
Jo." Schenck the fairest man they 
ever did business with. Joe Schenck 
was a model for a booker and Jake 
Lubin is a booking model. 

Joe Schenck was no different the 
day he left the Locw booking office 
than be was years before when book- 
ing a few Loew booses through the 
\yoods office; Jake Lubui is no dtf- 
fereak today than he was when act- 
ing as Schenck's first aasiataiit. 

VaudovDla had to lose Schenck 
bat it is tortonatc in retaining Lu- 
bin and loog may ke wave, for he 
directly aids all vandcyilTo, biir aad 
small tine, through tbe eiaaplca ke 
sets ill boolriBf, in deaBng with 
agents and io hanging the Lo«<w 
acts. 11 tkera ia an ivjoatice ia hook- 
lags Miywkere, for any reason, aad it 
ia brasckt to the attention of. Mr 
Labia ke at oaeo 

own seaso of Joaiico sad invariably 
for the benefit of the artist. When^^ 
transportation jumped op it waa 
Jake Lubin, among alt the hooking 
offices of the country, who first said: 
"We writ pay acts extrn,' regardless 
of outstanding eontpaets. through 
their increased eapense,** and aW of 
the vmidevine booking offices fol- 
lowed T>iibin's lead. 

That is why Mr. Lubin is. as Mr. 
SU>henck was, a tower of strength to 
all vandeville, for he does more thai* 
book the big Loew rircuit— he sets 
an example to all booking offices, for 
b-e has inithYtive and souivl judgment. 



TWO MUSICAL PIECES 
NOW CONDENSED 



Dave Benneil, General 

..Stage Director for Shu- 

beii Vaudeville 

The two first coMK^aatloBs fo» 
Shubert vaudcTilH ar« bow ia ro- 
bcarsal, being staged by Ddve Bct- 
oett, who is tho goacral stage dirtcor 
for tbe Shubert vaudeville circuit 

The pieces are "Oh Boy*'^ an* 
**Vftry Good Eddie,'* Princesa theatre 
musical comedy Aiccesses of past 
seasons, which Mr. Dennett staged ii: 
their full-sixod forsi. 

•*Oh Boy" win have a cast of 16 
people. *Bddia" UB people, with taen 
condensation carryiac &▼« <^ *** 
prmcipals, runaiuc between 35 aad 
40, minutes as acts. 

Other propoaod eoadenoed Ttralo» 
of legitimate shows are "Snap^ Shota**'' 
"Blaoh Bytd Susaa." "Florodosa**' 
■ad **Pa«k. A Boo.'* the attorpiocaai 
are to rum from SO aiinatea to one 
hoar and a quarkor. 

Low iioMa and Lulu McC^nnoU ara 
t» ho featured in *19nap Shota," mir- 
ra^ndoll by a caat of 40 people. Miaa 
KcCannell wiB alaa do a spodaltr 
(McGonaott and Simpson) in tbo oB» 
proeeodiBff tka laraa. 

Tka ganoiift plan of the Baabaiin 

ia their aandarlllc |>roduetioaa, aa 

,^ H^ propoaed, ins to haTomom- 

adiusts ;t J".^ JJ« f b«rt off tuvna ongaga in the llqpi tn- 

tomble. That pUuir it is lal^ aa- 
cepting in specific instances, has koan 
•bandoaed, with the two taUoidlK now 
rehearsing carrying their own prin- 
cipals. ^ 

Uax klarcin ia to make one aet 
TemtoDs of "Eyes of lo«th'* amt 
"Cheating Chentera." for presenU- 
tion in Bhubert vaudeville. 



guy 

It waa in the autumn of IIKX) that 
three proatMetlre showmen were 
seated aroond a table in the old Pal- 

fc2*' •^•Jf%^ ^^^*5C: V^^ were {lag theatrical stick on\h^*!^'unuSl 
fklopna_Cakn, Ad^ Zukor and' -Jt«t wiofher pranf of hi« ±1'!J 



Aaron J. Jonen They were discuss 
log the slot machine buainesa in which 
an three ware interested. It waj in 
the daya of tbe pennir arcade. A 
medium siaed ponar man came t» the 
table. Mr. Cuba greeted him and in- 
troduced him to Mr. Jones. Thev 
shook handff and that was the be- 
finninr of a kating friendship which 
la exemplified in the hnainess relations 
o^l'^jw and Jonea today. Roth t^olu 
and Zkikor were bn a i n eas partners of 
Loew m the slot maehhie business 
Jf ^j**," *^' WJene ever dremned of 
the tremendlros influence of motion 



ATTACKS TRAIKBB 



Mrs. 



Minsie Green, Traiser, 
cavehao — Animal Killed 



Re- 



KurUngton, Vt, Aug. 31. 
A bnll elephant with Sparks' cir- 
cus attached Mrs. Minnie Greea, 

who was bronght to the {iSt. Albans 

llof*|)ital here ami is recovering. 

Later tbe beaat xvent after fiCwis 
Ileed, snperiiktendent of the circus' 
moaagerie. He was not injured. 

Immediately afterward the ele- 
phant was taker, aboard the cinMis 
train, chained to his car and killed 
when three ex-service niea lireil 10 
rille bullets into it. 



CHOOS' GLEAK-XTP 

George Choos, the vaudeville pro- 
ducer, made a clean op Satarday 
(Aug. 27) when bio two-year-oM 
"Eager Eyes" won the aiitli race at 
Saratoga at 3 to 1. 

Choos won $15,600 on the victory 
and also touted the Palace theatre 
building bunch so strong many of the 
agents and bookers shared ia his 
goo<l luck. 

Fator ro<le the horse in what was 
reported as one of tbe most sensa- 
tional six furlong dashes stagetl at 
the meeting He wan pocketed until 
the last sixteenth but tinally found a 
liolc and got up io time to win by 
a nod, from the favorite. 

Choos has p\ircba«nd a yearling 

from the Van<lcrbiU sale which he 

Ikas named < Airmen Pantngi^s after 

tiM? daughter of the ONvncr of the Pan 

* t*ircuit. 




V there Is anikod^ whn ahfonU 
know Ifarcns Loew^e past* preaeat 
and future, it ia the so-cslled 'iittle 
Napoleon of the Middle West," for 
so has he keen dubbed by Loew (lum- 
aelf). Anton J. JaMe^ ptesideBl of 
Jonefl^ Llnich & Schaofer, that human 
dynamo wha cantrein ika two Chicago 
Haks in the vast Loew circuit. When 
asked his opinion of Loew, Jones 
sUted it in three words— '*A snuare 



fllfi 'V^'Ji- of the'Tow raa/kct'dMr^iJ 
tH>n at this time y«ou wUl vet ^2 

iTTKiJl^v ?r^r the.highest .. 1 



Aaran Jonea bad opened hia firsi 
ypm skpw^ ia Glileaga where In 
Jjjwidtte mw-fiaatf** entertain- 
■enc caned "vavinr pictBres.** hirt 

were a pdbs"?- 



hjo been prtean hr the fket that 
Mww new iMdn the giepleat «m 
onajriMdam iSmT ..^ ^^ 



a n^ 



naffer had mere confidence in 
in my Hfe than I did in Loew af, 
that fiasco. Just to prove that 
fidence ia the man, himself, andf 
•*«*»«y, we tnraed mround and 
vested a huge sum of atouoy wiMi 
m acqnirins hia southeni circuit 
course wc gave up our interest 
thoe houseM when Loow, Ine u^ 
formed and took our share in s* ', .^ 
"And let nw teH vou 



ness can be fou^ ^ the fact ^^ 
iM^w has never entered Chicaco nil 
his vaudeville or pictures. H«r i 
permitted u« to be the bindinc )i, 
with our BfcVieker'a and Kialto tl 
atres, which joino the Loew CiMt 
with the Loew western chain 
houses. 

^And vrith the same cmtrtesy 

recognition of Caleness, let me regiM 
ter tkst we never have a>nd never wi 
oppose Loew in the east. We hJ 
foUo^ed hiA policy in CJbicago 
have found it to he right. 

'^What more can. aayono say 
a feltonr? Re i^ fhir and sip 
koneet, dependMe and trnthfni 
if he ever neeiih my ^b'rf ho 
hare it. Thatls wAnt I tUnk 
Mnrevs- Loew.* ** 



msrsESE Apponnrro 

»r Fyanela Murphy's a 



•grn the 

„ ^ _ joahr5'prS3e«;Tf|r!r**'r::!^'^^ 

BaaJtot, lliicna Laew'a hooioeso la | ''****>*«■ '■•^ pwigf e Ba e ^l to thm ^ 

tent Jnotiee Waanewoffei tMs wei| 
affiled an order flppolntiag former A^ 
sietavt Dfstrlct Attorney inyijie 9 
Uedake as rMars^- fn the mattiK 
Bf^irphy. suing under h^ real naa^ 
tfcrougfc Kendler & OoTdrtlein. chnrgfli 
false and frandident -1^aftoai 

on the pari of his wife prior to thejj 
morriage, which she denies generally 

Under a sepflration decree, Mni 
J'*^^*^. lf>(was ordered la«t winter to pay 
"" $50 weekly alimony. 

Referee's heai-inga at hfs office 
the Rjpiitab e Building will begin 
month. 



SL ^ ft* PndoeOfm and oahthi- 
OMi of pictures, and Aaron Jones is 
5"SL *•*" Mettled fn the pictnre 
worWhy hia past ssaociation with 
Miwyn and Ffrat TTational and hy 
Ma amneFone pictnre houses in ffhi- 
rago'a ^nona loapi But. let Aaevon 
Jonea ten hia own story in his own. 
way. 

"I think Mar ena Loew ie one of the 
•vmreat goya 1 over met," said 
Joaea. "Away tecfc there 

^wS*?"*** ' ''•■ •' ^* ■■■»« opinion. 
That was when Nick Schenck, Dave 
Bernstein and Joe Schenck were fight- 
ing shonlder to shoulder with I^ew 
and for Loew, to establish some sort 
of amusenMnc busi n es s. 

"I reammber when Loew op'.ncti 
hm hrst picture hMse. It was in Cin 
oaaati aad the aeaCiug capacity was 
80. We all thought it wa.>r quite an 
undertaking, but it was the begin- 
ning of the Locw circuit. He picked 
up oU ran-dowB theatres, one after 
another, and like King Midas, tiinwd 
them into veritaMe goM mines. In 
1011, our friendship was cea>cDted 
whea we toured lihirope together, hot 
I beheve that the crowning trvt nf 
friendship caaie in 1913 when Loew. 
with the assHtaace <of Jones. I.inick 
it Sschaefcr, took over tke va*;t SulJi- 
van A Considiae circuit and dropped 
a cool mlttion. 

"Noiimiw funny . T snopose but 1 



HARDIKO AT KEITH'S 

Washington, Aug. 3!t. 
President Harding is really «!evelep- 
ing into a regular dyed in the woe| 
v-audevilltf fan. Accompanied by Btri 
Flarding and Kenator and Mrs. War<«o| 
of Indiana lie attended Keith's niea« 
trc la.Ht night aiul' seemed to m«r| 
than cnjov the bill, which had til 
Santos and Flayes Revu« fir>M()1inln^ 
The PrcMidcnt was more than Ubefd 
with his appla<ise fir each act as4 
was iHmncIf the recipient of a big ra> 
ception upon liis eiitranee to the theil 
trc. 




m 



CECIL-MANNERS aad LOWEREE-eowe 

Frisco— Hippodrome. "Manners and Loworee prayed a voiithful. peppery mixed couple off good appearf*ico and agreeahle persaanUty. They •tW 
a neat Ginging routiao that should preeaat|y Inad them In kattM* uompany. They registered solidly hers." VARIETY. 

Uiul«r the Psnoiia} Direction of Two Wonderful Boyg— 

JOH AND MARK LEVY 

- , . M^« ff^ish Marcus Loew Success on His New State Theaf ^ 

Just Completed an Enjoyable Season, Thanks to Mr. Ia^K^K 



Us Friday, Septcmbor 2, 1921 




VAUDEVILLE 



X'S VAUDEVILLE BOOKINGS 



BID FOR BY KEITH AND SHHBERT 



Diviiiion of Opinion by Fox People — Sliuberts Make 
/ Strong Play — May Continue Independently as at 
f Present. t 



^- 



w 



The booking of the William Fox 
nudevtlle theatres is bangiug in the 
air just now — between the Keith, 
Shul>crt and Fox's own yaudeyille 
a«<'ncies. 

Dormant for several weeks over the 

tomiiKi, after the Shuberts and 

Keith's bad each in turn talked the 

booking matter over with people of 

llhe Fox. circuit, the subject underwent 

a revival last week, when, according 

Jo repo it the Shuberts resumed their 

^mpaiffn to secure the Fox houses 

*for their vaudeville booking offices. 

William Fox is said to have had a 

Jang conference with liee Shubert, in 

K« Inttor's office. Upon the conclu- 

Bon of it, Fox repaired to his own 

Vaudeville agency, calling in the heads 

^f that department, and talked the 

natter over with them at some length, 

according to the story. 

Fox found, it is aaid, his lieutenants 

favored the Keith office, if a change 

^ Fox bookings were to occur. 

If^ey thought the big and small time 

£ekl 88 preventad to them by Keith's 

offered a wider range for the selection 

Vf nets, while, they claimed, the Shu- 

:1^rt8 were limited to their vaudeville 

ipotitmrts. with all of the contracts of 

the Shuberts prescribing the salary, 

thereby cutting off the opportunity for 

]|'ox to "buy" at the best price, as 

Hiir»uld be their option in an open 

^auirket 

"I William Fox is reported to have 
Strongly advocated a Shubert con- 
nection. Fox's interests with the 
,Jhuberts in theatres and the renting 

ftthem for picture exhibitions, while 
e possibility of the Shuberts as 
F'' film customers arc said to have 
weighed most heavily wi^h the Fox 
Incliuation. 

Keith Bid. 

' The Keith proposal to Fox made 

jftome months ago wqh said to have 

rbeen for Fox to retain his present 

booking quarters but to select any 

Keith net denired. Hitherto Fox has 

, and had been "slipping" Keith acts 

Jbto his programs, with Keith-Moss 

liousea opi>osing the Fox theatres at 

aeveral points. 

The Shubert inducement is the 
connection to line up against the 
Keith nnd Moss houMCM with the Shu- 
berth OS a bane for feature attrnc- 
-fions. The advantage to Shuberts 
would be the addition of the Fox 
time in weeks to their books, while 
the Ke'th benefit 88 figured, besides 
k^SKibly the office couuniKKion. would 
tie the elimination of Fox as a com- 
petitor signiust Keith houHCM, with 
Pox ;\t the i(|me liiue removed as 
a proHpeetive ally. 
With the Keith bookings in the 



TWO AGENTS NOW OF 
HORWITZ & KRAUS 



Biggest of the Small Time 

Agency Firms 

Separates 

Small time's biggest agency firm 
dissolved this week. Ita partners 
were Arthur J. Horwita and Lee 
Kraus, who will continue to book 
turns on the small time aa separate 
and independent agents. 

Both partners agreed the parting 
was agreeable and each avowed the 
fondest of concern for the other's 
future. ' The dissolution was caused, 
the two agents said, through condi- 
tions which had arisen, each believ- 
ing he can operate alouc with more 
personal benefit 

Horwita & Kraus formed about 
three years ago under an agreement 
for five years. Arthur J. Horwita 
then held a Loew Circuit book'ng 
franchise. He had advanced himself 
as a small time agent and was re^ 
ceiving recognition. Jjee Kraua was 
known as a Chicago agent, occupying 
something of the same reputation in 
the Chicago independent booking 
field. The partnership formed, with 
Krnus coming to New York, rapidly 
developed, with the firm extensively 
promoting itself into the lead of all- 
of the small time agents. 

Horwitz Sc Kraus opened branch 
offices, did a thriving business, and 
last year they were said to have 
netted around $90,000 profit. 

In the dissolution Horwitz retains 
nil of the firm's acts ond its offices 
in the Loew Annex building, with the 
branches. Sadie Kusell is the office 
manager. Miss Kusell is iT Chica- 
goan, srister of Dan. Kusell 

Kraus has taken offices in the Put- 
nam building. His interest in the 
firm was purchased outright by Hor- 
witx, for nn ngree<l upon amount that 
both expressed satisfaction over. 



extending over several weeks, in which 
the Great lA*on and other magicians 
disputed the i«oIdin claims to origin- 
ality and ownershi|). iioU\ n will con- 
tinue iu the larger Keith houKes with 
the illusion. 



Fox houses it is quite apt that the | sio". following a controversy 

B. S. MoHs theatres now leagued with 

the Keith eip^iilt ;.YFepld have to re- 
ceive careful fJitntfU^rittion in the way 

•f future boolbreoittingeniies, also 

the result of m^^aHiii^ business rela- 
tions that mirt|^«|S^ie i>etwee» K. S. 

Moss and Wijltai9[v)py>x if both were 

«*Jfr one ijadf . tigi^fatiw»l.v. 
The h\M0iiUi%4J^ booking people 

are of «,e:^iMili<»Jhnt they can go 
(ijeng in the. biiittlle of t!ie road as 

they have bofW-*rtfcg. and with the 
^^ances the t)ooklrtg condition around 
-«ew York this>.«eiitiMi may provide 

thorn with what they are" looking for 

Without any he9ilciiij|( affiliation. 
L l^P to Wedtt^^*y the Fox book- 

Mfs ere Ktill l^l||iQg. One of the 

retsons for the itt^an^ion is said to 

J* *oxs lapse front ^vaudeville nctiv- 

J*^- /r'»«'«''>K»> his i>ersonal attention 

w thp pnture end and theatre op- 

•rttsng. Tox is reported somewhat 

«r«milittr with curriut vaudeville. 

•^•n in his own houHCH. 



*>0K COLLEOE OLEE CLUB 

The Ohio Wesleyan rniversilv Glee 



Jjub fallowing a morning showing at 
«^ ral:,re Aug. 24. wns booked ns 
112 '*! "^ ^'''^ I'ttUcc work of Sept. 
^•» 1 ' *'"'* in^hiUes 17 men. all 
kIPMuatrs of the nniversilv. 
r*i*ire<ily after the Palace showing 
f »^ Moo Clnh snihvl fo l»anama to 
i!"'<jri. ... the r. S. (;ov<Mnment forces 
'•tik ?'."'^' " previous entertainment 
'^ ti ''''" '*'*'*^*' '" honor of Tresi- 
_" Hardin- having resulted in the 
[■•wm.i as.^ignnjont. Paul Durand*. 
>««'d the Keith booking 




NO. 2 "VIVISECTION 



t » 



N. V. A. Establishes Goldin's Rights 
to Illusion 



Horace Goldin has produced a 
number 2. "Sawing a Woman in 
Half" illusion, with the Great Jan- 
sen. The turn opens Sept. 4, at the 
12r)th St. Marinelli has the act. 

The N. V. A. recently decided that 
Goldin han the sole right to pro- 
duce the "Sawing a Woman" illu- 



NO ROCK-WHITE DEAL 

Killy Uock was tendered a proposi- 
tion by the Shuberts l.nst week, call- 
ing for a re-forming of the old Hilly 
Uock and Francos White combination 
for Shubert vaudeville, the proposal 
iucludimg a 20 week route and $.{.000 
salary for the team. 

Uock passed up the offer. He has 
almost rocovcreu )nn htallh, following 
a scriou!^ operation for intestinal 
trouble several weeks ago. 



SHUBERT 'S NEWARK MAN 

Frank L. Smith has been appointed 
manager of the Uialto. Newark, which 
will play Shubert vaudeville. Smith 
was formerly connected with the 
Spigel picture enterpri.ses as publicity 
man. Tho Uialto is undergoing com- 
plete renovation, and is scheduled 
to open Labor Day (Sept. 15). 



ILLNESS STOPS FOY 

For the first trine In his entire 
career IMdie Foy v.a.s f,»rced to eon- 
cel a vaudeville date when he called 
off an cngHKt'mrnt for the ciiirent 
week ot the Colniiibia. Far Uockaway, 
owing to throat tronhle. 

Victor Moore and l^ninia Littlelield 
took the vacancy. 



KATHRYN ANDREWS 

of 

TED AND KATHRYN ANDREWS 

Terpaichoreaa marvels of grace 
and ability. Have been playing con- 
secotively in New York for the long- 
est while. To remain at the Moulin 
Rouge and open in the New Show 
on Monday, Sept. 5, still continuing 
at the Cafe de Paris aod Little Club, 
having played all three places con- 
currently all this season. 



BLACK JACK TOMATO 
AS LIGHTS GO OUT 



Con Drops *'CoiipIa 

Grand" With Referee's 

Help 

Syracuse, Sept 7. 
Dear Chick: 

Tomato and me got an awfuU deal 
in Troy Ia«t Thursday night. Wc 
made the burg to box a local kid 
named Socks Conroy. It used to be 
a great sportin town about 20 years 
ago but about all they have left of 
the original cast is Johnny I'^vers, 
Arrow Collars, and a couple of fight 
promoters who make the James 
Boys sound like milk bottle pinchers. 

This Conroy kid has been knock. n 
them all cookoo and they offer us 
good jack to come on and quarrel 
with him. I grabbed the match for 
I seen Socks box a coupal times and 
I know that for Tomato, he's no co'u- 
test. 

My kid is in great shape and I 
figure it will be a nire workout for 
him. If Conroy behaves I was even 
figurin on lettin Tomato hold him u[) 
for 10 so we could do a come back 
later on. You know he's cleaocd 
most of these up state hitters and 
it's SH tough as navy recruitin. 
pickin them. 

We blast into Troy Thursday aft- 
ernoon and they have the bout 
b:lle<l like a circus with 23 sheets 
all over town. After we register at 
the Uensalcar Inn. John McCilyon 
who runs the slab, spills me an ear- 
full about them w.^ntin to lay hiiu 
two for one that Sockn stops To- 
mato before the finish. This is roo 
soft for your ox-chef sa I lam to 
grab yome of that sugar before the 
authorities at Matlewan hear about 
it. 

I never seen so much confidence 
in my life and had no trouble ot all 
bettin a coupla grand and gettin two 
to one. Thisiuado rae thouKhtfnll. 
for the sure thing Iwyn. never offer 
you anything bat sea weed for your 
dpuRh. unless they have ares ha-k 
to buck. 

I couldn't find nothin wrong after 
no.sin around and bu/.zin .some friend.s 
of mine v.-lio worked in tlw c<dlar 
.shops but I decided to look for any- 
thing. I made C'onroy take off his 
bandages in the ring and even frisked 
his tights to be sure he didn't pull 
nothin new but everv liiioK .seniHvl 
jake and up and np. 

I fiRiirod the referee would cjive ii.s 
the old slow count and all tlint hut 
thi:< k'd was snrh a push ovnr for 'i')- 
innto that it didn't make no'diffor- 
enoe about the book kropin. Once 
Tomato ropped him on the btitto:) 
they could count up to nine million 
without di.^tnrbin him any. 

I sent Tomato out to get hrm a.s 
soon as he rould for I didTi't want to 
take any rhanres in view of them 
(uUla. Am soon a.*! the bell r:>nj» To- 
mato walked over and dropped him 
in ]\ls tracks with a lonj; s-winp that 
Uij; T<'ss could have blocked. .Socks 
wasn't tliroUKh but he stayed down 
on one knee li.steuin to the Victr^di 
and if was only a (pieslit>n of wheth r 
(lie iirxf i)iiiicli look ifiin or the «»n«* 
after that. 

[ sf(«r) his iiiauajjer runrn'n ff»r t'li 
ba< k of the biiildin but. didu't ^^y any 
attention at the time for I was bold- 



BOOKED BY KEITH AT $3,000, 
FIELDS MAY PLAY SHUBERTS 



Billed For September 4 at San Francisco Oi-pberum, 
Comedian Still in N. Y. — Marinelli Has Claim 
For $6,000 Managerial Fees on 40 Weeks. 



Unless licw Fields opens at th« 
Orpheum, San Francisco, next Sun- 
day afternoon, Sept. 4, and proceeds 
t1h>reafter to fulfill contracts for 30 
additional weeks on the- Keith and 
Orpheum circuits, the Orpheum, San 
Francisco, engagpmcjjit. being the in- 
itial date of a 40-week tour, the 
bookings of which were entered into 
for Fields by the Marinelli office, a 
legal action by the Marinelli office 
against ' Fields for approximately 
$G,000 is a probability, according to 
an executive of H. It. Marinelli, Ltd. 

Fields, according to Marinelli, on 
Aug. 1, or thereabouts, gave him 
(Marinelli) full authority to arrange 
a route for him ou the Keith and 
Orpheum circuits 

Fields to appear in an act com- 
posed of Gve scenes from the 
Selwyn show, "Snapshots of 1021," 
which closed recently at the 
Selwyn theatre, fields was to be 
supported by a company of 20, the 
"Snapshots" scenes including "The 
Hat Shop," "Fiternal Triangle," "Jap- 
anese sccno," 'Sally number," and 
"Spanish number," the latter the 
first net finale of "Snapshots." Ac- 
cording to Marinelli. Fields specifics! - 
iy appointed MarineMi his (Fields) 
manager, and also authorized Mari- 
nelli to look after the net Fields was 
to hesd. Marinelli claims Fields also 
delegated him to assist at rehearsals 
MnrineUi says neeordin^ly, he pirk^d 
out the five scenes of "Saap.shots" he 
tlmu^ht best sniied ->r vaudeville, 

Marinelli. accordingly went ahead 
nnd arranged a 40-week Keith and 
Orpheum route for F'elds, the route 
in( hiding' two consecutive weeks at 
the Palace, New York, in February, 
and a third week later in the season. 



at a salary of $3,000 weekly for 35 
weeks, and $2,750 for the other five 
of the 40. The booking arraugcmcnt 
also called for Fields to receive an 
advance of $7,500 to be paid back to 
the booking office at the rate of $5<X) 
weekly. The $7,500 was to be used 
by Fields to pay the Selwyn.s for 
scenery and props of the five **Snap- 
shots" scenes mentioned, and to de- 
fray author's fees for the use of the 
material. In arranging with Mari- 
nelli to book him. Fields, Mirinelli 
H.'tys emphasixed the fact that he, 
Fi<'ldH. was not under contract to 
nuybody and was absolutely free to 
deni witli whoever he desired. 

Wednesday of last week Marinelli 
asserts he was informed by Fields' 
attorney that Fielda had committed 
hiiuself to the Shuberts, and ho 
(Fields' attorney) did not think 
Fields would fill the Orpheum Frisco 
date Sunday. Sept 4. 

Matters stood as above on Wednes- 
day, with Marinelli, the Keith and 
Orpheum Circuits marking time 
necessarily until next l^unday. Fields 
is billed to open in Frisco by the Or- 
pheum people. 

When delegating him to arrange 
time on the Keith and Orpheum Cir- 
cuits, Marinelli claim" Fields toM 
h m the Shuberts iiad proffered a 
20-week proposition on the Hhuttert 
vaudeville circuit. bu^ that he 
(Felds) had turned it down, •» be 
wanted a 40- week route. 



Tom North Leaves 

Tom North, formerly with Pathe, 
is leavinj; for .Viistrnlin th's week to 
act ns special renresentative for the 
First National Fxhibitors Corp. 1I# 
will be gone about six months. 




VIC STONE AND MOVER SISTERS 

Just iinislied two years solid bookiiiKH on Iajcw Circuit. Further Huccesa 
nnd best wishcH to the Loew Circuit. Our iM'rKonal thrinkH t,» you. Mr. 
.1. H.Lubin. Direetiou (il'AKiUK HOFUA.VSKI 



in Tomato'.H balli rolie all ready t» 
help liii!i out of the ring u.s hooii jh 
the Hiaughter w;ks over. 

.\t the nine rouut SorkH Kf'fs iiii 
.ind wrap.s hiinsMf up in his uruj-s, 
bendin over neriily iu half. Toin:it<» 
(akes a rou|)la punelie-^ at hix f jre- 
arni.s and tln'u tricM to pull one of 
li M gloves away \'nnu Ins jaw to fin- 
ish him. .lu.st at thi:; inoinenl every 
lij;hf in the joint k<H'H out. 

I wan about to jiiini» into the 
(laikeu'-d linx and feel around for 
my f >:liter but wn.s afraid they ini^jlit 
rli.s(|ualify liitn if the iJKht.M M'ent u;) 
r.nd 1 wa.s in the riii>;. In a few 
.seconds tlir* lights are .«^wit(•hed on 
and there liej* Tomato out on the 
floor With ('onroy holdin hiin.Helf up- 
1 i^ht by griibbin the to|) rope, while 
sl;ii»peiin like :i drunken Kailor. 

The referee .start.s to count but I 
jumped in and draKged the kid to his 
corner, forfeitin the figiit, for I know 



he ,'tint Koin to (oai(> around for a 
Ions; wh h>. It took nie 10 niinuteH 
to revive him and theu he lo!d iii« 
jiiHt what I suHperted. Tlie referee 
wnH ill on the fruincv When Ik* mjw 
that Conroy war* t!irou<;h hr» Rjivr 
the office to the K'ly Inndlin the 
1 ghtH. Thi.s bird turned (li<>m off. 
V»'hile the place i.s u.s bl.K U ,..i .loe 
(Jan.H, the referee reac'i .s iii.o fils 
Moise, liriiiKM out a ja>i. ind Kips 
Toniat ) on the cl ii:ie. .liMiipiii him like 
a loR. 

lie :<wore after the ficht that just 
;js flie Itght.s went out Conroy let fly 
with a wild M\v II'; tliit l.no 1; 'd niy 
kid dead. Coni-oy conldn't nUt\i To- 
mato if the kid had on liand< uft'i and 
shackles and they let Soek.s go in 
with . u I /linn club in each <ltike. Utit 
try and lunke I hem hel'eve th.-^t in 
'i'ro4 

Your oH pal, 

Con. 



6 
fAKIETY'S SAN FBANCI800 OFFIOES 



g>att 3Prattri0r0 



Fi-Way, September 2, 1^21 
PANTAG£8 THEATilE BUILDING 



SAN FRAMSCO SHOWS 



LEVEY GETS 10 MORE 
IN NORTHWEST 



OKPHEUM, FRISCO 

Sim l'/uij<. »?»t"<>, Aug. •.-. 

Kn.« -tinn Artie Mobliiigcr ami 
'P<oiiio W. Meyer, tbe actjj on the 
Oi-pluMini bill tbis we«k were hold- 
tovors or bad plnyod bere before, but 
drspito tbo familiarity tbere wan mo 
•i.i b good loinody tbe sbow ran well, 
|ivi:i;i Mil Piijoynble entertainment. 

Cporse t'ord and Flo runningbam 
ponl.ibiwcd nnu'U class snid mauy 
laiipi'^ >vitb tbeir ronlidontial «Iomes- 
lie talk ;jl()ns original lines. llotb 
t.O'X's^i strikinj; perninalities nnd de- 
liver in thiinbed style. Their encore 
i;iu -.M ;,. •; a|)i)ear rtiiperfluous and let 
lii.i.t down liebt. 

<:;bson an«l (%>nnell, well down lo- 



bird^ tb^t are a b:g feature of tbe 
turn. Josephs. 



McJ Lewy Will Return to 

FriHCO Office instead of 

Kansas City 



San Krancigco, Aug. •'^1. 
M«-l Lefey, who has been, touring 



HIPP, FBISOO 

San Francisco. Aug- 31. 
The first half ol tbe bill hrro ( first 
half of tli'» week) gavo good satisfae- 

tion. Ther.- w.:s plenty of comedy ; .u...^.^"^™ K.kalf nf thp Ii4»rt 

and enough singini;. : the. northwest on, behalf of the li^rt 

Marco and Co. wont big for on ; Levey ein nit, wW not go to Kantsas 
opener. Marco's magic and cJnl I ,-.jjy ^^ fj,.j^( planned, but will return 
tricks of a familiar nature cleverly . * , ,^ ^k««»« «f tl»a v;iin 

executed and with good talk aroixs,^^ here to assume charge of tb. Sun 

plenty of enlhu'^iii.^n) 



OBITUARY 



Francisco offiet*,- b« former position. 
Dick Tenny goen to the Denver of- 
fice while Bert rittniau will head the 



CHARLES M. BREQQ 

Charles M. P»rcgg. ugeil 57, died 
Aug. 'JS, after a long illnexti. He wuh 
born in Virginia and fur yearn .served 
aH dramatic editor of the 4}axeite- 
Times, IMtthburgh, where be built up 
a reputation as a writer on the the- 
atre and a fortnight, able newsivaper- 
maii. lie is survived by u wife and 
daughter. 



Allen and Kioore got along fairly 
well with songs and dar..*es, but there 
!.«; still plenty of room for improve- ' Seattle bea<hiuartcrs. 

northwestern acqujsi- 




displ.>\ed artistic terpsicborean abd 
ity, bill on the whole tbe act lacked 
tlie u^tiJl Morgan pretentiousness and 
failed to hold the interest, loaing a 
big portion of the audience. 

<ar3on and Willord, held over, 
6toppe<l the show, while Mehlinger 
and Meyer were very tucccssful next 
to closing. A medley of Meyer's 
Bongi", with II line in each song cm- 
phaniiiing ^^cyer an the melodist, de- 
livered in a kidding manner by Mehl- 
inger, landed solid applause. 

Htcanlon, Deono Brothers aad 
Seanlon enualled their success of last 
week, and the Four Lamy Brotberst 
also holdovers, gave the show a great 
start, while William H. Craac an*! 
Co. in "The Mayor and the Maaicttrc ' 
held third position interestiiifly. 

Josephs. 



with smart talk and songs, secured 
a hit next to closing. 

"Inspiration,** a well constructed 
song and dance offering, mtde a fine 
impression closing. JOStpflS. 



PANTAOE0, FSI800 

Ban Frandacet Aug. SI. 

I*antafes this week bfte « pretty 
good WMl weH divevaitol WU. 

Dorothy Morris and Co., a trio of 
nifty firto, set m fast pace epening 
with syncopated and artistk dance« 
nicely presented. Tbe clever and 
versatile dameing el Misa Morris got 
big returns. 

Pan4aer-»yvMa, a couple of men, 
iron ^eartf appUraae with their aero- 
batics following soase talk, with half 
ibe team enteriiMC from the audience. 
The last was iMMTerently received. 

The Dixie Few, a e«lore4 <iuar- 
tette next te elaslnf, received more 
fiolid applaose than mr act in moatas 
for their exeellcAC harmony atsfing 
while their coaUffio«fl e^cenulc 
dance tied up tlM show. 

Pert and Rue KoICm, a couple of 
girls. slavtiBf wWl toMabone Jjd 
cornet, were a g enwiwe hH, l»e 
irombontst di4playc4 ^eaa Ters«tllitj. 
putting over Cha«illa and Friaco im- 
pressions ^verly. also displayuis 
ability on the drama ai»4 ia saw play- 

"Oood Night Loadoa** i« n musical 
comedy Ub witfc an excoReat cast 
featuring RaM Bell and Joseph 
tioaner. A« ihe headline act, it had 
the audience with it from the start 
tnd hekl the dosiag spot to a nicety. 
Harry l>ewis preaent« tbe bi$ act 
nhich ia filial with lauffhing shaa- 
iionn aad^ carries a neat ehonia. 

"A Springtime Classie** pra«e4 a 
l>Ieaeinc noveltj. Joseph Beteaat 
and Mary Ftokan eoasprisc the of- 
fering consisting of bird impresaioBR. 
piano ami fltite ptaying, seemiaglf 
harmonised with aumeroas 



Wa Catar ta Mia P r t f i a ilaa 



HIPP, FRISCO 

San Frandsco. Aug. 31. 
Despite the presence of five mixed 
leama in the vaudeville end of tlie 
program the offerings at the Hip for 
the last half of tbe week prove<l 
highly entertaining and with singing 
music and comedy well divided round- 
ed out nicely. Business was below 
the usual, tbe first show TVednesday 
night drawing heavily while the sec- 
ond was light. 

King and Cody workicf in *'three'* 
liave a neat appearing daucios skit 
Mrhich starts weakly with a medley, 
but by the time the pair have worked 
tbroogb a few numbers tltey have 
the awMeoee fully for tbem. -The 
team carries a pretty drop tha' 
bears ive miniature entraneen fro|ii 
which they appear for the dances. 
The/ open the bill but could easily 
aoeupy a place further aloaf. 

Tlie hit of the show eaaie with 
Rob Bahiasoa and Renee Pierce who 
offer "Giauaie (be Money." Tbe 
team played the house just two 
weeha a|o and the rcinrn engage- 
meat ia the irst for a Hip act in 
(quite a while. They repeated great 
and walked off leaving aa aodience 
daaM^ng. They were third on tbe 
aiM« 

HamiHOB WaUoa has his «wn way 
of pattinc over Chineae and Irish 
ioftea. and althoagh he wovfca straight 
he fives the impreaaieB of a "Chink" 
ia cetiott with his OricDta] dialect 
talk asd thBfiBf. Ta daae.that act 
be jivaa imitaliaBa of anlBud sounds. 
Fhu FcIb 9mA Flo Teimyson are 
pa saasa ora <.cA»d vaiees, especially 
the wamaa. Thay aisf bits from 
opera ia Wagliwli >k» ape» and while 
one chaaffs the other entertains 
with more aooga. Miss Tennyson 
plays the plaao also. A camedy im- 
periMHiatioa frojtt the '^ikido'* gets 
them oTor stronf at the eloae. Both 
wear pxetty etothea throoshout and 
make a pleasiac impreaaioa. Their 
stage cquilpmeiit ia all elaas. 

liaak and Dean have a comedy 
talkW and siaftiag tora which is 
ffood aa far aa the «i«siBK foes. but 
Is woefaliy adliax io comiedy. Both 
are posaesaors of sweet voices. A 
sarpvise comes at the Aaiah. 

The Gahberta, man and woman, 
dosed the raadevIHe with fiome nifty 
aerohatie good for applause. The 



8HUBEBTS ON 00A8T 

Reported la Deal with Carraa far 
New Loa APflalaa Home 



San Francisco. Aug. 31. 

A deal was msde last week by 
Homer Curran with Joseph Toplitzky 
of Los Angeles for the construction 
of a theatre in Los Angeles on prop- 
erty adjoining the new $8,000,<)e0 
hotel to be built by John B. McBow- 
man of the Diltmore hotel interests. 
Plans for tbe new theatre have al- 
ready been drawn by Schultxe & 
Weaver, archKecta of New York. 

The house will seat 1,800. It will 
be known as the Bhabert-Curran. 
Work is soon to start so that the 
structure may be ready nt the same 
time tbe new Ban F^andsco Curran 
theatre will be donr. The deal for 
the southern house will give the Sbu- 
bert-Curran combinatioB two excel- 
lent Oallfomia bouses and pave the 
way for stroag boldinsa on tbe Pa- 
dfic CoQSt and in the northwest 



OSCAR N. WALCM 

Oscar N. Wnlcb, of the vaudeville 
team of Walch and llaml, dteil sud- 
denly Aug. *J1, at the Hotel DeFmuec, 
aged 4(>. Deceased hnd made appli- 
cation for memberKhip in the N. V. A., 
but it l.a<l net yet been acted upon. 
The X. V. A. took cbnrge ainl sent 
bis body, accompanied by the widow, 
to their home at Pueblo, Colo. 

Frederick Starr 

Frederick Starr, for nearly 20 

years connected with tbe stage, died 

Aof. 20 at bis home in Ijos Angeles. 
He was born in San Francisco 43 

years ago. 

STATE OPENING 

(Continued from page 2) 
It was a delicate matter, as tbe of- 
fice building is over tbe lobby and 
tbe dressing rooms connect with the 
Loew annex buildinc on West dtltb 
street. The total insurance on the 
Btmcture ia $2,500,000." 

It is daimed the house has a seat- 
ing capacity of 3,000. but the aetual 
number of chairs is 3,45.5. 



For the post six year^- tbe 
4'eased had bern in picture work. 
Sturr is sur\ived by bis wift- 
one son, Laurence. 



In Mrmory of 

L. EARLE LLOYO 

Whty iMiKfcd to tli« trMit bfy*n4l 

AiiftiiHt "Ut. 10 It). 

IliN niotUi^r'M hruit hlorti.t 
afrrwli rrrli titi.v. 

MRS. BELLE* H. LLOYD 



Mrs. Martha S. Pittack, a^'ed 51' 
years, wife of Uobert F. rilLul;, for- 
mer coiincihnau and prominent citi- 
zen of Bremerton, Woh'j. and uioth< 
of Wnnda Ilawley, died at her lunnv. 
a few days ago, after an illness of 
24 hours. ]3eatb wa^i due to a 8trok« 
of paialysiii. 



ORPHEQM JUMPS 



Playart 



la FriMsa Coma All Way 
Acrast Caatlaaat 



San Francisco. Aug. 31. 

The summer season arraagement of 
bills was especially noticeable last 
week at the Orpheum when lour of 
the acts opened here alter dlreot 
leapa from the east 

Hie Four Lamys came all tbe way 
from Beaton without a stop; Car- 
aon ami Willard were here from 
Philadelphia; Seanlon. Denno Bros, 
and Seanton dropped ia from St 
Ijouis: while Nadje arrived from 
Ohicato. Nadije ia the only one of 
tbe qaartet that wasn't beW over, 
she sails for Australia Sept. 0. 



CUBRAll *S mSW TBNAIITS 

San Francisco. Aug. 31. 
With the coming of September 1, 
Homer Curraa, Fred Qiesea and W. 
A. Buaco. are prepariag to vacate 
tbdr ^reseat ofiecs ia the Curraa 
theatre buBdiiv which ia to coaie un- 
der the management of Harry Bailey 
(or Herbert A. Harris and Charks 



Opening of Loew^s * 

State B% Ballyhoo 

Monday vpaa Ballyhoo Day on 
Biwadway. 

Not within the past 2S y^ars baa 
there been a aiagle day that carried 
at much history aMikiaf action in 
the world of the theatre as was held 
withia a 12 hour period oa Aag. 30, 
1021, from noon lo aMaight. 

Two eviept, both marfciag mile- 
stones theatrically, paaaed in review. 
The first was the Frank Baeoa 
fareweO reception and the attendant 
parade down the aMia stem early 
in the aftemooa. The second, aad 
by far the asoro impreaaive, was the 
tremeadoaa jam that entered .about 
the comer of B ro adway aad dfith 
Street for tbe opeaJat af Marcaa 
Loew*a State theatre, the firat thea- 
tre he has haiU ia the heart of the 
theatrical district in the town that 
saw the hef inatac of the Laew for- 
tunes. 

From early la the afteraooa a 
cordon of poliee was thrown about 
tbe boaee. Aa the evening drew oa 
Bftoanted poliee vrere added to thoae 
OB foot to keep the crowds movfatg 
and make it posihie tar thoae hold- 
iag tickets to gain admittance to the 
theatre. 

Thoae that arrived oa foot had 

literally to fight their way iato the 

Thoae that arrived via motor 



The mother of Lester Stevens mem- 
ber of Fiest's San Francisco staff and 
leader of Bert I-evey's Princess or-t 
ehestra died in that city last Wed*.^ 
nesday after an illness of iseveral 
weeks. ' 

wait for events. Those that saw 
the Bacon send off in the afternoon 
felt that it was foing to east a dam- ' 
per on anything that could be pulled 
for the Loew opening. But tbey 
ffgured wrong. 

Eight o'clock on Monday uigb^. 
while the crowd was gathering, at- 
tracted by the flaring of two Sim- 
light arcs that auide it possible for 
the weekly news events camera men 
to shoot the arriving celebrities, 
brought a ifistinct a^ of courtesy that 
was remarked by everyone. It was 
the arrival of the B. F. Keith Oir- 
eaK Boys Band whidi marched up 
Broadway headed by a banner read- 



J 




male member doea the hard work H. Brown on that date, 

and opriags a few new .hand flops Giesea, who has been doing tkt 

that look diSeult His winner comes booking of road shows coming oat 

whea he does some somersaulting ^^^ ^^j, ^ill move to 1039 Market 

down a flight of short-step stairs ^^^^ temporarily until the new 

bouncing oa his bead and lighting Q^^n^jn theatre is completed. Ruaeo 



on his feet one notch Ibwer. Har 
in Conscience <,m j^}^^^ in "The Tip" and Con- 

^•'-^'??**i^*?" I stance Binney in "Such a Little 
*" eondade tb«» bHl. 



The Ho<t«e With n ronscience 
III Pawall 
Saa Fraaalaaa Partlaad, Ora.'oV-en 



A. C. BLUMENTHAL&CO.,Iiic. 

REALTY BROKERS 



SPECIALISTS 



IN THEATRICAL FINANCINC. LEAC.NG AND 
CONSTRUCTION IN THE WEST. 



58 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HEADQVARTERS 

GREEN ROOM CLUB 

Thespians' Rendezvous Supreme 

Cafe Marquard 

BIG REVUE FEATURES 

COLUMBIA g^j>j FRANCISCO ""CLi'S 



will acoompaay Oiesea. 

To date no bookiags have been 
made for the Curraa untiF tbe lat- 
ter part of October when the first 
road sbow will appear. Meanwhile 
the Century is to undergo renova- 
tions aB4l will probably open by tbe 
middle of the month with so«>e fe«t- 
ure picture. 

WIFE ASKS HALF 

San Frundsco, Aug. 31. 
Fr&nk G. Parker, theatre man of 
Stockton, is defendant in a separate 
maintenance suit filed by his wife hist 
week. The plaintiff asks for half 
ownership in Parker's theatrical 
propertieii in Stookton, Manteca and 
Pasadena. 



ing *'B. F. Kritfa*8 Circuit Extenda 
Greeting aad Beat Wishes to the 
Loew drcoit for the Saceess of the 
New Statie Theatre." The band then 
remained on the former K. of C. hut 
triaagle and gave aa iaq^romptu con 
cert catertaiaiBg tile crowdo that 
filled tbe street from carb to curb 
from 44th to 46th Streets 

Then as tbe notables of tbe Mtage 
and screen began to arrive the crowds 
grew so unmaaageahle that it was 
impoasihie for the p4^ce on foot to 
handle them. As each of tbe fav- 
orites arrived, the big are ttgbts were 
shot OB aad the d^aeraa began to 
griad and that was the due for the 
crowd to posh forward to try to seo 
who was being ''shot**. Theda Bara 
waa ahaost swept from her feet and 
the world's heavywe^t •'i*«iHipio» 
Jack Deaipsey fared no better wb«i 
bo shovrcd. Tbe aMonted ^ops wero 
th* only thiag that aared the diamp 
from remaialBg out oa the street and 
never getting into the theatre. Ha 
same state of affairs prevailed aa 
Nonaa and Coastanee Talmadge a#^. 
paared accompaaied by Joe .s< nendu 
lames J. Corhatt aad BiUy Van, Do- 
raUaia, Bichard Barthelmes^ u4 
•cores of others ev>aHy known (a 
fame appeared. 

It waa long after 9 o'doek befort 
the crowd showed aay aigas of weak- 
oiiBg Ib their determination to stidt 
to the laat. The Weekly cameran«i| 
slipped from their platforms $mti weat 
UMir way, hat the «fawd still stuck. 

Paarwta Tawptad 
Later it became ippareat why tbey 
were atieftlag. ' Sameone raised a 
ery of *^iare comes Dpug and M&ry^ 
pad tha Jam that waa apparent earlier 
in the arealBg ttarfed an ov«r agaki. 
It waa a false alarm, however. «ad 
from that time on tiire crowd dwihr 
died. ^1 

Mary and her husband witnes*iea 
the opening of ^TPhe Whee " at the 
Gaiety. Those of the business ^ 
of tbe picture fraternity in the lobby 
during the evening could not under- 
stand why tbis duo of stars figur^^ 
they could afford to pass np ^ 



managed to gaia the curb !n front 
of the house, but there they were in 
daag^ of hciag avaaifKd aj tbe 
crowds until thoae ia charge <if the 
poliee arraagesBeata managed to get 
a couple of monnted men on lo !f:e 
sidewalk ami dear the way frou the 
street to the house. Later it W9S 
accessary for one of the mounted 
officers to ride iato the 1o*>by of (he 
hooee to dear that «pi2e of the 
oBoh that managed to filter ia oao 
by one past the poliee lines on one 
pretext and another until they com- 
pletdy filled the lobby apace. 

Groat ShawMaMhlp 
And it was all done with show- 
manship! Showmanship that got 
down to tbe first esentials of the 
game, that of attracting crowds and 
making them stand and wait for 
1 something to happen! Tbe crowds --' : - 

did gather and they did sUnd and ««*J« ^^T** ,. . ^ * * i that 

One distributmg bead stated tnat 



THEATRE 
it 



Symphony at Calambta 

San Francisco, Aug. 31. 
The eleventh season of the San 
Francisco .Symphony Orchestra will 
open at the Columbia theatre Octo- 
ber 28. A series of twenty-eight 



MAUDE rULIOV TOUE OFF 

San Francisco, Aug. 31. 
Tbe Maude Fulton-Hobert Ober 
road engagement scheduled for Cali- 
fornia small towns this month has 
been called off by W. A. Bnsco and 
Fred Giesea. whose offer for an out- 
right purchase of the stars and com- 
pany was refused by George Bbey 
and Ralph Pincus, sponsors for the 
Fulton engagement at tbe Curran, 
which closed last Saturday after 
three weeks. "Pinkie" and "Sonny," 
Miss Fulton's latest plays, were used 
at the Curran during that stay and 



concerts has been planned for I it was thought these would be tbe 
neighboring cities of the bay region, i plays for the road tour 



Alfred Hertz is in charge. 
WidenMm ia manager. 



A. W. 



I.oew, as the biggest single indepen- 
dent factor in the picture exhlMb' 
ing world, undoubtedly spent mors 
than IT.'AOOO a >ear with the United 
Artists for the Pickford and Fair- 
banks product and that the coniin*^' 
dal sease of both of the sUrs shottM 
have been sufficient to make the* 
see the value of being on hand. 

Some of the rough worker-^ «lo"J 
the curbs managed to get *»<>^^ 
a number of balcony seots for T^ 
House and were offering them »t ^ 
a seat. There were offers of ^^*^ 
early in the evening to doormen »•* 
other atUches of $10 to slip a <^nip^ 
past the doors. One doorman «•*■ 
that he could hove cleaned a eowjJW 
Tbe Curran engagement averaged I of hundred if be had bad »<eutH to 



about le^OOO weekly. 



get rid of. 



Friday. September 2, 1921 



VARIETY 



TT 



INSIDE STUFF 



ON VAUDEVILLE 



Several professional women recently sub-lot an apartment close to 

la. theatre district for the summer, but it was not long before the 

liar tenants were complaining about the noisie let loose by the 

'iewcomors. The climax came about ten days ago when two of the 

twoxnen ^leclded.to get even with a male caller by attempting to throw 

flUsi out of the seventh story window. It looked like a sure murder 

ERr a time, and, an it was, the man only got off after being severely 

!H|»ten. This row led to the building superintendent giving the 

irpmen the air. Among mem was a vaudevllllan who is suing for 

divorce. 

- A small-time actor not working this week was walking along Ran- 
' dolph street, Chicago, when he met a team playing at one of the four- 
n^ay houses. Stopping them, he remarked: *'You ought to see 'The 
Golem.' " " 'Goalem,' did you say," repeated the male member of the 
working team, "why you should of seen our second show tonight and 
jrou would know what 'Goal'em* means," and then the couple walked 
haugtii onward, leaving the questioner stand to argue with himself 
«ff to just what he did mean. 



8HUBERT8' ONLY SPLIT 



N«w Bethlehem House Playing Shu- 
bert Vautfoville Twice Weekly 



CIRCUS CUTS TEXAS 



Ringlings. to Cross the Oarolinas to 
Avoid Cotton Belt 



' TIip Lorenze, Bethlehem, Pa., open- 

W Monday as a Shubcrt-booked 

iraudeville house is the first Shubert 

ifiudeville opening. The house, re- 
cently completed, is owned by H. Hei- 
^l^rger, who has entered into a book- 
Jbs arranf^ement with the Shuberts 
for bills, the latter having no interest 
ia the theatre. 

The Bethlehem house will not play 
the full Shubert vaudeville shows, the 
hills being made up from the smaller' 
turns on the agency's books, with the 
ahows to be played on a split week. 
It will be the only split on the Shu- 
bert route. 

It is planned to use the Pennsylva- 
nia bouse to a certain extent as a 
break-iu point. 

N. V. A. COMPLAINTS 

'. The following complaints have been 
lied with the National Vaudeville Ar- 
tists' Complaint Bureau: 
L Oertrudo Vanderbilt against Ford 
ind (loodridge. infringement claimed 
ij Miss Vandorbilt on song, "You 
Can't Believe Them." 

F. Cordini OKainst nnoMior Cordini, 
of Stoi'l and Cordini, alleging Infriuge- 
Beat on name. 

Lew TiOslie. agent, against "Mam- 
■y," Leslie acting for '*Aunt Jpmima" 
.and alleging "Mammy" is a copy of 
"Aunt .Temima." Infringement, ac- 
cording to Leslie, consists of style of 
delivery in songs, make up, manner- 
nm, etc. 



The Bingling circus will avoid 
Texas and Oklahoma this season, 
coming east across the Oarolinas in 
order to avoid a trip through the 
cotton belt which is reported in poor 
linancial condition owing to the low 
price of raw cotton and the high cost 
of farm labor. 

The route will thread through these 
sections where cotton cultivation has 
been reduced by the boll weevil and 
dairy farming substituted. The tour 
will probably end somewhere in Vir- 
ginia Oct. 22. 

The new Ringling Bros.-Barnum & 
Bailey route card just out brings the 
show into Omaha Labor Day and car- 
ries it to St. Louis for the three-day 
stand Sept. 17-19. From Omaha the 
tour goes: Sept. 6, Jefferson, la.; 7, 
Des Moines; 8, Mason City; 1), Water- 
loo; 10, Cedar llapid; 12, Freeport; 
1.1, Bloomington, 111.; 14. Champlain; 
15,. Matoon; 10, Decatur and St. 
Louis. 

The Andy Downey circus will stop 
Oct. 11 in the south, making an early 
ending for it. Downey has booked his 
elephants for fairs ait $1,000 weekly. 
Several of his acts have left and the 
circus is running short in turns. 



Basil Lynn against P. O'Malley .Ten- 
■ing.s and Wiiliani Ilowland, alleging 
Jlifritis:""i(>"f on fmi^h of act no'w be- 
ing done by Lynn and before that done 
"bg^ Lynn and'Howlaud. 






I .'Eddie Powell' against Fe<lrow and 
fteulter, tnfringeihent on "Yankee 
Doodle" bit. ^ 



•Harry Colo!y»a)(»(Ortlemon and Ray> 
'igainstW«H^'nBin(J' Walters, second 
'eoniplQfnt on ^ight.-^' tn walking doll 
tJsed by Walters and Walters. 

''Tlie complaint of -James Francis 
BnlHvan against Henry P. -Dixon, in 
whieh -Sullivan claimed Dixon failed 
to>five>hiM>'fotiriweolis' notice, in ac- 
coivliHice wi*U>hifl ^Sullivan's) agree- 
ment witlkj^^i^^n^ hl^^bPOn settled by 
Dixon paying Sullivan 'a sum of money 
(anionfit nAt'givVn)"ln settlement of 
contract cl a iMsV" 

; 1 -■■... 

>lUNKiaW«.EtftST. SHOW 

B. «i 'Molts' ..saw Franklin, IGlst 
street andi Proapeot 4iv«nue, opens La- 
bor Day with the following bill: .Tim- 
»By iMioas and Prancene. Dave Harris 
•nd band, C«?rs Bros., Jack Trainor & 
tb.. Uoyal <laseioignes and Wells, Vir- 
fiaia and Wnst^vDaahy Simmons will 
book the house through the Keith 
*Jfice. in <y>nj>inctkMl with others of 
«»^ MoHs-Keith Jltriag. The policy 
^"11 he pop vaudeville and pictures, 
.1«t« HhowH dwly, with a hi weekly 
«*»nm-' of bill. 

^The Franklin seats ."^.fjOO and cost 
*^the noiR|,|,orh«iod. ©f $.1,000,000. 



^t N. V. House Playing Split Week 

.^be Hupkin^hn. "KiiHt New York, 
^f>lvl.v.'i. xvln '(oi'iimcncc a pop 
■▼"udovillo policy •T:iuirs(lay of thil 
^2?«k. four' (u'ts ' on a .spliL week 

.^«*«1 !)>' .T:,,l; Xin.lcr. 

.The li.Mi<<.. own»<d*by S.imuM ^,o\^^ 

''<'1J. loitiH.ily tHjiV^I piflUlCS. 

NEW ACTS 

Ci»nisy Itciiiii^^t*in of the old Mines 
^■^ Jiwiiiulitoir, *cnm is making a 
TS?7'J)^.(Jumn Uiv.k, this fall in a 
'r7''V."<n|eu,.liy Uugii U.^buruo, the 




HOUSES OPENING 

Sablosky & MctJurk expect to 
have eighteen houses open by Labor 
Day, including three new ones. The 
Allegheny is slated to reopen Sept. 
25 and on Labor- Day the Broadway. 
Cross-Keys, - Norristoivn, South 
Bethlehem, Camden and the Alham- 
bra arc due to resume activities. The 
(ilobe, PhMadeli)hia, and the Siiblosky 
houses in Trenton, WJ^^4»inBton, Bal-, 
tiinore and Wilkosburre were run- 
ning all summer. 

()ri)hcum,' (iaiesburg. 111., (vaiide-, 
villcK reopened Aug. 'SI. 
• I'hnpress, Danhury, Conn., reopens 
with vaudrvillo Se[)t. .1. 

The Alhambra, Brooklyn, reopen?* 
lifthor Day. playing six acts. 

Strand, White IMnins. N. Y., plays 
vaudeville c»)mmencing Labor Day. 

.Ucausc of lhc,.sfato convention of 
the Knijjhts of Pythias an<l increased 
patronage, martagrnicnt of the four 
Oil City, I'a., local theatre havr 
agreed to reopen Monday. 

Opera House, St.. John's, N. B., 
Aug. 22: StraiKl, Halifax. N. S., Aug. 
22; Music Hall, I>ewiston. Me.. Sept. 
7i\ Bijou, Bangor, Me,, Scjit. 5; Al- 
(oona. Harrisburg, York, lOaston, Al- 
lentown. Beading, Pa., and Utica, N. 
Y., Aug. 20; Proctor's. Albany and 
Troy, Sept. .'i; Keystone. William 
Pcnu and ticrard, Philade'phia, Sept. 
5. 

TiOow's. Kansas City, opens Sunday 
for the season with the regular Loew 
western shows. 

The Pagola theatre, Allenfown. Pa.. 
owned by I). K. Knorr. will install a 
vplit week vaudeville policy bepinnin;* 
Labor Day. The lioiisc liiis liereto- 
fore playc;! strMiglit pichir<s. a st.'ige 
having recently been installed. 




LICENSE REFUSED 



Here I Am 
ANNE KENT 

Playing for Mr. IjOCW. Horwita & 
Kraus say the reports are okay. I'v^ 
got my health and an offer to go back 
to Australia. 

Not too bad. eh? 



TORONTO FAIR COSTS 
$750,000 TO OPEN 

Big Two - Week Event 

Draws From Theatres, 

Just Opening 

Toronto, Aug. 3L 

The Canadian National Exposition, 

better known as the Toronto Fair, 

Monday officially opened the fair 
season, which permits consecutive 
bookings of fifteen or more weeka. 
Though the fir.st to get under way 
the Toronto Fair is the btggCKt thia 
side of the water. Its fine perma- 
nent exhibition buildings make it the 
biggest in the world. Last year the 
fair drew 1,250,000 paid admissions. 
That is over one-sixth of the Do- 
minion's population and is ruauing 
two weeks. 

The theatrical season is under way 
this week, but the fair is sapping 
almost all trade starting' this season. 
All events go as schediiled, rain or 
shine. lioew's Yong*' Street usuaUy 
has standing room wUh a long line by 
1 o'clock, but Monday at that time 
only a haridful was in line. The size 
of th^'fbir is measured by the rost 
of opening it. This year's figure is 
$7.'>0,000. Nunirrons bands entail an 
expenditure" of $40,000 'alone. Thd 
fair ground.^; extend a mile and a 
quarter along Lake Ontario. The 
grandstand hold.s 72.000. The ca- 
pacity will be doubled next reason. 
The ??how is-iiow playing capacity. It 
is arranged in chcus style. May, 
Wirth and Family are the headliners, 
getting ^5.000 on engjKgement. Others 
are Zeno. Moll and Carl: Poodles and 
Dottei; Sully, Iloger and Sully; Re- 
gals Martels \'intour; Trick House, 
Leuiarts. Four Oitons. UonahU. Mar- 
garet Hill, Icelanders, Coglen and 
Comedy.Itnckleys. Atteno. Hardy. In- 
ternational Nine, 

Despite enormotis crowds there is 
not a sheet of paper in Toronto. 
Mi(kvay concession.«T Are free of pad- 
dle wheels. One sectiou is allotted 
to the Wortham Shows, which are 
giving .^r> per cent gross to the fair- 
nianageiucnt. Orren and Vicky. Dav- 
enport have .settled their differences 
and their riding act <ontin>ies inta(l. 
The wife withdrew <livorce action 
started in Chicago recently. 



IN AND OUT 

■ Kaufman Hros. left the bill at the 
r>ri<;hton Peach Music Hall Aug. 2S 
<»n a<(Oiint of illness. .Monday (liey 
r.-iti.cl.-d the Palace New York. Frank 
Van Ilovcn lot»k tlw vacancy. 

H'ness of one of the members of 
the Texas Comedy I-'our caused the 
act to droi) out of flic bill at the l-'iil- 
ton. lirooklyn. the last half of last 
wi-ek. (;illen and Mu'caliy snhsilhitod. 
Cilleu prior to entering vaiid.'ville 
was the orchestra leader at the I'ul- 
\on for seveial years. 

ENGAGEMENTS 

Lillian King, 'Tickle Me." 

.loliu Mcrkyl. '"JMie Six Fifty" (Ku- 
gel). 

Malcolm Fas.ett, "The Silver 
TcacocU' (Solwyu.) . , 



ILL AND INJURED 

Oswold (>/. (Tolly and Ozl wa.s op- 
crated on this' week at a local hospital 
for ai)pendicitis. The Kt'ivh route 
of the act has been put hack t'iree 
weeks on account of his illnes . 

Oz (Polly and Oz) was operated 
on A.;?r. 24 for appendicitis ind peri- 
tonitis by Dr. .lerome Wagner, at St. 
I'aitliolomew llosjtifal. lie is recov- 
ering. 

.\nna I'lmer of the Lopw publicity 
oflice sustained a fractured arm last 
week while on her vac;ilion iti Thom- 
aston. Conn. It was necessary to 
lake .Miss CJmer lo (he ^Vate^l)urv. 
Conn.. lir)spi(al. where it is exiiected 
sli'e will he confined for yhoiit two 
wci'k.-v 

lliipli L. ( 'onn (Iinliof. t'nn.i .'ind 
Cmiine) lias liecn t.ik'-n to the IIa.\s 
V.i-others H()si)itMl. at I{nclie -t cr. 
Minn., for a major op i at ion. .Icrr.v 
If. Ilcr/ell is taking Lis ] l!".< c diiiiir.^ 
his al»sencc. 

M.ihel T. Sampson of Sninp^on awA 
PfMii^las is at her home in .\sli(il;:in 
it; r»vei irig from a ni;ij<tr operation 
performed in Chicago 



Kansas City Will Not Allow Clrcvt 
to Show Qfk Labor Day 



Kansas City, Aug. .'il. 

At the request of the Ceniral I^- 
bor Union of this city. Mayor Cow- 
gill has instructed the city license de- 
partment to refuse to issue n license 
to the liingling circus to show here 
Labor Day. There is a local ordi- 
nance, passed a couple of years ago, 
prohibiting circuses from exhibiting 
here on the Fourth of July, Labor 
Day or Christmas. It was passed 
at the re<niest of the labor leader* 
who feared the parades would in- 
terfere with their demonstrations. 

This year's recpiest to the mayor 
seems precautionary as the lUng- 
ling shows are not billed here for 
that date. Some opposition [uiper 
was put up several weeks ago when 
Sells-Floto was here but it was not 
dated. 



BALLARD-MUGGIVAN 
SHOWS REFORMING 



Report Circus Men Order 

Cleanup of Lot for 1932 

Season 



MATRIMONY, ETC. 

Troy, N. Y., Aug. 31. 

Charles A. Prew is a good lion 
tamer and a pretty fair woman tamer, 
but be can't conquer the law. Laat 
week's experience taught him this. He 
arrived in this city with Mary A. 
Granville, 19, and Mary Brown, 18, 
both of whom had hoofed it all* the 
way from Lebanon, N. IL, where the 
hero was playing with a circus, and 
was immediately arrested under the 
Mann White Slave Act, and arraigned 
before a United States Commissioner. 
The Commissioner decided not to hold 
Prew and he was then picked up by 
the police on a charge of vagrancy. 

Meanwhile, the Salvation Army be- 
came interented in the case of the girls 



The word was circulate<l in New 
York this week that the Hallard-Mug- 
givan circus group had been instructed 
to clean up the lot for the balance of 
the current season, and plans had 
been laid out for conducting next sea- 
son's tour on a strictly business basis, 
minus any sort of loose practice 
around the half dozen shows they 
operate 

The inspirati(^, so it is said, for 
this move lies in the fact that the 
statement for the tops out this year 
to date make an un.satisfactory show- 
ing. The Sells-Flolo property is un- 
derstood to stand pPTilou.sly cloae to 
a deficit. estimate<l nt between $75,000 
and $1(X).()00. wbi e none of the oth- 
ers — Yankee Robinson, John Robin- 
sou and Wallace — is returning any 
staggering profit. The Sells-Floto 
show was not allowtnl to open in 
Newark, N. J., for the surface reason 
that there had been some jam In the 
license ollice. The same thing hap- 
pened in Albany immediately after, 
the reason in the latter case appar- 
ently being the transit strike. 

These experiencea are said to have 
been very expensive, and the suspi- 
cion prevailed that the reputation ol 
the show as it came arroaa New 
York state from the middle west htfd 
had something to do with the *\infor- 
tunate" occurrences In the two cities. 

Muggivan and Hallard are not hj 




Trudie Charles 

RECKLESS and ARLEY 

Who arc presenting their sensational novelty for the" 00th o6nsec;itive on 
the Loew Circuit under thq direction of ^ABE^'^^lflE^RG. 



and learned that the Jion l;iiner was 
willing t) marry Mihs (Iranville and 
vice ver.MM. Tdlicc .Ii»slice llyron 
dropped the vunrnTM y ehnrge. and unit- 
ed the coup e in v.cdiock. Aft .' tin* 
fatal worVis had bicn proiK/iiiu cd; 
Prew reiiKMiihered tlirit he lux) once 
married a womnn from wImmm lie Imd 
not Neen divorrcd. and he wlis , ac- 
C'li-dinijly nrre.,t<Ml as a bitjiimist. II'' 
now wislies that he had .sfiuk lo his 
lions :ind left Hie woinim :i!omc. The 
iiniuial Ir.iiiier is oidy twenty one 
years old. 

LUNA QUITS EARLY 

Elephants Out— Frco Acts Wi'.h- 
drawn on Labor Day 

Tlie f!( '^aiit display in lama I'Mrk 

(li-paijr.l last Saturday and nil free 

1(1. < \\;ll he witlidrawn ik-iI Monday. 

'I'lic^-' f<Miiires and the .\rtliur 

|'i\or hai.d !in\<' heeli (lie et'ciise for 

! (h<- 'J'» <i'iit v'lnii-<ion at the ^'ali'. 

I ,\ftir l!ie (I!-!:- f''atnr<-- eml the 

i i;,ll,. \\ ill he r,ii;l ilMK'd. I'at 1 "Ma^e 

1-. Slid t't li;i\ <• Ii ''11 lii^ht d II lit'.,' Ill" 

; (Old .\iiuu : ;<n'I Hi'- < nt i:i ••xinn ic 
corne.s .s.'vii,;! u.t'L.i t'uilier than 

I |isi<''>l 



any means through with the circus 
business. It is underslood (hat the 
plaiHH- for next season ( oi'itculplate u 
considcrahlo 'outl.'iy in crjui'piuebt, dnd 
the personnel of the troui) wi 1 be on 
about the lOlil .seale. - 

The Ifanneford I'amily has been 
signed again as feature display. The 
rint; turn will not play the Ili|)po- 
droiue this season. It. has been booked 
for Sluibert vaiideville. 



World's Champ Swimmer and Act 

Duke I*. Kalianamoku, world's 
swimming champion, is to enter 
yaiideville. Duke, whr) i.s now in 
I lonoliilii. lias l.K'ori in < (»rresjM»iid«>nee 
w*t,li the local Irii; lime office.s nnd 
will itrodnce a ImtiI: a't. lie w:ll I»i* 
assisted \)\ !ii ; hiotlicr mid sister 
who sMij; and play na'iv" iiistni- 

nieiit >. 

1 

I Song Canncrs Booked 

j Wdn'.der Wad.-wi.rt h, \'i-tnr .\( ker 

I nnd (icoi'^i- ll.innllon, ( MinMr'.,. n (be 

'All St.ii- 'J'li.. ..f 111.' \;cN»r 'I'alldnR 

!\Ia< liiiif rciMid iiia!i'i;i: -talf, li.ave 

hri'ii huuked f >r '.aidi'ville in th€ 

l\";fh liniisr-;, with ,i:i i>;"'''""J ^llortly, 

hv Cliarlie M<>i i ison, u£ the Uaij 

I Ilud|;dijU olh< 0. 






VARIETY 8 CHI0A60 OFFICE 



■'.?n' 






■•icu««i3Mt:^^r«' 'i^T""*".' 



mt^trago 






'■^•M^-'JW^ (^•-^|P>C<'"-»>-^ ■ 



I 



vM" 



-» • • »•.':. ^ 



PHdaj, September 2, 1&21 
STATS-LAKE THEATRE BUILDllit 



CHICAGO VAUDEVILLE SHOWS 



PALACE, CHICAQO 

Ohioaso, Autf. 31. 
After beins dark for the pa;it .tw« 
mouths tfais bouse opened ita vaude> 
>il1e 8€«Aon with a typical ChicE^o 
vaudrvillc bill. Many of the acts are 
legiilar staodbyK, aaost of tbcio bav- 
ins been Meen at lea^t twice labt year. 

This did not 9top the recalar me- 
tomers from applaudiof, and it was 
like old times to see the show i^o 
over. The waHow ntarted with inob- 
:ibly the hotteHl day iu Au£U8t, but 
rveryone waH happy the l^alaoe is 
opru again. Ivitty Doner with her 
KJnter UoHC and brother Ted were the 
headlinerH, and lived up to cxpeota- 
liou^. The uet ^as never in bcttt>r 
rhapo, and th«* way the trio worked 
ebamed the nwingera of fans and ker- 

rM% into wiM applause. 
The show wuh opened with an act 
%k 4M10, Two Sternards, xylophonints. 
a dean*cut mixed team, with the girl 
making two classy changes snd using 
colored mallctM to correspond with 
lier clothes. They started the show 
off in high and were forced to come 
back for an encore. Bart ram and 
S«*xton sang tbeir way into an easy 
early bit. The boys have a lot of 
riflss, and wear tuxes a.v if to the 
manner born. Dorothea Sadler and 
<*o. were th# weak spot of the show, 
although the cast is not to blame, as 
thcAf put over the piffle giv^n to them. 
WilHam C. DeMille had an idea, but 
faile<1 to write up to it. The sketch 
is laid in 'IfyjO;' still all the props 
used are of the 1921 vinUge, and 
some of tbem could d»te back further 
than that, for example, an old-fash* 
ioned phonograph playing "Margie." 
It is the triangle, only reversed with 
the man paying. The entire thing 
was IndlcrouiP. and for a minute it 
Iookc<1 as if the sketch would never 
finish, as there was a cold laugh from 
tbe liudicnoe that spelled calamity. 
Hnt the ''ourage of the players polled 
it through. 

William Gaston and Helen Rapport 
are the supporting cast. Jack Joyce 
came back with a new act. As soon 
as Joyce finds a few stronger stories 
It will sail along very smoothly, as it 
has all the acquirements of a big- 
t1m> single of merit. 

Harry I^ngdcn and Co. in the tried 
and proved vehicle didn't miss, but 
time is telling, the laughs are getting 
weaker. Lloyd and Rubin with their 
funny talk goaled 'em for a sure fire 
«iM-time Palace hit. The boys then 
<'aroe back for individual dances that 
brought another salvo of applause. 
Tlw Doner Family followed all this 
dancing, but it^ npver phased theioQ one 
bit. With Kitty Doner as the nu 
«Ien9, this act was built for vaudeville 
consumption, ami vaudeville took 
them to her heart. Sinre laKt seen 
here the act has added a Bowery 
ilnn#»<». with M!<»s Kittv taking a cou- 



AARON JONES TIES UP 
PICTURES FOR LOOP 



EUGENE COX 

SCENERY 

1734 Ogden Ave. 

Phone Beeley 3801 

Chicago 

A3K ERNC8T EVANS 



ELI," The Jeweler 



TO THB PROFESSIOM 

Special Discount to Performer* 

WHEN IN CIIICAaO 

(%tate-I.Ake Tbrntrr Biilf. GroHiMt Floor 



ART 



EIER & 



HENRY 

ULLIVAN 



MERCHANT TAILORS 

TO rUF riCOFf^'SiON 

610 State- Lake B«da- - Chicago, IU, 



I>le of "Dooleyft" that were darbi*. 
Tbe aet tinisbed with everylkinf tht 
gBjag eouhl offer, including a apeeeb of 
thanks. 

(jene Greene, untft^'i6ted outride *ft 
a few sons pluggirs who sat iu the 
audience, trwept along and never lost 
a soul until be came to bis stories, 
and tben patrons hesitated* wondering 
nbetber they should hear the ro«t of 
the HtoHes and miss their aubin'ban 
trains or hear Greene finish. Most of 
them decided to make tbe train; they 
wore right. Greene i<i singing one 
new song that sounds like n winner. 
Fivck and Penny coukl give lessens 
to a lot of dumb acts, speed, action 
with showmanKbip. every minute 
crowded with a thrill, and no let up 
vn account of the Iiert or the ;>i)aaU 
tiowd. After the bcjs got •started 
they in:.de th«ni wait in tbe aisles for 
the finish. 

STATELAKE, CHICAGO 

/ Chicago, August 31. 

The crowds were in a hlippy-go* 

Incky mood and the bill was "the 

more you see, the more you want.** 

The bill did not hold any big draw- 
ing card, yet the people came, even 
stdoil in line, knowing that this honst 
gives value. It was a good test on 
the drawing power of tbe house, and 
not the bill. Tbe boraing stiii couldn't 
keep them away. This ia all in the 
face of tbe Palace. Just around the 
corner, opening this Monday, an4 
even when the Apollo enters its vaude^ 
ville regime this comfortable, ei^ery; 
t>ody's pet house will keep them wait- 
ing outside. As long as tbe State-" 
Lake has been open, a pretty girl 
appeared on the stage with a large 
sign, having the act's name upon it. 
This week tbe annunciator was put 
into operation. It is a spool-like de- 
vice, with the bill printed on a roll, 
and operate<l back stage. The roll 
turns until it comes to the name of 
the aet appearing. 

Al Wohlman was the "Big Squeeze"* 
of the bill and held up the show. He 
sang himself into a show stopper, and 
very few shows have been 8toj)pe(| 
the way he did it. -Wohlman has a 
little history behind him. For a very 
long time he warbled in local cafes, 
and toured the small time. His 
latest appearance was with tbe Fan- 
ebon-Marco revue, in which he was 
one of the principals. It took big 
time a long time to realize that they 
were overlooking something worth' 
whil«> and now they have him and 
should keep him. Many years of Rrae- 
tice have put a fine polish to Wohl- 
man's style and it is a legitimate and 
welcome one. 

Mr. Wohlman enters in a sdiool 
graduate's frock, offering a few highly 
amusing specialty songs of how the 
I. O. S. had trained him. Then he 
goes into a number about a chap 
who chased W>bster off the map, 
when it came to speaking English, but 
when be ate, the peas kept rolling 
off his knife. Each of these ditties 
brings smashing applause. Thei) be 
doffs the graduate's garb, mngs popu- 
lar numbers, encoring with an Al 
Jolson impression. He slips into each 
number with prose. 

The Uayolites have fitted up an 
easel with light effects and when the 
man completes a painting it is mad^ 
much more attractive by electrical ef- 
fects. The subjects of tbe paintjng^ 
are well chosen. They opened the 
the show in a novel fashion. The 
Two Rozellas cauie Ncoond. The act 
is the same as before with a few 
changes in the popular selections. As 
usual the man's drunk character 
and playing brought the applauR**, 
while tbe woman is excellent at the 
harp. 

Bernice Howard and Jack White 
showed a comedy sketch, the plot of 
which has to do with a man caught 
slipping out at night. His wife de- 
mands nn explanation, and he wants 
to know why she is fully dressed. 
The man wanted to play poker, the 
womnn wante«l to danro. Thoy decide 
to go to their separate beds, which 
havr a screen between them. When 
both think the other i« asleep, they 
slip out. A fow slides ar»' then 



' » » 



"ST. REGIS" HOTELS "MARION 

516 N. Clark Street CHICAGO 505 W. Madison St. 

PROFESSIONAL WEEKLY RATES 



CnANC:K OF KATKH 

Pincle. without hntli f 8.00 und fO.OA 

y>oiiblr. without bnth. .tlO.M and Sit.oa 

8inirle. with bath |I0..'>0 and $12.00 

l>oubl«>, with bath $14.00 and 916.09 



Tborooahly mcdern. 
Newly farnishrd. 
Convenient t4> all theatre*. 
Free rehenronl holl. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



HAZEL RENE 



HATS -GOWNS- COSTUMES 



Sf>fi 



:U»H Shilc I.uK" I'liihlintf. t I» « :mn 

ii{i:m: di lit ()i k 



TrI. Cent. 1H09 



ilA/i;i. 



HA vol < 



I'l rnwrly n ilFi 
»^«lith si.Hkliiid 



Secures First Run for 
Roosevdl Theatre to 
Shut Out New Chicago 

Obie«tOf Aug. 31. 

Aaron Jmmb, of Jones, Linick A 
tSii>tt^it-i, hofl 6«T«loiMd to be the 
tboru in tbe aide of B^laban & Katz 
with respect to thtir obtaiDiDg a va- 
riety of progrMD mud special pic- 
tures for B«lab«n A Katx' new $3.- 
000,000 tbestre. tb« Chicago, due tf 
open ?ery shortly. 

The ebicago will B«at 5,000 and 
is lecftted diafonally acroaa tbe 
street from J. L. & S's Randolph 
theatre, which holds the key to tbe 
picture situation in the loop. Half f 
block below the Randolph on State 
street is Ascher Brothers* new |1,* 
000,000 Luust, Roosevelt. 

Tbe Chicago would be direct oppo^ 
sition to tb^ Roosevelt, as Ihe poK- 
cies no doubt would be similar. Pitted 
in betwrpn thr<;r two the RaJidolph 
might have been smothered as far as 
revenue were eoncenied, as its price 
of admission is the same as charged 
at tbe Rooi>eveit. 

To spike any efforts which Balaban 
41 Katz might make toward obtaining 
tbe Paramount program for the Obi- 
cago, Jones made an agreement with 
the AKrhrr Brothers whereby be 
would arrange to get for them tho 
first ruB of ParamoDDt pictures in 
tbe loop at the Boooselt. He then 
prevailed upon Adolph Zukor to give 
Ascher Brother'^ the Paramount fran- 
chise for lirnt run in the loop. 

In making thia deal Mr. Jones did 
not overlook he had six small pic- 
ture boBses downtown which <on]d 
alCord to run tbe Paramount picture 
subsequeBt to their showing at the 
Roosevelt. He arranged with Ascher 
Brothers immediately after a picture 
couciiiiita its engagepent at the 
Roosevelt it would be shown at the 
Orpheum, a J. L & S. house down the 
street, and subsequently at the other 
J. Ij. & 8 theatres. 

After putting over tbe Paramount 
deal with Ascher Brothers. Jones bad 
the latter "sewed up" as far a^ tbeir 
desire for big features could be sat- 
isfied, and then began to intrench 
himself with respect to the produc- 
tion which the Randolph would get to 
combat the Balaban k. Katx policy. 
He has signed up for the output of 
the Associated Artists, Metro, Fox, 
Patbe and numerous other independ- 
ent producers. 

Besides these he has contracted to 
play all of the big ^'spedais,** which 
include "Way Down Bast," "Over the 
Hills." 'The Four Horsemen** and 
Douglas Fairbanks in "The Three 
Musketeer^;.*' Tbe latter has opened 
an unlimited engaferaeat Bven 
though the Randolph plays the soper 
productions there is no presentation 
in conjunction with them, nor is there 
an augmented orchestra used. The 
rental for this house in nominal, and 
an admission charge of GO cents is 
made. 

The Aseber Brothern also have an 
"ace" in the hole by being able to 
have first call on tbe Goldwyn product 
in Chicago. Goklwyn is financially in- 
terested in tbe Ascher Brothers en- 
terprises. 



thrown on the olio drop, telling how 
the man had won at poker. The 
curtain rising shows the hubby and 
wife stealing in. Cross fire talk takes 
place, they find each other out, and 
decide to discard tbe twin beds and 
screen. It has many funny situa- 
tions, but not so clever lines. 

"Blue" Bert Kenny, with the as- 
sistance of I. R. Nobo<l3', fed his fa- 
miliar talk abQut an argument. 
Kenny's material i > standard, and is 
always appropriate. He is a cork 
artist of a type and class by himself. 
"I?ubblcH." a miniature revue, fea- 
twrinf; Jack Norton and Queenie 
Smith, was welcomed with open arms. 
Then came Al Wohlman. Wayne 
Beeman and Alma Grace roller skated 
thcmfiolves into high favor. Applause 
often interrupted their feats. Olsen 
and Johnson and Miss Robbie Gor- 
don not seen at this show. 



doors after having theas eloecd for a 
few months. 

Tbe real treat on the euUre bill was 
Ralph Whitehead. 8uiall time crowds 
here have been showered with motion 
picture stars, appearing ib person. 
But it has been a vevy long tim« since 
a musical comedy star entertaided. 
Perhaps this had its influence on tbe 
succestt of Whitehead. Nevertheless, 
Whitehead worked with a glossy 
polish, art, nonchalant, care-free 
manner and presented bis cbaracteri- 
sationn appropriately. The stories, 
depicting each character, were highly 
amusing, and did not overnhadow th*" 
tricks Whitehead employed in making 
each character real Ib every sense 
he must have felt that the approba> 
tion accorded him was just as sin- 
cere and voluminous as he would 
have received in a two-a-day house. 

Tbe Lampinis opened with their 
"magic." Both the nuua and woman 
handle tbe hoak of dmng a tnea and 
showing how it is faked. Kneeland 
and Powers have an offering which 
meets tbe No. 2 demands here. The 
miss hos a lot of appearances and 
plays the violin pleasingly. Her male 
I>artuer does some singing, talking 
and a litC)% dancing. The torn looked 
as though time will remove the rough 
edges. 

G. Swayne Gordon, with' bis cast 
of another aoan and woman, nerved 
his sketch of a druDken fellow who 
spoils everything by talking too much. 
Gordon is great Bud bis vehicle af- 
fords the opportunity to bring out 
many good situations. The only sug- 
gestion is that the other man with 
the act enunciate more clearly. 
Peggy Vincent came fourth, leaving 
the heaviest work of tbe act to a 
male plant, who is hefty and has a 
hearty laugh. The plant interrupts 
Miss Vinc«9at. crossfires and comes 
on the stage, to sing upon a dare. 
The man's singing drew the act back 
for B^ny bows. 

Herman and Briscoe start o«t 
with great possibilities, slow down, 
and then pick np on tbeir final song, 
a parody. The men appear in one, 
wearing mohair soits. One is a 
Heb conic, to tbe other's straight. 
Jim and Irene Mariein had the flys 
full of hangings, drops and drapes. 
The senery caused a lot of connnent, 
and was enough for a rainiuiurt* re- 
vue. The settings were in one, two, 
three and full stage, and showed a 
heavy draft on tbe exchequer. The 
man aad woman vary their act with 
singing, violin playing and dancing. 
The girl is a whixz at manipulating 
the four 'Stringed box, and got lots of 
attention on her playing. Once she 
played a few bars of music on tho 
piano. Tbe man did a few 'tx^rn 
to allow the girl to change to flashy 
gowns. The team is light, and tbe 
wardrobe and scenery meant moch in 
putting them over. Ralph Whitehead 
followed and left the crowd in a good 
frame of nuBd for the foUowiBg act. 
Three MeWins. This trio has shown 
ita lumdsprlngs and aerobatics on 
the better time bills, and had bo 
trouble in making the doaiag act as 
important as the next to closiag. 
Howland, IrwiB sad Rowland and 
Haverly and Rogers not seea at this 
show. 



HARETTA KALLY 8TBIKE8 

Chicago, Aog. SI. 

Maretta Nally, comedienne with 
Ike Bloom's "Midnite Frolic.** 
hopped out OB the eve of the stag- 
ing of tbe new ahow, breaking a six- 
week contract. 

The morning before the new riiow 
was to open she phoned Bloom that 
she was leaving for New York. Ike 
tokl her she had a contract and he 
would hold her to it. fihe failed to 
appear at the opening performance. 

Miss Nally formerly appeared with 
Jack Allttan in vaudeville. 



Jot Erktr 8«Ns at BalivHIo 

Chicago, Aug. 31. , 
Joe Erber has sold tbe Wash- 
ington Airdrome, and tbe Lyric at 
Bellville. Itl., to the Mullen Building 
Corporation. Erber is said to have 
received $100.000 for the property. 



SINGER'S FIRST STEPi 
BOXOFFICE CHANGM 

Cleans Up Condition at 
Majestie and Pala 
Good Seats Always 

Ghieago, Aag. 31. 

Harry Siofer, reeoBtly put {^ 
charge of the Orpheum Cirevit 
houses here — Majestic, Palace, Statt* 
Lake — has started house 'cleaning 

As usual, the new broon sw 
into the box ofllce, and tins i>iuger 
at the Palace and Majestic 
box oilce aituation id tho Maje 
uud Palace waii that patrons 
not fot de sirabl e seats at the 
oflce \viutit>tv, but Qoukl be accon 
dated at nearby brokers. 

A number of tbe employees at 
Majestic have been with the thea 
for many years an4 have been looks 
upon as house "fixtures," The ^ 
meanor and actions of these persoi 
instead of adding caste and pres 
to the bouse have brovght about 
flection and in some ways injured 
business. Mr. Singer is investigi 
ing and may asake changes. 



A«oii9 t*o sovan principals in tM 
new edition of Ike Bloom's ''Hi! 
nite Frolics,** in Chicago, two ha| 
from tbe largest city in An»erifg 
One, tbe girl, frolicked with Ziegfel|, 
heretofore, while the other, the n 
hoofed in vaudeville and New Toj 
pflf^c With an entire new choruQ 
ensemble looked g9Qd and w 
very well and hard. Charles 
the director, is training Lloyd By 
the ingenue, in an efficient mann 
Miss Byron, taken from tbe chor 
ia a good bet and it time her poi 
sibilities will blossom forth. 
Burton, prima donba, is a holdevet 
and so is Ralph Bart, tenor. BoUl 
are reliables and their warbling drew 
concentrated attention from the 
crowds. A new face to the Ktnb 
patrons of Bloom's place is that H 
Gloria Hildebrand, soiibrette. who ii 
familiar locally. Miss iiiuu:braQd III 
a typical coon shouter, and every ar>| 
tion and number of hers bears eiil 
this impression. She is a black hairdi 
miss, and quite a live wire. 

Martha Wood, buck dancer, is tibi 
''Follies'* miss, who was ' importsi 
from New Torfc. Miss Wood sta«|i 
up to 2Uegfeld's choice, being tall aa4 
willowy. Her style of working addd 
a welcome color to the show. 4^ 
times she does double dances wifij 
her eastern, friend. Charley Calvertj 
billed as a juvenile, while In realittj 
ho is an eccentric, clever dancer^ 
Calvert brings an atmosphere aboti 
bis work, wbi<^ la noMr to the dmf 
jority o( pafrOAs, h^ce they af- 
plauded bim heavily. By* bis work 
he shows he knows how to get at tbi 
dioer. Helen Hnj^h^lui, dansuese, c«B- 
tributes a variigty of stepping, il 

which the toe ^(rog||jw«i|::hLer the uosi 
Miss Hughes i^Ki'iSdliscientiously, 
and is rewarded alS^t^ffilgly. Maretii 
Nally was billed hot jumped her eeil^ 
tract. Tbe eight to bhie numbers l| 
each of tbe four frolics held attea* 
tion, and the cherM** <»o«fi}?»»ng wfl 
attractive. The new chorus addd 
goo4l looks, and talent to tbe revm. 
Again DoU can. p^^j blip sdf ob b«il>q 
ing his kg^ revue. -^ |j 

Roger Grabaip. who retired froil 
the music piiKlUhitig business hef« 
last March, is now a department 
manager in tbe Mandel Brotheri 
Ntore. 



HYATrS BOOKING EXCHANGE 

Booking Better Tabloids-36 W. Randolph :St^ CHICACK 

-A NEW FEATTRE El^KRY WKmr»t ? .' -^ 

Fritzers Friars Jnn I 



McVICKER'S, CHICAGO 

Chicago, Aug. 31. 
Somotimrs a crowd shows its ap- 
preciation by laughing without ap- 
plauding. That is the sort that 
I witness* (1 wlmt is terincd th«' open- 
' inp of the H)*21-1i)U2 season. The 
bill proprp hehl a few high lightn. 
LilH'ly in this housr, operating year 
round, tlio romin* ncing of tho now 
f>r;iso?i did rntf nienn «<; n)Ufh as to 
, fho h»n>si v! whuli fliT (tjK King thrir 



KsrtbosAt Corner Wabash and Van Bwren, 
■ZCE1.LENT CV181NB, SKKVICE AND nANTING— PK01^£8^0i(A|^ MOfi'i^ 

EVERY WElX ' ' :\M^-'..^i^ * - ' ' "v^ 

M. J. FRITZEL, PROP. Wabttri 6815. t'.^j::::^,^.: CHICAftft 



n tJ 8 S E L. li.^ 

PHOTOGRAPHED' 

BHADOW PICTURES A SPECTAL^f v: 

Special rates to the professioll' 
209 SOUTH STATE STREET' ^ 
REPUBLIC BUILDING CHICAGO 

PHONE HARRISON f)36l 



NIVERSAL 






CENic Artist 

YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 



TU5lOS 



'i 



1 ar writ^. 91$ STATE-LAKE Btrkt,l>lVC5. * MM'AfiO 



I^iday, S«HMiN>r 2, 1981 

"s omoioo ownoit 




Clyirago 



8TATR.L4KB THBASBS EOILDBWI > 



IGESEEKaW-IliEUiBR, 




P^r Grafters Fined $25 in Chicage — Northfield, 

..in 

Minn., Citixctts Force Ban on "Show Sewen*^ 



TICKET QU^EN IS 
LOSING AGENCY GRIP 

Comiti^ to N. Y. to Seek 

S^tleoiMit tif Slittberi 

Jam 



FAMOUS SBORTS 

•etter before the dk«ltrftii«a ot the 



Mf«, «o4 G»Mii^ya kuDf •round iU 
•!« iwioe UtwMtt S «ad 4. 

TIM ^uii'iiiitrjr •>! II AiWA.'. llaQS Atf. SS 

t« Ao*. St lacltaalv* itrf §• toUomt: 
MOCK KKCWUfttV 
Tk«rad«r — 



OJyiMif* was Tftitled whiie playinf • 
m In tlie outdkirtH, four crooked 
lulors were arrested Mid each fined 
|0(, and Uttei(«r i« betag souf bt bf 

p^lce. 

\Ai KorCkfield, Minn., tlie conacil hj 
K>ate of 4 to 2 drore canuralv o«t 
»f ttie town orer the mayor's veto. 
]4« townspeople crowded about the 
^ hall in a damonstrailon orcan- 
bH^ to ahow the ii^nttaieBt against 
ifpiiiTitn The buit one there a1au»ert 
ced the town, acoorduig to newa- 
ir reiKNTts of gamhlhig, immoral - 
riolenee and general denorftliBa- 

BeileTille, HI., the News-Demo- 
aajra anent a camiTal there: 
\wm\B are «• rotten that there 
||.Ao defense for them from aay 
2|it of Tiew. The/ have no ««- 
jpiriwg features and should be abated 
»r aH other jniblic auiaaneea. 

-'^Vhe womett in this outfit looked 
ltd rips froai Baat St. Louis aad 
tp mt» like baaaa. Oar people were 
^Uliaed to the ^aeea'a taste bj sure- 
^ifhlg tinhorns who are ahrays tlilevea, 
gaferally gun-totera and oft<*n assas- 

andTighte 

m 

!Aislon^8 Silk Shop, Ltd. 

14 W. Washiaotoa SU Cliieafo 



ains. T^t side shows had the oaual 
eharaeteriaties of such adianeta: 
there were fake freaka and tiiree 
wora-oat airoM and dried'Up ramps 
sehedided for bootebie-kootehie per- 
fornances. It was not lewd — tbaj 
might as well hare tried to create 
laAciviouKnesa with a naked teiegn^h 
pale. But it was downright nilgar* 
diflgiiBtiaglj nasty and obscene, re- 
roltingly awlaiali, bestial, degenerate, 
corrupt and corrupting, gaggy, nan- 
seating, stoakaeh -turning and mala- 
^laroas, sodoauie and reeking of the 
cheap rice oC the forgotten segre- 
gated dislzicta. 

"The gan^iiog tenta were rotten 

(Coatiaaed on page 10) 



HXfJBR MUBFH7 EEXntSS 




Ribbaa UMa»— Uadar* 



itMk gHlabary WW Talia Ovr Maa- 
agattabt af Afaaay 

Obteago, A.«g. SL 
Helen Murphy of the Helen Marphy 
Agency, ts to retire froib theat^eal 
bttttiness and turn orer the agency 
holdii^s to her brotber-in U ■/. Jack 
Hi Isbury. formerly of the i'ictoria 
Four, who is her busiaess associate. 
The agency name is to be cbaaged to 
the Billtsbury Agency. 

MtHs Murpby waH married some 
time ago to a stock broker and he pre- 
railed upon her to* retire from busi 
ncRR which she has consented to do 
I Prior to becoming an agent Miss Mur 
plir was .R4K?retary to Carl Hoblitsel 



Cbicaga. Aag. ^1. 

The pabUe has mmt been getting alt 
of tbe tidK'to tteom the ataada ia tba 
hotels controlled by Florence Goa- 
thoni, "Queen of the Scalpers/' as 
it has been learned thit the girls 
employed at the rarioiis efands hare 
been handint aat large batches aC 
tickets to oataUe brobara at a pre- 
mium of 2Si eeota ofer the printed 
price af the iK.kcU. Tbaae aataide 
brokers ia tarn have bian getting aa 
extra half dollar or 9^ profit a* these 
ticketa. This greatlj incensed Mrs. 
Caothoal It waa afae (tet had a eitgr 
ardiaance pa^iacu uj luv ittcal council 
probibitittg any deab betag made be- 
tween brokers apd theatre saaaafa- 
meata, which wo«ld permit the fdr- 
aer ts dicq^aae af ticketa at a price 
ia excess of the hoc office figare. 

The outside brokers bare been 
adrised that this law is aaeoastitu- 
tional and tbey hare retained the law 
firm of j^abbath, GraMmaa it 9i^- 
batb to teat ita constitatioimlity. 
Samuel Ettteaoi^ who ia the corpora- 
tiaa counsel here aad a big political 
factor, waa formerly a member of 
the firm af Weyaiaatb ft Sehayler. 

The breach between Afr&. Coutboui 
and the Shubeit theatres is still 
widening. The ApaUo theatre, wbich 
has a direct wire with the C^Mthoui 
jitaads. refuses to answer nny oalls 
orer these lines. 

Mrs. Coathoni became greatly per 
turbed orrr thia incadeot. Bat Mra.Jboth the baat prices since the slump. 



It is paaaible tlipt another «'i^m^tit 
ia the reaewfll af bear operations, 
itbieb ran fraas Maadaj throagh 
Wednesday, Is tbe fact that profaa- 
oiofMil beara aajr — pfrit that m the 
loof figbt of eooipaaar iaaiders to aap- 
port prices on the way op from 46. 

the buB dique within the eottcera had 
loa(l(^d itself up with holdings pretty 
well, and the paaiibili^ of tiring them 
oat by a deCeriabHsd setting drire 
might have praaastad itaelf. Wbat- 
erer ia going an witbia the market 
repreaenta a miu<^ financial eagage* 
Bent, as ladicatad hj the tumarar In 
a single day af 8Dv006 shores of stock. 

Marfcat RaWaa 

lioew aad Orpbeua this week par- 
ticipated la the ratty which ran 
through tbe entire market. Nearly 
all the actire atocks ware well ap 
from their laws of mid-August Mex- 
Jean Petroleum crojaed par from 
around ^; Baldwin" was arwuud 77, 
from 70. and other speculatire issues 
were strong (n like manner. The 
bulls were jtri^ilant and talked canfi- 
deatly aboat tbe loag expected "tura,^ 
bnt the under-current of trading sen- 
timent was cautious* regarding tbe 
up-tura aa merely a temporary bulge, 
and forecasting another big slump be- 
fore the maii^et steps out for tbe 
long upgrade, based upon some fuu- 
damentai betteraseat, «U4ib a tM re- 
form. 

At tbe best lioew got past 12 to 
12 Vi, and held it« ifsproTement well, 
white OnUieam asored ap to 10^^ 





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■: 



— Ia the Heart of tba lOtb Ward» 



CiTRO's Restaurant 

^ lAiA tt/ifiTi4 uni «Tirn <^Tf»rCT. CHICAGO 



I 



1014 SOUTH HALSTEO STRE€T, CHICAGO 

Itaiiaa Tahia d'Hota 

C^mtUw O i ww »nU> m i — I I>« iMMm 

— Th«ro hara beon «ls mitfa«ra and ton bomtio wUhln ten aiocka oC wna 
ptaco In ate mantha— bat. don't M, that Interfora w4ta yo*r diMor. 
p no ta Bobomla with iko Apachea of Ckicaxo. 




Under New Management 



I'i. 



^ TRAMSPtmTATtON: 

< « ta Kt n. from l^oop — ' f." aad S«rfac«. 



BOTE SAM 



3009 Blichi^n Ave., Chicago 

A Hom« for Theatrical People 
at Theatrical Rates 

T«lept)o«e: ( Af.UMBT ffS2-64i3-S€S4 

$1.5a Tor Day; Weekly Kate i7J»a aad Up 
CoCa in Camoo^tHw. M ader o ta Prieaa. 



H EAST 
liD STREET 



OPPOSITE 
"L' STATION 



IKE BLOOM'S 

"MID-NITE FROLIC 

BANGING BETWEEN F&OLICB 

'^■r DWereot hiWwa Kwvrj Kl^t. Klmt Krmlnff Frolir at U:ia P. M. 

Rvataannt tk t glca a I«m C'aWe. rmTaaiMonal ('-owtwif* IUt««a«4. 

H«a«rvat»aa l*ho»« CMunMt SJM. 



NEW YORK COSTUME CO. 

'COSTUMES 



Couthoui does not seem to want to 
stop here. Far it has been leamed- 
that she ha» gone to New York with 
8amm.v Ettelsoo to see J. J. Bbubert 
and aficertaia from htm what right 
J. J. Garrity, general manager of the 
Sfiubcrt enterprises here, and Charles 
ThanhouRer. manager of the Apollo 
tiieatre. had in taking steps to hush 
her telephone wires for orer two 
weeks, aud the Coutboui clerka make 
UA bones about admitting thia fact 
The Shuhert theatres hare also elim- 
inated the use of the "Coutboui" 
name in their newspaper adrertts* 
ing. 

It is said that Mra. Goathoti: at-* 
tempted to settle the IIT^WO Iosi9 on 
tiikets. which i>he tried to dump bact^ 
at the ApoUa» for tbe 'Tasaing tibow'* 
for $3,300. bat that A. H. Woods 
refuaed to settle. 

EHdentUr tbe 'H^u^ea •f ike 
Scalpers" ^«aub«ve aMieip^ad ^t^ 
apen rupture With tbe Shubert man- 
agcment i>ereral weeks ago, as she 
was nngUug in the direction of buyiag 
heavily for the l\>wcrs and Krlaager 
Htriug of theatres. She made a 
proposition to the Goktea forces far 
au outright buy of $100,000 %rorth of 
tickets for "J.ightnin' ". 

Tbe powers. Berlaoger chain of 
UouspR hare tlieir instructioo.i not to 
permit Mrs. Coutboui to "dump" 
back any tickets whatsoerer. As in 
the Colonial. Fred Stone, in "Tifi 
Top'* is going along at a fast gai^ 
with aa adrance sale said to ex-^ 
c(>ed $80,000. *'LightniB" and the 
•Gold Diggers/' will undoubtedly 
run the Stone show a close second 
in adrance sales. 

Therefore should Mrs. Coutboui be 
unable to straighten out her diflTer- 
enees with the Shub<»rt management 
here, the bulk of her busincH!* will 
be lost. 



Nothing of haportaace haM^eaed in 
the Carb atocks. GrifiUi marked a 
new bottom at G flat on nomiail deal- 



Aalar 

Cbicaga. Aug. %i. 
Stuart De Long <8taaft aad Kel>, 
▼asderlUe act), if aow manager af 
tbe Ktar. Milwaukee and Iftrergreen 
arenues. The house which opened laat 
week is fdayhig a palicy of fire acts 
and a feature picture. Tbe theatre fa 
lacated ia a residential aectian ^i tba 
city and booked by Bit y Diamaad. 

RVRRXTHINQ IN 

rmwoL 



AKTONS, Inc. 

Makers aad Retailava 
14 W. WbifttetlMi St. Cltieae« 



LARGEST COSTUME 
MANUFACTURERS IN WEST 



GOWNS 



Cbicngo. .\ug. 31. 

Iamiis A. Bachmnn. llic .rounge.st 
• inusioal director io Chicsfo. has been 

; 1S7 N. WABASH AVE., CHICAGO Central 1801 Z.^t^.rcVX '.'*t".^/a>ro„r 



CHICAGO ITEMS 



I'O N. STATE ST. ^ FKor'. Sand^irh 3393, 

■ LARGEST ANp^BEST EQUIPPED 
^POSING R00:\1J IN THE COUNTRY 



GRAND PIANO F'JRNI 



ro ror: all wltiIcai. acts 

r» <POr L'^HT OPEN- s;;Nr^Avs 



William Abbott. Ia!«t with the Sa- 
vnge oflic'.'.s. is now n«.')ui)ger of tUr 
St«d<*bak(»r, f 



YOU ISETTER BURHY 
> 19S IW las 

ACTS BOOKED 80UD 

c«t folank«t contracts (or <• wrks or m^t from thm acencl** U«t«d toeiaw 

DID YOU? 

ANT ONB OF TlfV AQSNCtBS BBLOW CAN OCT tT STOK TOU 

\r nrs apvxo tou 'want— wftrra cm wirk. 



ftirai « vntMii 



Soil* 302 
Loop Cml Bldt. 



Eil^&^diiiiiift 



$04 

Loop jEad WAm. 



TaifIKi 






Suite 904 
Wooda Thoolro Bide- 



Eiki 1 




Suite 302 
Woodi Theatre Bldff. 



T*eo Singer, owner of Singer's 
MideetN. ha.s taken out hi.s final Citi- 
xenKhip panor» in the Federal C^urt. 
Jud^e K. M. TiSndis adniittod him to 
ritizcu.<«hip and at the^ name time 
If ranted first nnpers to five of the 
Mietnlx'r-s of the not who derlnred 
their intentions of becoming Anieri- 
oau oifir.ens. , 



tabu 



• VOUVE TRIED THE REST •*«^ fiOW TRY THE BEST 

lirTHE 13th O r "PETE'' Soteros 



^li«w Daor ta Colaaiaf Tf*^ the Fol- 

t THE FOLLOWiMC !^, J*^! 

•t^ .•«*ng tae aaiaa 

»'-S* »;«^. aniy Fn,h,/ 



«••'"* 



II 



'-----'■-^ *•- 



^ W. RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO 

^ATK IIKKB lAUT WKEK:— 

i\\ I>oi««l(laoii, Billjr Joa««, Frmnk 
^A4 5»e*t<»rt. ffartf Cooper, Fred<H« 
A Woaiiwa^ 



At Blackstona B. O. 

Chicago, AuguKt 31. 
Rugene Wilder, treanurer of the 
Colonial theatre. hnK been transferred 
by Ilarrr J. Powers to take charge 
of the Blackstone boi office duhar 
the run of *'f/ightnin'." Harold 
Donovan, hin aRnifitant. ban beea 
made trenMirer of the Colonial, and 
nuHsell MorriKon. formerly of the 
Mc<'aule^, lA>ui0viUe. Iiaa beeu made 
aaaiitaat to Donovao, j^ 



TheSoNB 



Av 



Suito 807 
Woods Thoatro Udg. 



Jess Freemu 

' Suko 1413 ' 
Templo 



Hurry W. Spissold 



Suko 40S 
Woods Thoatro Bldg. 



LewGoUberg 

A««My 

« » Sttito 305 
Woods Thoatro Bldg. 



Billf JacksMi 

Suito 504 > 
Loop End Bldg. 



J 



BeeUer & Jacobs 



Suito 307 
Woods Thoatro Bldg. 



Helen Murpby 

As«My 

Suite 306 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Burt CortelyoB 



1607-08 
Masonic Temple 



Charles Nelson 



SuUe 609 
Wood* Theatre Bldg. 



Oiarles Crowl 

Av«l«y 

Suite 301 
Wooda Theatre Bldg. 



The above agfencies, in Chicago, booking exclusively 
with W. V. ML A., B. F. Keith (Western) and aU affili- 
ated circnits. 

YOUR NEW YORK AGENT CANNOT BOOK HERE DIRECT 



10 



.c: 



:;^ 



BU RLESQU E 



Friday, September 2-, 1921 



■L .t'. 



NEW MUSICIANS' 

UNION IS SET 



Associated Musicians, of 

Greater NeW York Haa 

2,500 Members 



nMi,o new iiuihioal union which rc- 
plafoM Mutiinl Musical l»rotcctiv«^ 
I'uion 310, UH the Now Yorli local of 
(lie American Fodcrntion of Musi- 
cians having boon granted a cliartiT 
list weok. will be known as? the As- 
soiiated Mii'Meians of (ireter Xow 
York. I>oeal S02. The new organisa- 
tion has already enlisted a UHMnher- 
Khii» of li.riOO. Edward ('nnavan has 
been ui)0|)inte(1 chi iriuan of the Gov- 
tiinin;? Hvard and M. S. Uauch, src- 
iMt.irv of the hoard. lOleetions of of- 
fit ( IS arr scheduicd shortTj-. Meet- 
in;.'; of tlx li<);ir<I are boing held daily. 
'J'lic lieatl<iijarters of the new locnl 
are in Kreut/.cr llall on Kast 86t.h 
St.. ri few doors away from tlio old 
M. M. V. I', union headquarters. 

A pcneral nieeting is to be called 
in a w«M»k or so. T1m> new local will 
hnl 1 n inoetinc with the vau'leviFle 
pirture and legit managers, within a 
few dayn to negotiate a wage scale 
nf::re(>nieut for the coming seasoa. 



AVasliington, D. C, Aug. 30. 

With the Theatre managers and 
exhibitors of Washington organized 
to en)])loy r.on-uni<»n Hlage liandH and 
oprratovs :.nd the men firmly statin.:; 
Iliry wo.ihl not accept any reduction 
fioi?i t;.i' v; ale now iti j'ffert it was 



t4ce Wolt«, of li»e City I'ourl her • 
when a collection of Hoers, necro- 
niancers and oriental dancing maidenN. 
rounded up at the Labor Home Car- 
nival, were arraigned before hi;ii. 
Throe alleged Iliudu fortune tellers 
nnd a wou'.an palmist Were sent to 
jail for ten days, rtnd the man c'er of 
the oriental dance emporium drew teu 
<lays in ia»l and a $100 tiiie. 

The .judge, iit pasHinx sontence on 
the crew, criticised severely the cir- 
nival management. T. A. Hodj^sort. of 
the New York CiVic I^iguo,' testified 
tluit he had been i;:cnt to* Buffalo on 
onlers to investigate the oriental 
dancing exhibition. A number of 
other members of the carnival wero 
ordered to leave town immediately. 



JEB8E7 CITY STATUS 

Majestic May Stay In Wheel Follow- 
Ing Settlement 



Just prior to the agreement 
reached by the Uniotis and burlcsiiuc 
people, the Majestic, Jersey City 
bad withdrawn from the Columbia 
Circuit. It was intended to play 
stock burlesquc^t the house instead. 

Ben Kahn, owner of Kahu's Union 

Square was to produce the stock 

polirj. No announcement as to 

whether the Afajestic would again 

become a wheel unit could be ob- 
tained up to ^Vcdncsday, with the 
general belief that the calling off of 
the i)ropo8e<l "open shop" programe 
would place the Iwuse once a^ain 
on the Columbia Circuit. 



I- « I'lj 

r. ■ I I « 




"CLEAN FIGHT" IS 
ORDERED IN KANSAS 



Local Stage Hands Union 

Instructs Member^-'— Two 

Show8 Rehearing 



.') 



EVANGELINE 



KATHLEEN 



MURRAY GIRLS 



In "Son;;s and Dances" 

PLAYING B. F. KEITH'S NEW YORK THEATRES 
Direct on, FRANK EVANS 



docdeil 1<m1 iv to have tlu question 
settle;] by .ivbt ration with the !>«'- 
partmcnt of Labor apiiointing a con- 
cili:'>tor. 

At :mi all-day conference betweeii 
the ManaK(>'.s, exhibitor and em- 
ploy«'h last week, the original offer 
of a -0 j)er cint. cut was changed to 
a cut ol 10 pc: cent, for the Iie;»ds of 
dop.rtnicnts of the stapc hands and 
the operators. Wages of the bal- 
ance of the stage crews to remain 
the sMiie. Tills offer also entailed 
the rcdwctiyn in the number of opera- 
tors re(i\iire.l by the .oca! union from 
three men to a booth to two men. 

At tins fonl'M'eiifc this offer was 
refused liv the \in;oM ; an;l today the 
questi(;ii of :. ibit r:it k.m was accepted 
by both sides thus avoiding a lock- 
(>iit. 

,7<)Iin Ctilpoys. Conniiissioner of 
<\)nrili;ition of the Department of 
I,;;hf»i-, will |.m side dm itij; the arbi- 
tration iiH et iiiK"^. 



POLICE SEEK 

(Con'inued fri>ni pa-j;*' M) 

with loadr<l dice, fixed red and blacks 
and under protection of fixed oflicialK 
therte thugs robbed the town. The 
Whole outfit should be in Jaif now." 



KuffaJv, Aug. 31. 
"This is nbsoTutely the rottenei«t 
eituation I have ever heard of in o 
dfjilistdceinm unity/' aaid Ctiicf Joa-|Backej Lake^ lowi^ 



GIRL HELD IN $1,000 

Betty Dcnpiro ,who has been ap- 
t>earing with Coldin^ and William's 
Musical show wuh held this week in 
the West Side court, on a charjjc 
of stealing a dress from Angclinc 
Ko)iai'ciato of (JO.") West 47th street. 

She waived examination and was 
held in $1,000 hail. 

The bail was put up by the girl's 
father, Michiel, who is in the trucking 
business at 52r> West 47th street. 



Kansas City, Atig. .^1. ,. 

Tht leadors and offieert^ of the 

International Alliance of Theatrical 

Stage .Employees of this city« which 

includes the picture operators upion, 

arc declaring themselves in faVor of 

a clean fight against the two bur*. 

lesque houses which will open Sept. 
4. as open «hop houses. The stage 
emiUoyecs have secured the .endorse* 
lucnt of the iVntral Labor Union of. 
thin city and a general boycott ia 
planned. It is the expectation to 
put up a thousand sheets of paper 
declaring the two theatres un- 
fair and relying upon the support of 
the aflBliated unions to keep business 
away from the bouses. In s«pi>ort 
of their claims that they intend to 
fight fair the I. A. T. 8. B. has 
mailed the following letter to all 
members and picture operators in 
the city. 
"Dear Sir and Brother: • 

This is to notify you that in the 
controversy between the two Bur-* 
lesque houses and Local No. 31, I. 
A. T. S. E., you are requested to. 
use no violence or in any way con- 
duct yourselves as to lose the con- 
fidence of the public. , "^ 

"You will remember years ago 
when the Cirand Opera House was 
put on the unfair list the gallant 
and clean fight we wage<l, gaining 
all we asked. The fight against the 
Gnyety and Ontury must be fought 
on the same lines, clean and no vio- 
lence. 

"If you feel your committees and 
officers are not doing their duty, the 
meeting hall is the place to diHcus.s 
the matter and not public places. 
Fraternallv vours. 
CLEM WRKjIlT, Trea. 
S. {\ HOYT, Secy." 

For the first time in the history 
of Kansas City theatricals two bur- 
lesque shows are rehearsing here 
preparatory to their regular season. 
They are Barney Gerard's "Girls de 
Looks," which will open at the Gay- 
ety (Columbia circuit) and Jack 
Heeds "Itccord Breakers,*' starting at 
the Century (American). A number 
of the girls for the Gerard show 
were recruited here. Both houses 
open Sunday matinee (Sept. 4) with 
a fuU .9p^p\i^fpt. V.f flpPP ^»l«jtlM; 
orchestra . pits an^l' pu , the ^sti^e, No 
^ttbw frouW^ of /w^ijfli^.^n^Mj^ ^,,iip. 
ticipated here. . . • - 

W rosier .^6'r \''tfrrLv ^i! Y^k^' 
is Jos. K. Watson, Will H. Cohan, 
Eddie Green, Peter Frazier, Billy 
Joseph, I^arry La Mont, Ray Lenvitt, 
Gussie White, Teddy Stowall and 
Ilallic Deane, with the following 
choristers: Bebe Greenberg, Irene 
Squire, Corinne Francis, I»rretn 
Darmody, Yvonne LaTour, Dolly Ijq- 
Mont, Winnifred Finnell, Vivian 
Hope, Edna Carrol, Emma Nelson, 
Florence Hart, Jaunnita La Hue 
Majori« Rome, Emma Condon, Flor- 
ence Robinson, Helen Boggs, Betty 
ReVley, Lucille Courtwood, Maxine 
Blanchard. 



LOTHROP 8PaN0QB6 TAB 

WoRiar If rtik« Saolitf It Baiag 
GrooMietf far f^faaolilaaf 

Boston, Aug. 81. 

Mfke Sacka, now hcadisng a4X)-min- 
ntfc tab rliat waa urtfinally a'^rfrcus- 
luana^eil offering/ was given a Sunday 
newspaper "slash" thiif week by Geo. 
K. Lothrap, Jr., head of the BurleaqUe 
Managers' Association of Boston, 
which is the group that resigned from 
the locarnirtnagofk* flssoctatfon in or- 
der to have" a free hand In the ope:i 
shop fight which breaks next Monday. 
In a box in the "ads" was the Tol ow- 
ing: "In my for(y years aa a show- 
man, this is the first time that I have 
given the public my personal indorse- 
ment of any production, and I recom- 
fond the Mike Sack.s offering as' one 
that is better than any I have ever 
seen, even at higher prices," 

Whether the splurge was merely to 
boost a quiet week at I^throp's Bow- 
doin Square Theatre, or whether the 
"tab'* ia being groomed to take a bur- 
lesque wheel franchise under Ix>throp 
management is not known. The "tab" 
is carrying a dozen girls at. present, 
and has be.i play'i s to big business, 
holding over a week in Lynn last 
week. J 



I 

■( 111 



Gaiety, Utica, Vaudeville 

IHica, N. Y., Aug. 31. 
Following the abandonment of the 
burle.-cpjp policy, the Gaiety (Wilmer 
& Vincent) opined Monday with 
three-a-day vaudeviMc. 



Vorke and Maybelle in Peek-a-Boo 

Yorke' and Maybelle joined Jean 
Bedini's "Pcek-a-Boo." which start- 
ed thi:- week in Brooklyn, Yorke go- 
ing in as principal comedian. The 
Six Musical Spillers have rejoined the 
show. 



Henry Lewis has returned to 
vaudeville after a year's absence from 
the stage caused by a nervous break" 
down. Lewis is playing the out of 
town Keith time, doing his single 
specialty. 



Clyde Rlnaldo has secured a new 
woman partner for an act which be 
will do in vanderilke Ihij seaaon. He 
ia rehearsing the act at Ilinaldo Villa, 



NEW ACTS 

Arthur Hartley ond Helen Patter- 
son have left the William and Gor- 
don Dooley act after a full season 
with the turn. Hartley is framing a 
new two-act with Miss Patterson as 
a nartncr. 

Jim Brady, who has been plaving 
for 14 consecutive years in "The Toll 
Bridge," will be seen in "Just a 
Minute," assisted by Ann Cole. Billy 
Grady wrote the act. 

George Jessel will shelve 

♦Troubles of 1021" next season and 
do a new come<ly drama by Sam 
Shipnum. TiCwis and Xiordon are the 
producers. 

Fred Pi.sano and Katie Bingham, 
new act written by Henry Bergman. 
A couple of audience plants will com- 
plete the cast. 

Lew Clayton (Clayton and Ed- 
wards) and George Morton. (Kra- 
mer and Morton) black and tan act. 

James Doyle (Dixon and Doyle) 
and Laura Hamilton have formed n 
partnership for vamievdle. Mr. 
Doyle was to have teamed with Peggy 
Parker, but it xvas called off. 

New Port and Stirk, new act by 
Paul Gerard Smith, assisted by Sue 
Parker from musical comedv. 

Maurice Diamond and Helen Mc- 
Mahon* (of "Snapshots") are to re- 
enter vaudeville. 

William: Howland (Lynn and How- 
Ian) and P, O. MaUe.y Jennings, late 
of Intimate,. |p a^.skit. ^enpings is 
an English comedian. 

Arthur Pickens in skit * 

Lawrenee and Beasely, including 
, Jack Beaiclj. 



CHICAGO BURLESQUE 
HOUSES BOMBED 

Explosives Wreck Parts of 
Star and Garter and Col- 
umbia — 7 Hurt 

Chicago, Aug. 31. 

Sundav mornin;:. Aujr. 2S. the Co- 
limibia and Sttr nnd (Jarter, two of 
the (^olunihi.i Burhvque Circuit 
houses here due to open Labor Day 
with an "open shop" i>olicv were 
bombed by persons unknown and 
considerable damage done. 

The real wall and stage entrance 
of the l^olumbij were danmged a» 
were also pMits of the Star and (iar- 
ter. Both houses were dark at the 
time of the exjdosions which oc- 
curred almost sinr.illaneonsly. 

Seven | ersonr? weie injured, and 
battalions of fire apjturatuK t.nd po- 
lice resorvoM, and thousands of peo- 
ple rushed to the scene of the Co- 
lumbia situated in the heart of th*^ 
•'loop" district. 

The police have been unable to ob- 
tnin any clues t<t the bombciiiv • the 
neareyt n>»o»iM^b«jd' ibeioff .a* peaciloiT 
4iote found in. tbn ilrbriia which 4Mtad>/: 
ffTlio. (;aiwRhaa:rha«.i ibt«T^,c«Dlair. jto' 
^rgaipsiM vlaboTi** •' - • if let * • ' ; ^ ' 

'Aidcmaa < >Ianriee. -F. • KnvnaagV 
conferred Monday with <'hief of I*o- 
lice Fit»morris on the ndvisibility <( 
refusing to iss\ie licenses to theatres 
likely to r.uffer from l.bor troubles. 
(Continued on page 60) 




GO 



STO€K 4N-^I 
AT STAT]^ CONGR 

Announces . *fliiffepend< 
Burfesque" -^ Taking 
Advantage of Situation 

Chicago. Aug. .^1. 

The'S;tate Congress^ u house wbi 
has had a great many policies dui 
its existence, ia,,^vJdently taking 
vantage of the pttaetkt biirlcii 
situation and ia being gotten rei 
for the inaugnratien of a stock bai 
le.sque policiy. 

The house ia benig redeeorat 
and its ' seating capdclty ort-'argf 
One sheets arc being posted- ni 
the city announcing. the house aa 
independent bu.rles(iue theatre 
belonging to any wheel, but wit 
large stock burlesque company. 

The- season will open -there I^al 
Day. 



I 



3 



t'dii 
dioi 



indfl 



DOUG AND MARY 

(Continued from page 1) 
would be guaranteed $5,000 weekly 
each, select their own play and the 
supporting cost. 

\yhen Fairbanks and Miss Piekford 
arrived in town there was an unfound- 
ed rumor that they were here to ne- 
gotiate contracts for their return to 
the speaking stage. Aa a matter of 
fact they were here for the opening 
of the Fairbanks picture, **The Three 
Musketeers," the showing of Miss 
Pickfonl's latest screen effort, "Lit- 
tle Lord Fauntlcroy," a ten-reeler, 
and to attend the annual meeting of 
the United Artists Corporation. 

Both stars are pledged to the Unit- 
ed Artists to the extent of three pro- 
gram productions and one special each 
year and under that contract it would 
be an impossibility for them to at- 
tempt an appearance in the speaking 
drama. 

The United Artists meeting was 
hcM on Wednesday with Fairbanks, 
Miss Piekford and Charlie Chaplin 
present from the coast. Jhe reason 
for holding the meeting so soon was 
that Chaplin sails for 'England ♦anujr- 
row. 

Mr. Carroll admitted that he had 
made an offer to both Mr. Fairbanks 
and Miss Piekford to either co-star 
them or play either one of them sepa- 
rately, but that they p'eaded that 
they could not consider the proposi- 
tion because of their picture con- 
tracts. 

Late next week Mr. and l\Irs. Fair- 
banks ere returning to the coast and 
thence to Wyoming where Doug, will 
immediately start work on the screen- 
ing of the "Virginian." It ie possible 
that he wilLconsider the former Kyrle 
Be)>w play, "A (Gentleman 'of France" 
for another special to follow up the 
l"Mu8keteeri,»< , / 



BURLESQUE PEACE 

(Continued froqa paf; J) 

and American Burleeqix* 'Circuits 
the heads of the I.'A.T. S. R tSti 
Hands) and A. E. ofM.. (Musician 

Concessions were made by 
sides, the roost important grieva 
of the -managers, "the 'yellow ea: 
.•system,** being waived for thr 
months, by the stage hands union. 
tween now and the expiration of 
three monthe waiver of the "yell 
curd" eystem, both sides will, hoi 
conferences with a view to ai rivi 
at an understanding as to what 
position is to be made of the "ye 
card" jnfitter, when the three moat 
expires. 

ThQ union stage hands and mu 
eians return to work at once^ to 
grams being sent to all houses of boll 
Columbia and American circuits. We 
nesday afternoon, announcing the end 
ing of the "open shop" dispute. Tb 
stage hands and musicians go bae 
to work at the - same scale of wage 
as they received the past -^088001 
The burlesque men had asked for 
general wage reduction of 25 p< 
cent, for musicians and stage ha 
but this was waived in view of- 
unions conceding the "yellow ca 
contention for three months. 

The agreement between the stag 
handH union (International Allian 
of Theatrical Stage Employes 0: 
America) and the musicians imioi 
(American Federation of Mi <'iaD8 
and the burlesque circuits, is for ooi 
year, ending Sept. 1922. 

. •Pcacv 'For Opanlnfl 

■^Tlff bflrtg^ng' ibbttt bf a .•<m1<* 
-of flf«?"'^p6rtishoi/* fl^f bV>t<ie>+f 

*Mlly >^v<^r'rtvff tb the <!tt>'^^i^viV' ^^^ 
of I. H. Herk president of the Ame 
can Burlesjue Association. U. K. By 
nicka also figur<^d'in the settlenieai 
to a large extent it la said. 

It is probable that the two ConnI 
ban & Shannon hobies,' Plain field a 
Perth Amboy the Felber & Hh 
houses in Akron, atft Yonngstow 
Wilmer & Vincent hoitse In Utica, t 
Stamford Theatre, Stfln>Tofd, a'l 
which dropped out' of thf Colunib 
wheel, since the "open shop" figh 
started, will return to thet'olumbi 
route again, now that the trouble ha 
been settled. The same applies to 
the Penn Cireult*of • one niiftiters ii 
Pennsylvania, the Hathaway house in 
Binghamton and several others that 
left the American ro,utc, recently ow- 
ing to the "open ah,op". dispute. 

Joseph Weber, president ,of th 
American Federation of,. Musician! 
acted as the repres.eQtati^c 0^ ^^ 
musicians in the . conference tb* 
brought about t^c settlement aD< 
.Tames Lemke, p^csU^enV of the L A. 
T. S. E. and Richard Gr^.e;!. 3rd vici 
president of the J.,A: acted in. a simi- 
lar capacity for the, stage l^ands union. 

The peace agreement places bur* 
lesque in a separate and distinct 
class, as regarda the making o» 
agreements between' the stage unioni 
and the managers tov»ring wag« 
scales and working eondltions. Here- 
(Continued on -page 00) 

S * I. ^ I - 

MARTINI TAB BLOWS 

Saratoga, Aug. 31. 
,The scenery |o/. Martini ii"»'"^ 
tidns. Inc., a musical' tab^ wbicl 
pl^ed House's l^oin't^ last week, ha 
bcfn attached, 'the 'company tn-W 
galed the Broad^jruly theatre in tbn 
ci^ for August^ jiut deiparlod at tb 

enH of the first "^eek! non 

They agreed to pay the house .fOOO, 
but ^nly made good with $22.^ an< 
the ii^tacbment followed. Howard 
Young, who m»Ms^ inuniBiasioned tt 

engage l^he stagHt' hawHa a*****'^** ., 
check fpi^^20, «bi<^<ca9M hark. Boh 
Martini is U the head of the ^< '"' 
pany. It wa9 at the Empire thouti 
iGleni Falli, ^ J^. 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



EDITORIALS 



a 




3s: 



Trade- Mark Reglat^red 

glilB SILVBRMAN, PrciiMMt 
114 V/m»L Itth mr««t N«w Tork C:ty 

y aoBscniPTioN 

j^^tMl $7 rorelcn M 



yOL. I.XIV. 



No. t. 



JUJt-L 



CABARETS 




TiM Fra»ii Fay entertMBdiMt at 

JletiieBweber's Paradise reooi la dtflag 

|»««iD«M. Frank Fa/ beada the hst 

iwl acta aa auaaenMait dircetor, with 

fiaily Fields oni the refular Uat af eu- 

teKaiocri}. The value 9t the Fax 

ia^r ehaw appaara to he ita aifhtly 

ehange of bill, aiace aeveral eater- 

taiaers are usually the Ku<>t»ia oC tha 

hattse for 4h« cvemiif. Fay ealla 

then ffoai the tables for a taia, fal- 

|a#ioc hia iatrodttctioii of the toIhb* 

a. iteiaenweber'i can seat ia a 

•h around 650 The coreur eharf e 

er 10 p. m. ia ono dollar per per- 

aon. Faj ceta all of caa eovear 

v^eharges tofother with 10 per cent. 

't; of the reataarant'a groaa receipts. 

-. He para for the eatertaionMSt ex- 
eeptiac the orehaatra. The lattar ia 

. heroj 9oiith'B colored oreheetra froB 
Detroit, aad It la ttakUg a rap for 

> Itoeff m the Fay room. Miaa Fielda 

. w workiag into a strong cabaret 
favorite aronnd New York. The laor 
j98t seena to amt her in the special 
work she ia doliig op thoro, assisted 
st times by a couple of ^ing boys. 
Oa preaaat form it looka aa though 
, Miss Fielda will BMre than duplicato 

^ihe receptioaa formerly flraa ia the 

' ame room to Sophia Tackar. Far 
hat a following of his own that baa 

^ grown to be ateady patraaa hi the 
Paradise room. It rcmaiaa open late 
as a rule wil& patroaa dropping ia 

/ aU of the whiie. Fay haa aaoM idea 

r af making a dab out of the room, 
.thereby liouting ita memberahip^. or 
poiaibly atartiag a Frank Fay dub 
with the same style of entertainment 
Baytn and Schramm left the Fay 
show last week. Fay expects to a0ain 
sUrt his ''Fables" show shortly. 



'^GYPPING" VAUDEVILLE PRODUCERS 

▼nudarlUa prodveers are complaining that it is naxt U> 
iapoaalble to oaat aketchoa or acta from stock or legitimate playeoi. 
The r aaaB M tl^es are the **ahpe atring" producers who have mia- 
treatod ihiom to auch an extent that playera oataMe of- ra^devHIe 
hare a dbtorted idea ot the perils and pitfalls of a vaudeville en- 

SAgAAOIlt. 



BaifiBg tke recent "aluaap" when bundreda of profesaionala wore 
odt of employaaaBt one big tiaao vaudeville produ^oer found that hia 
offera of nOO a week enf^t^M^ *^dre «olng bogsiiig. He made a 
round ot the asenciea and w*a told people of ability preferred un- 
emplojaient to tnkfng a chaaoa with «ny kind of a vaudeville pro. 
dttctlon, no natter how reapoauible the backeaa. 



ThSm^ 



gypa. 



haa been foolered by the actlvltlea of the 
The "gyp** type of prodocer tub In the past recmltad people for a 
prodnctton, alla;ylB« tlralr feara with extravagant promiaoa of aalnry 
$ad pM«ttlii9 a rMj fmtnfv for the act. Many tiaaaa the artlat haa 
been told It la «a **otlee ntl" gdd that a route haa beota irtolaad 
immediately after tho breakte-perlod. 



WaliaiwJnIa without pay follow for three or more weoka. Tho nctor 
moaiMrMlo la In debt for living expenaea. Thia tyye of pro4iocer 
never "adrancea" snlariea . Finnllr the aketeh la proaoanced ready to 
open. The premiere occura oot of town, but the player la adkod to 
work at halt salary while the act ia receiving a break-In num. Some- 
tlmoa leaa than that amount. 



If bfr tmw atioko of luck tbe turn ia aucceaafnl and time la laid out. 
the "gyp" Immediately informa the prlneipdla he amgot pay the 
original aalary agreed upoa, giving one of « dosoa reaaoas, aad foi^ 
Iowa by aaklag all to "cut" apoa »aia of dlabaading. The player, 
who ia now badly In need of monor and who haa lavaatod ftTo or alx 
weeka of hia timb ia the Teatare, haa the altemathro of aeekteg em- 
plofflMBt olaewliere or remalalag, oa the chance ho wfil at ieaat got 
eaough moaey ont of It to pay hia debts. He aaaatly cboaaea tho 
latter and after playiai; tkrough tlie career of the tara, leavea Taode- 
vllle with a belief the average yaaderitte producer ia a croaa between 
the J«flna Boya and Traoy, tho outlaw. 

Tho ▼amderiUe orgaahatfoaa have It in their power to make it ira- 
poaaible tor thla claaa to live off the reputations and records of the 
legitimate producer conaected^ with the Tandevllle cirouita. The 
independent agencies would then be his only field of activities and 
eould bo whipped into line through publicity and tho strict enforce- 
ment of the "agency" regulationa. 

SPORTS 



INSIDE STOFF 



ON LEQIT 



Paliaamea in oniform sUtioaed in 
-aay number of restaurants in the 
night section of New Tork may be 
there for one of several reasons. 
Ihat their presMice does not irritate 
the restaurant maaagemaats is almost 
ti, (certtuu. jNur dv liie caps aypear to 
,,(tM^ undae notice of proceedings. One 
.^jCfisoa advanced why the restaurailts 
«.^r<liah iai>tead of hating the cope ia 
that by their very presanct the offl- 
cers in HTne may diacourage patrons 
from taking bottles off the bip Tt 
6 not uncommon for a friendly head- 
waiter to inforpi guests the potteeman 
t fa the restanraat is very vigilant* that 
f ha jDst said ho thought he would 
y have to omke a pinch to show he 
^ was active, and if they (gueaU) have 
''anything with yon," thax ahoald ha 
extremely cautions. If they have noth- 
ing sod should want something from 
the restaurant, it might be fumiahod 
through being supplied in a White 
Baek bottle. The hint ia usually 
enough for the patrons who prefer to 
hay and be safe. 



Jack Laaiflaa has taken the north- 
wjat comer of Seventh avenue and 
»Knd street. He will transform the 
fwnd and third floors into restau- 
rant-ballrooms, with Grace Plold in 
;<^harge of the third floor, to be named 
Jc Grace Field Club. The ground 
wMT of the building wm be an auto 
•Mcsroom. Mr. Lenigan was best 
*w>wn last season as proprietor of 
the Club Maurice on Slst street. 



Aaat JaaMaui, though joining the 
lafe de Psris cabaret, stiU remains 
In George White's "Scandals." The 
IJ2?;** ^^ carrying the extra music 
2*^ for by Jemima's torn, was a 
™lea Co White and he agreed to 
JJ cafe showiag provided a cut ia 
'w acts ebow salary was acceptable. 

A Leaf Itlaad duck dinner went 
laio the meau at the Chateau Laurler, 
^itf Island, yesterday (Thursday), 
jra a regular meal retailing at |2i50, 
«• ume price as the Chateau's ahore 
Jljaer. it Ui the first time a taUe 
«Tiote duck dinner ha^ been aeen 
•rwind the Pelham section. 



* iJ^^ WWei's band opens at the Fol- 

tj {^rr''*^'^ Sept. 15. Bee Palmer 
r^be t^e hostesa, opening the samo 



A new aet of rules to govern thai 
conduct of wreatling In thia atate ial 
being drawn by William Muldaan, 
chairman of the atate athletic ooaH»ia- 
aion, aecordag to the statesMnt Uat 
week of George K. Morris of AnMter- 
dam, n aaember* of the commission. 
The drafting of the regulationa ia en- 
tirely in the handa of Mr. M|ddooa, 
bat they will be aubmitted in their 
final form to the body ahortiy, for ita 
approval. Mr. Morria aaid that he 
knew nothing of their contents aa yet, 
but it ia believed that they will put 
an end to hippodroming, long a aean- 
dal ia the grappling game, and win 
Jolt the wrestling ''trust'* out of lU 
hitherto impregnable position in New 
Tork. The impression that the sport 
was due for an honoat -to •goodness 
clfMQ up was heightened by the dedac^ 
ation of Mr. Morris thU "the sole 
endeavor of thO" commission ig toi nrot 
tect and benefit the apoMiag public. 
We have no axea to grind and will 
irrind none. We do not intend to fur- 
ther the ends of any coterie of man- 
agers or contestants. Politics will not 
enter into our consideration. Boxing 
and wreatling maat be run on the 
square or not at all. I can't empha- 
aise it too atrongly that the public 
must be given an even break." Com- 
missioner Morris said that the com- 
mission was moving along with ita 
work smoothly, efficiently and with 
little complaint 



The Madison Square Garden swim- 
ming pool closes SepL 15 to make 
way for the beginning of the winter 
boiing schedule^ Since tho first of 
August receipts have fallen off and 
the idea of carrying the indoor bath- 
ing plant over into the winter haa 
been abandoned. In the warm weather 
the garden waa doing |5,000 to |0,- 
000 a day. With the arrival of mod- 
erate temperatures the gate has been 
cut more than in half, with all the 
play in the eveninga. 

During the winter the tile and con- 
crete pool will be preserved. The 
stone fioor of the tank will be boarded 
over close to the bottom so that the 
ringside seats will stand below the 
level and what is now the narrow 
walk befweea the boxes and the water 
will be used as a means of reaching 
the ringside chairs. The boxes, arena 
aeats and balconies wiU remain as 
they are. 

At it stands the pool is la the form 
of a huge drcus ring surrounded with 
a ring bank of tile and concrete about 
four feet high. For the horse show 
or like events, presumably the level 
of tho ring wiU be raised to the 
Garden floor and wide gates let into 
the bank. 

Joe Jacobs, former msnager of 
Benny Valger. Is now handyag the 
affairs of Mike McTigue. the Irish 
middleweight champtoe, who has been 
fcnorktng out all his opponenta lately. 
McTlgut's Utest k. o. victim waa 



"Yankee" Robinson, the colored 
middlewdght, who gave Champion 
Johnny Wilson a tongh battle a few 
months sgo in New Bngland. M^Tigue 
is one fighter who has been a vic- 
time of the "trust" and while under 
the management of Tom O'Rourke 
was consistent^ sMestopped by the 
leading lights of hia division. Under 
Jacob's handling it may happen that 
some of the so-callad flrat ratera will 
have a change of heart and allow 
themselves to be diragged into the 
same rlag with the deadly punching 
Tad. On his record he deserves 
matches with Wflson, I>owney. Gib- 
bons, Smith and the reat of the 
elite. 



How Copway Tearle waa driven Into beooming a picture atar is an 
intereating little ule. He held the American righta to "UUom" for 
three years, paying options at the rate of |1,000 per annum for tho 
privlloge ot aubmlttlng it to practically every legiUmate prodaoor, 
hoffo attd iMbfUig tt rojaoted. Wlathroy Amaa Ti»tanpod tho MfM 
with a aote aaylBg he had never apent a more ploaaaat ovoalag than ' 
the one la which ho read the script, but believod It waa aot ^t. to 
play. William Harria, Jr.. could not aee In It a role for Fay Balator, 
Arthur Hopklaa thoaght It ridicalona and A. ^. Woods thoaght It 
the height of iaaaalty to show a scone la Heavoa upon tho atago. 
Eventually 1MI» Raali aad Lyie Aadrewa agreed to produce It at tho 
Vaaderbflt theatre, hut were eight montha gettiag the house la shape. 
duiMtg whiek timb Teiana oould aet afford to earrr tha iorlpt aad 
pormlttod his optlom to lagia. Oddly oaoagh, tho aetor liad la ihlaA 
Eva LeGattleae for tho loadlaff lohitaiae iwlb In tho floeo wMch Aa 
U aow itiayiaf. Aboat tkat ttaae, ar irlUtn a period oC oaa si a ss ^ 
Tearle waa offered parte la aliM drffaront fraduotloai, whloh ko ra*- 
fusod oa Ike grouad they had ao chaaco of auoeoaa. Of tfeaaa flvo 
were fallaras aad the romalalag four never opoaod. It waa thea 
he turned his attention to pletare acting. 

The SMnagemeat of '"The Nightcap" at tho fifth Street was la 
doaht of tho play's ehaaoea uatil after the yromlora. Tuosdar tha 
box o«ce opeaed to a $19 advanco sale. By flYo o'clock moat of tHa 
lower floor was goao, bat the balcoay aad gailorp adata woro aad 
moviag. Tho honao manager thorei^oa, after ooaaultlag with tha 
Shubort office* ahot tho agper floor aeats lata cut rates. Whea Maa 
Marda, oao of tho produoaara, arrived at sovea ho awallaC ag, aealai; 
the raetoi wore easpty. But he waa able to wear tha aaaM hat oa tha 
way iMmo, leaning aboot the cut ratea. Toaaday night's koasa 
grossed $7>1 beeanso of that, whereas tha eapadty la 11,100. aad 
from the Imns office liao tho house would have goaedloaa. Oa Tuov- 
day the ticket ageaeles look 'The Nightcap" as a hoy-out. 

Publicity in chunks came to Comstock ft Qeat upon thoir aaaouao^ 
moot of a reduction ia admisaioa scale for tho road for thoir faar 
shows again going oa tear thia aoasoa. Tho rodacttoa asMaala Co 
about an average of 50 ooaU. Not aloao la Now Tork waa thla aotod 
by the dallies, but all aloag the routoa tho ahowa will take whoro tho 
announcement waa sent, the local papers picked It up for a "rate, 
cutting war." 

Tho plan appoara to have beea Morria Goat 'a. Tho flrm'a ataff waa 
wondering how they could get preaa atuff ont of old ahowa. for tho 
advance work, when tbe aoggeatloa waa made to cat thO acale dowa 
from last aeaaoa as an Inctattve. 

This Is the frookled-neck season for soubrets. They are now baek 
on Broadway aeekiag engagomenta, and maay who have aot beea to 
the aeaahore are making up thoir necks and arma to give them tho 
appearance of havlag beea there. Some of thla work la ao cleverly 
done it iv^lHcult to detect. 



Otto Floto, of the Kansas City 
Post, dean of aportliig writ^rSi:i8 out 
with a scntlring . article ilcaou,bcihg 
tbe prol[M>8ed trip of tb4 ''Bladk ^" 
through pUaboma. He callji Uppn 
tbe OtTahomb f anil to defend' tbe fair 
name of their state by driving the 
members of tbe team to cover, even 
aoggesting calling oa tbe Klu Klux 
Klan to take action. He also pleads 
with the plsyers of all teams to steer 
clear of the proposed games, so as 
not to ruin their chances in organized 
baseball. 



"High life" has cut short the ca- 
reer of more than one promising 
athlete. It bids fsir to Hcod 
"Buddy" Ensor, the most brilliant 
jockey in th-* country, to the Hcrap 
heap. The glamor the white lighta 
have proved too much for the little 
fellow and he has been set down 
for failure to keep in condition. The 
discipline has not worked him any 
benefit, however. Ensor was ar- 
rested in Saratoga last Saturday for 
intoxication, bot was discharged after 
a reyriuiand. 



At least one Eastern college hat 
taken s stand against what has been 
delicately termed "summer bsU," but 
which iH in reality camouflaged pro- 
fossiopalism. The authorities of 
Williams College recently objected to 
the appearance of Ed Holmes, first 
string twirler on the Purple nine, 
with a team in a Massachusetts in- 
dustrial league. Holmes has accord- 
ingly returned to his home in New 
Jersey. The fact that he waa so- 
jonming in the Bay State for the 
summer months led the faculty at the 
college to heKeve that he was there 
for the purpose of playing ball. At 
tbe aame time they made their views 
known, one Harvard, two Amherst 
and one Msssschusetts Institute of 
Technology men signed with another 
team in the league. Alumni at Syra- 
cuse C'Ollege say that tbe lastitntion 
haa repeatedly gone on record at 
favoriag "summer ball" and that ita 
beada are cognisant of the fact that 
varsity men are playing It. Efforts 
to Has op Intercollegiate assodatlona 
with them in the matter, have faikd, 
according to reportOk i ' ' " 



In front of the Playhouse Saturday night between acts of the oi^oa* 
log performance of "Personality," two women calmly and com- 
plBcently lighted cigarettes aad walked too and fro with th« r-;^ 
during the interval. Both are wives of dramatic reviewers; ooA 
have been press agenta in their time. - - ' 

* « - ■ ^#- w^ 

— ^ ■■" - — • — ■ TT - III ■ II I ^ 

ARTISTS' FORUM 

< 

Letteri to the Forum $k<nild not exceed 150 words. They mu9i 
he signed by the writer and not duplicated for any other paper, 

Shayne, about "Misfit Yellow Shoes.** 

I hare been wondering if Miaa 

Wolfus or r«lhM'^l99Miiia and Wol- 



IJverpool, Aug. 10. 

Editor Variety: 

Ii|^*|i^r review \M.^^^ 
Will WVris in yoUtHw^ 
you, refer -to him aa 






: colled 
ug. 5 

cjclist 
of the Jackson Scbdjgv]v^991y sure^ 
(his man has lived off'lliflrlrains long 
enough without bis retting the credit 
for originating the tramp cyclist. It 
may interest you to know that he 
admitted* taking the idea from mt 
when be tried to stop Max Taoibillion 
from doing "bis" act. Then again, 
Reno copied me first in fact as Reno 
said, be was tbe original copy of 
Ritchie. As 1 am coming to New 
Tork in October with a new idea in 
cycyling, I wish to go on record in 
suying I have something entirely new 
and it ia protected by copyright and 
it is booked for 20 weeks. 

W. E. Rikhie. 



te^think 



ij(|iff^>i|«|;ioriginatora 

being worn oa 

icd oa tha 




New York, Aug. 22. 
Editor Variety: 

I^st weeks Variety had an article 
in reference to Miss Wolfus snd Al. 

Kay Kaadall is suing Frank Fay | 
in tbe Third District Municipal 
Court to recover a $500 balance 
claimed on a $1,000 written contract 
for aervices rendered in staging Fay's 
late "Fables of 1021" production. 
Kcodan is represented by Harold 
M. Goldblstt. 

Ahaar Graeaberf, the theatrical 
attorney, has locsted in the Knicker- 
bocker building. Mr. Greenberg. who 
has been actively identified with the 
professioB in tbe halcyon days of 
the 28tb street "tin pan alley"* as 
song writer and music publisher be- 
fore the active practise of law, haa 
been downtown for several years. 



Yvttte RsfSl arrived home from 
Europe last week after a three 
montha* trip abroad. Friday Miss Bu- 
gel hsd been routed for the season, 
on the Keith time. 

Eva Clark has returned to New 
Tork City after a summer vacation 
spent at Russian River, Cal.. follow* 
ing her season in "Sun Kist." Miss 
Clark is at the Hotel Belmont. 



to be The origia- 
ntor, but I do know that I did it Id 
years ago, at the time working with 
Joe Kelly, noiv dead (Hoffman aad 
Kelly), also with the School Boy 
Trio a few years later. From what 
I underHtand thia was before Mr. 
Williams waa in ahow business <sa 
a performer) then playing piano at a 
Philadelphia theatre. 

My reasoa for iaterfering in tho 
above controversy Is that the time 
may come when I should feel that I 
want to do the above bueltteas of 
wearing shoes oa the opposite feet 
again, and would like to avoid ang 
argument before hand. 

Dave A. Hoffman, 
(Howard aad Hoffman.) 
P. S. — I have photographs, etc., to 
prove ststements. 

from Frank A. Bamaby of Lyncrofti 
New Kocbelle, N. Y., bis attractive 
residence consisting of a colonial 
house snd aa acre of ground with 
beautiful shade trees. 



Goorfo A. Tharatoa, the midget 
romedian for the past four seasona 
with the Al Jolson company, has 
Higned with George Gatta' "Katxeo- 
jammer Kids" show. 



Mrs. Lyaa Ovaraiaa has purchased 



Llfser In expected to advoace in 

price within a few days. Tbe tip 

has been about for a couple of weeiu 

to load up and avoid tbe increaae. 

The cause advanced for the uplift of 

booze cost is the higher prices tho 

permits are going to, with tbe cropping 

off of many of those now outatand' 

ing. In this connection there ia 

ftaid to be a political story of aa 

orgsnixst ion's arm that must raise 
|2O(K0OO t<rease up the indebtedneaa 
or deficit of a certain person. Some' 
what complex but seemingly easily 
understood and familiar ^in political 
sad liquor circle^ 



12 



/"I f»- ^ "f r T T" • 

LEGITT M A TR 



Friday, Septemper 2, 1921 



1 



"GOOD SHOWS, BUT ROHEN ACTORS," 

SAYS EMEM^ AT EQUITY MEETING 

DenoniKv^s Newspapers — Asks Members to Rely oil OflBcers — **In Three Years 
Every Theatre in America Will Be a Closed Shop/' Said Gillmore, Who 
Offered $41 Second-Handed Ecpiity Costumes For $10 Apiece. 



'There ore foo<l nhowR with rot- 
ten aoturs," said John Kmcrsou, pre- 
sident of the ActorH' Equity Ahso- 
ciatioD, at the Equity mooting Sun- 
day afternoon in the Hotel Astor. 
Ml*. Emerson referred to the playK 
of George M. Ck>ban, llcury Miller 
and Ix)uis Mann, whom he named. 
Mr. Emerson Haid those three man 
agors were members of the Actor's 
Fidelity league; tJiat they had ruined 
good playH through ousting them 
witlj uon-Kquity players. 

Tlio meeting opcued at 2:4f) and 
rlosod at 4:45. About 1,700 mem- 
bers were present at the start and 
about 700 at the close. One of the 
abKonlecs ut the finish was lOtliel 
Burrymore. Mr. Emerson called the 
attention uf those present to M ss 
Hurryiuore and John Drew, who 
were on the platform, saying their 
presence there gave the lie to news- 
paper reports of their defection. 
Miss Rarrymore icft the platform 
and meeting before it was half over. 
Kmer;;o:i berated all newspapci's he 
believ^d not openly friendly to the 
Etniit.v. lie also read Judge Mack's 
deci.-ion in the Equity-Producing 
Mnnujrer's arbitration. After read- 
ing t Knierson said that at laKt 
Kf;uity Shop in trutlj is the real 
«n «ui shop, after which Emerson do- 
scriided to personalities about <3olian. 
Miller and Mann, concluding his har- 
angue with the comment on non- 
Eqnily artors. 

Frank (iillnioro stated the closed 
nhop would bo continued to bo wa^ed 
ag:'.iust independent prothicers, mean- 
ing those outside the V. M, A. In 
three years from now every tiieatro 
in America would be a cltsed shop 
for Equity actors, Gillmore stated. 
Directly following that announcement, 
Mr. (iilmorc mentioned that Etpiity 
had some rostumos left over from 
the Equity benefit; that thoy cost 
$41 each, new, and if any actor pres- 
ent wante<l them they would be 8(dd 
for $10 each. 

Admission Refused 

Many applicants for admiasion to 
the hall fi^fTt refused tb^dugli not 
holding vaSShp Equity cards.^ A dttes 
eo Meeting "i&ible was n«tr the door 
for those^ who in'n^it dMire to pay 
on the BiJOt. 

E(iuity members in the west were 
watehing Equity in the east, said 
Paul Dwlzel). "Don't let tliom see 
you falter. Stick to your officers '" 
said Du ze!l. lie ndvis( d the mem- 
bers to pay no attention to unfav- 
orable newspape:- reports nbotit 



Equity and admonished: "Great 
generals plan battles. Soldiers win 
them. You are aoldiera." 

Hal Briggs talked about stock 
companies; Frank Bacon made a 
farewell address and Grant Stewart 
talked about Judge Mack's decision. 

A telegram from Fritzi Schcff was 
read, mentioning her great regret 
she could not personally appear. 

During Gillmoro's adiress he read 
(Continued on itago 00) 



4^ 



JOI£ON S CHABITY 

Al. .Tolson's concert at Sjirannc 
I^ake for the benefit of the Kiddies' 
Nursery and (Jirls* Club netted $:V-00 
in an auditorium with a seating ca- 
pacity of 7G0. He sang 14 songs. 
The on'y other artist on the bill was 
Lucille Chalfonte. Ho brought his 
own orchestra along at his own ex- 
pense. 

The Day Nursery and Girls' Club 
at Saranac Lake was organized by 
William Morris four years ago. 



''JCM5EPHINE" REVIVED 

The Ititz Producing <'o. has taken 
over thr rights to the musical piece, 
"Not To-Night, Josephine," with a 
company to be recruited for the road. 
The piece was tried out last season, 
but never reached New York. Pro- 
viding it shows sufficient promise out 
of town, it wi 1 be brought into n 
Broadway theatre. 



'THE PINK SLIP" 

"The Pink Slip," which was called in 

fiom the road by A. IL Woods for 
revision, will be placed in rehearsal 
again Sept. It). The play, which has 
Bert Williams (or the star, has been 
rewritten in several parts. 



COUNSEL FOR T. M. A. 

James Timonoy has been appointed 
attorney for the Touring Managers 
Association. 

Mr. Timonoy was the counsel for 
the White Rats Actors' Union about 
four y^ars ago. 



8tocl< Company at Lyric 
.. ^Sfll^Atock company which oi>en«* at 
iW l4ff I^N Newark, fionday, will phiy 
n seven day week, a new custom at 
the Jersey stand. The management 
iiiK arranged to give a certain i)er- 
(•entago of the receipts for the Sunday 
performances to local charities, the 
[►orformances being allowed on the 
Sabbath on (his ac<'oi:nt. 






:■■■ . ^' 



'K^ 



%■<-. 



ETHEL GILMORE 



•Tu^'t finished a srdid season over the Marcus I^oew Circuit with "Dance 
jOrigifialilies." Next scjuiou Miss (;iln»<Me will be featured iu the act, which 
I will be under her own inanagenx lit. 

f Miss Gilmore before entering vandevile was premiere dansouse at the 

^Metropolitan and has attracted much attention by her clever too dancing 

Direction HORWITZ &. KRAUS 
BEST WjSHES FOR MARCUS LOEW'S STATE THEATRE 



SHUBERT LEGIT 

TO NEW ORLEANS 



Old Orpheum Renamed 

St. Charles — No Shubert 

Vaudeville This Season 



. New Orleans, Aug. .Tl 

The Shuberts have called off their 
vaudeville entry into this city, for 
this season at least. Several weeks 
ago, they announced the o"d Orpheum 
would house Shubert vaudeville, with 
Sept. 18 the opening date. 

The latest from the Shubert offices 
is that their plans havo changed) 
with reference to the local house. 
Instead of vaudeville that theatre 
will have legitimate attactions. be- 
ginning Sept. 20. * The Shuberts are 
withholding the .^ame of the opening 
attraction as wel! of that as the resi-- 
deut manager to be sent .south. 

The name of the old Orpheum is 
to be changed to the St. Charles. 
With the playhou.se presenting legit 
there will be keen competition. At- 
tiaclioUH for the south are very 
scarce. 

The pooirio of New Orleans have 
not been impressed with the shows 
at the Tulane the past several sea- 
sons, not getting over seven or eight 
high class productions during the 
theatrical term. They will welcome 
opposition. 




NAMING OF ROLAND 
SURPRISES BOSTON 



>s 



44 



Expected to Se. 
Instead of "Ed" in 
Worm's Place 



Will" 



I 



JOSEPH E. BERNARD 

In "Who Is She?" 
By Wlllard Macic 
A ComcHly Playlet with Inez Ra- 
gan. This act was booked solid by 
Burt Corteiyou Agoncy, 1G07-1G0S 
Masonic Temple Builduig. Chicago, 
over the W. V. M. A. and 15. F. 
Keith Western (Circuits. 
(Watch this space.) 



JACK DEMPSEY 

A. H. WOODS STAR 

He and Kearns Hold Con- 
ference With the 
Producer 



It looks as though Jack Dcmpsoy 
were going to be a stage po.-sibility 
after. aH. Tb« world's heavyweight 
champion, accompanied by his man- 
ager, *'Doc'; Kearns, were in confer- 
ence for more than an hour with 
A. H. Woods on Tuesday. 

Woods later refused to say any- 
thing regarding his talk wiin the 
champ. Just what sort of a produc- 
tion he could be presented in. or 
what manner other than tlie theatre 
and a play that Woods would employ 
to exploit Dempsey's popularity is a 
matter of conjecture at present. 



LEDERER ON COAST 

Will Produce Musical Comedies in 
San Francisco. 



George W. T.ederer left for San 
KranviKco Wednesday to pr<Kluco mu- 
sical comedy there in colluborution 
with Nat (Joldstein and Nat ('arr. 
inaugurating the new enterprise with a 
bran<l new producti<m of the success- 
ful Victor Herbert -Harry H. .^mitli 
gaiety, "Angel Face," interpreteted 
by the original cast, in«lu(Iing the re- 
cent Lcderer lyrical find. Marguerite 
Zender, in her original role. 

The Lederer transplantation to the 
west: coast is due primarily to the 
flourishing commercial activities fast 
returning California to the tinancial 
map. The producer's new business as- 
sociates. Nathaniel Curr and Nathan- 
iel (Joldstein, ore native San Francis- 
cans. 

San Francisco just now is in the 
fever (jf an expansive business boom 
promoted by nil the business men of 
the city itself and the outlying centres 
of California. 

Among moaures decided upon to 
bring a return of distinction to the 
state was the establishment, among 
other worth-whi e institutions, ot a 
theatre atmosphere tJiat might ask 
nothing of the east. Encouraged by .i 
substantial coterie of the Coast's busi- 
ness men, Goldstein and Carr com- 
bined in the formation of a corpora- 
tion for Coast theatrical production, 
the firat move of which was to tempt 
I.iederer with all his production ex- 
perience to join them at a workioff 
unit of their proJecU 



NEW HARRISS BLDG. 
HOTEL, NOT THEATRE 

Traffic Commissioner Re- 
ported Contemplating 
Change in Plan 

The proposed office building and 
theatre at Itroaduay and 57th street, 
taking in the entire triangular plot, 
facing on nJSth street and Eighth ave- 
nue as well, may develop into ii huge 
hotel instead of the original combina- 
tion in mind by the Commissioner ot 
Traffic, Dr. John A. Ilarriss. 

Excavation has gone forward on 
the site, but construction has not yet 
commenced. According to report. 
Dr. liarriss the other day received a 
proposition to convert the proposed 
office building and theatre into a hotet 
instead, ami is considering it. The 
first theatre plan was to have a houso 
of about 3,100 capacity included In 
the structure. 

AVhen the Harris building was an- 
nounced it was said Famous Players 
had given the Commicsiouer a bid of 
$ir»0,000 -yearly for the theatre on a 
long lease. When Dr. Ilarriss, it was 
said, later received, without solicita- 
tion on his part for cither, a bid from 
the Hearst interests of $165,000 an- 
nually, with a choice of a perccntag'* 
of receipts, the Dr, decided to with- 
hold the letting of the theatre portion 
until a later date, if not operating 
the theatre when finislied himself. 

WliiTip the plan of a theatre may l>e 
carried out, accounts say now that if 
so it is more likely the surrounding 
portion will be apartments rather 
than for office space. The neighbor- 
hood is not looked upon as one de- 
manding office boilding space just 
now, with the immense Fisk building 
on the next blo«k nearly ready to let 
its offices. 

Dr. Harris has a variety of in- 
terests. Among his latest is the 
novel Flotilla restaurant at Sixth ave- 
nue and r»r)th j?treet. ropresenting an 
Investment of JJiSOO.OOO and operated 
by the Dr. b'mself. 



Tloston, Aug. ;n. 

The Shubertb sprung a general .sur- 
prise by naming "Rd" Uo and as geu. 
eral manager of all their Hoston in- 
terests, replacing A. Toxen Worm, 
who sailed two weeks ago for Den- 
mark and Carlsbad as the result of « 
general breakdown in health. Roland? 
walked into the Shubert general othce 
unannounced, and it came as ipiite a 
shock to one or two of the local men 
who thought they were "in on the 
know," and who had imagined that 
the Koland who was to take the berth j 
was Will Uoland of the Shubert staff.' 
"Kd" Uoland, although relatively! 
young, is a veteran showman, an<l tbei 
son of Itoland of Roland & Clifford,^ 
the Western melodrama producers. 

He was hero last season as mana- 
ger of "Broadway Brevities," in the 
production of which he had a leading j 
hand, but as far as is known, has ^ 
never been an official member of the 
Shubert staff. William Oviatt, with j 
Morris (lest. is said to have tiiruedJ! 
down the berth because of inability to i 
get any definite contract for length of 
services, as thrro is considerable un- 
certainty as to whether Worm will re- 
turn in a couple of months or wiQ 
stay abroad indefinitely in 1 >cuuiark, 
where he has u sibter and other rcla« 
tives. 

K. D. Smith, who recently returned 
to Boston for a visit from California, 
he'd the general Shubert uiuluiv t.siiip 
in Itoston for many years until un- 
expectedly replaced by Worm twe 
sca.sons ago. Roland is expected to ^ 
concentrate his time for the present 
on the Majestic in conjunction with 
House Manager Henry Taylor, in an- 
ticipation of the opening with vaude- 
ville the last week in September. 



SAXON BUYS ERIE 



Seeks Break in Jump lito His Tciede 
Auditorium 



Toledo, Aug. ?A. 

Herman Saxon, manager and it ssee 
of the Auditorium, has purchah<^d thi> 
Park theatre in Erie, Pa., and will 
spend $40,000 on improvements in the 
house. The Park is Erie's otely legi- 
timate theatre. It has a eeating ca- 
pacity of 1,G00. Saxon's particular 
purpose in the purchase was to 
strengthen his stand in ol^taining atr 
tractions for the Auditorium ia To- 
ledo. By paying transportation ex- 
penses of standard road attractions 
between Toledo and Erie ho caii boo1( 
a show for an entire week by giving 
tiie attraction a split week between 
Brie and Toledo. 

The Auditorium opens its season 
Friday evening, Sept. 2, with Florence 
Reed in "The Mirage," which remaniB 
for.>matinoe and evening performnnp* 
Saturday, Sept. 3, before going on to 
Chicago for an engagement in the 
Shubert Great Northern. The Dun- 
bar Opera Company in "Robin Hood** 
follows "The Mii-age" here, with 
"Aphodrite" next. 



i< 



SCANDALS'' FOR LONDON 



GOETZ S PHI-PHI" 

"Phi-Phi," the foreign piece se- 
cured by Ray Coetz will have Fran- 
ces White in the leading role when 
pnnluccd over here. 

Mr. <ioctz. who returned to New 
York lasi weeU. purchased while 
abroad ".Mile. Butterfly'* in which 
Irene Bordoni will appear. 

"The Bat" from Moscow, a group 
of .'»() Russian players, is to come 
to New York under (Joet/.'s direction, 
after finishing a Cochran engagement 
in London, where the company is at 
present. It went to London after a 
run at the Feninie, Paris. , 



Six Weeks There In April— Rehear- 
sals There for 1922. 



LEO DONNELLY G OWN 

lioo Donnelly, now under the A. 
H. Woods management and appear- 
ing in "Back Pay," which opened at 
the Eltinge Tuohday, is to be fea- 
tured in a new play by Woods at a 
later date. Fannie Hurst is to write 
the piece, the title of which at pres- 
ent is "Entertaining the Trade." 



HODOE OPENS 

Lancaster, Pa., Aug. 81. 
William Hodge opened his season 
here with the new play "Beware of 
Dogs" tonight. In the cast are Ann 
Davis, Edith Shayoe, Julia Bruns, 
George Darbicr, Jack Webster and 
Mrs. Charles Craig. John Donnelly 
ia manaf ing the organixatioib 



Goorire White plans to take the 
now "Scandals," now playing the 
Liberty, to London after th" tour- 
ing season. This would tiiko the 
show over intact sometime in April. 
Thf ^^kon engagement is not to 
extend for more than six weeks, it 
being figured that such a period 
would about pay expenses for the 
trip. 

If the Tiondon engagement is con- 
summated White intends rohcarsinf 
the company there for the next edi- 
tion of "Scandals." 



ALICE BRADY ON TOUR 

Alice Brady is going on tour in a 
revival of "Forever After." She 
opens Labor Day in Alleufown, Ps-t 
and will continue until some time 
after the first of the year, by which 
time William A. Brady hopes to have 
a new play for his daughter. 

"Drifting," tried out several 
weeks ago with Miss Brady as the 
star, has been shelved. 

( 

"Girls In Blue" Resumes 

"Two Little Cirls in Blue, ' which 
closed at the Cohan Saturday of last 
week will reopen in three weeks >■ 
Boston. Several new people will be 
added to the show nvhinh wiUcoUin 
the Fairbanks Twins as the feature. 



niiay, Septemlier 2, 1921 



I: 



HEAT WALLOPS M SHOWS; 
SIX Qfmm NEXT WEEK 




11 



garly Ealrifis on Broadway Create No Hqge Demand 

— Two Uocks Away Only Agency Buy — Mc- 
" Harris Fight Still On. ^ 



I 



Broadway f «t a vtllop from the 

piathw tkis week. Pnctka'ly ewry 

laviDf idMiff t%e Mne wu hit by tbe 

feMft and the Vok •flkcea suffered «c- 

eordioflf. 1%i« wu eH the laore dis- 

li«lroui bectuee of the ftct that the 

iMBif era countiag on continned 9996 

ireither km4 schedMed 10 epcatics 
far the week. Of tke fear that epeaed 
•• the Urat twa nifhts e(f the week, 
*The PopTJ (^•d" aad **The Wheel" 
«B tfoadaf aad *^w« Blecks Avajr'* 
•Dd *'Baok PajT M Taeaday there 
was DO tremendatta eackeaMBt ohovt. 
Neit week tlada sic <^caii«tB 
aali«d«I^ Tw« ef these are ref4ra*a 
*«The Uerrj Widow^ at die Ktitk- 
tH>ocker on Mandav alflfat and '^fhe 
Bssiest WajT at the Itir<;ettia on 
Tuesday. Other Itnmdt^ opemata are 
(Cvui on pafe 69) 

«w>iiSEiiAfr AT n 

UPSETS PROPHESIES] 

lAdvanoe Saks Figbt for 
Openings in Philadwl- 
Nezt Week 



FOUR-CORNERBD 
TICKET AGENCY COM. 

Alexander and Marks Join 
Tyson-United Group 

^ new ticket brakariBf esmblM- 
tioa waa ceaaaMaiated raaterday 
with the completing of arrasffemeats 
far the aaalfaMitiaB ef the CeL 
Aiexaader aad J. Lu Marks aseades 
with the already eoaUned Tyson and 
Bro. and the United Ajeociea. The 



phia 




a^Aua. SI. 
attended wie 
UoraeaMa of 
aaened at 
leatie Auintst 72. 
dlthoofh the SfMcate people 
assn ralQCtaBt to ftTe figurca, the 
firt rematea that Monday nifht of 
Ihia week>-4ke hottest night here in 
tte last Bsoath — the Garrick was 
janyaed upatairs and doww. 

PftBheaioa of the wiae ones here 
that FhiUy woulda^t sUnd a $2 Up 
fictere t&a fall were knocked into 
a cocked hat. 

The adrance sale of "The Love 
Letter*' at the Forrest is cood, hut 



cool qwU titat so long existed here, 
is expected to send it soaring. "Irene** 
is getting a similar adTance play at 
the Shubert box-oftce, and "Cor- 
nered/' the only mm-musical show 
•aonij^ next week, is rather light on 
adTaaoe saies. 

"^rene.* br the way, has a $2M 
tia.. while 'The Lare letter** haa 
a^ This Um repeMtion of the sit* 
laoaa iirUdi happtaed three timea 
Mat year hetween tiiese iv^o houses 
W South Broad streeL Th<; memo- 
MMe case last year was when "Tickle 
Mt** Ame in at a lover scale that 
Oaarge White's "Scandals" at the 
Vorrest, and Rmrt the letter's huoi- 
Mss so that week was c\it from the 
ma. Everybody here in wondering 
• 'Aether the Huberts will again win 
cat, bnt it IB rcneriil^y felt that the 
pepularity of nillingham Ahown here 
wUl nat over John Charles Thomas 
iBd ^The fjOTe letter*' in big style. 
. The "Iren<»" company, by the way, 
w T^-ithont Bobbie WaUou of Uic Van- 
wrbilt caat. In IiIh place is Jere 
pelanoT, who played here in the show 
last year. 

The Walnut Street, which an- 
Bounced "i>oor I^tty" with Charlotte 
ureenwood for September 5, has 
changed its bookings, a^i<l will have a 
brand new show, stvled a "melody 
drama." oslle<l "The Love Drnma," a 
Morosoo prodiictinu, op^^ning SaturdnT 
wght, Sept. 10. Edna Nichols wrote 
the book, Morosco the lyrics aud Wer- 
ner Janiwen tho score. The cant in- 
;J«de8 EIhc Adlor. Maude Kburne, 
Tom Powers and Marion Green. 

Irish Kyea," with Walter Scan- 
»■, will open the Adelphi Sept. 12, 
'#"!!rn* ^^" w«^k8 before the arrival 
01 The Bat." Aaide from that, 

^u*'^*' no booking chanKC8. 
♦• J ^ '''^"'' Hor.Hcmen" i.s adver- 
tised for a "limited nm" and the 
mr(niru»or people are non-committal 
«J» to whether Kot>d buniness will 
K'^^P It 111 this houHe for more than 
• month. 

u^lV^ V^*"*^""*^ Street Opera House 
ir ■" ripped out inside, aftec it was 
tI.^ (^prnpleted. The architects are 
responsible, say those on the inside, 
tr.j***? »atc, the 4iouse won't be 
nMy by the Hth. a^i was intejided, 
r^3-P»'<*ably not until after the 
m»«dle of the month. Not a peep ou 

InuA -u^^l^^ *»' ^^« opening bill ot 
vaudeville has been made here. 

4 "LADIEg' NIGHTS" 

The A. H. Woods office has placed 
w companies of "Ladies' Night" in 
JWjearsal. The original company wfll 
h j!!!*" *''*»'«y >» AUsntic City with 
i!I?u "^"*>«ri«n4 as the featured 
■««»ber. This comnany wiU ploy 



yeaterday (T%«ndsy) aad OeL Alex- 
ander closed his eatahliakmeK at 41at 
street aad BvoadvMy tad entered 
the Tyaon-Ualtod aBcaa at 1449 
Broadway. The J. L. Marks eaUh^ 
laalanaat at IBM Braaiway wttl be 
continned wilk ifr. Uarka ia «0Btrel 
aa one ef 
Alexander 

mie ageadea tai the eaaaMBatiDa 
win start iamediately t* iaaufvMta 
a oaaipaiga ati kshatf el their new 
ehrift ticket hayiag |>laa aad an ex- 
teaidre adrertiaiac ^aapiiga to the 
paMic ta aeqaatet tkea wilk the fact 
that they are doiag basiaeas ea a 
straight 00 cent adrance. 



"LOVE LBTTXB" MOMBAT 

OiHIavhain Piaea Ta Have PbHa. Pr«- 
Biiart at Farraat 



Philad^pMa, Aa««Bt SI. 

Charles DiDingham is bringing a 
young army oeer here for the opening 
of "The Lore Letter,** his newest 
musical comedy Jdoaday i^ht, at the 
Forrest 

In the party which came over an 



aet ererwhetariag. A return of the .a special train Tfaaraday were Mr 



DiUiagkam, William LeBaron, the li- 
bretist, Tictor JacObi, eonposer and 
the complete technical ataS of the 
Qlobc, New Tork, all under the au- 
perrision of the stage director, Ed- 
ward Royce. JoaeiA Urban, accom- 
panied by a staff of mea from hia 
stu<Uo, wis also on tbe train. Re- 
hearsals are being hcAd ev^ry hour of 
the day and night There are oyer 
100 in the company. 

Last year, IMQlngham tried out 
"Tip-Top** with Stone at the same 
liouse. The^receptioa was lukewarm, 
being another case of reversal of de- 
cision on Broadway. Dillingham also 
picked the Forrest for the first metro- 
politan run of the musicalised version 
of "The Dictator** with Fmnk Craven, 
which was well received here, but 
floi>ped afterwards. 



\^ the (Hieaiag atand into Chicago, 
•*■• others takins ud rosd routes. 



SEEKS DIVORCE 

Mrs. Elsie Frazee haa instituted 
suit for divorce against Harry li. 
Frazee, naming Elizabeth Nelson as 
corosnandent and other women un- 
knovj^ to her. Through her attorney, 
Nathan Burkan, Mrs. Frazee asks for 
alimony and counsel fee. The papers 
were filed Monday. 

The FrazecH were married in Chi- 
CHRo April 5, 1902, and have one 
«fiild, Ilarry Herbert Frazee, Jr.« 
who is DOW 18 years old. 



MAGICIAN'S ROUTE LOST 

Alexander, the magician, haa con- 
re'led hiH route for the coming sea- 
son booked through the Erlang^r of- 
fices, owing to injuries he sustained 
while on a huntin); trip last week, 
when he fractured his ribs. 

The route has been given to Black- 
stone, another magician, who went 
under the manngement of Augustus 
Pitou last season. 



SON IN CHORUS 

Boston, Aug. 31. 
James A. Qaliiran. Jr.. son of Con- 
fre.«(Knian James A. Gallivan, has 
been given a chorus position, with 
the approval of hia parents in **The 
O'Brien Oirl'* at the Tremont by 
Manager Jake Rosenthal, to replace 
one of the discharged ISqaity chorus 
men. Congressman Oa^lraa is a well 
known attorney and former Harvard 
athlete and a probable candidate for 
mayor of Dostea at the neat electlea. 




harHy downing 

State, New York, Now (Sept 1-4) 
The versatile muaical producttea 
comedian^ preaented by LOUIS 8. 
McCLBLtiA^ ia 'Tep-O-Mlaf* with 
s company c^ youthfal atara. 

Beat wisheu to MfV. MAflCUS 
LOCW afMl MR. J. M, VUBIM. 

DirectioB. ABE rEIWgEWG 

■ ^^ I I. 



MANN SECRETLY REBEARSIMG 
COMPANY OF HON-EQOITYS 

Theatre First Employed for Rehearsals, Picketed — 
^^In the Mountains^* Opens Sept. 12 at Baltimore — 
Protection Offers Declined by Star. 



WOULD FORCE 

COHAN TO PLAY 



Author Applies to Court — 
New Equity Fight Angle 

Broadway waa startled this week 
by the report that Augnstin Mae- 
Hoagh waa bringing salt against 
Oeorge M. Cohaa. The action on 
the part of Mr. MacHongh, who was 
the author of **Tfae Meanest Man la 
the World,** ia to compel Mr. Cohan, 
as producer of the play, to either 
turn over the script' of the piece to 
him or to continue to make presea- 
tation of the play. 

With the discontinuance of the 
actirity of Mr. Cohan in the man- 
ftgeritl ranks because of the Equity 
Shop, all of the productions that he 
presented last year with the excep- 
tion of "The- O'Brien Girl' were 
shelved. In the event that he had 
continued he would hare undouht* 
edly sent "The Meanest Man ia the 
WoiQd*' on tour thia season with 
other productions. 

Mr. Macliug;h, who kas been on 
the Pacific Coast for a number of 
months during whidi time he tried 
out a new |day under the manage- 
ment of Frank Egan, returned here 
recently. 



HIPP CHORUS IS 

NOW NON-EQUTTY 

Equity Choristers Last 

Season Were Too 

Aggressive 

The new Hippodrome show will be 
100 per cent. non-Equity as far as the 
chorus is concerned, according to an- 
thoritative itources. 

Abont 120 firia wil! be needed in 
the Fokine and ice ballets and wi 1 be 
recruited from non-E^ty members 
as far aa poaaible. The reaaoa be- 
lieved to inspire the decision was the 
activity ofr Equity ehoT4aters laet sea- 
son among the nona, with coercion 
charged by the management. 

The Eqiiity members were active 
thrpogkawt Uie aenaon with numerous 
complaints registered by the nen- 
Eqalty members about their methoda 
of *'persuasion.*' 

The ice ballet wiU be lead by Char- 
k»tte, at a reported salary of $S00 
weekly. When the dancer last ap- 
peared at the HippodroBM, sereral 
season's age, ahe receiftd ''^$250 
weekly. 



balli;t dancer sues 

A $23,000 Supreme Court damage 
suit is on file In the County Clerk's 
office in which Jessie York, ballet 
dancer, asks that amount from Alex- 
ander Oiimansky, ballet master. Her 
grievance is set forth in but a single, 
one-page paragraph to the effect the 
defendant "without cause or provo- 
cation assaulted and beat the plain- 
tiff by violently striking her in the 
face and throwing her to the ground 
and otherwise maltreating her." 

Behind tlic niiit is said to be some 
back-i<taf(e trouble, wherein MIkh 
York disapproved of Oumansky's di- 
rectorial tactics, which Hhe deemed 
to be not entirely necessary to the 
production of the ballet scones in 
which Hhe was to take part. 

Miss York i.s a'so suing the More- 
dall Healty ('orporation, operators 
of the Capitol, for flr>me throe hun- 
dred odd (loUars for breach of con- 
tract and salary due. 



"BLUE BEf^RD" STOPPED 

Now Haven, Aug. .Tl. 
The fiolice this afternoon forbade 
the performance of "HlnchrartrH 
Kighth Wife" at tho Shubort, on tho 
ground it ia immoral. 



"SCANDALS" TOUR 

George White is to sond a company 
on tour playing the "Scandals of 
1020." his la.st year's attraction. The 
company is to open in Srhenortady on 
Sept. 10 and will play all of the ter- 
ritory as far west as Kansas City 
which the uricanisation did not touch 
list year. Harry Bryant is ^oinj? 
hack with the show and F'red Jordan 
ahead. 



Ed Wynn's New Book 
The Ed Wynn show for the cur- 
rent season will not open until shout 
Oct 3. The orifinal book selected 
for production did not meet l^'lth 
the approval of A. Ii. Rrlanger and 
was rejected. A new rehide has 
since been provided and the attrac- 
tion is to go in rehearsal in about 
a week's tiiite. 



POUR MOBS WBBK8 

Ohtcago, Ant. '!• 
Joaepk M. Galtea haa won eat and 

extended hia engagement at the 
Garrick for another four weeks, 
commencing Sept. S. ~~ 
This miracle- was accomplished 



"In the lloaatains*' with Loui» 
Mann starred, is being rehearsed se- 
cretly in New York. The company 
is HOO per cent. aon-Bquity. Ifr. 
Maan is said to hare at first started 
rcheasala in a theatre. He found 
the theatre was picketed with thr 
members of his company behig ap- 
proached in aa effort to entice them 
away. The company haa 18* princi- 
pals. They complained of the con* 
tinned annayancei, when Mann ea 
gaged a atndie where rehaataals are 
now held. 

The ilann play, 1^ Clara Lfpaiau 
and Sam Shlpman, is due to opei 
Sept. 12, at Baltimare. 

Offera made to Ifana by memhen 
of the Pi^udag hfaaagara' Aaaocto- 
tioa, aecofdiag to report, to ha^« t^- 
Mann p^eee preaented aader thaii 
avapieca hut to rensaia ilana'a, wair 
declined hy t^e atar wka haa re 
dared, it is said, he intends ffaiar 
through with his nan-Bqulty akov 
under hia owa banner at all timaa. 
Mr. Mann ia produoint the piece. 

Mann Is an attcer of the AetPra* 
Fidality League. He was aaiM««thc 
firat of the prominent actora to em 
phaaiae hia attitude against tfaa prin 
cipala of the Equity aa exempl4iaa 
iu the atrike of two yaara afo. 



1 1 



oBBmr antL ' for a t 



Thrpa Weak* Mpre la Naw mw^ttmC 
M< Tina Bra«i«ay» la llaptPL 

Boston, Aug. SI. 
"The O'Brien Qlrl*' wiU go tP Ner 
York by the end of this month, ac 
cording to present plans, p'ayin 
Uhree weeks in New Engtapd ^at 




■•'I I I ,.i 



EVA CLARK 

Arrived "Sun-Kist" aad Saaburnt from her tammar home la Cai;« 
fornia. 

Sigaad with Messri. Lea A J. J. Shubart for taasaa 1921-1922. 
Personal Dfroctlea, ED OAVIDOW aad RUFUS LEMAIRE 



through shunting off the "Rat" 
from tho (iarrick to the Ciohan- 
(irand wljoro it will open on Labor 
Day instead of "The O15rion (iirl," 
which is not coming to Chicago at 
this time. 

"Up In tho Clouds" had been do- 
infif an uniiHiialy bi); businoss at the 
Carrick and was scheduled to de- 
part at tho hoight of its run for a 
four-wook road tour and return in 
October at the Studohakor. 



TULANE BOOKS ''BIRTH" 

New Orleans, Aug. 31. 

The Tulsne has secured "The 
Birth of a Nation" for a supple- 
mentary Boa«on, beginning Sept. 18. 
The (iriffith picture will remain at 
tho theatre two wooka. 

Griffith in sending various produc- 
tions of tho picture to different parts 
of the country to be shown at popular 
prices. Jack Rdwsrds is in charge 
of thst at the Tulnne, when the 
scale will run to a dollar top. 



< I 



Business continues to be a turn-awn; 
nnd an extra performance was stru^ 
in this wook, bringing the gross up i 
about $22,000. A new story wr 
sprung this week In reference to ('<> 
ban's c'cvonth hour decision not to l'> 
vade Chicago with this show, whi 
is the pivotal point of the Equity fig' 
at tho present time. 

The new yam is to the effect tli 
recently enacted 4egi8lation pormi 
ting liberal restraining injunctio 
ngnlnst aggroHsIvo actions by orga. 
i^ed labor in Massachusetts mak 
this state ?ook good to Cohan for 
few weeks in case any uneitpect 
orisis is precipitated by Equity. T 
real story, howovor, Roems to be th 
after plsying 10 weeks through t 
summer, "The O'Brien Girl" Is c 
titled to the September gravy in N' 
Kngland, and with a Boston booki 
out of the question, (he New Rngln 
bookings with extra performances v. 
substituted. 



• V 



■*sm 



wmamm- 



14 



LEG I 




A 




zsc 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



1 



AGTOR-MMBERS RMLESS 
IN AUSTRALIAN FEDERATION 

Legit Artists* Organization Has Waited 18 Months for 
Award — Intend Applying to Court — Vaudeville 
Section Also Complains. 



CHI HAILS SQUARE 
DEAL AT BOX OFFICE 



44 



Syilney, Aof. 8. 

Walter Daker, prtsident of the Ac- 

orii' Federation of Auatralaaia, mmI 
t the latt meeting ef thai organiaa- 
tioQ the meinbera were reatlcsH. The 
'ili«erK h <1 grave uiiagivioga regard- 
ing the future. Mr. Ihinu, the gen- 
'^ral Recrctary, said: 
"The actora had waited 18 BionthA 
* nn awnrd and they were rcaolved 
(0 wait ly longer, bat would decide 
their conditiona for theoiaelTea, if 
ueceaaary, by direct action.*' 

Mr. Baker explained tk^ cxccutiTe 
liad decided to spply to tk« Fi)4cr«l 
Arbitration Court f«r a cMipnlaory 
• onferenre in connection with the 
new achednle of cUlna which had 
been prepared. Tbe award, expiring 
June 10 laot, waa a tentative one, and 
it did not in any way tend to promoto 
harmony or give aatiifaction to the 
members. 

Among the qoeationa continnally 
being hurled at the oAccra by tko 
artista were: what were they waiting 
for? and, ia It neceasary to wait for 
the Court? It might, he explained, 
be some time before the claims would 
be heard. He did not feel that in 
duKtrial peace conM be prcaenred un- 
less some agreement was reached. 

Mr. Baker raid an attempt would 
be made by one theatrical manage- 
ment to introduce more than -eight 
'< ninntic 8ho\vs a week, but he wouM 
assure the management that suoh 
•n n'-tion would bring nbout 4 com- 
plic.ition, the end of which it would 
be difficult to forecast. 

If^thc court was tho congesreil to 
hear the claims, then some metho<l 
would have to be discovered to settle 
them more speedily. Whatever meth- 
ods were decided upon, the manage- 
ment could be assured the Federa- 
tion would carry them into effect. 

Complaints had been made by the 
vandrvilli; section, one of which wa$ 
that the Federation could have done 
Romething for them. If the vaude- 
ville nrtists wore prepared to act as 
the other sections had done, there 
would be no difDcuUy in abolishing 
llio unpleasant conditions they wer« 
vnikinj,' under. Mr. linker said. The 
oflieers of the Federation hnd hud 
murh difficulty during the last few 
months in curbing the anxiety for 
;>r( <i)iifate action by thcfe members. 
He desire<l to impress on the man- 
nsfements that over 00 per cent of 
the nerformers hod joined the Fed 
crution. 

Non-Unlonistt. 

A policy was beinjc framed for deal- 
ing with non-unionists in the profes- 
sion. If they did not join they would 
be exi>elled fiom^, the speaker said. 
Tf nny cfTort wns made to exclude 
M?)?onists it v.duhl be stopped. The 
Federation w:ir f.'ir too strong to per- 
mit nny 9\\ch thin;; to be attemj)ted. 

In the recent tentative nword, the 
Court would not fix conditions for 
persons rcceivinj; over £10 per week. 
The majority of members of the Fed- 
eration were heir.K pnid over £10 a 
\v(M'l<, and t!)is crente*! n Rcrious 
iniomnly. lie consi<lered the Court, 
in duty boun 1. to tix conditions for 
the whole of the industry, irrespec- 
tive of what wape.*< were paid, and 
leave the mntr(»r of salaries to be de- 
cided between the ailist end tiie eni- 
])loyer. In the award just expired 
there was srnrccly one clause cnps- 
blc of clear interpretation. The mem- 
bers were insisting that condition 
must be fixed. If tlie Court declined 
fi) do it. tlicn the or;;ani7ation would 
have to take the mntter in bund, und 
it intended to do fo. 

Kven the reprcKent'itives of tlie 
employers had admitted the award 
hnd hnd featurcH. The Federation 
asked the Court for an award con- 
sistent with f;:irnes-< and iuslice, no 
matter what woges were being pai<l. 

Clyde Meynell, managing director 
of Willioroson-Tsit. in an interview- 
said that three weeks ago representa- 
tives of the Actorn* Federation asked 
whnt It was intended to do with the 
tentative agreement which had been 
in operation for the past six months. 
The Federation had to nut in a fresh 
application for either a new award or 
for continuance of the old one. After 
an nmicflble di.scussion the represen- 
tatives of the actors agreed to waive 
the oiiaAtion of a new award and 



carry on under the exiatiag •&• for 
another year for tbe purpooe of giv- 
ing an opportunity of aceinf iMnr It 
worked. 

John Fuller, o% bekal! of Bcb Jk 
John Fuller, Ltd.. aaid tkat tho ar- 
tifta working for hia Arm were c«B- 
tented. For the Fedtration to Uke 
direct actiea at tbla time wken pnklie 
apathy la to maaifett fai attandate 
at theatrca in Uke Uliag tkc gooao 
that lay* the goldem cgga, he added. 



**UGHTNIN' '* HELD 
DRAW LAST WEEK 



Conld Have Stayed a 

Fourth Year 

Probably 

"Lightnin"* departed from Bread- 
way laat Saturday, leaving tke Gai- 
ety after 153 weeka, a three-yeari^ 
B^lid ma only latermpted by the 
aeveral weeka the ahow was . deaed 
during the actors* strike In the sum- 
mer of 1019. The final two weeks 
were virtual capacity at every per- 
formance, with laat week finding 
standees in through the week, the 
gross going to over $14,000. At |2.60 
top, the summer scale, that grosa is 
about all the Gaiety will bold, sulking 
the remarkable record-breaking run 
all the more notable by the whirl-'' 

wind finish. 

With Frank Bacon jumping direct 
to Chicago to open Wednesday at the 
niackstone, tbe road company with 
Milton Noble» opened quietly at the 
Montauk, Brooklyn, for a four- week 
booking. That the management took 
the Brooklyn time after three years 
on Broadwav Is another evidence of 
faith that "Lightnin' " coukl have 
completed 4 fourth season in New 
York. Both companies will be on 
tour this season, but though the Ba- 
con company is expected to remain a 
year in Chicago, the other major 
stands will be kept open for him for 
the season of 1922-23 or later. 



SHOWS IN N. Y. AND GOHHENT 



STAND-OFF SUITS 



'"Drammie Mirror" Saiaf Ad Maa, 

Who Previestly Had Sued Paper 



The United Motion Picture Publica- 
tion, Inc.. otherwise the ''Dramatic 
Mirror," ia suing Jack Newmark, one 
of its former sdvertising solicitors, 
for $5,000 dsmages for slander and 
defamation of character. The com- 
plaint sets forth that in the presence 
of another advertising solicitor for 
the plaintiff, Newmark stated **it has 
a good and bad set of books" and 
that the publication "runs advertise- 
ments without contracts,'* which latter 
statement the defendant has circulated 
among other advertising men and ad- 
vertisers to the Mirror's damage of 
$r>.000, it is alleged. 

Newmark a short while previous 
began action for $0,000 damages on 
breach of contract grounds, alleging 
unjust dismissal from service, by the 
paper. 



KLEIN BACK 



Celebrations When Harry D. Returns 
to Dillisoham's Globs 



Harry D. Klein is back with the 
Charles Dillingham forces after an 
absence of three years. During that 
time he was general manager of Uni- 
versal City for Carl Leammle and 
more late'y general manager of the 
Arthur Hopkins theatrical interests. 

There was s genersl home coming 
week celebrated at the Globe when 
Klein returned. Previous to going 
to the (>>ast he had been with the 
Dillingham forces for 11 years and 
manager of the Globe for a long 
period 

His first assignment since his re- 
turn will be to look sfter the inter- 
ests of the Irish Players, being 
bronght to this country under the 
Dillingham munngenient to present 
"The White Headed Boy." 



Lightnin''' and ''Gold 
Diggers*^ Come in at 
$2.50— NoFavoritism 



Chicago, Aag. 81. 

Thia town ia bnaaing wlib tbe 

opening of tbe new tbeatrical sea- 
•on. By September 5 every legit 
theatre win be bonslng some attrac- 
tion. This Inelodes Sbabert's latest 
acquisition, tbe Great Northern, 
wbicb opens next week with 8elwyn*s 
"Tbe Mirage." Sbubert's CenUal 
dipped into tbe seaaon last Batar- 
day with "Three Live Ghosts." 

Tbe anhject cauaing tbe highest in- 
terest on tbe Rialto la tbe fact that 
two of tbe biggest legit bita of New 
York, "LigbtninV" and me Gold 
Diggers," vIB open here at tbe same 
prices charged in tbe Bast* Tbla is 
levrer than any New York bit bas 
ptayed here in years. They come in 
•■ tbe prmniae made by their man- 
ageBMnt of $2.50 top and a fifty-eent 
Increase on Saturday aigbt Tbeae 
twe "cbamp" attraetiona are install- 
big n new policy In ticket aelUbg 
and advertising. The new^ppapefs are 
carrying in tbeir ada tbe ezaet ben 
office pricea for every seat in tbe 
bonae, tbe eiact tIaM tbe cnrtaln 
riaea and even tbe true ]«Bgtb of 
tbeir' eastern runs, of wbicb tbcy 4o 
n#t need be aabamed. 

Tbe Gonthooi agency is not given 
any preference over other Uebet 
brokers and Mra. Contboai was not 
allowed all of tbe best seats. Stress 
ia placed on tbe four-week advance 
sale and mail orders. This being 
tbe case tbe Contboai agencies will 
pay $2.00 for tbeir oeats and will 
charge a fifty-cent advance over box 
office prices, with a five per cent 
return up until 7 o'clock. These two 
shows have taken the attitude of 
direct sales to their patrons and a 
forecast of tbeir success and long 
run is not hard to make. 

With more legit theatres open than 
ever before and with more tried and 
proven successes housed in these 
theatres, "Lightnin* " and "The Gold 
Diggers" have the largest mail order 
and advance sale that has been aeen 
here in years. This attitude from 
these sterling producers, Belasco and 
Golden, ig a stimulant to the public. 
Where formerly the Erlanger and 
Powers theatres carried lines in all 
their theatre ads. "Tickets at all 
Couthoui stands at box office prices,*^ 
the Couthoui name is not even men- 
tioned In either "Lightnin' " or "Gold 
Diggers" ads. 

"Up In The Clouds" and "The Bat" 
will hold over. The openings last 
week were "Three Live Ghosts," 
•The Champion" and "The Broken 
Wing." 

"Up la The Glands" (Garrick, 8th 
week), was to be forced out at the 
height of ita run, but a change in 
bookings gives this show hit four 
more profitable weeks. The phenom- 
enal press work hsndled by Howard 
Gail will always stsnd as a big item 
in this show's success. Tucked an- 
other $22000 week under its belt. 

"Tip Top" (Colonial, .3rd week). 
No let-np in demand with another 
sell-out: $28,000 

"Passing Show" (Apollo, 12th 
week). Only one more week and 
then gives way for B<ldie Cantor's 
"Midnight Bounders," which opens 
with a I^bor Day matinee. "The 
Passing Show" held its own with 
around $20,000. 

'•Smooth As Sllk'» (Cort, 16th 
week). "The Champion" opening 
Sunday to good business. 

"Four Horsemen" (I^selle, 22nd 
week). Film. Against all odds is 
more than holding itn own. Said to 
have shown a $2,000 profit each 
week for the last three weeks. With 
the new season the management is 
plunging heavy on bill posting. 

"The Bat" (Princess, ,35th week). 
$17,000. Only one more week at 
this house, then moving to Cohan's 
(irand. There was talk of 'The 
Bat" lowering its prices at its new 
home, as its capacity is almost 
doubled, but it was decided to main- 
tain ita present prices. Tiiis show 
has played to around $000,000 on its 
run so far and in all probability will 
reach the million mark before leaving. 

"The Happy Cavalier" (Olympic, 
2nd week). Fiske (VHaro leaves 
this week, making room for "The 
Broken Wing." 

"Broadway Whirl" (Blinois, 1st 
week). Around $19,000 without a 
Sunday night performance, although 
doing a Wednesday matinee. Richard 
Carle b^ing out for several perform- 
ances, with no announcement being 
made as to the reason. 

"Tho Love Chef" (Playhouse, 1st 
week). Though Ist week, only 
$6,000, no criterion on drawing 



"Baefc PiOf." SMnge (1st week). A 
new Fnnnie Hnrat play presented 
by A. H. Woods opened Tueoday 
nigbt and beam all tbe earmarks 
•f bei^.a bit 

«*Dad^t GaM A^HnMaii'* PlyaMutb 
(lat weeb). Artbnr Hopkins' first 
produetion nf tba new season, writ- 
tan by Zee Akfau^ isptned en Wed- 
nesday nigbt _. 

"Dntay.** Praaee (8fd week). Tbe 
agendea renarttbat tbara bad been 
a f alMng atln Ibt duMnd for tbia 
attraction Bniinen laat week 
managed to ga'aver $IOJtm in spite 
ef this. 

•rmilta,'' Glaba (lltb week). LMt 
week's grosa was Jnat a little abort 
af S82jOOO. 

Tlru Yaar." Uttla (46tb weeb). 

: la still going along at tbe eapndty 

pace and looka te eantlnne at that 

far aome time. Between $10,000 

and $11,000. 

'Hlft Tafmtr," HIppadrome flat 
week). Due to ^epen tomorrow 
nigbt May have la be postpon e d 
bccnnae of tbe ninaldana. 

'tliWiH Owtta^« Gtftar," Bepnblfe 
<Slbwetk). Tba ignre daiaMd f or 
tbia attraction la $8^400. wbicb 
we^l be better than any ef tbe 
wefiana weekiB 

tliiiri Ara Bvan." TbMa.Jffunre 
<dlhwaak). Oat alBMat|8b05o laat 



(19tb 
week). ' Mevai «n Ibt inaC tbentre 
fiMB tbe B bn bwt Ibia week. Baa 
h bden a mUa bnrl Ibia week but 
laat week al Iba athar bauae bold 
Ua awn. liySOO.Iha gvaaa. 
•iJitoii,'' rMmiMk week). TVs 
ia ana af tba Mitver bita Ibnt 
ia atnigemng Hg bnrineaa. Again 
aver fOMTlaai wiab. 
««Mlala WaHi." Prsaenade tbentre 
8rd week).' Tbia laaka like tbe fi- 
nal week' lor tbia attraction atop 
af tbe Cenlnry. Sbnberta bnve 
been offering tbe bauae for other 
attractions. BaiineaB far from 



Another of tbe boMorer hits that 
the new arrivala have no effect on 
tbe busin^^nn of. Went aver $11,00S 
last week. 

''Tba Detanr," AsUr (2nd week) 
Moves to tbe Bijou next week to 
make room for tbe new Shubert 
attraction, "Tbe Blue Lagoon." 

•Tba Graaa Gadttat," Booth (33rd 
i^ek). StiU getting around 

"TlM Qraanwleb Vttlaga FaHlet" 
61hobert (Ist week). Opened «« 
Wednesday night, having been post- 
poned from Tuesday. 

-Tba Last WaNx," Century (17th 
weeb). Business not what it might 
be. Managing to draw about halt 
capacity in face of warm weather. 
Got under $lfi.000 last week. ^ 

-Tba Nlffcteap," 88tb Street (3id 
week). Got around $7,700 uist 
week. 

-Tba P«P»y Gad," Hudson (la| 
week). Opened Monday night with 
tbe noticea against its chance of 



larcb Haraa," Bijou (4tb week). 
Moves to tbe Punch and Judy next 

- week - being succeeded by *TRie 
Detour," moving In from tbe Aster. 
Got about t&^aO last week. Tbe 
new house for the shew baa been 
taken on a rentaL 

-Mask af Haalat," Princess. Closed 
after one week. 

-Mr. Pirn Paaaaa By," Garrick (26tb 
week). This is its final week. Has 
held up in business to the end al- 
though heat troubled it this week. 

-Niea Paepla," Klaw (27th week). 
Got a little under $7X)00 last week. 

-Nabadv's Maaey," Longacre (3rd 
week). Does not look as though 
it were going to hold on. May de- 
velop strength if it remains after 
Labor Day. 

-Parsaaality," Playhouse (1st week). 
Opened last Saturday night but 
does not seem to have any chance 
whatever of getting over. 

"Pat aad Take," Town Hall (2nd 
week). Denmnd not as strong as 
as that for "Shulfle Along," but 
getting some play. Took around 
$R.000 with cut rate aid. 

-SaNy," New Amsterdam (37tb 
wees). Here is the record of tbe 
town. Last week's figures were 
$334260. Playing to striding room 
at even the mid-week matinees. 

"Seaadals," Liberty (8tb week). 
Played to $22,700 last week with 
the house claiming to have topped 
the "Follies" business for the final 
night of the week. 

-Searlet Maa," Henry Miller (2nd 
week). Finishes tomorrow night, 
Charles Dillingham having decided 
early this week to withdraw the 
IjcBaron comedy. 

"Shaffle Alaag,". 63rd St (15th 
week). Played to almoat $0,000 
again last «week with the Friday 
extra added midnight performance 
pulling about half a bouse. It Ik 
a corking entertainment 

''Six Cyllader Lava^" Sam Harris 
(2nd week). This looks like the 
real McC^oy in the way of a hit. 
It hit the town like a wallop and 
hitting on all six will Uke the 
heat hills on high. 

-Saaya," 48th Street (3rd week). 
Picked up a little during the early 
part of last week hut not over as 
a hit. Got around $6,000. 

"Soany," Cort (3rd week). Here ia 
a show that does not seem to have 
hit right and not getting the pa- 
tronage it deserves. The business 
last week was such as to make the 
management decide to move the at- 
traction to the Selwyn beginning 
Sept 12. At that house a $2.50 
top scale will be instituted. 

-Swords," National (1st week). A 
new theatre and a new play open- 
ing on Thursday night. The house 
is Walter Jordan's snd the produc- 
tion presented by Brock Pember- 
ton. 

"Taagerlae," Casino (4th week). Is 
the musicsl comedy hit bf the new 
season thus fsr. Lsat week $18,000 
wss the 6gure. 

"Tarzaa ef the Apes," Brosdhurst 
1st week). Opened on Thursday 
night. 

"The Bat," Morosco (54th week). 

power of show. Should pick up, as 
both star and ahow are well spoken 
of. 

"Toto" (Studebaker, 2nd week), 
$18,700, playing to the city's ultra. 



*'Tm Blaaka Away," Cohan (1st 
week). Opened on Taeaday night 
witbberformances personal triumph 
f^ Barney Bernard. 

-Tba Whaal," Gaiety <lst week). 
Opened Monday night witb tbe no- 
ticea divided. 

•THnmpb af X." .Comedy (2nd week). 
Got around $4,000 last week. Doea 
net aeem to aUnd muck chance in 
tbe wild acramble af new attrac* 
tionn. 

mfbirl af Ntw Yarfc,* Winter Gar- 
fien (12tb week). Got about 
$ll,006 laat week ani ia aUted to 
at^ ant abortly. 

"^mm,^ Park (2rd we^). Net 
puieei witb tbe pktare bits, ran 
being forced to amall takings. 

Tb n n i er d np," Central (6tb wee). 
I4mt week. Universal tokcs aver 
tbe bouse Sunday. 

Tbrna Mnakataara," (lat week). 
Opened to $1,740 on Sunday night 
and developed an ndvance sal e of 
ITjOOO^ tbe moiwlng following. Will 
may to almost $23j000 on tbe week* 
Honae waa token by tbe United 
Artiats for eight weeka IhpiHng tbst 
Tbe PickforJ special, -Little Lord 
Fauatlerov," would fill tbe last 
four weeka of tbe time. "Mos- 
keteers," however, looks like It's 
in for n ^ng run snd Mary's' 
picture wiO kave to go dsewhere. 

MORE PIRACY CASES 
BEFORE COMMITTEE 



44 



44i 



Way Down East" and 
Over Night" Arc 
Infringed 



Now that the newly appointed Pi* • 

racy (Committee of the Pro^^nf^ingj 

Mansgers* Association bas the Ham- . 

ilton, Gnt, infringement af "Light-; 

nin*" off its hands, it Is taming its 
attention to other alleged piracies 
and infringements in tbe eaatom see- 
tion of this country. In Pennsylvania 
two cases of unauthorised perform- 
ances of "Way Down East" and 
**Over Nigbt" are engaging the com- 
mittee's attention* as Well ss Arthur 
Hsmmerstein's charge that the Men* 
hattan and Brooklyn Strsnd theatres 
gave unauthorised presentotions of 
an act from "The Firefly" as part of 
its weekly program recently. 

William G row's indictment and 
$200 fine in the "IJghtoin* " matter 
is tbe Isrgest sentence on piracy 
charges within the Dominion of Csn- 
ada. As far pa the Trans-Atlsntie 
Theatres, Ltd., is concerned, in whose 
Hamilton, Ont, house tbe "Light - 
nin* " infringement was discovered, 
John (3olden, chairman of the Piracy 
C'Oromittee, and O'Brien, Molevinsky 
fie DriscoU, its counsel, are convinced 
tbe theatre circuit wss innocent of 
actual knowledge of the infringement, 
and ia doing its utmost to rectify 
matters by issuing s stotement to its 
35 thestre managers threatening t1l!<- 
missal to any resident manager who 
permits any such lapM to occur. 



FBAMINO A.NOTHEB 

Another show for the new season 
is being framed by Ned Wayburn. It 
will go ip rehearsal during December. 
Waybum^s first is "Town Gossip," 
now in prepsration. 

His new one will be called "Fancy 
That." Ballard Macdonald will write 
tbe lyrics, Jimmy Hanley the music* 
and George Stoddard the book. 



HAVE NEW BEVUE 

Fanchon nml Marco will return to 
the coast thia fall and prepare an- 
other revue. The coast dancers will 
open with "Sun-klst," their show 
which played Broadway this summer 
and which starts for the south ▼»« 
Atlantic City Labor Poy, but will 
leave the attraction ahovtJ^ afur- 
ivards. 




'S REVIEWS 



•*,*• 



BlL l n^. i> I art 



STATE 

for pop vauduvale Ue first half 
yU«Ae4 str^ni; .vfitB Harrjr and Ann 
'1^119^9. JUavikd^iWarfif^M Harris abd 
gaotler, Norma ^ Talmadge, Law 
CoQjjitT, Itaymo^d' Hitchcock, Paisley 
K^B, pa .3^(>U. liopper, Ziegfald'a 
Tollie^ c^orufi, , Myor^A and Hauford, 
,W. 0. ^^^^^^^ Fan^ie Hrict*. c;uj..^(«..lc 
Ta]f()a5lKe, Mae Murray, Frank Tin- 
Sey, Adole Uowland, Coiiwpy Teazle, 
£)i^eiie.O'Briep^.Ilettv Wlythe, LoiiiKe 
Oroody, . Kftun^th. Harinn, Kichard 
giri^ijlipesfi^.jPcHruUJuJa, ^om Lewis. 
Jir^crman, V^lU . Morrisey, Frank 
yay, Farbcr Siaters, .Jack Dempsey, 
IiQDOre tllrvq, Ij^eiiii's B37 Hand, and 
^jLfcua jboe)v in a personal appear - 
tnce, . \. .., ., . 

lioew \yent pifger than anything else 
jsn ..the bili, though his ■ monologue* 
lacked. iho oomftdy ppnch. Hoover, it 
^a.«i timely and up to the minute, be- 
lli^ largeljr a dlHCvtsaion of > what' was 
Ejlpi^g oa about . him at the moment. 
*^arM^. ov<M^lo^i^.^. great getaway 
not saying to Loew, as be turned 
tha boiLM^ever to. him with hie bless - 
a^ '7r.yq^»ii.dpn.t yyant it, m grab 



l^t^.J^WrW.? ^h^ abow jan amoofh- 
Zicgfeld^s gu>l,act looked great for 



le 



{M^ s)|oa1d get the circuit. 



ti 

^gfjkeXutiiiiOL^Sjyfid to ha^e offered the 
K^lth Band • route aiao. As a baUy- 
fcQo^i$ ;<^w A turnaway. vr WhateTcr 
JiUbm ||^/a^:|oHt>ook hereafter sheuld 
go on a.i^ht .He.deseryea credit lor 
rfnittj^lV in -such an opening bill and 
gtaying inside the expenses. 
• The ^j^aiptoos wened the abow, be- 
ing the met woi^king performers to 
itep on,th^i|M»gt of the State. It 
iwas 8.43 when their, overture struck 
«R and UvM'.' enteired in "one,** look- 
^ uill^ iavSAanhing toga for a mild 
aong apd a P4».ve{r little trick double 
duice.' -1>ey .went into full for their 
jKTyte ^t.Hp (itt which Harry, doing 
. steps with giddy abandon on • the 
Vemi-tight knockep in a soiid hii> that 
atar^ed a Jirely pare. , The . talk in 
tjie act did noit roKi»ter. The State 
.la-no house Jor light t>anter. and the 
'^.Scrantoqs* banter is ni light that it 
M almost extinct. ' Mias- Scranton 
^I^^ed -weil in aeyeral changes. Tbis 
is easily worth any time and is far 
too good for the t^osition (m anything 
lass thon the top, big-small. 
^ Ifxnlie Harris and Pauline Santley 
did songs. ■ Miss .Santley has an alto 
Toice, harmonizing with MisM Harris* 
soprano. Thf ?TJ"ls attack songs wifch 
cunDintr. but they did not Rcem ii^ 
theip best. Tocal form here. Their 
.materinl is all exrlnsivc, or at lonst 
.,|iew. except the encore, n publishod 
"vBumber given in return for a hos- 
•''pitable demand. 

"• Lew Cooper, who makes np the 
Mnrkost of nnv blacl<faccr anywhere, 
got into the swine of n U'lah hit early, 
np strptched it just a trifle too long, 
nnd for the claps of audience he had 
here, some of the stuff wa« a bit 
T>ag8c. Ho had a compotito (»f ovrrT 
hia^faco 'Single \ In •tlle'•blliini^^v:. • Tt 



them that irreaistible and nerer-fail 

toudi of her own. and turnad oot a 

popular aucoass with the aaaiatance of 

tha ingradienta c-ontributed aa above 
set forth.** Thig <^ • not "mean that 
Panni^'a fl^at play was pldgiarized; 
she merely adopted. The' elements 
were far from ne# whan they ehtercd 
the- dramas, of whiclf, in "Back l*ay" 
they are reminiscent ' 

The story is of a girl with a mania 
for Hilk, though found in uu atno* 
spbera of filth and vi^c in a amall 
town — maybe beearuso of It She 
elopes wi4li a drammer and rernbvB 
Uiv^rside Drive via the Bronx, la a 
taai, probably. The r« ahc becometfthe 
queen of the gold-diggcrtj — and how 
she digs! Thirty -thousand dollar aa- 
blcs for a ki&s. But^what a kiss! \a 
tlie midst of the irevelry^-she learn^, 
that the saccharine simp whom she 
might have married out in 'Ohio if 
he hadn't- gone 4o war and she hadn't 
gtuie i^ tb« .cbow-ehowi,^ is Ia a -base 
hospital, blinded and dying. She then 
beaomaa a sick kitten, nurses the boy 
to death, and walks out on. the^^earls, 
the flat, the wine and the colored maid 
and goea ta work. (Add horrora of 
the wan). - •.-:■'■ • 

. Froip.a hcart-stoaling wonder-yamp 
she turna- i^o vs moanlnff, raving 
prade in a Jiny. Tba% comoa-'te' the 
cpilogne. The way ia paved for her 
in Jthe third act Jn acenaa with ihi 
blind yokal, Avh» .hag hoeoaa-'a-liau* 
tenant It ia a bit atretdi/ on tha 
plansibilltles after tha<i*Bae«iid ^ct; 
but • the $ao,000 aablag ska blows 
ara rn<7irr to awaHorw than' tha $30 
Jab aha graba. Not that Hiss Alac 
KaOar ..a?ar aeema -.waak or off tha 
kay. She is.nevet' on tha hay, having 
a' elef all her own. She coold have 
wafted through that Hiverside Drive 
harem with all her virtue if Miss 
Hurat bad asked her to, and made 



a ticket acaln^r belieya it She could 
malic anylM^'lr believe anything. 

Never iu her Bfoadwgy career has 
aha looke<l aa bewitching. She u-mV 
a stranga resomblanca to Ina Claire 
phiia tha fH'Ovar bi a J«{azimova.»She 
once played the best adventuress 
Forty-second Street iNer saw, in a 
mghtmara called 'The \laknown 
Purpla/' The uhknown rurpW in that 
play waa Helen Mac . Kellar-^un- 
knowtf aind of the theatre's most 
royal purple. Here iS)ie plays every- 
thing— a' child, a ni(^k, a courtesan, a 
sweetheart, a nurae, a bride, a saint, 
a demon, a numb^knll and a genius - 
all these, and all brilliantly. Wopds 
has dWi^ wjcely to star her." She 
demands it through her flittering per- 
sonality, her strange beauty and her 
sheer p^wer— a , pow(?r exorcised 
with ^ very' f^.^, of the ^^drdinary or 
even^tlie accepts^ com monplacea o( 
deMf err, 'deportment, technique' of at'' 
tack." •. •' -- ^ • .,.■...... ... J 

Leo Donnelly 
'maaty rola 
manca worthy 
'parta. aaam to 

understands whv. He- never misses 
in" any piart' Vyhy doesn't aome ouc 
caat' him for one of the hundreds 
of lilt ones ladled out on the oaqin 
St thta and every' n^'H^T*'seas6n,''to 
blithering incdnnicftents. and upstage 
second, raters wbft'aren't ina class to 
intelligently support players like Don- 
• nelly? <v.--- ... «^;<..- .,•••»*■•■« . 

And this man Bostwick. He. direct- 
ed {iuB play with (ouches of asjonish-, 
ing originality despite Its haclvueys, 
and he placed the'pai*t second to Miss 
M4c Kellar'ft with restraint Other 
oompetent performers had roles rang- 
ing from bits td episodes, not one 
handled by less than an expert This 
WoQds man doasn't believe in slough' 
ing .minor' roles to save salaries^ 
"Back Pay" looks that spi.rlt, too. I\ 
pldys, despite itf many fguUs, likf 
a tinging hit frOm the firat to the 
.Iftst. Its dreary spots" are held up 
by < Hnusual actidg force! , ' 

This is a rnn-hit beyond any doubt. 

Jjait, 




6.CYLINDER LOVE 

.fieraldlnA Uurtun Eleanor (Jordon 

Kichard Duitun Dunald MueU 

Pliyllts Uurtun lielty I.lnlry 

BUry. . . , ^. • .Kuy ^VulUo^ 

'M«rsar«t Hng(>i«..l 1Ii>ildA HuMper 

illerlram ltog«»ra. Calvin Thoinua 

I'littrold Wiititiiiii . . . . r Konnotli lltil 

\\ HllJim l)onr<»y Kalpli Sippirly 

Arurllyo Sleriiun Juuo WalUi-i- 

Gilbert Sterl Utf Krneat Tiu.« 

«;i»orir« Slupletoo Uerton Cniurchlll 

Smith Harry ll.»innnll 

Tom Johnson Howard Hull tiibson 



With lOrnpst Tiuex featured this 
comedy by \k .iliam Ant^oay AI^'Guire 
was brought Aur.'25- to the Harris 




actor tricks so obVionrf iu i^ny per- 
formances. "Jnne Walker proved ai 
fascinating dark-haired foii.^.i:Uic. has 
a. If pice and wetliod that bring intel-; 
ligcncc into the cutic ^typc and sci 
liiake^ rf'tfire 'of it than" K,iBf;les an<^ 
sighs. In fact,' tht acting was excep- 
tionally well balanced. Keuucth Hill 
had a part t list fitted him like 71 glove,- 
Ralph Sippcrly as the salesman made 
every. word jconnt for the audience's 
pleasure" and llertcm ' Cluirohill 
brought an unusual dignity to the nn rt 
of the millionaire. Tlicy are that 
way in., life, theae self-made hounds 
of fortune. 

The comedy itself hok|9 more than 
appears o!ri'"tbe surface though tha 
fun about a bride's poor cooking baa 
been done too often and is overdone 
here. That is the fuuU, but Mr. Mc- 



nc'w play in a prolog and three act» 
by Philip Bartholomae and Jaspc. 
Kwing Hrady, presented by Williat. 
A. Hrady. 

Mr. Hrady (William A., not Jas 
per) which Mr. Hrady (Jasper, no. 
William A.) had written in collubo 
ration witU Mr., Bartholomae aui 
rjiei'licd lip his sto^•ehou^'e lint, du. 
out a eounle of sets, tacked on t 
couple of drapes formerly part of th. 
Hotel Knickerbocker furnishioKU, anc 
.slipped the whow into produrtiou 
Tliat was .some lime in the sprlo:; 
At that time ?amca Crane (Mi. 
Hrady'a, 8on:in-lp\y — >y\ljjam.'s, t|t>v 
Jasper^s) shared the starring honon 
AWth Henry -Ki Uixey. Mr. Diie 
•stm ff*maine InMhe «"a»t but I^oui 
Hehnison iMLi replaced Mr. Crane i 
tl^e .7ii.Qttntimc. v , 

The review of the play in th 
springtime indicate^ there >vaan . 
much chance. There. dbf»so't seen 
to have been ' any tfitnf ' don^ to thi 
play since that ha':s improved it» 
chances. Those chances ■'tare thaf 
Mr. Hrady. r.( Hill,, not. Jasper) wil 
send those,,.. couple of seta badt tib 
the storehouse pretty qulcl^. .r 

Whatever ' honors in . t|ie playlfiw 
must be bestowed unreaetVealy o 
Mr. Dixcy as a conHd bur|flar. Mr 
Henniaon failed to impress; There 
^'jish't a sincere note sounded at an;* 

Boint in the dialog that waa : aaabmad 
im. Two .wbmeu in, the c||gt, Botl 
failed to |[et overj Evita Nu<|sen had 
a fla'{>per I'ofc supposed to b« a coin 
edy relief. Dorofhy BdltaaVd waa th. 
heroine. Dodson Mitchell waa moa! 
unhappy in hia role. Freddie Lawahc 




».«.•> 



SHOWS 



PALACE 

The Palace did capacity Monday 
night despite the opening of I^oew'a 
State a block below. At 8 o'clock the 
ticket lines stretched out past the 
sidewalk with the entire lower por- 
tion and boxes .solid when "Datlsc 
h'antasies'* opened 

Considerable switching had occur- 
red after the matinee due to tli^ ill^ 
noss of the Kaufman Bros., who were 
off the bilU with Frank Van Hoven 
<loul>ling into the v.ncancy^ from the 
l»ro.<<pect, Brooklyn, c'o.sing" the" shoxy 
to an 11:05 start nnd dragging down 
one of the hits of the .evening in a 
.snot as tough as Belleau Woods. Van 
did a great show for the wise eggs. 
pulling many a wise crack. At one 
m'onuMit he Tracked 'If they make me 
close the show tomorrow I hope 
Ii<>ow*s S'late is a gr«'at success." As 
i.^m as his card went up the walk- 
(»ut stopped 



t(»r intermission, with Harry Carro!! 
and Co. starting the second half off iu 
great, shape. The "Varieties'' in the 
main sticks to las^ sea.son's book, \vlth 
the new numbers up to last season's 
standards, wlien It was voted one of 
Hie hpst of the revues. A new finish, 
"Leader of the Clypsy Hand," gives an 
opportunity for pretty costume effects 
and a neat dance, by Harry Ijaughlia 
and" the Hennctt.s. Carroll had to 
make a speech at the linale. 

nie Wiltons followed, with Van 
Iloven, on down nt the end of the bat- 
linp order, cleaning off the bases and 
living about eight pounds iu tlie effort. 
It was quite a show and p'ayed lijce 
a charm. (Jgn^ 




money for it in tl\e purse or ijiot, should happen td n^ a g^rl then ah 
We see two famiires wrecked in con- gave a mighty good performance a'^ 
vincing fashion by thnt iadtilgenc<f and n boy.. John Cromwell, ' the Brady 
as A side light a lot of "devoted stage* director, played a minor pari 
guest8'*"wh'o become chummy with' a | with nataralness. 

worth takil" 
I^ is somewhat aim 



car ownsT at Ibat owner s expense. 

What is going to put this show 
across is word-of-mouth advertising. 
Young ' men' wiT take their yonnji 
wives or eweetheftrts lo it .iust to 
shpw. them indirectly pit-falls to 
avoid or to let them see illustrated on 
the -stage what is snrging In the younii 
m/in's bo^pm. I'^oc this is not op't 
a good cohiedy. but a wholesome ob- 
ject lesson OS wel'. Lecd. 




reiTne.-pepperetl. up with several dit- 
ties, wfis w.''w»|yif not vopjferonsTy 
^prcciatect 'The applause way^ wh-^le- 
Bome. wj^hal. i^oon is. a likcabje cbnp 
who danci»B anrl producevi well, but 
gtW owes hi sT tailor, his haberdasher 
awd hiJr'barW# J'rtTnlties. He hns n 
IHtle sistar 'psdrthat. will make the 
yaltbaalts .♦twJns . step lively. They 
pottthAicneajn-.TbafACt la for the bcs* 

clean, moving, or- 



tl!«t.»c combinrwlioh,, 
M>ei^s Ar\(\ mSu 



RIVERSIDE 

The booker- of thki hou.se sent a 
funny show this week. Devoid of 
Vnames'' .siiflicienty magnetic to at 



Iftford cleaned up with 
♦.heir Arkansas comcdr. the saw w'>rk 
and the split-sole hoofing. They took 
heme the biff'^sid' bam; of the house 
nlioWiOind. went) to their apple-gorginjj 
en<y»?(^. Fr^ffK Fny.fhad been "called 
♦xn.' Tyilh.hJa.,CDl7^ iasa band, me.nn,- 
wniie, HP" the ^cr<Swd knew snrnrises 
^eiHtrp'nint'.'llnf tills team could have 
h^M m\t for nVTeast one more ham- 
»*f->fld-fl!hr nntr.ber. 

Judf ed. .bv.' this show, the das.^lc 
Ptale Theatre, .described nt lenpth 
e]#e^h(;i;Q \j\ this edition as to def-iiil. 
J^ nijyte c^ijiabl^ pf .Qffering vandeytllf. 
j'ooni^n^ it.«», orlclpal policy was aimed 
lot >tral^ht*Y>>^Hire presentation, the 
seA»i^ic».^re atWfied to acts that g*t 
their vtnff tn 'Ifhe hnlVs eye. Tt isn't 
^ in. easy honsi^ 4o play. Sketches 
^11- nrohablg b^, rrare. and fiano- 
♦jned KAh wiU get lost in space- 
But talking acts can make it if they 
talk up. and singing arts r.nn rr^t ns 

Seed a break'here as can be expected 
I ■ theatjce ^f, it« magnitude 

LhH, 

BACK PAY 

■.1^^* ^- TZ^ods.sept in a walloping 
Jjt at the TOniii because Helen Ma'- 
Kellsr Is a'fAMHnnHng woman v^-ith 

• 'jwching • abponl. because FUtood 
'• «»"Stwiek is one director in a mob 
Jno hnn theatre sense and a soul, be- 
cansp W^Of<t gsve it a lavish cast nnd 

• Prodnc^tfoti that for detail is 1m- 
wnlste and; virtuslly nncritifissble. 
•«»i beeavseFnnnte Hurst furnished a 

-^qhft did not write. a great play- 

i 2Jl?"*' ^ iiW not create a wop- 

^ 5gjfrtl story. i\ui she compiled from 

' iCTi: I ^*^*^ Way." from TaitdeviHe 

■■W ehea, fn^ii a dosaa succesi 

WW DUMhtlemanta. then added 



<l:inco cleverly nnd harmonir.e agree- 
iihly. They•stop^l;d the a(^t on three 
different occnaions. Harry I^UKhhn 
and Crace Fi.sher shared the balance 
of the individ.ial honor.s with Carroll 
himself. The aiMlicuce ate up every 
thini? they did. , . ,. 

The Wilt«)us followed the llcnnctLs 
and soorcd hngolv with their vocali/- 
ing and music. They wisely de cted 
some of the ofTerioKs. cettt<i>4 to them 
enriy nnd leaving tlu»m huiiKr.v. The 
Carroll act >vas sevcath with the 
Wilton's eighth. „ ^. 

Liddcll nnd Cibson. a small tmie 
(Itio of fcmae iinp«*iii<»»atojs with .n 
hJR time prodn. tiou. were in second 
position. Wliat»'vcr merit the turn 
p:)ssesses lies in the f.-tlsctto v<;»<*«''^'- 
iiv of the !»tr:ii.','ht nTMiibor. Hie at- 
tenuated cfMurdian gets a lew ihm^'Us 
on his physhitie. bur intifTs wilh dia- 
l.>«»ue The removal of the wigs Ml 
the finish waa mildly Hiirpn.siUi^ to 
about one-fourth of the audience, llie 
hirn i.s reminiscent of Ssvoy and 
Brennan in construction. As coO- 
rerns delivery there is no conflict. 

"Rolfe's Kevuc" (New Acts) was a 

good No. 3 sclcHiou. Johnny Hurkc. 

fourth, found th.' k-hm;; ju.st to his 

liking nnd cleniiod up with his soldier 

mouoloRue i\u>\ chanicler that sounas 

fiMuiior now that the clouds of \yar 

have rolled away thnn it did durinR 

the war Hnrke lops off his siwcinUy 

with some trick temp.. i»i:ino pjaymg 

ihat ia.Bure fire. He <"'>k/,a\,;; 

.lo-en bows then had to go back to the 

box for another encore. , . . 

•Tarlor. Bedroom nnd Bath, wilti 

Rda Ann T.uke nnd Snger Mtdjley in 

the feature roles, got considerable 

lauffhs from the action and situations. 

The dialog started nothing, .despite 

Miss lAike's extreme ;^;"»t."g.'*^'Wh 

was reminiscent _of I- Joronoe Mo^," 



PERSONALITY 

Dortnta Hogah '..... .ProtMlo T.awshe 

SlmpHon ....;..... .John Cromwell 

A Windo.w Cleaner Krank I'ock 

John C. Ivcnt Dodson Mitchell 

.rtidce I..awton. . . . .. .. Albert .Suckett 

Ituth. Kent.-. ■• .E>ovotUy Bernard 

•ViTV Murdnck ....Bvlta Nudacn 

rWbrrt Wainwrlichi Taiu!* Ilr>nnlsoii 

I<eary. a burslar. Henry K. Plxcy 

Krf.nK^lfi Wnilum J. L*M>>rpuof 

Jenkins. . Ildbert Vivian 



is the prolog. 

ilar to the opening of "At 0:15,** ,tbt 
Dtady hit of ^a couple of years ago 
The scene, a girl's bedroom, is an 
tirely plsyed in the dark with a faint 
glpw of moonliglrt from a single win 
dow.. There are two sbota, twc 
screams, n thrawn . slipper, a sil 
liouette of the burglsr, snd that i> 
all. It promised tq be interMHiir 
but proved boreSbma ss it contlaitad. 

Fred. 



The Playhouse Score Season, '21: 



MAARIAOES ' 

Evelyn O'Neil^of the 6'Neil Bia 
ters on the TiOerw circuit and John 
Kelly of "A Week from Today,** alao 
on Loew's time,' were wedded laat 
week on the stsge of Loew's Ststc 
in Oakland, Calif., after a perform- 
ance. Members of the other acts on 
the bill witnessed the veremony. 



•, '> J ,-. ' 



,' '■ y\ ,.\ ,' , -I '"'•>''cc.n» •.•-•♦«!r .•: ■: ' 

r garden variety, hit and run type of wnmon and a myn are really artisli 



vaudeville patron, who likes his wordH 
ami music written in the "Knglish as 
she is spoke." The supporting cast is 
worUiy. . ' . . I 

Whipple and ^uston opened the 
second half, followed by .Toe Darcey. 
l>arcey just about exhausted his ren- 
ertoi're, doing three riu'orcs, the last 
"They Needed a Songbird in Heaven"' 
with Jark StanHey, the composer, as- 
sisting from the stage box. Darcey 
is a rcve'atjou. ■ He has. won hin big 
lime sPurs most certainly. The Iteyij- 
olds i'onegan familiar skate danciqg 
act closed hut could not oITset the 
(ircat Kxodus at thla late hour. 

Abel. 




I 



successes, 
to^ 



to a Blow start, and was bending fo. 
flopland when the complications siip- 
nlied by the author intervened an*! 
Bsved it There was mild applause 
at the final curtain. Miss Luke takipn 
the lion's share mauily for )V" J»r J 
the *'flirtation rehearsal bit. whiiU 
was well handled. 
The TopicB were dispensed wtin ai- 



.JSiUen .Van iiicne to Feedeeick' Bkl- 

Wftf^ M^cljC*.!^ Aug. 2.1, M 

is4:i:ib^p«A .fintn.Mi patKyp dUh¥m|t%- L •''^^■*^5;i»'» /*><«'''WaiT;tiia. »v»o«tni»to«j ; ^^h^^^ >fet.^p Willi^ai ,R Ilpnr 
>fai^ygji»iii^t<i, .-ipten^tmyly. . .Vo-.sil.ly . M'^^Jj^Jl^^^^^^^ ^ .^^i'-Hh^^mm^^ ,,^^idgcp»i:t„^ 

sib y (he weather, uncondiiclive to' in- 
door entertainment had soinctliiug to 
do with it, and it- is ijiiite possible the 
lioew Stale opcuHig liirther downtown 
was n factor. 

The :»liow h.idtwo acts new to bic 
time vaiKle^llle liercaliouts ''showing- 
here. They are Harry Kahne and 
l.ang atul Vernon, the latter a familiar 
oop liQusc framcup under s^Vcr.il flif- 
fereot-monicaa, including LaDg and 
I'.ce nnd Lang aild IWrl. It is a man 
and woman <oinedy team, the man do- 
ing a hybrid yiddish niit characteri/.a- 
tion with a line of 'hatter revolving 
on the inistind.TstandingH as to Lang's 
reference to "Who.'' "llim." "What." 
etc. These parts of speech also bring 
proper names. They . anpear Hi l.v 
things to pun about and smack of 
po[) rearini; hut the laughs reluctant 
almost excuses the means. N(vxt to 
shutting (he lirst section they w'alked 
off with a sweet hit. 

The big flash of the show was the 
Whipple and Huston production, 
•Tinii ." Ir is a curious conglpinera- 
tion of hokc. gepiiine .sentiment, ser- 
?uo!ii/.iM^ Mild ja/./.y cnlertniiiment (hat 
ri-.piiK's no furllijer coniment than that 
the sum total is a good rating de- 
spite the momentary <|»»l*^riora(ion into 
-some tawdrv attenipls nt sentimental- 
i/.injf. That "S.-idie (he Streef'U'nlk- 
cr" opus is a'l wrong and the Salva- 
tion lassie getaway maken it rah.-rah 
and '•Ameri<an Flag" in appearance. 
The present personation ia too 

Nrish. - , 

('(•rmdini's Animals opened to fair 
attention. I'ollowing were Miller and 
rapman. straight ho»>fers late of the 
"() Itrien (Jirl" who showed an inter-, 
esting col eetlon of steps in the deuce 
spot to kindly attention. Kane (New 
Acts) was brought down to the trey 
from reopening after intermission, the 
Itryiiolds Donegan Vn. switching to 
the faretliewcll spot. Following Lang 
snd Vernon's seance, Josephine Victor 
& <'o. Hhowed (heir ".luliet and Uo- 
tneo" sVit from the pen of Harry 
Wagstaff* Cirihble. (hi.s being also a 
change down fram second after inter - 
mUsion. Miss Vic(or has ao Ipteji- 
gent lltHe vehiole in five scenes that 
is built just right for class audiences, 
of the Palace and Hiversrde grade. 
Tturdened with Just that much adipose 
lexicology to flstter (he onlooker ns 
eligible for the soph istica tad, it Ifl oy 
no maana too heavy for the conuBaa 



BROADWAY 

Monday ushered in the .second week 
of (he new "State-Lake" continuous 
poHcy at the- Hroadway. The "State- 
Lake" idea, which So very closely re- 
sembles the original ontinuous plan 
initiated by II. F. Iveith in Hoston W 
odd years ago. iiud a ytsir or two 
later . at 'the Union Square in Now 
Vurk'that there is but a shade of. dif- 
ference between them, has caught pn 
in a positive way at the Hroadway 
(liat leaves no doubt of its permanent 
success there. ' 

The opening of Loew*i State, up 
Hroadway a block or two, seemed to 
have some slight effect on (he attenrl- 
aiiio Hi the Hroadway Monday night, 
the crowd being a bit smaller than 
MHiinl between 8 and 8:30 than any 
night of the previous Snd Initial w(>ek 
during the same half hour, lly 8:43 
the orchestra sorption bad filled up. the 
balcony temaining light throughout 
the evening The mt week (last 
week) the Hroadwaf did remarkably 
well with its ^ew policy. Whether 
the State, will have a continued ef- 
fect on the lii j^^uaj business re- 
mains to ba seen, that probably fe- 
peoding on tha relative atrength of 
the showa of both houses. 
• Tha current Hroadway show lists 
nine sets, aevtn appearing betwaen 
n:43 and 10:1L It'a a small time ar- 
rangement, |)la9iang w«ll enoagh, with- 
out reaching aay particular standard 
of merit. "An ArtisUc Treat." a 



caMy d^ne The; act registered very 
well for an opening number. Hasoi 
and Shsw, two ' girls, were second 
scoring with one girl's cleverly hsndled 
male impersonation. It seems a Uls 
take for the impersonator to discloa. 
her sex so cirly in the set. A bar 
monizcd double 4oward the fibisi' 
caught the fancy of the bunch and re- 
turned the girls aubstantial spphtusc. 
Hurt smi Jtoaedale, third, landei 
with comedy sod music and the mai 
of tlje act Moored his usual heavy re- 
turns with loose dancing, a type o 
stepping at which he is adept. Th' 
femal<» orchestra seemed to nave dif 
fieulty in catching the exact tempo o 
one of the Hurt. and Rosedalo ilmnf^.y 
and this apparently disconcerted the 
(cam. The h'>use liked the act and 
accorded them several bowa at tn* 
fini.sli. 

Caitca Hros., fourth, were the hi* 
Dt the f^iow Monday rtight. The ban' 
i%>e steppers got the crowd in a n* 
cf'ptivo state of mind prior to th- 
dancing wi(h their conversational ex 
changes ami when they reached the 
dancing they simply killed 'em. Mur 
ray Kissen and Vo. (New Acts) wer< 
fifth. Stsn Stanley and Co., sixtl< 
msde the foyrth comedy set in a row 
Mr. Stanley kept the Isugbs comin." 
at a good average of speed through- 
out the set with his conversations' 
cliatter. The doUar-fov-a-laugh Irasi 
ness St the finish landed a neat wallof> 
Jay V>1ia and Otrls, seventh 
pleaai^d with ainglpg and dancing. The 
lyrica of the turn are well . written 
and the mounting ia elaborate, bur 
tha art stems to Isck a needed panel) 
Mr. Velie haa a voice, persoaaHti 
and sll the requisites. All that i 
Baeded apparently is ona outatsndin" 
bit or number to make the turn a 
impoHant aa its people and prt>d0e 
tion should mske it The Brosdws- 
bnach liked the act and weten't .0 
bit backward in saying ao. 

The feature waa *Tbe End of tl 
World," and the eoiMdy fUan one < 
the current Harold l4ofds. Rob«H 
and Itoyne and Dooald slstera wer 
alao included in the vaudavtUa bil* 



woU .la^ed posing turn opened, 
different grouvtiaes. y Migd bf 



The 
two! 



^ Slav ivcraora in inr Tvnu«r«u« 

. I appa«rtaf t trlier hi the STMing 



JieU, 



mwmmmtm 



r 



19PHHBH 



VARI 



777 




BILLS NEXT Vv KEK (Sept. 5) 



(All houiiea open for llio wci-U wilU 

*n4)l< ;i(*«l ) 

'I'lii- IiIIIh txlow are gruui) '<t In dlvislo 
MO NUpplu-tl 'rout 

Tlu- iiianncr In which tJu'Bc bills nr 
liii|MM taiu'c of acta nor tlioir program pu 

*l'.(r<iio .luiMP inillrateB act is now 
(i'.).ti i.<u lioin vaudeville, or appcarlns -n c 



K TIIEATRBS 
Monday matinee, wlien not otherwise 

DP. nccordlng to the booking otllcca they 

o printcil docs not denote the relative 
Itlunii. 

doinK new turn, or reuppeKrIns after 
Ity where listed for the Ilrst time. 



KEITH S CIRCUIT 



NF.W \<>KK Crt\ 
txfiili'H I'ltlure 

T'^ '. .. ..-.►"i-r.- 

.\I v lii-oM A Eve 
1 (;li I i< t KtMnpIo 
It. i\ \V» Irh 
ll.i!iy I'.rroll Co 
i\r 'ii.lh 

Tv.., t ) flin 
Kellir^ 
llirrside 

! ' I •u/. I'll »'0 

I'l It.-. . A I'ritchard 

■n .■( C< 



(Others to nil) 
l«t half (&-7) 

Sancton 
Gold & Kdwards 
Torn Kelly 
(Others to nil) 

2d half (8 11) 
PIdnry Phillips 
Kny Nellnn 
!> 117. MonkovB 
KtilierB to n'l> 
Proctor'H Ijr.tli Rt 

2d half (1-4) 
Snwinp Thur 

M'oninn 
nurnn * Freda 
l».iv' Roth 



BOB BAKER 
f^.nkiirj Arts of Merit My Specially 
COAGT TO COAST 
. I.O ws Ann. \ I'.ulic. Ii5» W. 46th St.. 
Now Vorli 



I 'iMialiUc* 
s \-,: l.iiyal 
. til's Uoynl 
'. ;.:u^S'.' Co 

■j" ' \v ;.• 

r. 1 1 Si 1 Co 

\ 1:. V LandPteld 
; .' t !;:!\rr Co 
' n-i:: I 'handler 
r \ !.• .^: r. nnetl 

. I M a n n •< 
r • !i"h Alhontibrn 
1 s •? 
,1 \'"-re 
U F>,Th- 
,«:• ''.;i'it 
' ' IsliU" 
I ",■.<• :i ,•;. N'lce 
' ■ I 'MiTid Co 
'•■ .-.i.-y Co 
" ! « 

• " oo/iivny 
' ' ■ >ui'y 



•Mir 



M 



•; TMittcm 
w .s' ■■pton 
I ■ -. ta ',in 

-s' Coliv-nm 
V I.I •'"''••>• Co 
II Uakor A- 

1 H r n ^ 
.Iff (lirle 
.1 r. ■-.\:iB» 
t . Ii!l » 
2 1 iiair 

I Inches 
\- I > II r 1\ n 
; ' 1 1 ciiv rios 

• r.-^ to till ) • 
' h's Fo'dham 
I ■ I ton & 
t.«'in 

Uu^'hoa 

:':<-,-it 

» ■•' 's n 

I t.. rui) 

Jd hrilf 
( ' n it Class 

. ' y; ! a II 1 1 ■ ■ 
\ • I ),-i'rc Co 

:il lluntf-rs 

.MoKs' rriinkPn 

.1.; n Tiainor Co 

Cwik-- AL- DjrUIn 

I M \ f Harris Ci 

_.', '.y \.\i --ka Co 

\V( li.i Virginia & 
\V 

2d half 
1 ft J Kaufman 
ncAV'>iff c.i-^iw 
»o»' Ts to nil) 
T<''<th'N Hamilton 
I' • n (I Urns 
T>'i" Cloud * W 
T ♦' Hud 
CM qhor & Shean 

V \- K Stanton 
\'i' f >•• Moore Co 
Conrpe 

M If Karl and 
Ifarkrtt A' Oelmat 



Ijo Monde 
Unrvaril AL: Orucfa 
(One to nil) 

Ut half (5-7) 
Ned Norworth Co 
KlftSB & Termini 
Hob Forna Co 
Flo Lewis Co 
rienee Hoberts Co 
(One to (ill) 
rroctor's A8th St 
Younj? & Wheeler 
Xlarkel & Kay 
A & C. Falls 
Greenloo A 

Drayton 
(One to till) 
2d half 
Rurns * Freda 
Middlrton A 

Spellmeyer 
Cunnin^Miam & 

I'enn* tt 
J it E .M tc>ioll 
(Othrrs to nil) 
rioctor'n .%tli Ave 

2d half Xl-4) 
Saia Alii Co 
Rert Fltzfflbbon 
R Rounrer.s Circus 
Mtiriel Dae Co 
Kla5s ft Rrlll ant 
(Others to fill) 

l!«t half (6-7) 
"Tanpo Shoes" 
Maonrt AC- 

Rradfnr I 
Donovan ft I^ee 
(O'her.s to (ill) 

2<l half <<:-n) 
Frank .Tohnson 
I'.oh»>y O'Neil Co 
Creedon ft Travis 
R'-nee Roberts Co 
X T. O .1 
P'-ortor'« 2.141 St 

2d half n-4) 
•Tronteorlnj;" 

.T ft U A It ken 
Rrvant ft Stewart 
R'-ownl(>e C«> 
(Others to nil) 

lat half (5-7) 
Oroen ft Rurnett 
Sharkey Roth ft W 
NIobo 

Kay Nellan 
D ax Monkeys 
(Others to nil) 

2.1 half (M-in 
Ned Norworth Co 
Flo Lewis 
Harry Truax Oo 
"Bohliid Sccne^' 
Oeorpe \VII«on 
R Rouncers Circus 
(Two to flU) 
FAK IW>CKAWAT 
L I 
Colambi* 
Alexandr a 
P ft N Olma 
Ernest Itall 
(Others to fill) 

2d half 
.TImmy Huxsey Of. 
Yvetto Rusel 
Caites Pros 
Splma Hraatz 



DENTIST 

MrVK'KKK'S THEATItR DLDO. 

Dr. M. G. GARY 

CHICAC.O 
f^preinl Rates tiy the Profeaslon. . 



Kei.li's Jefferson 
Rernlvicl Rros 
Pearson Newport 

ft P 
(Others to nil) 
Prlncet<m ft 

Watson 
Art.stlc Treat 
lAtng ft Cotton 
SaTMiny Duncan 
liob Nelson 
Fernrl ft Dlnus 
Doree's Opera 
(One to nil) 

KIoMs' Keren* 
Valerie RerKere Co 
Maude Allen 
Ram my Duncan 
Musical Hunters 
(Two to Ail) 
2d half 
Johnson Baker Jk 

J 



(Two to nil) 

KIIOOKLYN 
Keith's UuNhwick 
Whipple Huston 

Co 
Clara Howard 
Ellnorc & 

Williams 
Jim JilcWilllama 
Rolls ft Royce 
Worden Dros 
Ivan RankoCt Co 
7 Bracks 
(One to nil) 
Keith's Orpbeum 
Harry Kahnu 
Joe Darvcy 
"Dummies" 
Claudia CoKfnan 
Bill RoblnMn 
Daphne Pollard 
Reynolds A 

Doneiran 



EDITH W. RICHARDS. D. C. 
Chiropractor 

5 Columbus Circle, New York. 
Tel. Col. 1281. Room 316 



(Others to (llli 
Keith's tut SireH 
H Watson Jr Co 
Maude Earl Co 
Powers A Wallace 
Lews & Norton 
Frank Ward 
Dancinv Horans 
Kelth*s Hon 
2d half (1-4) 
Kmlly Darrell 
"Frarments" 
Jennie Moscowlti 

Co 
VillnDl A Vlllanl 



Coradinl'a Animals 
Kelth'a Boro Park 
I A J Kaufman 
Tarxan 
Holllday A 

Wlllette 
8elma Bra#ta 
Dorce'a Opera 
(One to nil) 
Sd half 
Jack Tralnor Co 
Wm Bba 
Paaraon Newport 

A P 
DaT« Harrla Co 



MATTY WHITE 

Tht SlHlM P«ptlMltt 
With JACOBS A JKBMON, Ittl-Bl 

*'8TBOf,mwi ri4AYinfc8.*' 



Hurray Girls 
J ft N Olms 

Munh' fr^iitbnah 
'•illy (ilasun 

Jiatidir* "ft' Alili»a 
KdilU' Toy Co 
C'oopan ft Casey 
Adolphus ('o 
Keilli's (irecnpolnt 

2(1 half (1-4) 
Pnlrit'ola 
llnyat.aka Bros 
CItitori Cappelle 
tl« iiry "^lorton Co 
/others to nilT 

1st half (5-7) 
Moore ft Folds 
Lon-: ft Cotton 
nov^nnn Timberir 
Henry s Animals 
(Two to nil) 

21 half (8-11) 
Ro't Forna 
F .C- T Rabin I Co 
r^rvTiovan ft Lee 
CI, I ft RdAvards 

CTrvn to nil) 

K^lth'N Prospect 
''d half (1-4) 
.Too Cook 
Alex Rros A Eve 
Chas Lloyd Co 
Kay Nellan 
Dlar. Monkeys 
^Ono to nil) 

l.st half (6-7) 
Rert F'^itzglbbon 
X I. O 3 

2<l half («-lt) 
Herinan TImbore 
*Tan>ro Sho«!«" 

ALBANY 

Prortor'a 
RIckard Keane Co 
Harry .lolson 
Blvey Rls Co 
(Others to nil) 

2d half 
Great Johnson 
J C Lewis Co 
I^eipzlfT 

20th Century Rev 
(Two to nil) 
AI.LFNTOWN, PA 

Orpheum 

P^h^orU A Pollv 



2d half 
K£lka ft oianley 
MorsMn ft Hinder 
Duffy Jf Keller 
Hhr c,f , 4 

Ir . • L '.,?r. * ^• 

^'CLKVKLAND 

Hippodrome 

Wllsun Aubrey 3 
Funnan ft Nash 
Sully A HouKhton 
Lloyd ft Ruben 
Jay VeJIe Co 
H A A Seymour 
Henry Hantry Co 
COLUMniJH 
B P Kelth'a 
Jennler Rros 
WhIhJi a- Kdwnrdn 



Valda A Co 

liOWBLI^ 

B r Kelth'a 4 
Aero Plane Ulrls 
IjOWS Fceley A 8 
T P Jackson Co 
McCoy A Walton 
Robert Rellly Co 
D D H 

GarcinettI Bros 
lw\NCAHTKK 
<k»lor|il 
McDermott A Vin- 
cent 
Chas Wilson 
Jack Levey Co 
(One to fill) 

id half 
FieldInK ft Boomer 



Melodl«)Us Ma;ds 
(One to nil) 
MONTKRAL 

PrlBCMB 

(Sunday opening) 
Paul Levan A M 
PeiTRy (?arhari 
Emerson A 

Baldwin 
Wllliani Kent Co 
Franklin Chaa Co 
Healy ft Crons 
"In Arrenflnft " 



PORTLAND 

B V Kelth'a 
Spoor A Parsona 
Jean LaCrosa 
McCormIck A 

Wallace 
Marshall A 

Williams 
Mr A Mrs T 

Martin 
Presaler A Klaiss 

PKOVIDRNCB 
n P Kellh'« 
Pierce A Qoff 
Klutlnv's Annuals 
Helen Moiatl 
C A F Usher 
Jack Hanley 
BAB Wheeler 

tWihrs»^a«Mta»M 
ttelly Ward Co 
Dare Rrnii 

READING 
Hippodrome 
Cllbson A Price 
Chas Tobin ' 
l40venl>erir Sla A 

N 
Royal Venetian 5 
(One to nil> 

2d half 
Flylnu Henrys 
IMntn ft Boyle 



Toney A Qeo Co 
TORONTO 
HlppodroMo 

BaranoS A Son a 
Carney A Rose 

J R Johnson 
ESdward Esmond 
Co 

Shea'a 

Black A White 
McFarlane A 

Palace 
Frank Wilcox 
Fred Elliott 
Step Lively 
Fold ft Rice 
Joe lAurle Co 
Daly Mack A 



Co 



, . Praetor's . . 

Great John-son 
J C Lewis Co 
I^lpslir 

20tli Centui-y Rev 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Richard Keane Co 
Harry Jolson 
Elvey Sis 

(Others t.) rill) 



JUST A MINUTE 



In Variety next 
ino the formation 

417 Komax Itldr.. 
245 WcNt 47tk St., 
Now York. 



week an important announcement will be made regard- 
of a new partnership. 

MIKE LEVY 

CHARLES J. FREEMAN. 



Lane ft Harper 
Wilbur A 

Mansneld 
Jack Benny 
Dooley A Bales 
Beeman ft Orace 
DETROIT 
Temple 
La Bcrnecia Co 
Vernon Stiles 
Taylor Howard A 

T 
H A O Ellsworth 
Paul Decker Co 
Roy A Arthur 
Doris Duncan Co 
Silbor A North 
BARTON. PA 
Opera House 
Stanley ft Caffily 
1«<>anore Kern 
Annabello 
KInir A Irwin 



Let Us Represent 

You For 

Broadivay 

Productions 

and 

Shubert Vaudeville 

1403 Broadway. Tel. Bryant 841-S42 



Crvule Cocktail 
(Two to nil) 
3 Belmonts 

2d half 
Stanley A Caffery 
Leanore Kern 
Annabelle 
King A Irwin 
Elsie ft Paulson 
j^I^TOONA. PA 



Clovn Seal 
Fraaar A Bunco 
Da I ton A Crjalff 
Hampton A Blake 
Amaranth Sla 
2d half 
Donald Sia 
Hart Warner A Vi 
"Dreas Rehearsal" 
Primrose 3 
Brcen Famlv 
ATIJINTA 
Lyrle 
(Blrm'nxham 
Split) 
1st half 
A A L Barlow 
Bert Howard 
Pauline Saxon A 

Sis 
Elm City 4 
Tonnerv'lle 

Tootor^ 

ATf^ANTIC fWTY 
Garden Pier 

Juffirtincr McBanns 
Ann Gray 
Wylle ft Hartman 
Cral» Campbell 
Geo Jessel's Co 
Kane ft Herman 
Lorner Olrls 

BAf.T1W/>RB 
Marylfad 
KAA\p Rons 
Psv'n A Darnell 
Chiek Sale 
Victor Co 
Van Hoven 
T.uclll«> Chalfonta 
Bender A 

Armstronff 
F * K Cikrmpn 

BIRItfTNGHAM 
Lyrlo 

(Atlanta Rpllt) 
1st half . 
Ela'tie Sis A H 
.TeanI MIddleton 
Pearls Gypsy Rev 
Mnllen A Francis 
"Current of Fpn" 
BORTON 
B P Kelth'a 
Dancinir 

McDonalda 
Haiir A Levera 
Newell A Moat 
Jaa J Morton 
Bert Brroll 
■ Taliferro Co 
Challen A Reko 
BUPPAIO 



Elsie ft Paulson 
2d half • 
Babcock & Dolly 
Creole Cockail 
3 Belmonts 
(Two to till) 
ERIK 
Colonial 
Raymond Wilbert 
Hazel Crosby Co 
Cook A Oatman 
H .HoUnan Co 
Jennings A 
Howland 
Doris Hnmphrlea 

Co 
GRAND RAPIDS 

Empreaa 
Unusual 2 
Willie Solar 
Bobby Bernard Co 
Casey ft Warren 
Flashes 

Kranz ft White 
2 Sternards 
HAMILTON. CAN 

lorle 
Camilla's Birds 



MT VERNON, N Y 
Proctor'a 

2d half (1-4) 
F A M Britton 
-Jazz Baby 
"pencer A 

Williams* 
Ed Taliaferro Co 
Rome ft Oaut 
Renee Robert Rev 

1st half (6-7) 
Creedon A Davis 
John Conkey 
Mme Hermann 
B Bouncers Circus 
(Others to nil) 

2d hnit (8-11) 
B^rt Fltzslbl>on 
NIobe 

Dowson Sis Co 
Tom KcUy 
(Others to nil) 

NEWARK N J 

Proctor's 
Id half (1-4) 
Tom Kelly 
NIobe 

DaliRR Walker 
Hazel M.inn Co 
7 Bracks 
(Others to nil) 

1st half (5-7) 
Murray Girls 
F ft T Sahlnl Co 
(Others to nil) 

2d half (^-11) 
Moore and Fields 
Macart A 

Bradford 
(Others to nil) 

NORFOLK 
AendeniT 

fRlchmond .*?plit) 

1st half 
Musloal Geralds 
Howard ft 
Norwood 
Denno fl ft 

Thibniilt ft r 
Devoe ft Statzer 

PHILADRLPITIA 
n F Keith's 

Herberts Docs 
Jed Dooley 
Vaughn Comfort 

Co 
Baraban A Grohs 
W A Joe Mandell 
MMIer ft Cnpman 
Keane A Whitney 
Saed A Austin 
Olranl. 
Joe De Ller 
McBrlde Gazette A 

M 
Dave FerKuaon Co 
7 Military Glrla 
(One to nil) 
td half 
Dave A Lillian 
Joe Martini 
Mark Hart Co 
BiK 3 
Jack T^evey Co 

Keystone 
T.orImer ft Hudson 
W ft. M Roeers 



Columbia ft Victor 
Claude Golden 
Kavanaush A 
Everett 
RICHMOND 
Lyric 
(Norfolk Split) 
Ist half 
Overholt A Tounc 
Cecil Gray 
F Stafford Co 
Wilson Bros 
A A B Frabelle 

ROANOKE VA 
Roanoke 

Juirffllng DeLale 
4 Brown Girls 
Max Bloom Co 
Vic Plant Co 
Lloyd Nevada Co 

2d half 
Bedford ft 

Winchester 
Merritt ft Rrhlwoll 
Hayes ft Lynch Co 
Alexander A 

Fields 
Wyoming 3 

ROrilEKTER 
Temple 
BAP Vanentine 
Ray Raymond Co 

3 Kitaros 
Theresa A Wiley 
Fisher ft Gilmore 
Joe Rolley Co 

Ed H II 

Mabel Fonda Co 
SAVANNAH 

Bijcti 
(Jacksonville 
split) 
1st half 
Robert ft Robert 
Dora Hilton Co 
Wtyno Marshall 

A C 
Murray Bennett 
Meldoy Garden 
SCHKNRCTAOY 
Proctor's 
Musical Johnsons 
Kelly A Pollock 
Alcott ft Ann 

4 Entertainers 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Perez ft 

Marguerite 
Pollard Sis 
Reval ft Mack 
Bert Walton 
7 Hon#«y Boya 
SHENANDOAH. 
PA 
Strand 
RIcardo A Ash- 

forth 
Kramer A Patter- 
son 
Marie Casper 
Musical HlRhland- 
ero 

2d- half 
The Rheltons 
Kmlly Darrell 
ITarry ^Joulson Co 

/One to nm 



POUS 

BRIDGEPORT 

PoUa 
Melnotte 2 
Ruby Kids 
Anderson A Burt 
Warren A O'Brleu 
"Rubeville" 

2d half 
Dell A Giles 
Lexey A O'Connor 
Doyle A Hamilton 
Mine Kee 4 
"Cave Man Love" 

Plaaa 
O'Connor A 

McCormIck 
Briennc ft Klnr 
Dolly Dimplin 
Murray K'asen Co 

2d half 
Dave Johnson 



VTICA. N T I 

Gaiety 

Carl A Ines 
Dance Fantasies 
(Others to nil) 

2d half 
The Waltons 
Alcott A Ann 
(Others to nil) 

YORK, PA 

Opera Hoase 

Flying Henrys 
Pinto A BoylA 
Columbia A Victor 
Claude Golden 
Breen Fam ly 
2J half 
Olbaon A Price 

T>ovenbe>-|{ Ki« ft "i' 
Hampton A BlaV 
Royal Venetian 5 

WASHINGTON 

B P Kelth'a • 

3 I^rdens 
Clinton ft Rooney 
"Pronteerlna" 
HowanI A Sadller 
Horaee Gold In Cu 
2 Little Pals 
John Burke 
Davis ft Pelle 

YOIJNCSTO^VN 

Hippodrome 

Reynolds 3 
Bernard ft Garry 

Toto 

Newhoff A Phelps 
Chas Howard Co 
Nat Nazarro Jr Co 
Olsen A Johnson 
Ben Beyer 

CIRCUIT 

sWeency A Stanley 
Carson A Kano 
Nestor A Haynes 
Money Is Money 
8CRANTON 
Poll* 
(Wilkes-Barre 
aplit) 
lat half 
Zasa A Adele 
Bergen A Bloom 
Fox A Curtia 
Marguerite Padula 
Morton A Jewell 
Co 

SPRINGFIELD. 
MASS 
Palace 
Hannlford 
Sw^ATiey A Stan- 
ley 



If *you want Time in the 
West communicate with 
the Largest Independent 
Vaudeville Agency in the 



World. 



ERNIE YOUNG 

AGENCY 

1312-13 Masonic Temple 
CHICAGO 



Nevins A Gordon 
Grace Leonard Co 
"Knick Knack" 

HARTFORD 
Capitol 

Dell A Ullss 
Tuck A Clnir 
Doylo A Hamilton 
Biglow ft Clinton 
"Money is Money" 

2d half 
Melnotte 2 
Prank Jerome 
Walter Flshter Co 
F A M Dale 
Leightner A Alex 
Rev 

Palace 
Dave Johnson 
Plaza 3 

Elizabeth Brice Co 
Nestor ft Haynes 
"Knck Knack" 

2d half 
a Dixie Boys 



CIUCAGO 



BOSTON 



NEW YORK 



DANNY DAVENPORT OFFICES 

Artlata Representatives. Our Acta Always Working. 

£46 W1SST 47th STREET (Romax BIdg.) Hulto 216. Phone: BRYANT 467e 

MICKEY CURRAN, Manager. 



Klly 

Will Mahoney 
Dillon A Parker 
Fraacea Kennedy 
Bevan A PHnt 
Coartney 81a 
Kallam A O'Dara 
Allca Aahna la 

CHEsrm. PA 

A4««M«it 

Nathaaa Broa 
JAB Paca 
HartUy A Patiar- 

•OB 

Adier. A Daabar 
Boekrldffa A Caaay 



Black A O'Donnell 
Edwin George 
Gladys Delmar Co 
M A A Clark 
HARRISBURO 
Majeillo 
Donald Sia 
Hart Wagner A H 
"Dresa Rehearaal" 
Prlmroae 8 
Kavanaugh A 
Bverette 
2d half 
Clowa Seal 
Fraaer A Bunco 
Dal ton A Cra'ig 
Amaranth Sla 
(One to nil) 
HAZLBTON. Pa 
Pedcy'a 
The Sheltona 
Bmlly Darrell 
Harry Ooulson 
(One to nil) 
Id half 
RIcardo A 
Aabforth 
Kramer A Patter- 

aon 
Maria Oasper 
Moaical Higbland- 
ara 

INDIANAPOLIS 
B F Kolth'a 
LAP Murdock 
Howard A White 
Swor A Weat brook 
Traeey A McBrlde 
BIngera Midgeta 
JAGK80NY1LJJK 

Areada 
(BaTaanah Split 
lat half 
Tha Norrallaa. 
Carroll A Gordon 
Odda A Vnda 
Bob Mllllken 
Warner Amoroa t 

JOHNVroWN 
MijMlla 
B A JOray 
D RIafetnond Oi 
Kntar t 
AtaafMaa A Shialda 



Henry B. Toomer 


SYRACUSE 


Co 


B F Kelth'a 


Ben Sm "th 


Maxinc Bros A 


Brown Gardner A 


Bob 


T 


Melva Telma 


Wm Penn 


Primrose Scmon A 


Kafka A Stanley 


c 


Morgan ft Binder 


"Love Race" 


Duffy A Keller 


Jack McGowan 


Big City 4 


"Wonder Girl" 


Little Jim 
2d half 


Proctor'a 


Nathane Bros 


Perez ft 


JAB Page 


Marguerite 


Hartley A Patter- 


Pollai'd Sis 


son 


Peck A Parsona 


Adier A Dunbar 


Regal A Mack 


Buckridge A 


Bert Walton 


Cssey Co 


Robinson's Bab> 


PiTTSBfTRGn 


boons 


Darla 


2d half 


Rasaell A Devltt 


Musical Johnaona 


Meehan's AnlmsH 


Jerome A Frances 


MOLLIE WII'LIAMS 


. "Comedleo affim** 


apealag Tolorin, O., t 


lept. 4. Boak ravalc 


and lyrtea by 




Jack Clarcnco J. 


Narab Laa 


Stern, Marks 


& Hayroond 


1€68 B*way (flat 8* 


.) N. T. CIrcIa •t40 


Mack A Jamea 


4 Entertainers 


Olenn A Jenklna 


Kelly A Pollock 


"Mualcland" 


(Two to nil) 


Sylvia Clarke 


TOLEDO 
B F Kelth'a 


Althaa Lacaa Co 


Reddington A 


Bharldaa Sqaara 


Grant 


Scalo 


Whltneld A 


Rene A Florence 


Ireland 


Sidney Taylor Go 


Pilcer A Douglaaa 


Flanagan A 


BAB Gorman 


Stapleton 


Hope Bden 


The Herberta 


Jack Norworth 


MAY an 


d HILL 


DlMettoBt JACK Ur 


IflB— KBITH. 


MOBWT 


rZ-KBAVS— LOBW. 



Ruby Kids 
Anderson A Burt 
Bobby Folsom 
"Rubeville" 

NEW HAVEN 
Bijoa 
Lynch A Zeller 
I^lghton ft Rrady 
Walter Wt«:<er 
Grace I^onard Co 
Roland Travers Co 

2d half 
O'Connor ft Mc- 
CormIck 
Tuck A Clare 
Dolly Dumplln 
Murray Kissen Co 
(One to nil) 
Palace 
Percival Olria 
Lexey A O'Coni^or 
Abraham Lincoln 
Mbig Kee 4 
"Cave Man Love" 

2d half 
Cuba Crutchneld 



Story ft Clark 
Health A Sperling 
WAG Dooley Co 

2d half 
Percival Girls 
Mason ft Dixon 
Elizabeth Brice Co 
Pietro 

Evelyn Phillips Co 
WATERBURY 
PoUv 
Cuba Crutchneld 
NAB Gilbert 
Lelghtner A Alex 

Rev 
Pietro 

Gene ft White 
2d half 
Hannlford 
Plaza 3 

Stevens A King 
Eddie Foyer Co 
Shamrock A This- 
tle Rev 

WILKEH-BARRE, 
PA 

Folia 

(Scranton split) 
1st hair 
)'Donnell Co 
Al H Wilaon 
Kennedy A Bcrle 
HAP Oakes 
Royal 4 

WORCESTER 
Polls 

Joaaphine Harrity 
Maaon A Dixon 
Evelyn Phillips Co 
Eddie Foyer Co 
Pender Troupe 

2d half 
Gene A White 
Story A Clark 
Abraham Lincoln 
Heath A Sperling 
Poland Travers Co 

PUua 
3 Dixie Boya 
Frank Jerome 
Nevins A Gordon 
F A M Dale 
Shamrock A Thto- 
tlo Rev 

2d hair 
NAB Gilbert 
Lelghton A Brady 
Brlerre A King 
Biglow A Clinton 
Arthur Miller Co 



BOSTON— KEITH '8 



BOSTON 
Boaton 

Teachow's Animala 
Neat Johnaon 
Loncy Haakell 
Welch Mealy A M 
GardoB*a Olympla 

Scolhiy Sq 
Leonard A Whit- 
ney 
Glldea A Jafola 
La Dora A Beck- 
man 
(One to nil) 
Oardoa'a Olympla 

Waahlagton 84 
Jack McAvlifra 
Will!ama A Taylor 
Gypsy Songatera 
BROCKTON 
Straad 
Cornell Leona A Z 
Reed A Tucker 
Claude A Mario* 
I Haley Sia 
Sd half 



Marcello Fallctt 
Bddie Carr Co 
Anthony A Arnold 
Chong A Moey 

CAMBRIDGE 
Ciaffdon'a Cent 8q 
Gertrude Morgan 
Anthony A Arnold 
(Two to nil) 
td half 
Chaa L Fletcher 
Tha De Lyopa 
(Two to nil) 
HALIFAX 
Strand 
Roma I 
Alva Lloyd 
Sydney A Caldwell 
Joe Armatrong 
J 8 Blondy A Sia 
LBWI8TON 
Maale Hall 
Margaret Taytor 
Baxley A Porter 
Ziaka 
Marie A Marlowe 



BILLY GLASON 

"JUST SONGS AND SAYINGS" 



Potteil A Hartwtell 

2d half 
Gertrude Morgan 
Mary A Al Royce 
Joe Armstrong 
J S Blondy A Sis 

LYNN, MASH 
Gordon's Olympla 
ColTmnn A Carroh 
Chas L Fletcher 
Al Ritrhle Co 
2d half 
Bckhoff A Gordon 
Perrone ft Ol'ver 



k NT 14 SKI 

Palace 

The Dc I^yoiis 
Mapnn A Gwvnn 
Eddie Carr Co 
Perrono A Oliver 
Chony A Moey 



2d half 
^ill Morris 
Reed A Tucker 
Three Haley »is 

ft Murlun 
PrinifHH Rajah 
NKU'POKT, H I 

Cohmlal 
Eckhofr ^■ <! r.v,^ 
Shapiro 4t Jordan 
Eva Fay 

2d half 
Alva Lh)yd 
Coffmat ft CarraQ 

Operu liu*ino 

Musical Alvlnoa 
Mar'on Kny 
Weaton ft Younf 
Cooper ft Lane 
Wise ft WVier 



CHICAGO—KEITH CrPfuix 



CINCINNATI 

Pnluce 

Grace Wallace 
Ethel Keller 
Mr A Mrs 



Cook ft Vernon 
Lee ft Granston 
Zelaya 

Joe Fanton Co 
2d half 



I 



Palace, New York, thla week (Ajig. tS) 

EDYTHE MAYE 

Pentnrrd In "Two Little Pals" ns Juliet 
Maryland, Bnltl., this week (Aug. 29) 



Scigfried 
Joe Jenny 8 
Juvenility 
Welch ft Ifazelton 
DANVILLE. ILL 

Terrace 
Llnd Bros 
Mack A Salle 
M Hamilton Co 
Fulton A Burt 
Vampire A Victme 
Bobby Vanhorn 

2d half 
Fisher A I^loyd 
"Blosaomn" 
Marston A Manly 
Lee Barth 
"Smiles" 
(One to nil) 

DAYTON 

Kelth'a 
Vracey Palmer A T 
Al Jerome 
Clifford A Leslie 
(Two to nil) 

(2d half 
Knowlcs ft Hurst 
Mullen A Rene 
Tonnesseo Ten 
Dewey ft RoKer^ 
Beagy ft C la u.<f 
DETROIT 
La Halle 
Mcllyar A Hamil- 
ton 
Mack A Stanton 
Merlan's Dogs 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 
Nippon Duo 
Jo Jo Harrison 
"District School" 
(Two to nil) 
FLINT. BllCir 

Pnluce 
Noel Lester 
John Galger 
Byron Rros Band 
Jo Jo Hnrrinon 
Five Avclun.n 

2d half 
Jo Madden 
Lynn ft Lorey 
Dancing Dorans 
Tilyou A Rogers 
Coales ft Co 
FT. WAYNE IND 

Palnre 
Nippon Duo 
Dewey ft Rogers 
J ft J Gibson 
Bert Earl ft Oris 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Fenwlck GIrH 
Ooeti A Duffy 
Zelaya 

WlUle Hale Co 
•Touch In Time" 
HAMMOND. IND 

Parthenon 
Monroe Bros 
Howard 
Jack Georfre I 
(One to niP 

2d half 
Aloha A Girlie 
Bobby Vanhorn 
Martha Hamilton 
B WnriA ft Girls 
nUNTTNGTON, 
IND 
Hhn^lnrton 



Winter Garden 4 
Valentine ft Rell 
L.\FAYKTTB 
IND 
New Mars 
Willie Hale Co 
Hollins Sis 
Tennessee Ten 
Lee Barth 
RufHes 

2d half 
Mack A Salle .. 
King A Wise 
"Faclnatlon" 
Helen Staples 
O Lovett A Uoyi 
LANHIl^G. MI<5a 

. Htnuid 
The Latours 
GoetB A Duffy 
Milo Dance 
I<ynnfe A Lorey 
(Toates Co 

td half 
Marcellc Hardy 
Cook A Vernon 
Ifee A Cranston 
Helen Collne Co 
Joe Fanton Co 
LEXINGTON, * 
IND 
Ben AH 
Nagfya 

Doyle A Elalna 
Great Howard 
Mullen ft Renn 
"Faclnatlon" 
Rose Bills A R 

8d half 
Spirit Mardi Orae 
Theater Raymond 
Clifford ft Leslie 
Tracer Palmer A 

Tracoy 
Newport Co 
(One to fill) 
MARION, O 
Orphenm 
Fonwlck Gtrls 
Knowle!^ ft Hurst 
Beagy ft Claus 

2d half 
Great l^oward 
Hull A Dexler 
Dnnlay A Merrill 
MT. CLEMENS 
Macomb 
DUtrl'-t School 
Joft Madden 
••(One to nil) 

Sd half , 
Three L^ee^ 
Byron Co 

0WAS5>0 
St rami 
Sd half 
MIrann Dogs 
Miryn A "'Vrnoif 
J A S 0»M«r!» 
RICHMOND 
Morray 

BplHt Mardl Gra« 
DunUy A Merrill 
(Two to nil) 
Sd half 
Nagfys 

Mack A Stanton 
liune Ellis A Roa# 
Harrison Horue <3o 
RA<;iNAW 
.rrffer«-Sfr«n<l 
Valentine A Relle 



FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN 

— ami— ^ 

BEVERLY BAYNE 

IB "THE POOR RICH MAN" 

ORPHEUM, SEATTLE 
Next Week (Sept. 5) 



Reo ft Helmar 
King A AVise 
2d half 
Rollins Sisters 
J A J Gibson 
• KALAMAZOO, 
MICH 
Regent 
Marcelle Hardy 
Watsika 
Rosa Valayda 
Mllo Dance 



Baldwin Austih A 

O 
Dancing Dorana 
Tilyou A Rogers 
H Colinc Co 
2d half 
La Tours 

John Ceiger 
Capper I'limily 
KnapD A « ..inelia 
pive Avelons 



OEPHEUM OntCUIT 



« CHICAGO I 

Palaco I 

Clark A Bergman i 
Dolly Kay ' 



Mary Haynes 
Norton A Melnotte 
Bq^Ei' Combe 
Les Keillors 



CHICK— 



.^ROSI 



YORK and KING 

Preaeat "THE OLD FAMILY TIN TYPlV 

Orphaam Clrcalt— Opened Aug 14 

Faraonal Direction LUE STEWART 



Bradley A Ardfne 
Stone A Ilayea 
McGrath A Deeda 
Cliff Nasarro Co 
Frank A Milt Brlt- 

tno 
Roae Bllla A R 

Majeatle 
Bantoa A Hayea 

Rev 
Morrla A Campbell 
Mocre A Jane 



The Roa 

Bute Lafc« 

Friaco Co 
Harry Langdon W 
Carl McCulloufh 
Farrell A Taylor 

Co 
Connolly A Fr*«* 

A Miniature »•▼ 
Gfecn A Myra 
Ruth Howell J 



(Continued on patfc 18) 

1erd"p7¥oss 

six MttsMal Notaae 
tf W. ft«th Btreatt^Kav York OH^ 



■<,,<! 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



NEW ACTS THIS WEEK 



at 



r:- 



I, ■ 



OAPHNE POLLARD. 

Cliarteter S«iOS- 

15 Mins.; FvN SU|t (Special Hanp- 

lift). 

Wnbinfton, Aug. 31. 

IliM PollanI'* American debut this 
veek at Keith's In this city, althouf h 
^cc«*».-it*'. could not be termed a 
**triuiDi)ii" Sbe sang three numbers, 
her last nnmber, during which she 

kibble, being her best, bringing her 
|i«t one caU. After the bit with the 
^«bbie ahe again goes into the 
ch'orus of the song with the orches- 
tra playiof Ita loudest This really 
took away the applause she oth^r- 
xkise would haTO earned with a better 
finiHh. 

The little comedienne had been in 
Europe for about six years, during 
v.ii lu time she has i)ecome one of 
Eingland's ' most popular Etars. She 
wei^t over just prior to the wai', was 
in the All-Amorican lieyuc iu Paris, 
where she scored heavily. She orig- 
inally came to America when about 
8 years old, with the Pollard Juvenile 
Qpora Co. from Australia, following 
which flhe appeared with various 
companies op the coast, finally ap- 
pearing in "The Candy Shop," where 
she scored. 

, Miss Pollard, so the billing states, 
is here lu: a lin^tcd engagement of 
aix weeks on the , l^th .time. She 
headlines the bill here. The first 
number utilized is J'The Ragtime 
Germ," wherein she is just a bub- 
bling -bunch of "pep." The lyrics, 
however, are entirely lost, only an 
occasional line being understandable. 
This is n1 n true of a little announce- 
ment she makes concerning her sec- 
lind number. This second number is 
"Cleopatra," as she did it in the Lon- 
don halls. Her choice of this is 
questioned, the number having been 
such a big success here as done by 
one of our own comediennes that 
ctfroparisons, from the laugh-gother- 
ifig standpoint, makes Miss Pollard's 
ren'lition run a poor second. 

Her third number about a slavey 
•who 80 wanted but couldn't get a 
man is, as stated, her be^t. The bit 
with the bobbie is a positive delight 
It is regretted that a better finish 
was not devised. 

Her dressing of each number is in 
eftaracter which, coupled with a pale 
lavender drop that is raised, di^idos- 
fcig a special drop for each song, 
proves effective. Possibly her suc- 
tcs6 would have been greater with a 
^ re-arrangement of her numbers. 
However her six weeks, will no doubt 

prove successful. Meakin. 



"ROLFE'8 REVUE" (10). 
Music, Songs, Dance. 
24 Mint.; Special Sat 
Palace. 

This is a C. B. Maddock production 
and includes, besides a leader, a mixed 
sextette of brass p'ayera, a girl 
dancer, a juvenile male singer and an 
ingenue with a pleasing soprano 
voice. _ __ _ _ , 

e action talea place iinHtetrep' 
resenting a veranda with u country 
acene in perspective. A butler greets 
the arriving guests, who are in becom- 
ing seasonal attire.' No dialog trans- 
pires to mar the effect. The aextette 
got right into it with a well-selected 
and rendered medley of semi-classical 
numbers. 

The violinist folio wft in Oypsy get- 
up with a solo. The juvenfle next vo- 
calizes "That's How I Love Broad- 
way," we'l delivered. 

The blonde dancer has an inning 
with a skirt dance, showing kicking 
ability that is later forgotten when, in 
1}lack transparent short dresses and 
fan costume, she docs an almost flaw- 
less imitation (unannounced) of Pearl 
Rega'y's specialty dance. 

A trio of the girl musicians accom- 
pany the soprano's so'o, which landed 
strongly, as did a cornel triple- 
tongueing and range-fiuding solo by 
the male cornettist. 

A double song number by the in- 
genue and juvenile led up to the finale, 
with the sextette sgain handling the 
brass with the four principa's, each 
contributing a bit of their previous 
specialties. None of the people is 



HARRY KAHNE. 

"The Ineomparabla Mtitallst" 

16 Mint.; Two. 

RIveraida. 

Kabne is new to the east althoogh 

a standard in the middle west houses. 
For no other reason than that Tameo 
Kajiyama, the Japanese mentaliat 
preceded him loca'ly the comparison 
tn'rcSorteif to. kahne 'Kiss 'one filing 
on the Oriental performer — his piece- 
de-resistance Is quintuple mind con- 
centration or the art of performing 

five different things at the same time. 
The Japanese does only four. On the 
showmanship angle, the Oriental has 
(he edge, however. He works with 
ingratiating modesty. Kahne strives 
too strongly to impress hia mental 
superiority, empbasblng needlessly 
the difficulty of hiis feata, not being 
content to let judgment on that point 
rest with the audience. Kahne also 
adds a good deal of hand-shivering 
hokum that is good business for a 
few seconds, but its showy, stagey 
continuation is a boomerang. He 
would do well to assume a carefully 
studied pose of modesty. • 

He is a neat-appearing young man 
and whangs the bouse from the start 
even with this, perhaps, excusab-e 
shortcoming of needless display of the 
'ego. His routine proper consists of 
writing sentences upside down and 
backward, reading headlinea from a 
newspaper likewise, finishing with the 
five-point trick, that of reading a 
newspaper, answering questions as to 
capitals of states and giving their 
population and what noted for, split- 



billed. All of the specialists deserve, **°K "° ^»K*>^ billion odd total into six 



it. The turn is entertaining, well 
staged and pretti'y produced. Va- 
riety, speed and a happy selection In 
casting are the main assets. It's a 
big time novelty, this particular type 
of act having passed from the two-a- 
day stages when the producer whose 
name it bears became inactive. He 
has done a come-back with this one. 

' ' • Con. 



MURRAY KISSEN and CO. (3). 
Comedy aad Siaolag. 
18 Miaa.; Two (Special). 
Broadway. 

Murray Klaaen and three men offer 
a mixture of hoke comedy and singing 
that la made to order for the better 

class of neighborhood houses. Kissen 
does a stage Jew, with whiskered 
countenance and the rent of the ear- 

type aa depicted la bvleaque. An- 
other chap alao d*ea a Hebraic type, 
a bit more modemiaed, with a mus- 
tache and spectaclea. The two other 
men play a variety of cbaractera. 

A special setting of a barber shop 
in two, with steps. Indicating the piece 
is in a basement. Is carried. The act 
stsrts with a wallop, an argument be- 
tween the owners of the shop and 
the barbers over an increase in wages. 
Comedy follows, some* very fami'iar, 
such as the shaving bit, with the bar- 
ber lathering a nervous man and 
roughing him up for laughs. The turn 
closes in one with the four men 
seated on chairs doing a moving pic- 
ture travesty bit that sounded some- 
what |ike one. done by a single woman. 
Harmony singing by the quartet is 
also included in the stuff offered in 
one. 

The act landed a comedy hit at the 
"Broadway Monday night BeU, 



ERGOTTE and HERMAN. 
Songs, Dance, Acrobatics. 
(12 Mint.; Fall Stage. 

• Alixed double. The male of the 
pair is a Lilliputian. A novel en- 
trance is obtained by. the girl sing- 
ing about hubby, while carrying a hat 
box from which hubby emerges. 
' He steps forth to sing with an ec- 
e^Qtric acrobatip dance. The girl re- 
turns in cute black short-skirted jazi 
costume to assist, while he does head 
balancing on a perch atop a table. 
He drinks, smokes and talks in the 
ioverted position, the girl doing 
straight. 

She does a fair dance which is fol- 
lowed by haxid to hand stunts with 
the girl os understander followed by 
his ground tumbling all speedily and 
npatly executed. 

It is a fast neat act with the girl's 
appearance helping. They can open 
or close anywhere. Qgf^ 



BURNS and FREDA. 
Italian Comedians. 
16 Min.; One. 
Fifth Ave. (Sept. 5th). 

Burns is half of the former Bums 
and Frabito combination and has 
teamed with Steve Freda, who form- 
erly did a ."single." The former 
Burns snd Frabito turn retained al- 
most in tact with the "saloon" busi- 
ness the comedy high light as before. 

Freda is a valuable asset, being a 
musician of the first water in addi- 
tion to handling his dia'ect portion 



factors, the sum of which totals the 
answer, and also writing phrases and 
sentences upside down and backward. 
There is no doubt Kahne is a val- 
uable vaudeville adjunct. He .is a nov- 
elty for anybody's theatre and it needs 
no further proof than the exclamation 
by a neighbor, "The boy's clever!" 
He held them interested here in the< 
No. 3, and doubtless can hold down 
a later spot Ahel, 



Webb and HALL. 
Singing, Talk and Music. 
113 MlB8.; OneJ 

^ The two men do straight and 
Wop." • The sjtraight roan plays the 
▼lolin and the; comedian the guitar. 
,Thc latter also sings in one of those 
food, small-tinie biHlad voices. The 
■»nging is all there is, The talk is 
not funny and the men do not put it 
«ver pDrticnlarly well. Two straight 
auftibcrs o^| ihe, violin early in the 
proceedings kill whatever chance 
th^ have of getting over. 

The act is just a small timer and 
Uot a good one at that. 



WARTIN udi KENNEDY. 
Talk and Daaoat. 
12 Mils.; One, 

A two-man I black face act with 
Kennedy, formjerly of La France and 
Kennedy, Th^y open by throwing a 
'vge pair of, lawn dice from the 
]^»ng8 to the center of the etage, they 
loHowing the ^bes, going into a rou- 
tine of chattel* dealing with crap and 
J*ce horses. The talk is mildly In- 
teresting and has a certain amount of 
eomedy value. 

^Thelr best efforts come forth with 
^e soft shoe dancing each taking his 

'rx !!l^° ^^ * *^^ >>i^ "^^l finishing the 
!:■ «»■« with double stepping. A com- 
*^y act that has ralue and can atand 
.^ae of the lichtee snAtM am sn« hilL 



THE LORDONS (3). 
Trampoline and Castl.ig. 
7 MIns.; Full Stage. 
Fifth Ave. 

Three gymnasts, two working 
straight and a comedian, presenting 
a fast routine of casting and com- 
edy. The two straight men work the 
aerial stuff entirely, with the come- 
dian doing some of the flying and 
some tumbling And bouncing on the 
trnnip. 

The act is one that gets^ny num« 
her of laughs and more than the 
usual share of applause and seems 
strong enaagh to go down halfway 
on the bill in some of the small big 
timers and get away with it in great 
shape. Fred, 



LITTLE YOSI and Co. (I). 

Acrobatic. 

8 Min.; Full Stage. 

Greely Sqoare. 

Little Yosi is an agile Japanese 
contortionist with certain tendencies 
toward acrobatics. The opening con- 
sists of whirlwind tumbling followed 
by contortion work and hand balsnc- 
ing. The cigar box and handkerchief 
-tricks sre capably bandied with the 
finishing touch a bending bit on a 
smal- pedestal \^hich tops the turn off 
in good style. Yosi is assisted by a 



on attendant. The customary Japan 
ese style of dressing is used. A good 
opening turn for the smaller houses. 



cleverly. The duo may be getting one f young woman who appears merely as 

or two less laughs than the former 

pair but this will be overcome with 

better knowledge of each other's per- 

sorislities. 

The act has been strengthened from 
a mu.sical standpoint, the boys quit- 
ting after 11 minutes but being forced, 
to cticore with the double mandolins 
and mandolin and clarionette numbers 
for an additional five minutes. Burns 
ond Freda are ready for the best of 
(he bills where a strong comedy combo 
is missing. Cofl. 



CONLEY and ST. JOHN. 
Songs and Talk. 
12 Mins.; One. 

The male was formerly a member 
of the American Trio, a singing com- 
bination. In the present vehicle bis 
singing voice is the only excuse. 

Tlie girl is a cute looking blonde of 
the tiny type with a rair, pleasing 
singing voice. They do well with all 
of their song numbers and thave con- 
siderable appearance. 

The weakness lies in the manifest 
inexperience of both- handling dialog 
that is aimed for comedy results, but 
misses widely. The talk got nothing 
between* the numbers, which alone re- 
deemed. 

At present they are a light No. 
2 for the smaller, houses. Con. 



BYRON and PRICE. 
"A Model Union." 
Singing aad Talking Skit 
14 MIns.; Two. (Spadal). 
23d St. 

- Sydney Byron and Betty Price pre- 
sent "A Model Union." It's s simple 
little framework of talk, backed by 
a very pretty landscape netting, drop, 
hanging piece and some set stuff, 
with vocal interpolations and a bit 
of elementary stepping breaking up 
the dialog occasionally. 

Mr. Price has a splendid singing 
voice of ordinary quality^ but posses- 
ses a thorough knowledge of delivery, 
enunciation which, coupled with a 
corl(ing presence, enables him to get 
his vocalizing over excellently. Miss 
Price is a bit shy vocally, but has a 
likeable peraonality, and carries her 
three pretty costume changes becom- 
ingly. 

The lighting of the act helps the 
general effect. A gaoae drape is used 
at the opening, with a red flood shin- 
ing through and making a pretty stage 
picture. The dancing might be dropped 
altogether, with benefit to the turn, 
and something else substituted for the 
present finish. 

An author to bolster up a weak 
spot here and there, and a seasonable 
work out in the smaller neighborhood 
houses out of town, should round out 
a pleasing number 2 turn for the pop 
houses. The act passed nice'y at the 
23d Street. Bell. 



NELLA WEBB. 

Songs and Piano. 

14 MIna.; "Two." Special Drap. 

Fifth Ave. (Sept 6tb). 

Miaa Webb, a headline aingle of i 
decade ago, la making her firat Am- 
erican appearance le ten jeara. In the 
interim ahe haa been In ' prodnctioaa 
and vaudeville abroad. 

equipped with fonr Engtiah-aounding 
songs which she delivera la a clear, 
perfectly enunciated soprano, atun- 
ningiy gowned in a c-oth of ailver eve* 
ning dress. 

Miss Webb remains present 
throughout her entire turn and shows 
good judgment by not requiring her 
male pianist to solo. 

The songs were "I've a Rich Boy 
Now," "Dreaming of You," a high- 
class semi ballad with a pretty mel- 
ody; ''Old Fashioned Waltn," written 
on a theme that haa been copiously 
covered hereabouts and "Honey," a 
cute punch-ess song that was a bit 
over the Fifth Avenue heads. 

In the second position Miss Webb 
did a successful comeback but the 
services of a local song writer will 
make her journey much smoother. She 
has an the rest of the necessary 
equipment of personality, voice, de; 
livery and appearance. Whtn properly 
'oiAfitted she would be 'in demand, for 
the best of time. Con. 



CARROLL and GORMAN. 
Songs, Dances and Piano. 
12 Mine.; One. 

Two young fellows, Tuxedo clad, in 
a singing and piano turn that is away 
from the conventional. Each has a 
singing voice above the Average, and 
each dances well 

Open with a harmonized double off 
stage, following which, one goes to 
piano and accompanies partner for 
- dialect number, doubled for the 



DUGAL and LEARY. 
Piano and Songs. 
12 Mins.; One. 

Two young chaps with the conven- 
tional piano and song double frame- 
up. Both make neat appearance in 
tuxedos with one at i)iano throughout 

The repertoire consists of solos and 
doubles with the tenor getting most 
with a solo version of a pop song well 
adapted to his lyric tones. An intro- 
ductory number about one partner's 
lateness, followed by his appearance^ 
explaining he missed a train, was the 
only divergence from the standard 
two-man singing arrangement. 

They qualify as a three-a-day turn 
of this type. Con. 



ANDY and LOUISE BARLOW. 

Dances and Songs. 

10 MIns.; One (Special Drop). 

A young couple teirly eqipped with 
material, though they showed best in 
dancing. 

The opening bit included a prop 
acrobatic stunt and a short lyric that 
led to a duet dance. The boy with an 
eccentric number gave way to Miss 
Barlow,, who changed to very nifty 
male evening toga. She^ essayed a 
ballad that about passed. Her dance 
single met with much .betten results. 

A Bowery bit finaled the boy, sing- 
i^ a special lyric to the tune of 
'Uosie O'Gtady,". while his partner 
changed. The exit hud the boy somer- 
saulting. The act fits for number two, 
three a day. Ibee. 



RASSO and CO. (1). 

Novelty Jogglar. 

15 Mint.; Fall Stage. 

Rasso is • clean cut blonde man 
in evening clothes. HIa assistant is 
a becomingly garbed woman. He doea 
all the standard juggling and balanc- 
ing stuff In snappy, artistic fashion 
with several new and. novel crcationa 
interpolated. One waa the balancing 
of a victrola in operation atop a whip 
balanced on the men's head while he 
spun a phonograph record on a atick 
in one hand and juggled two more 
records with the other. 

Another difficult looking feat waa 
the juggling of *a cannon ball, an egg 
and a tiny bit of tissue paper. "Ball- 
road Pool," with two cues and the 
object ball, spinning a table cover 
mounted on an aaael edte tbarwaa 
balanced on hia forehead, and ball 
"control" were his beat efforto. 

Raaso wCU interest any audience. 
It is a big time novelty turn for the 
top or bottom apota. Con, 

-'■ 
BURNS aad FREDA. 
Comedy aad Mnslcal. 
22 Min*.; One. 

This two-man copibination is doinit 
the Burns and Frabito routine, with 
the talk much the some, but with the 
musical portion extended. 

As many laughs were won with the 
comedy as by the former combination, 
Freda foiling Bums well. The imUkiw 
when left alone atrummed a aweet gui- 
tar, and could have tarried longer. 
Following the balloon bit from the 
regular routtse, Byma ambled forth 
with the little mandolin and later 
joined by Fr^dn with his guitar, they 
started the moalcal section that waa 
much encored. A song in between 
landed, and in bowing they brought 
the instruments on as an invitation to 
more applause. 

The net wont over with n bang and 
came near stopping the show. With 
the musical feature so we'l built up 
and the comedy sure, the team can 
take a spot on any bill. Ihee. 



COSMOS TROUPE (6). 
Pyramid Work and Tumbling. 
8 Mine.; Four. 



choruses. A 8ing> with a neat waits] That second line under the act'sj fOLLETT'S MONKEYS. 

clog included. The other chap piano- '■ "*- -'*- ' 

logs a mother ballad. He has a lyric 



name gives away the troupe's forte — 
pyramid building and ground tumbling 



NADA NORRAINE. 

Singing. 

8 Mins.. One. 

Single woman straight singer with 
.pleasing voice and pretty frock of 
pale green. At opening sings off in 
voice resembling boy soprano or fe- 
male baritone. On entrance sings two 
current popular songs then goes into 
familiar number from one of the 
Italian operas, doing one verse in 
high soprano and another in female 
baritone. 

Gets applause for the double voice 
performance which is agreeable to 
listen to in both registers. For en- 
core sings yodling number, finishing 
in freak high note that wins burst 
of Applause for capital exit. Good 
small time number on strength of the, 
double voice performance. Rtuh. 



SHARKEY, ROTH and WITT. 
Piano, Maslo, Songs. 
12 MIns.; One. 

Male trio of musicians and singers. 
The frsmeup of the turn is reminis- 
cent of .the old Rathskeller trios and 
is referred to in the opening song. 
The violinist, is a fat romedian who 
jnzzcs it up a bit in delivery with 
sawdust technique. 

It's a sure fire three-a-day turn, 
hut lacks the novelty or class to lift 
it. They were one of the bill's hits 
at this house in the fourth spot. 

Con. 



tenor, well controlled and marked" That's aU they have and the Istter 



with plenty of range and a noticeable 
sweetness of tone Double raggy 
number harmonised and another 
double with a ooft ahoe dance for 
the encore. 

One of the most promising two acU 
of Ita kind that has been aeea around 
in yeara Belk 



won the gravy; the topmouqting 
business brodied to marked silence. 
Fortunstely they desist in thst line 
of endeavor soon enough for the lit- 
tle comedy business they have lead- 
ing up to the whirls and tumbles. 

It's an opener of amaH big and 
better small time calibre. AM. 



ANIMAL and JUGGLING. 
8 Mias.; Full Stage (Special Drop). 
A monk plays the drums after the 
manner of the Monkey Hippodrome 
acts. It is worked in exactly the 
same manner and gets quite a few 
Isugbs. In d>etween there are other 
animal training stunts snd some club 
juggling by the man and woman who 
work the animals. It makes a light 
opening act for the smaller billa. 



NORBERT and LOTTA. 
Music and Songs. 
12 Mine.; One. 

M»n opouM playing violin. ITe is 
joined by woman playing saxophone In 
a double of published numbers. Fo-- 
lowing she solos on the sax with a 
few near jazz movements and a bit of 
dance. 

He inserts a violin solo, "Piccstta.** 
ets., while she changes to short 
.skirted cape costume to return with 
pinno accordion when they double 
"La Veeda." Another 'double fol'ows 
the woman singing a ballad to the ac- 
companiment. Another double with 
vocalizing concludes. 

The eauple are good musicians c-i 
can hold an opening spot on the pop 
bil's thereby. The 'vocslizing should 
go out. Hhe has n thin unrousicsl 
voice that detracts from the^eneral 
impression. Con, 



.^ xS* 



VI'. 



IF 



ft 



VARIETY 



l^tflay, SeptemVer 2, 1921 



BILLS NEXT WEEK 



Vom 
Broi 



(CoDtinucd from page 16) 

DBNTER 

Orphcom 

WlM Co 



* Bald- 



Iroason 

Y«ra Berliner 
Wanaer A Palmer 
■vhD & Dries 
Clinton Bis - 

"XJivano 4 

\ DKH MOINES 
OvpbeBBi 
Boaaer Huiualno 
Byron * Hala 
Billy Arlinstou Co 
Bloasom Be«ley Co 
Jo« BrowAlns 

Nnio * Rlsao 
DULUTH 
OrphciUA 

ilarry Conlvy 
Bob La aalle 
Helen Keller 
l>aley & Berlew 
Hel Klee 
Bert ftteh-oae 
Mari«rl« Barrack 

KDMONTON. CAM 

OrpbciuM 

ISauie bUI plays 

Cal«aiy 8-11} 
Carlylu Black well 
McKay A Antlue 
Meal Abel 
Bennett Sts 
Qukxey Four 
4imglin« Nelsons 
Carletoii & Ballew 
BANSAB CITY 
tHitheum 
Ijsrry Comer 
Hwh Herbert Co 
Weeks A Barron 
Matbews A A)rr«s 

?fmtaius A Wolftts 
enipest A Bun- 
shins 
WInton Bros 
Van Horn A Ines 

MNCOLN. NKB 
Orpbcam 

Trixie Frlganza 
Wilfred Clark Co 
Oyci A Yadls 
Mans A Bnyder 
Booth A aina 
Geo A Moore 

IiD8 ANOBUM 



Prssscr A Oardner 
Carson A Wlllard 
Flanacan A Msir- 

fIsob 
Oordon A Ries 
Ona Mvnssn Co 
Vosr LAsnys 
^san Barrios 
MKMFH1S 
Orphs«na 

Lasra Plerpons Co 
Bsth Berl Co 
Blar Friscos 
CttConI A Johnson 
Char Harrison Co 
fltacpole A Hplrs 
Pss^Uack A M 



Dooley A Stocsy 
Bwlft A Kelly 
Fsarl R<cay Ga 
Jack Koae 
Ooill Troupo 
Margaret Ford 

OMAHA 

Orphsum 

BAP ."""lll^?'* 
Franc iate fCt-itiiotij 
Qeo Yi'oinan 
"On Fifth Ave- 
nue" 
DeVoe A Hosford 
Sultsn 

8T LOUIS 
Orphn— i 
Bsbbles 
Oene Orcens 
Dorothea Sadler 

Co 
Jack Joycs 
Lola UlrUe Co 
Bartram A Baxton 
Bsbble Qovdone 

ST LOUIS 

Tip Tip 

Tapbanksrs 
'Ja Da S 

Porter J Whtto Co 
La France A 

HarrJi 
Carlisle A I^nial 
Tyler A St Clair 

ST. PAUL 
Orphcam 

Bd Marshall 
Bcblchtl Co 
Adams A Urifllth 
"ln<|oor Sports'* 
Grace Nelson 
Mo ran A Mack 
SALT LAKB 



Gob Edwards Co 
Jack Inclis 
Ljady Tscn Ms! 
Norton A 

Nlckolaon 
S Romanes 

BsfVisted A Marlon 

BAN FHANnSCO 

Or^euni 

Jallan BItinge 
Frank Farron 
Clalnnont Bros 
NaaoB Wslah Co 
Gallagher A 

Martin 
Mshllnser A 

Meyer 
Marlon Morgan 

8BATTLR 



Bttsbnan A Bayne 
Watts ^ Haw ley 
Tork A Kmg 
Galletti A Kokin 
Henry A Moore 
Clifford Wayne 8 

Barbette 

SIOCX CITY. 8 D 



Mlohon Bros 
Bailey A Cuvan 



UNUSUAL DUO 



; FITteK Mi^ OBO. JBNNT 

This Week <Aar. »> Tmtmtr, Chles«o— 
Week Sept. 5. Rmprsss. OnHMl RapUls. 
BotiAcd Solid 1921-S8. D'r. Frsnk Brann 



MILWAUKEE 

Pttiacs 



Zena Kcefe 
Billy McDermott 
Martha Prfor 
The Rosellas 
W H Arm>>|ronc 
. Co 

Wilbur A Adams 
Adams A Barnett 
^rd A Price 
Majsstle 
J>ore«.'s Opera 
•*flnm m ert hn e" 
I<ysBs A Tosco 
Melville A Rale 
Moody A Duncan 
Barry A Whitledro 
Frear Bairffott A P 
The Rayolitf-e 

MINNF.APOIJ.S 

Orphrum 
Van Ccllufl 



Corlnne Tllton Re 
Foliis Sin 
Andermtn A 
Graves 

VANCOUVER. D C 

Orphsvs* 

Muldoon FAR 
Princeton A 

Watson 
Gantlor's 

Bricklayers 
Los A Fay Dubello 
Millard A Marlin 

WINNIPBO 
Orphensi 

Hughes Munif-al 2 
Wood A Wydo 
Aileen Stanley 
The Cnnninos 
Adler A Ross 
Bowers Walters A 

C 
Wallace Oalvln 



LOEW S CIRCUIT 



NEW YORK CITY 

Ntate 
PAW LaVarre 
Babe T^eTour Co 
KvturJHtic H'>vije 
CallAhun A lUis!i 
6t Clair Twins Co 
(One tn nil) 

2d half 
Rtanley ft Klva 
I<anibert A Fish 
P'lerU.rl; Kl^ 
Folry «r O'MfJll 
Mrru^ Ilia If o Co 
fOne to fill) 

Anicrlrnn 

Wt.st & Van Sick- 

loii 
DoriDvan & Ilan- 

kell 
Wilson ft LAfson 
JliiiMiy I,yrin;4 
Quintette Huirhf-a 

Co 
IF.)w;ir(l ft P.rown 

r, A i: i'hi1(<» 

t'laylnn Ar l.rnnle 
Dcfiifn Ai CUfS 'M 

Cd l:alf 
Alloi., 

Kf lly ft Jcilinpon 
H«aly, i:. i'ihiir.l 

Miirlt ,';. N, N< n 
<!r;i/"r .':• CivLr 
(l;i t fii 1(1 ,'> :■"•. 1' I 
Lri^li I '' I .:»' y Cm 
Ila'T .V i:.! .• 
Vro .■:• 'I''!': / 
\ i'tori.1 

l''is';.- ft r,;:,n 

;•!;.;. .;:. i-n In i;Msi- 
r»i 111 !■ k ft D.v 



"Put A Take" 

2J hair 
Ilnrt ft Ileh ne 
Beainont ft Kinir 
'•riayniafc-. ' 
Callah.in ft r.lJFs 
Kalfa.uhl Co 

Lincoln Sq 
I-ar.tl;ro 2 
J ft <' N;ithan 
DoURlu^ Klinf Co 
CnUnt* ft Prlla;! 
Martin 1 

:M hnlf 
Ma*M ft OjB ,1 
Jennin-'T ft .AT.II,.'> 
r-UMiby ft Kiown 

}lf'n;1.1,l ft l:;jy 

I'ep <) .Min^ l:. V 

CIroelrv Sj 

Want. II .'c I iM',.<?fo 
A! r,',,;,.. 

<"Jia!iM ft T^TMit, -t 
f'ra/r ft I.awl, r 
Ma" I, ,:- N' ly ,., 
Castii,^' I !n- ,1s 

?.'] ii..ir 

•T A I. S'- V .„^ 
T")-ii:.il ft !.»;♦, 7 
I"*'il < 1 Mix 'u;. « 
♦ ' ! 1 1 1 ; i t i ■,• k ft I >, . - 

V ,^ I 

Vf (•'-.•r r-.]n-. C,, I 

r>illlllr( V >t 
U )-i' r- .\.,u;,:; i 

;<■! f I II ! ■ ( ;. .. , :• ,. 
p» I' < • :.!: t. n, v 

M( ( '. •:, r> 'i ■■ 4t 

\V I.. . V il 
I< ilC; Ci!i r Co 
(•-)n.' I > ! .' ) 

2 \ '■ r.r 

T.ift!.> ^ . •.( «•.» 
A! C.;:-; 



Ronber A Golds 
Jack Martini S 

National 
Hart A Helens 
Mai[nmy 

••Welcome Homo" 
Lambert A Fish 
I>ilett« Co 

2d half 
Bell A Gva 
Psbe LaTour Co 
"Busmess is Busl- 
nens" 

OrvlieaBt 
Hash I A Osal 
H A I< Stevens 
Uartlehl A Smith 
Stevers A Kinr 
Fol«-y A VNelll 
Kallaluht Co 

2d half 
Billy KInkald 
Flsko A Falloa 
Fox A Kelly 
Fr.nnk Terry 
Paisley Noon Co 

BaalevMrd 

Little Yoshl Co 
Du^al A I^iCary 
Bond Berry Co 
Frank Terry 
Dance Creations 

Sd half 
Stevens A King 
ilertrnde Georys 
*'Welrome Home** 
ColHnA St Plllard 

Atsahs B 

Cordini 

Jennlnes A Melba 
Hyde's Revue 
Baker A Rocsrs 
(T>so to fill) 
Id half 
Nora Jane Co 
Dave Gardner 
Gould's Jesters 
Maley A O'Brien 
Cook, Mortimer A 

II 
(One to flII) 

HROOKLTN 

MciropoUtoA 

Stanley A Elva 
Cum by A Browtt 
Fox A Kelly 
Race A Bdge 
Mme Hlnlta Co 

Id halt 
Went A Van Steh- 

len 
Quintette rTa«hss 

Co 
riaytnn % Leaals 
Csptlnt; Lloyds 
(Ono to nil) 

Fnltoa 

Bell A Bva 
Bctor A Dena 
Duke's Mlxturs 
Hnghle Clark 
(One to (III) 

2d half 
PAW LaVarrs 
rhnllif) A l^nwbert 
O A E Parks 
Howtrd A Isobell 
Bettys Seals 

PalDos 
Plunkett A Bo- 

maine 
Davfl Gardner 
Maley A O'lirlen 
Cook Mortimer A 

Harvey 

2d half 
Chan Martin 
Dance Creations 
Jimmy Lvi ns 
(Two to n»v) 

TVarH-lstc 

Nora Jnn«» Co 
Tollman A Kernan 
Cnpt Mndero Co 
Terry A WMbur 
Gould's Jesters 

2d half 
BurdcM ft Burden 
Rnth Fifer A . Co 
(Two to flllV 

ATLANTA 
Oraiul 

Summ'-r-* 2 
•T.oro" 

Mnid^ retonij^ 
TId Bits 
(One to Sll> 

21 half 
MrTkl ilwn A Ade- 

laiil 
."'nnntMy ft 9t John 
!^1tirra/ ft Lane 
DTrv ft Ntrkerson 
•One t". .1?1) 

RAMIMORf! 

llipivMlroms 

Kennoilv A No'Pon 

wint/x Smlfh 
nawl<-<* A Van 

Kauffmnn 
Lane ft Freeman 
Charfonff^ 3^* 

niRM«N4iHAM 

i;ilon 

MiM ft mum 
Collins A Dunbar 
Grtfarth Brock- 

away Co 
FrHTik T'.uvh 
"Girl Til li.iitct" 
2,1 lialC 

PuinTr>»'TH 'J 

Ma;,'" PcToPir 
TM C:'«? 

(On*- tn n'n 

UO>iTOV 

Orplieiini 

TT ft A :-'T.»nton 
V ft K Tlinko 
II. M,;; C:-..".vn Cn 
•T t\v 1\ ' '1 iv<) V Cry 
Hu.l, r ,'.• Winifred 
Chan Mill"' 

.T^^^:^;^•iu' )', Tiler 
Ci,i>l\n:k S* Snad- 



UALIAH 



r. »..,• 



I' ;\T 



l't:t .".• •!',' 



Oll.c:.;! 1»(iifi«:t to tl:i< N". V. A. 

BE. JULIAN SIEGEL 

Mf)' Ui. iit!xv.)y (I'lilnjini r.!(!::.') New \fvk 



Haynofls 
Joan A Shayns 
laaboile Miller Co 
Gso H*::ither 
l>e Pierre I 

>i half 
Monte A FartI 
L^oLyle A lUrmoA 
tlordun A Jo lies 
LuelMuaa Luct a 

Dttyksn 
Dancing Cronlns 
Tlll«»r his 
Tripoli S 

Arnold A Manlon 
Lss Valadons 

ad half 
Frank Bard en 
Mystk) Garden 
Washiafton S 
▲rdsU Bros 

DBTBOIT 

CvlMikil 

Palermo's Dogs 
Johnson Bros A J 
Skslly A Uelt Hev 
Wm Dick 
Mykoff A Vanity 

FBBSNO. OAL 



WATCH FOR THE 
LADDER CLIMBERS 



c 



Ttv 



j\Vi;'-M ft T-ar.son 
Mii,l(' r\ H'". !iij 
(i)A<' ••■> f. II) 

C tIK ACO 
>!r^ icUers 

r:,i c >•■': !:>::* 

' 'i|.-'; ;r ' .'/ W'p^t 
Tavi-i- M;,' v K- U 
V}y ,}• : fill s:,ijn Co 
(r, .J., fa I'l) 

CI ?.V!:i.\M> 

[.ilfirly 



W 

.Mi 
l-'i' 



I 'I : 
■ ' I- 



i /. t.'u 
oil 



Cason Bros 
"CJosy Revoo" 
Moher A Bldrodge 
"Katiand" 

M half 
Work A Mack 
Lrndssy A Hssel 
Connors A Boyn«< 
Wslters Hopkins 

A C 
S MuBcal Buds 
HAMILTON. CAN 

King Htreet . 
Arthur Abbott Co 
Bern Ice LeBarr Cu 
Johnson A i^rane 
Hector 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Stsnlsy Bros 
Uslsa Vincent 
Wm Morris Co 
Danny Simmons 
-Patches" 
UOBOKEN. V J 

lAew 
Austin A Medford 
Ada Onnthsr 
Nails A Co 
Kane A Chldlow 
4 Dannbes 

2d hAlf 
Plvnkett A Ro- 

maine 
Fred Gordon 
Byncopstcd Step- 
pers 
Terry A Wilbur 
Vee A Tully 
UOVSTON 

Prines 
Polhi 
Hilton Sis 
Roof Ganlen S 
Lnbin A Lewis 
t Baiters 

2il half 
Harts A Evans 
Jack Lyle 
Musical }«f loses 
Morrissey A Tounf; 
Graf* Avres A T^ro 
KANAA8 CITY 

<>raiMl 
Pollyana 

Bingham A Meyers 
Murray A Popkova 
Beck A Stont 
Russell A Russell 

2d halt 
Zelda Bos 
Keefe A LMIIan 
Palmer A liounton 
Elwyi 1 

RNOXVILLK 

MnMahon A Ada- 

Ulde 
Connelly A Bt John 
Murray A Lane 
Berry A Ntcherson 

2d half 
Glenn A Rlohardn 
Kennedy A Martin 
Arthur LIov«l 
AerUl Macks 

LONG RBACH 
CAL 

Rtste 

Peters A T..eBufT 
Roblnnon A Pierce 
Walter Kaufnr\^n 
"Straight' 
Bvann Mero ft F 
D«'>wning A Dunn In 
Sis 

5d hnlf 
De Albert A Mar- 
tin 
Walsh A B^'ntlry 
Link A Philips 
Chaa C.lbhn 
"Ruboiown Fol- 
lies" 

LONDON. CAN 
Loew 

Andrieff 1 • 
Marcar*>t Merle 
Phoenix 3 

2(1 half 
WondfT Rt-al 
MorriH ft T(jwne 
IJrowrr 3 

IXIS AVr.KI.ES 

IItUITO<lromi> 

DeAIhorf ft Martin 
Walsh ft Hen t ley 
T.Ink ft IMilIlipa 
fMias C. ;.!.<) 
"Rnh<^t,<\vn Fol- 
Jlts" 

:.! half 
On^f'^f^n IIj-M-j 
"Cf.'.v Tt»'\-i<"' 
Ttr.ti'f ft r:! IriiliT- 
"Kat!an<l" 

MEMfHiS 

«T;nrV, ,> ft' Cr-rv 

T. '•!'•. .'•'.;, w (•,> 
IJn'iin'-, ri .Mfi'.in, 
3 

?'1 half 

ArlTiur V>»\\,m Cc 
/•n'.iiv .r. !%-,)! t 

M01jF<T0. CAL 

H .1) 

< '• t r. • ■. ,r- IN.\- v^ 



Rarti A Evans 
Jack Lyle 
Hammell's Mii 
Morriasey A Toung 
Grace Ay res A Bn> 

2(1 half 
Sinclair A Grey 
Wheeler A Mack 
Leila Shaw Co 
Robinson A Mc- 

Cabo S 
I Dancing Surprale 
QAKIiANB. CAL 

King A Cody 
Harndton A Wal- 
ton 



A C 

t Musical Bttds 

(•-I©) 

Kinit A Cedy 

Hamilton A Wal- 
ton 

MOXTBBAl. 
Lsew 
Nerman A Jean- 

ette 
Pstrlce A Sullivan 
"Nine O'clock" 
Leckhardt A Lad- 
die 
MBW OBLEAN8 



Hilton 8 s 

Roof Garden I 

Lubin A Lewis 

S Baiters 

BAN FRANCISCO 



Rita Shirley 
Burke A Burke 
Frank Sbepard 
Royal 3 

ad halt 
Stryker 
Galloway A Gar- 

rette 
Frances A Dey 
Bnrton A Dyer 
"Fortune Queen' L 

Wlgwnns 
Btnta Bros 
Reed A Lucey 
Frank Rogern 
Madame VerobeUe 
Co 

2d half 
Appier A Appier 
Rita Shirley 
Burke A Burke 
Frank Shepard 
Royal S 
SAN .lOSE. CAL 

HlppMrenae 
Marco Co 
V Allen A Moore 



Mellssn M ax 

.TEN EYGK and wJ&lLY 

with **Vp In The Clnvdn'* Co 
No«v Onrrick Thentre. lUicngo 



Fien A Tennyson 
Mack A Dean 
The Onhhects 
Mack A Dean 
Tbs Gabberts 
ad half 
Marco Co 
Allen A Moore 
Chapman A Ring 
Gordon A Heolcy 
"Inspiration" 
OKLAHOMA ClTl 

I4h<ttT 
Australian Delses 
Fl»teh#r A Terry 
Cato S Keith Co 
Street Urchin 
Walter Baker Co 

M half 
Cnriton A Beck 
Thanks A Kelly 
Harry Berry Co 
Al Tyler ' 

OTTAWA 



AerUl LaValln 
Frank Hartley 
Melroy Sisters 
"Let's Go" 
Jails Curtis 
Lewkis A Thornton 
riTTSBURO 
Lyceum 
Montambo A Nap 



Chapman A Ring 
Qerden A Henley 
"Insphratten" 

2d hnit 
Stnts Bros 
Reed A Lueey 
O P Randall Co 
Frank Rogers 
Madapte Verobelle 

Co 
SPBNGF*I>. MA88 



Snetl A Vernon 
Chadwlek. A Tay- 

tor 
Cniattef 

Guy Bartlett t 
Wyoming 3 

2d half 
Erfotti A Herman 
Cliff Green 
Fre^ Weber Co 
Gillen A Mulcahy 
Chas Harte Co 
STOCKTON 
Stafts ' 
Stryker 

Oslloway A Gar- 
rotte 
Frances A Dsy 
Burton A Dyer 
Jean Hanlcastle 
Co 

2d half 



JOHN J. KEMP 
Theatrical Insurance 

08 JOHX RTREKT. NRW YOIIK CITT 

Phone Bowling Green SlOO 



Orville Stamm 
Flanders A Butler 
"Cotton Pickers" 
SI Jrnks 

M Montgomery Co 
Lvriuliiv S'Rters 
CHICAGO 
Americnn 

Howard A Chass 

Co • 
Milt Collins 
Lloyd A Rubin 
Jitsc tL9.&..Bcaun 



Jack Gohile 

Klbcl A Kane 

Weston A Blins 

Rose Revue 
PKOVIDKNCE 
■mtiy 

BrgQttl A Herman 

Cliff Gren 

Foster A Kay 

OUlen A Mulcahy 

Malera Revue 

Fred Weber Co 
2d half 

Snell A Vernon 

Chadwlek A Tay- 
lor 

Hank Brown Co 

Chattel 

Guy Bartlett 3 

Wyoming 3 
flACBAMENTO 
Stnte - 

Flying Howards 

Zolar A Knox 

T A H Hperks • 

Ward A Wilson 

Ds Msrin 6 

2d half 

TJip Raymonil 

OAK KinK 

J?Tii)nv RoP'-n Co 

Granville ft Fl.'las 



Plying Howards 
Zolar A Knox 

T A H Speck 
Ward A Wilson 
DsMarin 6 

TORONTO 
Locw 
Mason A Morris 
Gordon A Gordon 
"Breakfast For 3." 
Criterion 4 
Dancers De Luxe 
WACa TEX 
Orphenm 
Monte A .Parti 
DeLyle A Marmon 
Gordon A Jolico 
Luce A no A Lucca 
Dura A Peeley 
2d half 
Bird A Ransom 
DuTlel A Covey 
Guillani 3 
Bayen A Fields 
Krenika Bros . 
WASHIN4iTON 
Strand 

Frvf oto 

MeKenna A Fltz- 

putrlck 
Eadlr> ft Ramsden 
Falln ft nobles 



nou 



CARRIE 



AUSTIN and ALLEN 

"BROADWAY TO THE ORIENT" 



"Mixturr.s- 
HAN ANTONIO 
Frln<-eK» 

lUnl ft liiiii.smn 
r»u'rifl ft Covry 
CuUlaiil 3 
Hayt-r ft Fields 
Krcinia Uros 

2d half 
Pollu 

WESTERN 

ALTON. ILL 

lfippo4lr«)tiie 

Fl J Mimpfi* < '<> 

ytfcci.s s<i't<t 

V.| !>.tlf 
Cralff ft (.'alo 
H Mi.ri- U t'li 

i>i.i.i.i:vir I r:.iL 

V«r'iisl(i:iirt<>[i 

I^an- .n,: I. a 1 i.ii !>,■ 
I , . I ; I . : 1 1 • ft I J I : I • • 1 y 
K I p 1 » ft 1\ I r I ' y 

J'l liall 
F ft <) I). 1: ..nt 
NVill,a-:M ft 

Mow. I r, I 
Trip..;; I 
HL()()MIN<iTON 
11. L 
M.I jistio 
7t AInh;, <'.) 
\a:i ft \i ri^n 
K( rui K ' \ .', M 
2.\ h;,:.- 



Royal Harrfiony 5 
WINDSOR. CAN 
L<»ew 

Wonder Seal 

Mo IT is ft Town© 

lirowtrr 3 

2.1 half 
Andrioff S 
Marirarct Merle 
rh'XMiix 3 

VAUDEVILLE 

XeUon K- Madison 
Kd .T.ini.i IC,viic> 
CED.XK UAI'ID.S 

M;i.!r-t;r 
Ffilll.s Sisl'i-sf 
Hilly .Miil.-r Co 

L Al AM. 't 

ItoaM Kill:: 1 

a 2(1 liiilf 

Fr.i*i,.-i ft r.-i k 

Avot i»r <> N. il 
Ifat:s.>n ft I'.uiton 

S'i<-? tV^ 

Cii.\Miv\u;v, 11,1. 

Orp?Hiim 

Cliff H.iM.v 2 
V ft. (; l>. Mont 
TM«,!)<-r ft T-I.,v.l 
Hlrs'-li.,fC!4 !{. V 
.) ■{< !i < i.^-'t I :ji; .1 ti 
Fuur < ' I I'.'r •'!.>« 
•J,l h:.:f 



(Two to nil) 

2d half 
rykoir A Vanity 
Minstrel Monarchs 
Golden Bird 
Al Abbott 
Bronnon A 
Kdwurds 
(One to fill) 

Avenue 
Medley A Dupree 
C Barney Co 
Tableaux D'Art 

2d half 
Fried lander 3 
Oans A Terkins 
Deldrhlge A 

Kraemer 
4 Muakeeters 

Empress 

Wilfred A Dubois 
Ws.'manA Betry 
Milton A Lehmun 
•Touch In Time" 
81 Jenks 
UJrIs of the 
Aitltwle" 

2d half 
WAG Aheam 
: Clifton A Kraeraer 
a Minstrel Misses' 
Kcrvaillo Family 

iliirpev 
Helen Staples 
Bd Janls Co 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Alf Ripon 
Olga-M^hka Co 
(One to All) 

Kednle 
The Brightens 
Flanders A Batler 
Pern>alne A Shelly 
"Cotton Pickers" 
Alf RIppon 
Brolson A Howard 

2d half 
Medley A Dupree 
Walman A Berry 
Manlon A Arnold 

Lincoln 
Golden Bird 
Minstrel Monarchs 
Briscoe A Rank 
Oant!cr's Toy Shop 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
Eddie Hume Cn 
F V Bowers Rev 
Bensee A Baird 
Joe Bennett 
(Two to nil) 
DAVENPORT. lA 

Cslnmbia 
The Question 
Kalania ft Kaa 
Avey A ON«el 
UunHon A Burton 

Sis 
<Two to All) 
Pierlot & Srofteld 
F A O Wslters 
Permalne A Shelly 
••Fall of Eve" 
Geo Morton 
(One to Oil) 
DEC ATI' K. nX 

Empress 
Bennington A 

Scott 
Nelson A Madison 
Howard A Clark 
J "Fat" Thompson 
Kate A Wiley 
(One to All) 

2il half 
f Kitty Thomas 
Anstin A Delaney 
Hirschofr's Rev 
Milt Collins 
Smiling B.lly 

Mason 
Hong Kong 
Mysteries 
DSS MOINES. lA 

llnjcstle 

G A N Fosto 
I A M Hart 
(One to All) 
2d half 
Warner A Cols 
Dave Manley 
Maxwell Qnintee 

wr. Loidis. fix 

Srhers 

TAD Carbrey 
O Pnmarel Co 
Cr«lg ft Cato 
"Bl08si>m8" 

2d hnlf 
T^aplne & FJmery 
Swiss Rone Rlrds 
FagK A White 
Gtrdiner'R Mnnlacs 

KLGIN. ILL 
Riulfn 

2d half 
OVls of Altitude 
Sh-lner ft 

Fitzslmrnons 
Kalair.a ft Knn 

EVANSVILLE 
C«rand 

Wllbnr ft AdaTTis 
Tran.sn.Md Bisters 
Brown iiij; ft Davin 
Nn.««h ft OPonnel 
Hurry dop'r 
Coi rill" Cn 

KAi.Fsitriir., ii.i. 

Orphi iini 

SulMv.ci K- M;ic-k 
Kls',<.> ft'. Klvod 
l-.ullv IToo 1? 

2.1 half 
Kpiinitly ft U;i>^e 
r'ii,.o s. n'..n 
Marl.'tt.M M.iniUins 

JOMTT. ILL 

Orplieiini 

WnitT^an ft. I '..Try 
Rjiv Conlin 

J E r.-'Mit.i Co 

Tnvlor M;i' <y ft H 
(One to fill) 

2.1 half 
Phrhur ft 

l'"'it>:.-;i;iiT:nn* 
0\K\ Mishli Co 
(One t'l fill) 

KANSNS CITY 

(•lolm 

JAN r.iirks 
^K-.iir to nil) 
(On,« to Ain 



B. HBMMSNIMNOKR. Ine. 

JEWELRY niAifONDS"'^^io^'^'riNa 

Tel »7I John 4S JOHN 8T. New York CM? 

rr- ' — i^ - 

TOPIWA. MAX 
Noveltjr 
Capmau A Cnp- 

man 
Joselyn M Tnrner 
(Three to All} 
Id half 

(Four to Hll) 
WATRKIAMI, lA 
Mnjestle 

PAMTAOES 

BCTTR, MONT 



<3-C> 

(Same Mil .pUyg 

Anaconda T; 
Missoula l> 
Paul Sydoll 
Carletoa A Bel- 
mont 
Mary RlKey 
Petite Revue 
Walter A Walter 
Powell Trowpe 
DICNVKA 
Pnntttges 
PVawley A West 
Stela A Smith 
Long Tack 8nm 
••Suite 1%" 
Cnrter A Dsrsey 
GT FALLS. MONT 



(•-1) 

(Same bill plnya 

Helena I) 
Georgallls S 
Lester A Moore 
B Clifton Co 
ChodT Dot A IS 
Al Shayne 
S Kanazwa Beys 
I/O MEACH. CAI. 



Harmony LanA 
Mason A Bniley 
A4onls Dev 
> li^Orohs 
Gay Little Home 
£09 ANOm.ES 



Baggettry A 8hel> 

don 
Xnrdech * Ken^ 

nedy 
llk:hard Franel* 
Jnrvis Revue 
Jndson Col* 
Melmlv Mnlds 
KDCNRAFOLW 



Hvmberto Bros 
Harmony 4 
Ann Suter 
Kennedy A Boone j 
99 Pfnk Toen 
(One to fill) 
•AKLAMD 



#8n»day Ooentnff) 
D Morris Co 
Pantser Pylvn 



Pelert A ScoIh id 
Warner A Co\^ • 
Dave ManU-y 
Idaxwrll Vjuintet * 
(One to ? > ■ , 
2d half ' . 
M6T)uliuii Cu 

Loretta * 

Billy Miller Co ^ 
Marion CKbney ' 

ontouiT 

Burue A Loralqo ° 
» A M l.anret • f 
Jan KaUni > 

WU.tw Hlack A \i 
Jeun Ciibaon ~ 

SALT LAKB 
PantugeN 
Henry ft Ad< laid^' 
Perry A F'eppjno 
"Preilittion" 
Dancing Duvey 
Greenwich Village 

ers 
Bva Tanguav 
SAN DIKtJO 
Rnvoy 
t Desly Olris 
Avalon 3 

Lydia McMillan t, 
Bobby Henshaw^ >t : 
Willie Bros . 
Sprtngtivne FrivoR 

ities 
BAN FKANCISCQ 

Punt««:>M 

(Smday Opening|{ 

Scamp A Bcamp « 

JAM Gray 

Carl Bmmy's PetA 

Sheiton Bruttks 

Santacci 

Flyine- Bnll*'f 

KKATTLR 
Pmntages 
Gilbert A SauT 
"Stnteroonj It* '^■■■■■• 
I.,ew Wiiw^n "j ^ 

Little r:ife" 
Llttlf* PitytfHX I, 

grOKANH '4. 
Psntacce 

e of TVorhl ■' 
n. "Calve 



ABM>ror A .leaneNB* 
-Tale of J rttJoi^ 
Onrry Owen 
Peklnev Tronpo ■■, 
TA€X>MA 



Saul I 

Am Sisters 
Boss Wyse * 

Pantnrea Opem C9# 
Joe WhiteH<>»d 
Clemenn^ ^^Hlnsff 
TOR4VMTO 



I D'A'^n»*»"<l ^ 

Bocers Dennett V ' 

T 1 

Ifekidten A Steps^ 

J 



CBABIIS BORNHADrT 



It vne dcs Frinees 

BRCSSnjfl 



Canary Opera 
Dixie Fowr 
Good Night Lon- 
don 
Ctan BImore Go 

OODBN 

Pnntaffes 

<«-10) 

Amoios A Obey 
Hayes A Iitoyd- 
A Arllss Co 
Lillian Ruby 
Japanese Romanes 

PORTLAND. OBJP 



(Two t o ftll) J 

▼ANCeUVBB « # 



The Western Vaudeville 







nas^ers^ Association 



Jofin J. Nash, Business Manager. Thcn;^'; J. Carmody, Booking Maiiagcr 



Stj^looi^tate 



te-Lake Tliealie Bid-., CIIICAGa XL 




DALLAS 

By WILLIAM H. BRANCH. 

Tho INrnjosfic Tlioatrc, th(» Intor- 
st.'ito A»:i'!-ninei;t ('()iM;mii.v's koyHton*' 
IiMi-r', ui!I open tho season Siiiulay. 
TIio opniinR bill Ih tcpped by Kobyii 
Adair's rrvuo, "Spic and Span." Oth- 
ers' on the program an* i.(>ni)y iian- 

Continucd on pa^e 20). _,,_ 



2d hftit 
Pyncopatcd Feet 
Wlllianis A CMlver 
J Gordon Palers 
Akin Ambrose A L 
Two Edwards 

UNCX>IA MBB 
Uberly 

Rlnehart A DolT 
Dani:lng Cronlns 
Sol Brrnn 
CTwo to All) 
2d hslf 

Peters A West 

llelly 

(Two to All) 

urpueuMA 

Follls «e L>ei-uy 
Cose. a tii V«rul 
Beiuaru A AiugOA 
At \vuuliuan 
^ Lelgni«lle Rev 

A*X liaif 
Ray A Fum. 
"'frip to Hitiand" 
Billy Broud 
JacK Uediey S 
(Two to ttil) 

O&lAllA 

JfimysesB 
Peters A Weat 

Holly 

(Twu to All) 
2d half 
Kale A toduttn 
Harry Hayward Co 
Nifty Trio 
2emater A Smith 

PKORIA. ILi* 
OrpliettBs 

••8mil*s" 
Chaiuberlaln A 

Karl 
F A O Walters 
**Fall of Eve" 
Bense A Balrd 
Lorraine Sip 
2d half 
Keno Keys A M 
Higgina A Braun 
Van A Vernon 
Jack Ostsmian 
(One tn Ail) 

QUINCT, ILL 

Orphean 

Kettne<ly A Davln 
Chas Semen 
Marletis Manikins 

2d halt 
Sullivan A Mack 
Ftske Lloyd 
Bally Uoo I 

BACINK. lUi 

BInlto 
4 Lnnda 

KersUle Family 

2d half 
The BrightoBS 

BOCKFOBD. IIX 

Pnlnos 
Ray A Fox 
"Trip to UMIanA** 
Billy Broad 
Jack Hsdiey t 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
Tosart 

Follls A LeRoy 
Cose in A Verdi 
Bernard A Ragan 
Al Wohlman 
B Leightet Rev 

SPRLNGFIBLD^ 
ILL 

Mniestle 

Orville Htanim 
Austin A Delaney 
F V Bowers Rev 
M Montgomery CO 
Sandy Shaw 
Hnng Rong 

Mysteries 
2d half 
Cliff Bailey 3 
Bennington A 9oott 
Chamberla!n A 

Barle 
IToward A CTlark 
T'st'* Thompson 
Four Canterons 

80UTH BEND^ 
. IND 

OrplisaBi 

Winter Ganten 4 
Joe Bennett 
(Two te All) 
Id half 
Wilfred DuBnIs 
H A J Chase Qp 
Bandy Shaw 
Brisroe A Ranh 
Patrlcola A Delroy 
(One to nil) 

nOITX CITV. lA 
Orpbenn» 

Monohan Co 
Marion Glbnep 
C Tilton Rev 
Baily A Cowan 
Michon Bros 
2d half 
Follls Bisters 
LAM Hart 
Anderson A Graves 
Bailey A Cowan 
Rosa KinpT 3 
(One to Alt) 

BIOUX FALL8, 

H D 
Orpheom 

Kale A Indelta 
H Hftvward Co 

Nifty Trl'» 
(Ono to fill) 
2d hnlf 
Maureen Knirlen 
(Three to fllU 

BT. .fOF. MO 

Cr>-Mtnl 

Svn<^<ip"'''d Ii^eofr 
Wllli^ims A Culver 
J Criirilon Fliiyor?» 
Al<in Anihrnsu St L 
2 FCdwnrd^ 

2.1 lirtlf 
nineli.iit .':- Puffy 
Sol rcin-i 
(Three to nil> 

ST. LOIIH, 

Grnnd 

Wills flilboit Co 
(larn'^tt &. Hill 
K in/'> 

Jimmy Fnx Co 
Uosn k Tln^B 
Hay C«mr.n 
Hal .Tohnwon f*s 
Angel X- Fuller 
MInrtrel Rev.!" 

TKUUF IIM TK 
Hipi»o<lrt>in'^ 

Prof I'talio Co 

rJ/^n'iv.i' oJ'veniro »'^»"^V ANNKX »VJJ/^^ USi;^*'"'^' *''^'^*' 

.. ,, 1-3 

Three Great Speakers i 

UNCLE JOE CANNON 

TRIS SPEAKER ] 

and SPEAKER LEWjS 

Pir^Uon MAX HALPERLM AGEJ 



Harry Tsnda y 

Agnes Johns ' 
Rose A Meon 
t Knbns 

Rising GeneraUof 
Chas Mnrhpv 

wnfiaPBO • 



Bekonuk. *- 

LUtN Cnrasn Co ) 
Walton A Brandt 
Kane Moray A If 
WUl MorrWiey 
(One to All) L 



Tke Cromwelle 

MILE8-PANTACaS8 

CLBVBLAMD 

Morey A Mack 
Johnson A Crsns 
Cknng Wbn 4 
Dellon A DeltoA 
(One to AH) 



The Hennlngs 

BAH Walser 

Cseole Fash RsT 

Jnrrow 

Dnley A Berlew 



Al RIckard 
Sweeties 
Jtmes'A 
Jupiter Trbi 

(Ons tl> B»> 

1Uven« ^ 

Kltantura Japs i 
Pe^^dk A UeV>s^ 
Jslin llordnn 



Barton A SparHntt . 
^ I>(i<4^Blair 

GU8 SUN CUq^CpiT \ * 

Mcl^aliy A Ashtog 



BUFFALO 

Olynipln 
Ronoe A Rdwarte 

6 Mus Queens 
(Three to All) 

CLKYBIJIND 
Priseiiia 

Helen Miller 
The Lordens 
f^ang A Rogcr4 
Prlsrilla Co 

COLUMBUS 

Orplieuiu 

Nomian 

Warnrr Sc Corbott 
Kee Tow 4 
Kelso A Lee 
Armstrong A 

Jainen 
The Nichtons 

BETROIT 
C4>lnmbin 

Thrt FennrirdH 
B A R I ••"he ran 
Cecil .Teff(M«<Mi 
CoIUMibl.n Co 
EVANSVILLE 
VIetory 
MakarenKo 2 
Bra. ton ^• 
H a ^v U i 1 1 H 
2 WilK«»n (llrla 

2d half 
PaN 

Murplty A' Klin^ 
\rt rj.nrrous 
INDIANAPOLIS 
Lvrio 
Taylor Triplpfq 



Qsqe fo Cecile 
Byr^n A Langdo# 
Sherman A Rose 
Morey Sennn A: Q 
BOCI»:STKl| 
Victoria 
Hlle Vietoria i 

lAfry'ciirrord C4 ' 

2d halt t \ 
T$Ticty 4 
B!llSr.larvl.q CoJ •• 
TBRRR IIAUn. 

.C- .jLiberty . ■. 
Pals ; ♦ 

Murphy A Klin^ .: 
Act ' U.oorcuii^ 

2d half J f 
MaJtarenkn 2 
BrSMlbn .K-. 
Hawkins 
S Wllii'^n Cirls 
- W>LFI>0 
RiaKo 
?^lr«s 

Hlnld* A Mae 
Melodfes j 

J K, Fnimctt C|of 
fMtV» Tlr<.M 
Rosehnds * 

IVvrn^nc- A 

Clarrldi'-' 1^ 

WATKKTOWN 

Avon 
BITly J.irvis Co , 
Varletv 4 

2.1 hnlf ■ 
4 IT^trnionv CJiK^ies^ 






JOE MICHAE1.S 

T'.()(>!\ r\(: KAST AN'». n i:^'' \ ^ 
QriCK ArnON— RKLTAHfci: si:uvfci 

WitP. AVtifo or Call «1 irFJ 4":^ 




Friday. Septomher 'J. Jjrjl 



V ARIET Y 



i ■ 



^^ ■■■' • ■■-■ ■. ; ■ ■ . •■ ■■■■ f ' - ■ -. ,•, ■•-■ /. ;^ "■•'■■,■• , - ■ ■'■ ■■" ■■ " ■ ■ • ,.. .. 

The New Loew Buildinig 



t»f* 







Were Erected by 



Fleischmann Construction Company 

Engineers and Contractors 



■ ♦ 



Executive Offices: 

531 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY 

Branch Offices: 

BUFFALO— CHICAGO— CLEVELAND 
BOSTON— ST. LOUIS— MEMPHIS 



.i.< 






i' .i*-/>>- 






• v/,v ' ■■'■i- 



.fr" 



Our Reeord Comprises Over 



i -'■.*.. 



;• .-.,•. 



400 Buildings of 





Throughout the United States and Canada 



A FEW OF THE MOST RECENT ONES ARE: 



»iv.„ •■:' 



LOEWS NEW STATE THEATRE... •••••... .New York City 

LOEW'S 83d ST. THEATRE ........New York City 

LOEW'S OREELEY SQ. THEATRE....."..... .New York City 

LOEWS DELANCEY ST. THEATRE New York City 

LOEW'S VICTORIA THEATRE .......New York City 

LOEW'S 7th AVENUE THEATRE New York City 

LOEW'S YOUNO ST. THEATRE ft ROOF GARDEN. Toronto 

LOEW'S METROPOLITAN THEATRE Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LOEW'S NEW STATE THEATRE Memphis, Tenn. 

LOEW'S PALACE THEATRE •:.....*.. Memphis, Tenn. 

LOEW'S NEW STATE THEATRE .^ Buffalo, N. Y. 

LOEW'S NEW STATE THEATRE ........... .Cleveland, Ohio 

LOEW'S K. & E. THEATRE Cleveland, Ohia 

LOEW 'S PALACE THEATRE . ;. • Washington, D. C. 

LOEW S ORPHEUM THEATRE Boston, Mass. 

LOEW'S COLUMBIA THEATRE .............. .Boston, Mass. 

LOEW'S GLOBE THEATRE Boston, Mass. 

LOEW'S NEW STATE THEATRE Boston, Mass. 

LOEW'S NEW DRAMATIC THEATRE Boston, Mass. 

COPLEY THEATRE .Boston, Mass. 

ELTINGE THEATRE .......v.^..... ..New York City 

SHUBERT THEATRE .^. New York City 

BOOTH THEATRE ............ vv^.. •••♦.... New York City 

BENSON THEATRE ..r.... ...Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FULTON THEATRE New York City 

ST. NICHOLAS THEATRE New York City 

SELWYN^THEATRE .........New York City 



STRAND THEATRE ...:..... .' ^ . : . . Worceiter, Mass. 

KEITH'S FORDHAM RD. THEATRE New York City 

KEITH'S 181st STREET COLISEUM New York City 

KEITH'S 81st ST. THEATRE New York City 

COLONIAL THEATRE ..^... ....... .Germantown, Pa. 

RECTOR'S RESTAURANT New York City 

71st REGIMENT ARMORY ^ New York City 

FAMOUS PLAYERS' THEATRE St. Louis , Mo. 

FAMOUS PLAYERS' STUDIO Long Island City 

FAMOUS PLAYERS' LABORATORY Long Island City 

G. M. FILM LABORATORY Long Island City 

FORT LEE LABORATORY . . ... ........ ..]. . .Fort Lee, N. J. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL TORPEDO PLANT Virginia 

TECH. INSTITUTE ADDITION ............. .New York City 

HOME FOR AGED AND INFIRM New York City 

U. S. BANK BUILDING ......'............... .New York City 

TEMPLE EMANUEL, ALTERATIONS New York City 

TEMPLE BENI JESHURUM. ................ .New York City 

TEMPLE ISRAEL .New York City 

TEMPLE ANSHI CHESED .New York City , 

MONTEFIORE HOME, PATH. BLDG. New York City 

BORCHARD APARTMENTS New York City 

MARCONI APARTBSENT8 ....New York City 

GAINSBORO APARTMENTS New York City 

KEENE BUILDING .....New York City 

COLUMBIA BANK BUILDING .•..•••• ...... New YoiHk City 

HOWARD BUILDING .......................New York City 



20 



VARIETY 



Friday, iSppternhfr 2, 1021 



> 



SUCCESS TO 

WEW, INC. _ 

WHEN DO I PLAY 
^\-Y:^ FINEST 'TH EATRE ? 



WALTER FENNER and CO* 



In "SHOW ME" 



•MNHMniM* 



■H M M>» > l»l* ^ ■■>■ i» , >>pt. 



<4MaMM«M 



CORRESPONDENCE 

(Coutiuucd from paxe 18) 
4a1I, Mutyltte I^jppard, Howard Smith 
and Mildred Hurkcr, Barocs and 
Wura'.cy, Hart and Dyinond and Tb« 
Parkers cuini^lfto the bill. 

E. H. HiilKcy, gcncrnl maimgor of 
the Southern lOntorprise, Int., who 
hiiH been Hpentiiiig the summer in Col 
orndo, arrived back in Dallas thin 
week. 



M. GOLDEN 

Vaudeville Productions 



DES MOINES 

By DON CLARK 

The theatre seoson started here 
tills week with the openinK of tlu' 
Oipheijm. (lood crowds beeause of 
Ktutc Kair in Des Moines. No open- 
inK date has been set for the Kibeit 
and CJetchell theatres, the Princess. 
Btock; Hrrchel, leg t, and Empress, 
vaudeville. 



I)ea Moines street ears ceased 
running three weeks ago pending the 
m'ttlement of nn argument between 
the receivers and the city council 
over the terms of a new franchi.<e. 
The cars were ordered in operation 
again this week by the court because 
«f the Town State Fair, the fair board 
making tlie company a finan<-inl guar- 
■ntA«. Unless the new franchise is 
approved by Sept. 2 the ears will stop 
again. Motor busses are be'ng used 
in place of street ears, but tho trans- 

((^ontinued on page 22) 



The GEO. H. WEBSTER 

VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT 

301-303 Hiilet Block 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Consecutive Routes for Standard Acts 

PLAY OR PLAY CONTRACTS 



Phone: folambufi 2273-4 — 1473 

SOL R APTS. 

S3 West 65th St., N. Y. City 

1. I and b roomn. Complete houaekeeplnp 

riione In evprv Rpartntent. 

MHH. KII.FY. Prop. 



I 



CONTINUOUS DANCING AND 
CABARET 

FRANK FAY 

AND HIS "INTimATES" 

with ^ALLY FIELDS 

NIGHTLY AT 

REISENWEBER'S 

Columbus Circle L 5dth Street 
NEW YORK 



Can Always Use 



Specialty Artists 



160 W. 46th Street, New York 

SUITE 202-203 

Business Representative, SAM BAERWITZ 






GOFORTH 

BROCKAWAY 



in 



The Chicken Thief 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 









w?73^7mnm>. 



'y//////A''.y//// Waa 



Vaudeville '8 Best Productions 

HARRY ROGERS 



P 



WOODS' BLDG. 



CHICAGO 






JENIE JACOBS 

AGENCY 

114 West 44th Street 

Phone Bryant 2062 

MELVILLE ROSENOW, Aesocrate 

Can Still Use Several 

Headliners and Novelty 

Acts For 

SHUBERT 

SELECT 

VAUDEVILLE 

Musical Comedy 
Dramatic Productions 



T V 



"Just what yoH are looking for" ''Save 10 to 25% on your office supplies'* 

One ol Oar Branches Now Located in Your Neighborhood 

Miller & Barnett Co., inc. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

STATIONERS 
AND PRINTERS 

THEATRICAL PRINTINO AND SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY 

LOEW BUTLDrNG ANNEX - ^ 

160 West 4eth Street, N. Y. 



(JOHi off SkrvMlwAf) 
Main Htorv, General <>ntr«« 
I'riniJnff I>rp«rtmrat, 

H4 WeK SM RtrM« 

Opposite PenimyKanIa llotcl* 
New -V^li. 



Printing, ttngrnxlng. 
Typewriter HappJir«, 

Oflice Pitmlt«re, 

Loofi« I^af Hytrtmm, 

Filinc D«ir|««ii. 




Hiiilililiilllllli^^^^^^^^^^^ 



3 



'V ■ ■. '■ 



GEORGE W. 



*■•> 



GEORGE C. 



COOPER AND LANE 



Wixnt to extend their thanks to the 



%■: 



Marcus Loew Booking Offices 

/ for their many courtesies ^ 

Jq^ finished bookings through 

HARRY A. SHEA 






11 



■lllilillllllllllliilll 




Ttr 



The Big iMUgh in One 



■m 



i'i 



Smith 




The Original Millionaire Tramps 



: »;.; 



:-.;.» 



Direction BOB BAKER 



I 







iiilll 



llllill 




Greenwald & Anderson 



f' ■ '' .11. . fiT ij.. ■ ■ I II _ ,1 ^ 



Suite 307 Woods Bldg. 
CHICAGO 



146 West 45th Sl 
NEW YORK 

■lllllill 





Congratulations Again, Marcus hoew 



David Belasco 



\i 



PlaoU wltk 

BARNEY BERNARD'S 
*'Two Blooks Away" Company 

Robert OraHi 
Jessie Nagel 

"YOU MUST COME OVER" 



onaird Hllolc 




GRANTT„ 



Op«rai%irie Hlo't.ol* 




CHICAGO 




Joe WILBUR and ADAMS F^Y 



flay ing B. F. Keith and Orpheum Circtdts 'Jfe 



Present "ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN'* 



»v 




Friday, September 2, 1 921 



VI AIETY 

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'■.'.'.V 



The Opening of 



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.•/• -'V"- 



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;'i^ •>* J^'/'"!'?^ 





^> 



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demonstrated the genuine feeling of good fellow- 
ship I had always hoped existed in the theatric 
cal world for the Loew organization: I take 

••■■■■■■ ■:• ■.•" -v'-^ ■■••:,, . , . ■ ■■,;■■; ; -■';■■:-:■ ^ '-••■■■•• ■■■■•'■;•■••': '■■■'-^[.. ' "•• ■ '/ ' 

/A/j Opportunity of thanking my friends for their 
invaluable co-operation and hearty support. 



. I • » 



i-^.-;", 



■'»w 



MARCUS LOEW 



C%^. 



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22 



VAEljTir 



yridHy, 8e|»tetiiber 2, 1«)21 



"WE LIGHT BROADWAY" 

.« -> - ■ . 

All -The Electrie— SigRS— On— Loew'& State Theatre 

WERE BUILT BY 

™ NORDEN ELECTRIC SIGN CO. 



112 to 118 East 125th St., IN. Y. C. 



I'V 



»•)««;> iL< 



I 



THE LEADING THEATRES THROUGHOUT THE 
UNITED STATES and CANADA ARE USING OUR SYSTEM 



'?*. ' -,•"'» 



READ THIS 4l 



CORRESPONDENCE 

(GoDtinued from p«fe 20) 

portation is inadequaie and theatre?; 
and businch.s bouses, eipecially those 
catering to women, nave suffered. 

RiverTiew Park will close foa tiie 
<<eason next week. Brown Brotherrt 
P hone Sextet is the leading free 
attraetion this week. 






Bliart Walker daimed in a cur- 
tain st><^<'h at the Tu«8daj night 
showing of **HoDor Bright" last week 
that in the three prenkres gtren thH 
SQininer Meaabcrs of his ct/iiiiM^ny 
have h«4 t« be prom^«<l •Bly three 
times. 



% 






INDIANAPOLIS 

Bf VOLNEY a rOWLER 

Last week of the sunmer season of 
Stuart Walker Company at the 
Murat in rPbc Be«utiful Adventore. ' 



Marat and English's open I^bor 
Day, the foraaer with "The Passing 
Show of 1921'* and the latter with 
^'Bhaviii^t' " Keith's will open later 
in Beptember. 

George Somnes will direct the 1/t- 
Dr theatre society productions again 
this winter. 



IMPORTANT NEWS! PRICES REDVCED! 



IFROFESSIONAL 
WARDROBES 



iTHEATRICALl 
TRUNKS 



FAMOUS HERKERT & MEISEL MAKE, OF ST. LOUIS 

ICAN NOW BE BOUGHT IN N. Y. CITYI 

$55 to $90 

MAIL OBDBRS FIIXKD F. O. B. NEW YORK CITT 

USED TRUNKS AND SHOPWORN SAMPLEfl 
EVERY Hartoan, IndestnicU) Belbc^ EVERY 
iiAVr ^*y^®^' Oshkosh, Murphy, ^^wp 
irMAACi Neverbreak, Central, Bal oIlLEi 

SAMUEL NATHANS 

BOLE AOEirr FOR H Ik M TRUNKS IN THE EAST 

'TcSn'" 531 7thAve.,New York 3|,,\^- 

PHONB FIT/ ROY «M 

Old Trunks Taken in Exchange or Repaired 



KANSAS CITY 

By WILL R. HUGHES 

Four of KuuHus Ciiy'a hvunt-n are 
open. The new Pantages opeucd 
Saturday matinee, the Orpheum fol- 
low >><p ^^nday and Loew's Garden at 
the sasae time. The Empress, mu- 
sical stock, the only theatre in town 
that succeeded in goitin}; through the 
sufllmer, continues to give two bills 
weekly and has 'em coming. Just 
how well this house e«n stand «ppo* 
sition after having things all its own 
way all summer is problematical but 
the aaaBagement b'^lieves in giving a 
big show for 50 cents. 

The Mardi Gras is on and the park 
is thronged nightly with the oaruival 
fans. 



"CLEANLINESS IS AKIN TO GODLINESS" 



MARTHA A. RUSSELL 




AND 00^ Inc., 
Vaudevilles Cleanest, Comic, Classic Playlet "j 

"THY NEIGHBOR'S WIFE" 

Written by MISS RUSSELL 

Direc tion of HORWITZ & KRAUS' 

Martha Russell in her playlet proved wekome reKef from the mens- 
tr«aitle« uasqiieradiBg as sketches, playing "Very Two Dollars," anl 
naiBg lightiDg effects in Belaseoesqae fashion. Miss Russell has Oraptd 
bar stage beautifully, also. The act was a revelation. 

(Variety, New Orleans.) 

MR. LUBIN, tjve appreciate one solid year's booking,. 



MISS MINNIE FISH v 
^ins . 

EDWARD J. LAMBERT 

IN ^^ING MR. MARCUS LOEW 
CONTINUED SUCCESS 



Direction AL GROSSMAN 



"Tbe Saue/ Babies/' musical stock, 
has been doing capacity at the Em- 
press. The house has done no adver- 
tising and received no pabiicity or no- 
tice«> tn tbe leading evening and morn- 
ine papers. 



/ » ▼ T _ T ▼ T . T ,T. T ▼ T 



MME. RI ALTO and CO 



m 



"LOOK" 



Dirwlion ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



BEN and 

JOHN 

VAVDEVILLE, MELODRAMA AND PANTOMIME 



T?T IT T 1? "D AUSTRALIAN 
r U 1^ J^rLrlV CIRCUIT 



American Representative, A. BEN FULLER 

DELGER BLCN2 



8AN FRANCISCO 






1005 MARKET ST. 

PHONE PARK 4332 



Fred Hpeer is looking after tbe itve- 
limuiai> publicity work for tbe new 
Vantages theatre. 



Sam Ilackley, veteran (loork«>eper 
at the Globe, died Ang. 25 at 4 'harks 
City, la., \vherc he had gone to visit 
h's boyhood home. He was <>2 jt'ars 
of age and had resided here for some 
30 years. He had been doorkeeper 
at different theatres here for the last 
18 year*. In his earlier life he was 
a member of the original Pryor Band, 
organised by Sam rryor, father of 
Arthur Pryor. in St. Joseph. Mo. >lr. 
}iarkl<>y uas burie<l beside his fath«'r 
and mc1!;rr at CHiarlcH City. 



^ I 



■>% 



w «r"r T *'^ 



CompUments to MR. MARCVS WEW 



from 



FRANKIE WILSON 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

The nrrv- Auiericun. Will H. Kvaiis. 
maiiagfT, will open at Itonhiiiii, 'JVx., 
in the near future. 

\\. W. Ijiokrtt is openiiif: ii d' w 
filHi theatre at Thibadaui, Lii. 

Wernor nro«». announce tlieir 
Quern, Trinity, Tox.. will show f»»ur 
days only, the out of two <Inys beinjf 
niiido on ac<*ount of poor businrss. 

Riockmnn Ilros. hnvp ngn'n mkrn 
ov^'r the Queen. McKinnry. T«*x. The 
theatre was sold recently to K. I). 
Keat'ng. who is retiring from llw 
show business. 

The King, formerly owned h> Wil- 
liam Batisel. at SJuM-nian. Tex., has 
been reopened by 11. O. Jones, uho 
recently purchased it. 



Tbe Welch, Welch, Okla.. wan pur- B 
chased last week b^ J. B. Griinlle & 




Berry and Nickerson 



In Music — Laugh Skit 



44 



The Nicest Girl in Town" 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



^ f tfft.1^1 




tiVi day. September 2, 1921 



VAEIKTY 



53 ^^ 



8on». ^V. K. Bonnet the 
iwner, will resume farmlDg. 



former 



!The Talarc, Newkirk, Okla., has 
^opened after beini dark for the 
ist two months. 

<Thc American, with 311 seating 
ADacity. opened in Oklahoma Cltj 
SiV 1*7. rictures at 10-25. 

'A charter has been granted by the 
Secretary of 8tate to the Sunset 
I*hoto Play Coi'poration; r5.pital 
itock, $100,000; incorporarors, Rob- 
ert S. Ilcdgin, Joe A. Wai«8on and 
)bert 15. Tigar. all of Oklahoma 
ity. A Htudio site has been chosen. 

PITTSBURGH 

By COLEMAN HARRISON 

More uQ^ettied than in war dars, 
tke local theatrical season will be 
mhered in as usual, on l^ibor Day. 
Added to labor conditions which 
' farced several premature closings last 
■eason, musicians and stage help are 
worrying the managers. The Nixon is 
the only house sure of its ground. It 
waK the first to announce its opening 
njeco, which wi 1 be "Ermine*' with 
Hopper and Wilson, and Manager 
Harry Drown made it known some 
t)nie ago that the regular orchestra 
will be back, with its leader of many 
leasous Emil Woolf at the helm. 

The Alvin wl'l open with William 
Hodge in his oew vehicle ^'Beware of 
Do^^^y Hodge enjoys an unusually 
large patropage on his every visit 
kere. and is considered a good opener. 
**Up in the Clouds" next. 



Poubt that the Shubert would real- 
ly 4iouj»c vaudevil e this season in ac- 
cordance with last season's announce- 
ment is (Ui^pelled at least temporarily 
by the general announcement last 
week t»inf tho "Advanced Vaudeville'* 
would be presented here. The or- 
chestra which finished the season 
there is slated to go in again in about 
two weeks, but no official announce- 
ment has been forthcoming from the 
local offica. 



George Jaffe has his "Chick-Chick" 
company re&car.iing at the Academy- 
daily, preparatory to opening the sea- 
son there Labor Day. Jaffe was pre- 
pared to in.stall a now set of mu- 
hicians and stage bauds, but latest rc- 
poxt has it that he will re-engage all 
nii fori help. Jaff^'is'a busy man 
this season, with a couple of shows 
pliying the American wheel, three on 
the Columbia, li new. hotel just opened 
fc*te, and other business interests. 

The Harris enjoyed the distinction 
of keeping open ail 'summer, *thc only 
theatre other than movies in the 
downtown <iistnrt (o storm the rough 
business' doprossion.' ' The "Sheridan 
' Square a'so playing pop vaudevillel 
out in East Libertyj was the only 
other house to keep opeu. Hoth 
houses have kept A. F. M. meu on 
the job. 



Sentiment among musicians is any- 
thing but favorable to the managers' 
demands. Uegardless of any success 
other theatres in other (ities might 
achieve in substituting orchestras. lo- 
cal musicians feel 'that the theatres 
here can ill'aTford' to do that" without 
going to extra expense and bother. 

. Su.sanne Ke6n<^r, a North Hide p'rl. 
Hill shortly join the Metropolitan 
Opera forces. Iler rise has been 

eenomenal. she having sttidied here 
t.a sort time, and in New York a 
' few months. ^ , 

p» ■ 

■Kowlflnd npd (^Hrk who have al- 
laost a Dionoftol y in the ])resentation 
oT'ii^lfFrf^iWF^'friW ' who o'peFate'fhe 
Strand in Erie, have announced the 
purchase of the Maje«tic in that city, 
under a long-term lease. The latter 

house is ^I'^Hjf'vCfV^ '" ^^''^^ ^*^^' 

rochesterTn. y. 

By L. B. SKEFFINGTON 

lA'CEU.M— Xeal O'Brien's min- 
■trels, lirst half; NoDce ONeil in 
"The Passion Flower," second half. 

TEMl'LE— Vaughan (Jlascr com- 
Pihx»hyT4f iTTlirt hrlght . ' 
rr^^ !,■ B-^r'^'-C ^-^v"^' EUlredge 

Karle Will'. 

film feature. 

, FAMILY— Musical slock in "This 

" the Life." 

PKrrL'UES-v"nrbe . Sign on the 
goor," Uegentrme Blazing Trail," 
Bialto. 



I — m^^fixow itevuc, i*jiareoge 
kyil|fhd Cttrke, OH to Broth- 
!• nxV-mgaTiia; Ed Kola, and 
Williams in "The Silver Car," 



aan^ Mftift, nha huT been producer 
« tha^FAinll^.lhis week becomes 
prul^cli;(al.eg,l^^^^|y^ aim, 

J apacity sal(> * the Temple char- 
acterized the farewell week of the 
^niiRnan (ilnwer stock rompany. 
■iSSf jCi^'^li'^t*^*^*''*^*'®*' ^" advance, 



Wh< 






ii« *'*** Tiyreum opened this week 

[mprovements were noticeable, chief- 
•y concerninj? the illumination of the 
■rt""*!' '"'"^^''Rhts have been lowered, 
■0 . that (lance steps will now be 
Jow" 2"*'^''<* to patrons in the front 
,■»•*' nRreeable surprise awaits 

I>mormerf> fVerth paint and more 
jnan usuat VMeniences have trans- 
'ormojj the dressing rooms. Paint 
"" '*^^n scarce in tho dressing 
for'"'* ^"'^ <'onvcniences few hercto- 

duril fk^ to Mmw ".«»operfeatnres*' 
.vw?-^- ^^omiiig season, according 



ABE. I. FEINBERG 



PRESENTS 



46 



STAGELAND'S PREMIERE DANCE CREATORE 



»♦ 



PAISLEY 



NOON 



AND fflS CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE GIRLS 



JUL ANNE JOHNSTON 



i^ ~. 



KAY HAWLEY 




a. 




IN 




D' DANCE 



99 



■*"v 



Conceded by Managers and Public to be the most qrthitc presentation in 

Vaudeville / T ;. - 



Chosen by Mr, /. H. Lubin to headline the Opening Bill of Marcus Loews 

'•I 

new State Theatre, New York, this week (Au;g. 29). 



. I 



AM LEAVING FOR SHORT COAST TRIP UNTIL JANUARY. MANY NEW INNOVATIONS F^ 
VAUDEVILLE NOW IN PREPARATION— IN CONJUNCTlOl^ WrbH'ABE WEINBERG; 

MANAGERS AND ARTISTS, IF YOU WANT SOMETHING DIFFERENT IW STAGE EFFECTS, SEfi-j 
ABE FEINBERG. LOEW'S ANNEX BUILDING, SUITE 504, NEW YORK.-^ BRYANT 3664. 



mt 



?= 



» ' » 



BEST WISHES 



ROBT. GILES 



Direction, HORWITZ & «:RAUS 



Compliments of 



PEARL E. ABBOTT 



, ( 



IN 



'^SIL\TR THREADS'^ 

Loew Circuit. Direction Harry Shea. 



BEST WISHES AND SUCCESS 

to 

Loew's New State Theatre 

It 1 1' ■ , 



GUS SUN 



ARE YOU. GOING TO EUROPE? 

SlenmHliip arcommodationa Brraii|c<Hl on nil I.lnfii. aI Main Ofllre rrirrs. lloaM 
nre Koinir v^ry full; mrrnnge f^nrtj. Forricn Monrj tM>DKht and sold. l.tberty 

llondit bouglit und sold. 

I l>AUL f Al'HIG & SON, 101 VmhI UUi Ht., New York. I*tione; bluyvrHAnt 6130 6193 

c 



rsi- 



»•• 



▼ABIKTT 



3RI 



Friia»y, 8e|>i<iB»er 2, 1921 



i 



^tmma^att 



y . T _ T _ T ^ T ^ T ^ T _ T _ T J T j r _ ^ 



^r^ 



mmSi 



T ▼ _ ▼ 



HEUBEN HAAR ELS, Pr««, 



MILTON nLl'MItt^RG, Ser'y aud Mgr. 
PHONES— BKEKM AN 9001— 9002- 00?)3— WW— flOW 



ARTHUR W. 8TBBBINH, Vioc-Prw. and Tr« 




pCAL. 



8ERVlClt» 



SEVENTH FLOOR, ll§ FULTON STREET. NEW YORK, N. Y. 



INSURANCE EXPERTS 

To the Theatrical and Motion Picture Industry 

Ask any of the following Producers or Exhibitors 

Select Pictures Corp. Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

Selznick Corporation Realart Pictures Corp. 

6. S. Moss Theatrical Enterprises 

Loew's, Inc. 



^>^ 



'dTJ^ATJi 



s 



o:^^/yZ^/-:::;:, 



^y//.'/. 



SENNA and STEVENS 



Present 



"Washday-in-Qiinatown" 



to Maoagei- Fred Sarr. Six acts of 
vaudeville win continue, to be a part 
of the program. 



A Comedy Clean-Up 



Direction MARK LEVY 



w^r 



FRED ECKHOFF 
and ANNA GORDON 

In Clean Hokum 

A La Carte 

A COMEDY TALKING ACT 

If ith Soii^s and Music 
IN FULL STAGE OR ALL IN "ONE." 

PAST 6 SEASONS WITH 

MAKCl S LOEWS CIRCIIT 

Arranard by Ihirry A. Shea 



ST. PAUL 

By ARTHUR G. SHEEKMAN 

ORPUEUM— A very gaod bill at 
the Orpheuni this week, with Pearl 
Rcgay, nsmnted by her band and 
Ward de Wolfe, headlining. It is 
bard to recall a vaudeville dancer 
with the grace, Nwiftness and aban- 
don of MiRfl Regny. 

Van Cello opened the »how with 
novel foot-balancing. Margaret Ford 
Bang in double voice, going splen- 
didly in the HCcond position. "A 
Night on Broadway'' it) a hodge-podge 
of muHic. a bit of dancing, set off 
by a striking electrically lighted 
back-drop. There perhaps is no more 
loveable teniu in vaudeville than Hill 
Dooley and Helen Storey. Bill is 
droll and delightful; Helen, appear- 
ing like a Dresden doll. Thomas H. 
Swift and Mary H. Kelley, following 
Pearl Regay. were a hit with their 
really humorous repartee, Bert Mel- 
rose closing the- bill, scored his usuul 

METKOPOLITAN. — The Marcus 
Show of 1!)21, 'Cluck Cluck.' by 
Jock Lait. is playing at tho Metro- 
politan this week to good business, 
despite the warm weather. The re- 
view is one of the most striking that 
has played St. Paul in. months. The 
House of David band is causing much 
talk among the theatre-goecN no- 
ticeable at the box office, 

NEW OARRICK. — "The Four 
Horsemen." jijst started at the New 
(iarri(-k. is doinp a goo<l business and 
rereivinK favorable reviews. 

I'AltlC- -Vaudeville. 

CAPITOL— Pictures. 



Warm weather gave the baseball 
tenm an edjce on tht- theatres this 
week. 

A record for publiflty at the Or- 
pheiim was rstahlifabed last week by 
Manager Arthur R. White. Helen 
Keller, the headliner, was given sev- 
eral lirst-page stories by the daily 
papers. No dny passed without Helen 
Keller's nanu' being mentioned. 



Air. White was commended by 
Frances Hcirdman, dramatic critic 
for the St. Piinl Daily News, for hiti 
stand «fr»i""t viilparity on Um; Btagc, 
iu litr weekly editorial. 

~\ 
Tlir> Mninrnpoiis Syniplu-ny Or- 
chestra will start rehear-wlH in nix 
weeks. Until a few weeks ago, it 
was fen red that the famous orgaui- 
(Cantiniicd on pagt 49) 



w ^ — . ▼ _ 



JOE 



VYNN 



MORRIS and SHA 



m 



"The Mosquito Trust" 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ ' 



^ ^ - ▼ - T T^ '^ - T . T .y. T' T . y y . T . y w _ w t ^ i^ T . 'r ^ T 



DAVIS and MC^ 




1 1 /" 



in 



\A 



"A Study ofBooholmg" 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



TTT" 



?r 



Good Luck to Marcus Loeiv 

Wells, Virginia \ Wesi 



^ 



rVO SAILORS AND A GltHZ 



t 



: 7^ »(1 ■ 



T'^^'^ii ^ iW''' '""{"•'Tim' ' JSCI W TEf ^-^'^*^ -'^''^'^*"T^'''''''^TF^'^^'Z7'*''^*^'^'W TO?T ' tt'i^ 



hy\ SeptenH»er 2, 1^1 



NORTH 





▼▲miSTT 



a 



Congratulations Are in Order! 

to MR. MARCUS LOEW 



On the OcetttUn of %he Opening of the M m gm fioent 






AMERICA'S FOREMOST PLAYHOUSE 





Artists' Rq»re8entative 






NOW BOOKING FOR NEXT SEASON 



CAN ROUTE ANY GOOD ACT 

ARTISTS BESIROtlS OF PROPER ATTEIVnON COMMUNICATE WIIH ME AT ONCE 

BOOKING WITH LOEIW AND INDEPENDENT CIRCUITS. 



•^ 



CALL 



PHONE 



m K«idi Theatre Bldg. 
Philadelphia 



Mil 

PHMIKS WALNUT *•*' 

5141 



WIRE 

515 Romax Bldg., 245 West 47th St. 

New York 



PHONE BRYANT MM 

AMOSPAGUA 



EAST 




rry 




AGENCY 



I44I Broadway, New York 



PHONr BItVANT *Mt 



Booking First Class Acts in 

FIRST CLASS THEATRES 
ARTISTS MAY BOOK DIRECT 



'»*T ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^ l y yyT y T'y " »T » 



Success to MARCUS WEW. 
And the NEW" STATE THEATRE 



^Kn^ke^ing Apartments 



-WmHn Rtaeli •# E«*»Mnicsl Folks) 



tiMfliir 



(Of tilt <fl0lter Ctafis- 

9\tkU 

ir« •«• flbe toiart i C witoiNi>rt» it 
Al«' mmi iIHN»8 KOl'IPTM WHlf STEAM MVAVANB iKIJKVMO l«IC^HTtf 



HILDONA COURT > 

Ml l9 347 fVMt 44Hi Bt. 

A bolMinir 4* luie. JTwit rtnpHtiHl; 
9t*^mkt ftiMHflkMits *rnMi«r4t in fli»U«« 
»f Mie. tw* and three room*. «rtth 
*iled batte aad abower. tiled kit<>h«as. 
liilrhewettew. Tlirae Apartiiirntn em- 
l»Ddr eierjr laxair Known ta modem 
McieNee. 9IS.M weekly up, 9ftr>.tO mowih- 
ly up. 

YANDIS COURT 
341-247 \\t,t *Z4 8t. 
l*hone Kryant IS It 
On*, there iind four r4M*m apart' 
m4«»ila. with kitclienettea. privnte l>ath 
utid tetepliaae. Tli« prirarx flieiM 
apnrtmenlii ar* Ma<ed foe Is an* at its 
a(fera«tf«iM, 



NCNRI COURT 
4tf. t14 MMl tl« WaH 4t4|i St. 



An «p-to-tha aibNita, 
talMlA*. MMMrad Is mmntmHmtm mi 
th»w sMl fMir raaaw vrKli MtelMna 
Mn«l pHfmU k«tk. PImm la mHi 

- Hpwrtment. 

$17.00 Up Wefklr. 

THE DUPLEX 

SM and 8S5 ITeat 4M St. 
Phaaa: DrjAat •I81-4<M 
Three and fa«r raaia with bath, 
raraiahed ta a devrea af aaademnena 
that exeelB •■rthia* i« tMa triw •' 
IballdkiMr. llicM w po rta aaiita wUI ae- 
: eanMaadate taur ar Mava adalts. 
iO.M I p WaaMy. 



Addreaa ull rom-fiittnlcAllona to M. C*l«maa 
rrlnclpal omre — XmnAia Court, iti \V>»t tSrd Street, New York 
Apartiitenls inn be aecn even oen. OfDcc to each buildtnc. 



GARLAND 



MAE 



HOWARD Si BROWN 

"Creoles From N-ew Orlemis" 
Represeiued hy HORWIT: ' & KRAUS 




EDDIE MACK TALKS : No. 46 

When MARCUS LOEW had only one theatre I 
had only one suit of clothes. Now I gfoutu Hr. 
Loew has as many theatres as I have suits in my 
store. 

P. 8. — Just a minute! I have six less now. Van 
Hoven just came in and bought six suits. 



1582-]i;84 Broadway 

Opp. Straod Theatre 



722-724 Seventh Ave. 

Opp. Colninbia Theatro 




PRODUCERS 



= ARTISTS 



fHEATRES 



/ Present 

DuTiel 



and 



IF YOU WANT— Cleyeriy Dwigned Settings— Highest Quality Work— Reasonabk Prices— SEEUS 
You are a»inred of Drop Curtains and Stage Settings of the "BETTER KIND" in dealing with us. 

'VELTY SCENIC STUDIOS bryant e sir 220 West 46th St., New York 



Covey 



Direction 
MANDEL & ROSE 

Now Playing Loew Time 



'f.i 



s- w — ^*" -^ ' "•T''jJ^ ' 



—r. - -*'i 



.y^o^^ ^n^j^tarj^yi^'^n 



26 



VARIETY 



> » 



Friday, Set^tember' 2, 1921 



< ■ ^ 






•i*. 





Wishes to Thank MR. J. H. LtJBIN For a 
Most Pleasant and Profitable Season on 
r, the LQEW CIRCUIT. * 



.♦;. 



t 



if 





. V .t 



' it ■« 



FAIRFAX COTTAGE 

DUNNFIELD, N. J. 

JULY, AUGUST and SEPTEMBER 



\ 



JOSEPH BAUER 

Proprietor 

Wigwam Theatre 

THE LARGEST 

VAUDEVILLE 

THEATRE IN 

SAN FRANCISCO 

FAMILY DISTRICT 

Playing the best acts and feature 
Pictures obtainable. 

Dooknl by BI.I^\ ilKRIIKKT \VE8TON 



± 



S 



■F"^ 



^"4• 



^•^ ^ 



/• 



1 ^ 



M ^' 



W <• 



AerialYoungs 

Good wishes ivith the new 
theatre 



Complimenls 

A. S. NEWBURCH 

Attorney at Law 

1302-1305 Humboldt 
Bank Bldg. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Thanking MR. LOEW 

For a Pleasant and Profitable Season 

Also HORWitZ & KRAVS 

For Efficient Service 



".T^a 



The Six Musical Nosses 



d^d 



Ai 



t.*- 



i( 



SAFE AND SANE 
SVRE.FIRE SHOW-STOPPING" SPECIALTY!! 



# 



J^ 



H^ 



t 



KVKLVN BtANCHARD ^ •» 

H93 m^.iiliAV) / -fivtwAqRK ciii 

Hrc 1<H for 11 c Tini« Rmtrlcteil Material. 
Skefcli^H, dotnetljr Attn, Mingle*, ii;tc. 

Acta R<?Vritt*n, Rehoars*?*! and Opcninga 
Arranpf'tJ. 



DOBBS CLARK and DARE 

Presenting •TAUDEVILLE' REMNANTS " 

Just finished 2^^ years' consecutive bookings and it looks like the above takes an encore for the ^. 

same period or more. 
Personal Direction - - MARK LEVY 



I ? . i^ ; 4 * v^ f ; TH4JSKST0 . 

MR: MARCUS LOEW, MRJIIt. H. LUBIN AND ASSOCIATES 
yiAnil diiU i^iyTisfi^^Hts: many couRTESiai! extended to us during the 

THREE SEA8<^S' ENGACiEM^NTS. , . 
' HOPE TO PLAY MANY MORE RETURN DATEJS. ' 

BROWN^S DOGS— "Originator of the only contortionist dog. 



H V M 'V 



91 



lilillllllllllliillilli 

Consratulations ta 

MR. MARCUS LOEW 

and his associates 
on the opening of 



'it/IWJt,.. 


















-rr 






WISHING 

















SUCCESS 



TO THE LOEW 

ISSUE 



MARK LEVY, 1493 Broadway .^ 




1 



% 



•. ^-i i 




*\'^i^ 









SAM H. HARRIS 



llliiil 



reeder a Armstrong 

in 

^ 

Piano 
Diversion 

TliariUs to MB. E. A. SCHILLER ami VOL. JAKS^ LUBIN 

for the Loew Circuit. We have played the State of New York, 
but not the State of New York City. .Wc hope to pfay it. 









mM 



















at - «.-» ■ -* 



r •» r- 



nj/^ 



m 



Compliments lo the MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 

JIMMY PLUNKETT 

Presents 

PLUNKETT and ROMAlNE 



m 



"The Original Dancing Lampdb 

Successfully Touring LoeAv Circuit. / Thanks to lfHtH:.l^BIN. 



-*! 



1* . A ^ .._ teM ^^ 



r 



Friday. September 8. 1§21 



▼ ABIXTir 




SUCCESS TO YOU, MARCUS LOEW 



PAUL 



HARRY 




OHER 



and 



ELDRIDGE 



V 



*Tew. Funey Buoys" Present ** I DON'T CARE" Booked solid NEXT TO CLOSING oit aU Loew BiHs. 



Direction: GUY PERKINS, HORWITZ & KRAUS 



a 



: 



Willi I m i I 



ffiSSSSSSaSSSSSSS 



S3*=55f— WOBSe-S 



MANY THANKS TO MR. /. LVBIN 

^ - -ii 



BBiiii 



say 



ANNA 



MONOCLE 



<<.• < 






MARSTON AND MANLEY 



IN 



''Do You Follow Me? 



99 



Personal Direction HORWITZ & KRAUS 




and 




3 

tttm 



itmm 



fii 



^ 



^mmmmmammmmmmmmmm 



AS WE APPEARED 
WEEK OF MAY 2 

JONC9. UNi€K 41 «C«ABVSm 

MeVICKER'S 

MAMjOIf •MU'jrfATII 

rOWTTNOOITt VAinMBVILMC 

1 A. M. «• II P. M.-«r*p«l»r rrl««« 

1^»T TlBtSS TODAY 

WEHTON * BLINB. 
''BUZZIN' ABOUND" 



Befflanlnc Mon4ay 



MYES & FIELDS 

Tli«M Fumay. T»lk»Mv« FtltoTM 



B 



STRATFORD COMEDY FOUR 



Presenting "SCHOOL FROLICS 

l/firfcr the Direction of HORWITZ & KRAUS 
Now Touring the Loew Time 



»» 



mm^ 



Compliments of 



LES PERETTOS 



>' I:- 



". '-•"!» ',• ^ 1 









Their Snappy Novelty 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



Direction MARK LEVY 



HARRY MASON ! Co. 

^ LOEW CIRCUIT 

I i -i.rrvi .: 1 ^''.M.Direetion Bob Baker 



■' 



GREAT MEN 

MARCUS LOEW great circuit owner 

J« H. LVBIN GREAT BOOKER 

IVIAmC LEVY. great representative 

JiMirr LYONS great act 

I tMank you, gentlemen, for a very pleasant tour 

FROM CdAST TO coast. 

JIMMY LYONS 



LEHMAN and THATCHER 

Best Wishes for the New 
LOEWS STATE THEATRE 

Reprtsent«tiT«, HorwiU A Kram. 



YOVRS TRULY, 

PAULA 

The Gymnastic Marvel 

LOEW CIRCUIT Direction KRAMER & LEVY 

>«»&»»&»»»e>»ci«»««<<<<» ; -»*»»»»«»» « i»*»»o»»»i»»»«»»*«( 

STUTZ BROS. 

1921 MODEL 

GYMNASTIC ACT 

Success to MR. LOEW and many thanks to 
LEW CANTOR and everybody for a pleas- 
ant tour of his theatres. 



CBltBBlOW VOVB 



Rives & Arnold 

. .'*A Bit Bpto** 



V;mU« i jMnm 






Walter Poulter 

is "On Dmvct- 



"PATCHES'' 

A CrMjr Q«ilt 9i Hmkg and 






SIEGRIST 

AND 

DARRO 

A' SPARKLING 
VARIETY OF 
ACROBATICS 



I > 



Montambo ««rf Nap 

SILENT FUNSTERS 



LOEW CIRCUIT 

Direction 
LEW CANTOR Offices 



TTT^r'^y^TTTT^ 



Mn Marcus Loew 

We wish you well 

The Honey 
Hunters 

WHEELER TRIO 



Loew Circuit 



Direction ABE THALHEIMER 



-•**e-^>^«H^-^,>o<^♦«9*♦♦<^:•♦♦•>♦*>4<^ 



^^(QMQl^t^M^t^M^^^I 




Compliments to the Marcus Loew Circuit and thanks to Jake Lubin 



1*^^^ 



*0^m 



Josie Flynn's Fashion Minstrels 




ESTHER TRIO 

The Act A Little Different 

Just Finished Season's Booking 



Direction : : : LEW CANTOR OFFICE 



< ■ r- 



!!ll!!!il|li 



AIW ALL LOEW EFFORTS BE AS SUCCESSFUL 
fN THE FUTURE AS THEY HAVE BEEN IN 
THE PAST. 



Mystic Hanson Trio 

"The Magic Man and His Magical Maids" 



Thanks to Messrs. LOEW and LUBIN for a successful 

and pleasant season 

Direction, MAN DEL & ROSE 



iilliilll 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH^ 



FRED WEBER \ CO 

, >Inftlie!yehtr^oquialNa|velty 

"AT 
THE 
STAGE 
DOOR" 

Booked Solid, Thanks to Mr. JAKE LUBIN 
Direction SAM FALLOW 



NELL and 
ELSIE 



GILBERT 



"GEMS OF JOY" 

Booked solid, thanks to Mr. JAKE LUBIN 
Cheer Uader. SAM FALLOW 



ARTHUR LLOYD 

The **Huinan Card Index" 

Best Wishes and Success 

Direction SAM FALLOW 

Thanks to Mr. JAKE LUBIN 

Tlianicing MR. LOEW and MR. LUBIN for one of 
the most pleasant seasons in our experience 

BERRY and NICKERSON 

Success to your netv State Theatre 



Best Wishes For Success 

to 

MARCUS LOEWS 
STATE THEATRE 



Wirth, Blumenf eld & Co., inc. 



H. BLUMENFELD 
M. J. LOWENSTEIN 



FRANK WIRTH 
A. E. JOHNSON 



Strand Theatre Building, New York 

also — 

LONDON PARIS BERLIN 






COMPLIMENTS 



FRED LA 




AND CO. 

In a Scientific Novelty and a Cyclone of Fun 

LOEW CIRCUIT 



:->x<<»^<<<«>>^<<<'<'<>x<<<'<<<<<<<<»:»^4<<^^ 



K«K' 



WHEN IN SEARCH 

OF A 

VARIETY ACT 

KEEPUS INMYND 

LING and LONG 



Permanent Address : 
Care of Locw Circuit 



. 



DIRECTION: 
MARK LEVY 



Everest's Monkey Hippodrome 

NOW HEADLINING LOEW CIRCUIT 




Sfi 





^^^^l{&^*^*^ 

^ 

^ 





HARRY A. SHEA 



# 





* 






# 




Vaudeville Agency 







^ 



Now Routing Acts for Next Season over the 

LOEW CIRCUIT 




<^^ 





160 West 46th Street 

NEW YORK CITY 



NEW LOEW ANNEX BUILDING 














asTtt 



■BS 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii 



I'l 

> ' < 




i 



y . T T y y ▼ T y'T TT'T'yTyyy'ry'yy ¥ , T . y . ^ 



Heartiest Good Wishes 



TO 



U. .V i" 




AND ASSOCIATES 



James C. Matthews 



Jk,J^ 



IlililUilliiiilllillUii 



THE LOEW UNION SQUARE 

San Francisco's Most Exclusive Theatre 

REID BROS. 
'Architects, San Francisco, Calif. 



iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiim^^^^ 



in 



ELSIE EDDIE 

MURPHY and KLINE 

Extend their best wishes 
for the continuance 
of prosperity of the 

MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 

Direction, HORWITZ & KRAUS 



lllli 



L O N 



SUCCESS 




a n 







RY 



**1|' 



KELODIOUf SONQ SKETCHES 



LOEW cmouiT 



Direction LEW CANTOR 



s=^ 






sx 



ff' 



^ 



Z3,JiZ 



sc 



a;? 




■ '•(•' 



-r 



-^-.:. 



<■.,<■ .-t" ..' '- .' 



•k 






..vv 



w . <.-«^ 



. 1- ■» 

'*■#"■' 



.'A 



.^v-. 



.v:;:- 



■ilW"^' 









/- .•*■■ 



I am glad of any chance to say 
that Marcus Loew is one great 
little fellow. Here^s to him, and 
not in water, either! • 

— Willliam Harris. Jr. 



«.• 



•' . * • 







, «! 



Marcus Loew's 



.^v • >• ...^> > '^ -a '4- ' -^ i H A h it 



a .> ■ '^ 









STATE THEATRE 



Yours for Success 



George M. Cohan 



(^ 



^ 



Wc coTWtdcr the achievement of 
Loews y^ew State Theatre a mori' 
ument to Mr. Mtirctw Loew;. The 
entire theatrical profession is to he 
congratxjdated upon having a man 
IiJ(e Mr. Loew at the head of his 
enterprise. On hehalf of the institu^ 
tion which he originated and huilt, 
heartiest congratulations; long life to 
the Loew circuit. 

THE SELWYNS 



% 




r& 



▼▼▼▼TTTT 



I wish to thank Mr. MARCUS LOEW ami 
Associate Managers for the long successful 
season booked by my personal managers, Mr. 
ARTHUR J. HORWITZ and Mr. LEE KRAUS. 

Yours for another one just like it, 

JEAN GORDON 




Mortimer 



AND 



u, 



Harvey 

** Basketball on 
Bicycles" 

Coming Across the Water 
to Again Appear For 

Marcus Loew 

Beat of Luck with the 
New STATE THEATRE 

Management: 
HORWITZ & KBAUS 



iilllllllill 



I "1P*« 



W^W«*.« M iNAi4PI| 



!«*<^^ 




( 






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.■*'• , , 



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ii: 



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• f 



JULES E; MASTBAUM 

President - \. 



-I • * : 



> »*^ »• * •». I 



r4MM»»"-w-^. 



'nf 






*. 



Extends Congratulations 

MARCUS LOEW 

Whose energy and enterprise made possible 
\ the erection of . 

THE NEW STATE THEATRE 



'r., '.,>•( 



-:■*- -If' 



;» 









k* ■ J' ' 



I. 



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T; 




BCBB^ ** 6 ^ W *i '"' 
^. ' f tif • 



or- '^ 




V 



'^ H' 111 ■ : , , » . » . . 

! of exclusive ' • ^ 

' • '■' ' ■ ■ ■■■■;.'..>. 

Theatre Interiors — Decorative Drops * • 

•■•••■■.•,.•:-■ ' '« ^ ■. - 

Entire Theatre Appoinlments 
1804 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



'A submission of designs and estimates on tbe refurnishing 






>>./ 



« t 



Ht>' 



* \ 



♦ of your theatre solicited. 
Work successfully cvocuted in all parts 
of the United States. 






« • 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




!/4n<2 t/tejr say they uxmt Good Comedy Acts 

READ THIS 



Get 'Em, Rogers 



San Francisco 
VARIETY, April 15, 1921 

I'robably one of the binest h||8 seen here in many 
soasoDB waa scored by Fred Bosera. X^e durtcy en- 
tertainer atopped the ehoir a couple of'timea; Bat 
the audience demanded more of hia dancing before 
tbey would permit him to depart. Rogera la an ex- 
t'eptionally hard worker and hia dancing ia along 
orif inal lines wai the looMe, jaaiy, r.orobatic and com^ 
edy type. He waa a hit from the start, even hia 
gags and stories preceding hia dance efforts landed 
big. 



WHENEVER WE WANT WORK WE WIRE 

MARK LEVY 



AND HE FIXES US UP 
lours truly, 



HARRY 



JESSIE 



LEiONARD and WILLARD 

"A SERIES OF SMILES" 



tn 

irection 



COMPLIMENTS \ 

JULES PAULA 

KIBEL AND KANE 

"Inventions A la Nut" 

WEW CIRCVIT 



PfflL 



FLO 



Fein «- Tennyson 



MARK LEVY J 



"A REVUSICAL MUSICALE" 

Booked Solid, Thanks to Mr. JAKE LUBIN 
Direction SAM FALLOW 



VA 



At 




Rawson 



AND 



Oswald 



/^ubuiriidale^ Lj. I. 




DUELLA 

WOODY 

Linking 
Their Mark 

in 

A llox OfBrc 

AttmcClon 

by 

PAUL 

CERARO 

SMITH. 

fi^'li'.i- .-» Dir«c:ion: 

-X'l»*'' LEW CANTOR 




JIMMY ROSEN 

and Co. assisted by 
TRIXIE WARREN 

In 'CALL ME PAPA" 

_ . ,J ■ - ^^^TTTT^T^^nrTT 

SCANLON, DENNO BROS, 
and SCANLON 

Old Ideas Itencwrd 

Iiitroduriiie Their Ouii Original Waltz 

Qiiadrillo 

Touring Orphrum uiid Krith Circuits 

Itookrd Solid 

Direction AAIION KKSSI.KK and 

KD. RK8NIC'I\ 



Roso &. Curtis 
Represent 

"^nuline Saxon 
and "Sis" 




LAURIE ORDWA Y 



IRENE FISHER, At Piano 



*^Tew Funey Buoys^ 

PAUL MOHER 

AND 

HARRY ELDRIDGE 

in '*I DON'T CARE" 

Dookrd Solid. LOEW TI.MB 

Direction, HORWITZ & KRAUS 



EDWARDGROPPER.lnc. 

THEATRICAL 
WARDROBE TRUNKS 

IIOTKL NORMANDIE I;M)0„ 

B. K. Corner .?«th £ IJ'ivu.v. N. Y. City 

I'lIONK: irrZKOY 38 tH 




THEATRICAL OUTFITTEBS 

t6A0 Droadway New York City | 



CHA8. 











\: 



.'*• 



The Followin 





s Join Us In Wi 



THOS.t 



FRED 



Race and Edge 



•* London liridilc 



$% 



Class, Ma] 



*• Impen 



JACK 



LOUISE 





'%.^ 



" When (jrcck IViecU Greek 




f>. 





»» 



LUCY 



Monroe 



In a Delightfi 



Gi:ORGE 




ana \,idl\ 

**Wait and Sec" 




t. 





•'M 



Salle 



•• The Laugh 11 



Frank 






i 4 < • i ■■* 



' -^i>*' *' C ■ 'i^i t 



Willing an3 



1^. ^. 



In a Few Pleasant Monicats 




» »,,.!«•*, 



■■^'•. 



Geo. Stan 



c« 



Bid 



..■.-■« 



Bessie 



Leonard 



"The D( 



ALWAYS ABLE 



-1 



■«' 'X 




ews 





ilk gl %JJ. 






PHONE, 1 



^^^^.'^^A.J^^^^^ M. M. A 



^ M, ^ ik A A A- 



VT' T' V ^T'r V ▼TTT'^ 



V N T ▼ 



V TT^T V ir^y WWWWWWW'rT ^J ^ 



Sincerest Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

MR. MARCUS LOEW 
Upon the Completion of the Latest of his Many Wonderful Enterprises 

Cortnne Griffith 



A^^^ 



AAA 



VARIETY 




1 



ROBT. J. 



■• - .'^ 




^ 



v.\ 







g The Loew Circuit Continued Success 



jng and Class 



18 Via Wire 



KENNETH 

Grattan 



<< Aj:n«»«:'» 



Ipisdde — •* Miami 



Taylor, Macy and Hawks 



} 



i Robles 



Makes You Laugh 




99 





• •• 



TOM 



DOLLY 



Connell and St. John 

"The Girl of Yesterday and the Boy of Today 



tf 



E* J* 




d 




■^v 






Boy Girl" 




^LACE GOOD ACTS 




/ 



46th 






ANT 1691 



^.^4i 



^~^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 




E. Galizi k Bro. 

•ion«I AcrordMtt 
Manur«(*tur«rt ■a4 
llrmlrrr*. 

In'^mparabU !*/••* 
rUI trorlw. N«w 
I (1 r « l*t:cot«d 

Tri rrmnk'to IM 

Nt« V«rb City 

ID C«ii«t SlrtH 




Btautify Your F«e« 

Vty auft l*ck tMd t« •»■« 
•Mtf. Many •% tht "frafM* 
lien" Have oktalntd antf r«« 
taine«l Matter parli »y havlNf 
ma eorract tbelr laitural !•- 
perfaetlaat and remvva klain* 
liliat. Co«tuitatt»a fraa. Tsaa 
reafonabla. 

F. E. SMITH, M. O. 

347 Fifth Avenu* 
N. V. €liy. Odd. Wikldiarf 



A 



HUMBERT SINATRA - 

TIIKATKICAL SHOES 

For thr» l*rifes*ion's 
IlcKt Individuals ar.d Pro- 
ducci'H furnished ut spe- 
cial prices. 

EttahlUhcd n91 

lU.i West 4Rtli Rirect. New York Oity 

Opposito Friars" Club. Tel.: Uryant 970 






154 West 45th 8t 
New York 

NKWEUT 

FRENCH 
SHOES 

ALL MATBRIAI^ 
BEAHONABI.V 
PBICEO 



covers forv0 
6i<Ghestrations- ? 



NEW YORK CITV.. 




Querrlnl A C«. 

Tka LM«iBO ;.::^ 
Lariatt 

ACCORDION 
FACTORY 

la ttia Uatted ttataai 
Tb« onlf Fartory 

that makt* any -iX 

•r Reeda — vada tor 

banfl. 
t77.27t CatamfeM 
Avanua 

tM FrMaliM. 0«l. 



START 

the Season 
Right 



< V : ♦ r 



with 



TAYLOR 
TRUNKS 



Prices reduced 
Liberal allowance 
on your old trunk 

C.A.TAYLOR Trunk Works 

210 W. 44th St.. New York 
28 E. Randolph St., Chicago 



I 



*^ 



^BEST WISHES TO THE MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT 

MALETA BON C ONI 

Celebrated European Violin Virtuoso 



'Headlining Loew Circuit 



Thanks to MR. LUBIN 



Good Wishes to MESSRS. LOEW, LUBIN and Their Associates 

DOWNING and BUNNIN SISTERS 

LOEW CIRCUIT **H J 9 To Lttugh" 



Direction IRVING COOPER 



n 






•», 1 • ' *» "•• V '^__'^' • ^ r- 



>•:. >'»■-.;■' 






GREETING FROM "ONE STATW TO ANOTHER 



y.: .••",. 



»:;■». .ft- 




i^ 



Papa ' ' MABCUS LOEW :— LOEW S STATE THEATRE, 

NEW STATE THEATRE, . MEMPHIS, TENN., 

NEW YORK, N. Y. Sept. 5th, 1921. 

Happj returns of the day on this, the birthday of your most gorgeous new STATE THEATRE, 
New York City. We know you are happy, as are "Uncle'" J. H. LUBIN, and your "Nephews," 
HARRY SHEA. DAVE ROSE and JACK MANBEL. \ 

( Cordially yonn, ' • 






NEAL BAR38TT, BLAKCQIE FRANEI.YN and NAT. VINCENT. 



*- '^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .at^"^.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 






^-^"^^^ ^ ^ ^"^ A A. ^ ^ ^ ^ 



*^ — r 



The virture of originality 
is not newness, it is only 
genuineness. 

. To Mr. Marcus Loew, Mr. Lubin and entire staff, whom we thank 
for our 8 years of pleasant business association. 



J 



Our friends and guides Arthur Horwitz and Lee Kraus join us in 



this. 



HARVEY and DE VORA TRIO 



^ V ^ " ^ ▼ ▼ ^ 



▼^▼.ir_'r_v ▼.'v 



y_V_ X ▼ . ▼ V ¥T^ T ^^ >f^ T ,T,^.T- ¥^ 



Best If^ishes for the Continued Phenomenal Success of 

The Marcus Loew Circuit 

Congratulations on the Completion of the 

Loew's State Theatre 

A WONDERFUL MONUMENT TO THEIR HIGH IDEALS 
» ., From 

THE LUTES BROTHERS 

[ ' The Act That Puts Yariety in Vaudeville ~^ 

?; HARRY A. SHEA, Representative Booking Marcuis Loew Circuit 





Billy Atwell's 

BEST WISHES FOR THE SUCCESS 

of 

Marcus Loew's State Theatre 



GOOD LUCK TO THE LOEW CIRCUIT 

and 
JAKE LUBIN AND ASSISTANTS 

Boom 317, Strand Theatre Bldg. , New York. PJione Bryant 1899 

WISHING EVERY SUCCESS 

TO 

LOEWS NEW STATE THEATRE AND LOEW CIRCUIT 

FROM 

STERLING-ROSE TRIO 

Now Playini Lmw Circuit. Representative, Meyer B. North 



CIRCLE lOTEL '->»^r REISENWEBER'S 

C0LUMBU8 CIRCLE A 6tth STREET 'Phen« COLUMBUS Ittt 

J^!» *" ■! . •a' ^»A ABd 8«lUa of FMlar. llodr«oin »ad Itetki 

''•^\' •fHfe*5^ ■•■■gt ygti diieBtly FandJihrdi Atl Improvements t OTcr> 

U t tltm V m iw m l Wm^i aUm JflraUa from AU ThcAtiooi Lov BftUik 






r 



J*. 



A ,»._ 



ARTHUR NELSON Presente 




> ■ r 

Diew Circuit ^^ 









' n 



■^ 



WCCESS TO MARCUS LOEW, 



' Thanlaia MAX OBERNDORF 



yvlwy^ n^B 





■\ : I . . »■-• 




AND 



RIALTO 



Booked by Loew 



JONES, 
LINICK 
& SCHAEFER 




iiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiw 




VA»I»T¥ 



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1 



»gigag3iP3KaiP3iPgig3i%«pap3^ 



(f«. 



f' 




KATE MULLINI 



® 



Presenting 







Six White Hussars 




LOEW CIRCUIT 

Congratulations to MR. MARCUS LOEW from 
The Peer of All Double-Voiced Singers 

WILLIE SMITH 

The World's Greatest Male Soprano 
Positively the Only Act of Its Kind in Vaudeville 

I want to take this opportunity of thanklno IMr. LMbIa for tht romark- 
able treatment accorded me the many yean I have tota atsociatlli wltli 
the Loew Circuit. 

WHAT THE CRITICS HAVE SAID:— 

VARIETY DRAMATIC MIRROR THEATRE 

Probably the applause hit of the WORLD 

evening was Willie Sa>:th. Willie is CITY BlLL FULL 
a young man in Tuxedo who does a ^ V A W 1 1? T V 

Btraigbt specialty cleanly and with- •-'Jr V Allllii 1 I 

out side issues. He wallcs on and \^^iUie Smith Wdlks Off 

goes straight into a "blueo" number. 



He lias a line baritone voice for coon 
uliouting. His second number is also 
a rug number, witW a couple of kicks 
in the lyrics. For hiH third number 
and finish he announces an imitation 
of "my sister singing a popular bal- 
lad." He walks off and from the 
wings begins "Broadway Rose" in an 
astonishingly clear soprano voice, 
coming down center near the end to 
warble the finish in a series of high 
notes that brought a thundering 
burst of applause. Willie took six 
legitimate bows. He has a good 
Mtraightaway specialty and doesn't 
gum it up with tiilk or any other 
kind of extraneous matter. He just 
4loes the thing he knows best how 
to do nnd lets it go at that. May 
his kind increase and flourish. 



HOLYOKE DAILY TRANSCRIPT 

Willie Smith is somewhat of a sur- 
prise. He opens witli several song 
numbers of the usual type and then 
does a soprano solo in a fashion and 
with n perfection that would be the 



With Honors 

Though -Married by Wireless" is 
billed as the headline attraction at 
the City this week, it remained for 
Willie Smith, regarded as one of the 
lesser lights, to walk off with the 
lion's share of the enttrtirinittcnt, a 
reward which he fid Jewrfil WUUa 
tied the show into lOMta, the bedtav 
being stopped by tbt oirhestra, vhkh 
went into the foUawlag act de«bla 
forte. 

Willie Smith then appeared, open- 
ing with "Ohio" and telling some 
good clean stories that brought 
hearty response. His falsetto ren- 
dition of "Broadway Rose," which 
sounded more like the well-trained 
voice of the prima donna, brought 
dowm the house. For an encore he 
did "Eili Eili" by popular request. 
finally getting away to thunderous 
applause. 

CAMDEN, N. J. 

Substituting for another act. Willie 
Smith, an artist of the Eddie Cantor 

Smith 




WILL KiN^-nsyun 



San franolcoo^Oftlii^ 



type, went on and cleaned up 
<^Hvy«>f~HMH)y ft coftoeH f4ngert-v^a«h> -«H<m}d owt -wit the "Ohio"- number, 
ing the hrjrh register of tht»fwnrnine "which 'hai been ^snng to death at-th« 
Hoprnno with <*ase, grar^ nod purity Towers. He ha»-a nasty Wues num- 
of tone that is astounding. ber and his finish Is a corker. 

■ I t«,»i>i»ii ill - 



Rubetown Follies 

"A Bucolic Review" 



Acted out by Fred Lucier, Charles Creighton, Frank 
McStay, Phil Keeler, Willard Reed and Bess Lucier 

Booked on Loew's Circuit of Beautiful Theatres by 
Horwitz & Kraus. Boosted by Guy Perkini. 



Mr* lluroiiB Lo«v»> 

W9if Todt^Oilf • 
Mar Xre' LO0wt-> 

''Another feather la yonr oap** 
U;^ beat wiahea 9£r% for^yoar^goo&.liialtli 

oont inuotf 'auooessej 

Very truly 7oara», 



<• 



, » 




▼ V N ^ 



Tl 



SUCCESS TO 

MARCUS LOEW 

and the 

NEW STATE THEATRE 

Thanks to JAKE LUBIN for a Successful Season 

BOND "^d BARRY CO. 

^ Direction, HORWITZ & KRAUS 



Lyndall Laurel 



AND CO. 



in ''A Night on the Beach^^ 

LURA BENNETT, formerly of the 3 Bennett Sisters and Lura Bennett and Co. 

NOW HEADLINING THE ENTIRE LOEW ClUCUIT 

A Big Laughing Hit on Every Bill 

1 l//i3cr the Personal Direction of 

lARTHDR J. HORWITZ t LEE KRAOS 



ll*.«^ 'V J*. 



'i. '•-.^ V 



f.- 



'6o^^6iXi»mi969m9mt%9mxmmMiX969%f^^ 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



ipi»»j^iii mil imrw-^. 



VARIETY 




trndX i. .j —l fl 



COMPLIMENTS 



A. C. BLUMENTHAL & CO., Inc 



REALTY FINANCIAL AGEM'S 



SPECIALISTS THEATRE CONSTRUCTION 



58 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



M<~>*^>>>*'> > *"**'i"5''-'**2">***~S<****>'"!**'^^ 




"Ahvays On The Job" 



FRED / ELSIE BURKE 



in 



"Striving for Snickers 



Personal Direction, MARK LEVY 



9) 







.;>.,.,,>:<,.<i-.^^,>.^;:<^v: 


C><->o.<><r*^<*>^>^,--^ ->^-^»,c^>oc->^t^^ 


BURT 


ABLER 



LOEWS STATE THEATRE 

MARKET and TAYLOR STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

G. ALBERT LANSBURGH Architect 



The Jovial Jester 

BOOKED SOLID LOEW TIME 
Thanks to MR. LVBIN 
Direction: HORWITZ & KRAUS. . 






GEORGE WARD 



HILDA GILES 



as 



-./ 



WARD and WILSONi 

Booked Solid — SO Weeks — Loew Gircuit 
Many Thanks to JAKE LVBIN 
Best of Success to MARCUS LOEW'S NEW STATE THEATRE 
Representatives, HORWITZ & KRAUS 



I ■ . I ■ >«■ .c 



^^^^^^^^^"^^^^^^^ 



■ " ■ iii 



■*aMM*iM«M«*wa^i^p4*i«BVi^i^^^B«»iT^>v«^4* 



>^i*««7*— ••*^T"p^"^— »*■— ••^-^-i^— ii*»— iw»— «i^-^»t" 



LOU and GRACE 





La Coste and Bonave 



"TYPICAL TOPICAL TUNES" 

Direction ALEX HANLON 

Our Sincere Thanks to MESSRS. LOEW, LUBIN 
and HANLON for a Verv Successful Season 



MARCUS LOEW-BOB ROBISON-RENEE PIERCE 

Nothing Succec«ls Like Success 
"BOB" "RENEE" 

ROBISON and PIERCE 

Offer 

"rsO MORE SALOONS' 

A Comedy Chissic 

//>/;» CIHCVIT Direction LEW CANTOR 



LOEW TIME 



(lonipliments from 



HUGH 



EMMA 



A Circuit with a real system, where co-operation g Jf^gLLY and HEIT 

and showmanship stand back of you i 




I)ire<tion: CANTOR «Sc YATES 



Host W ishes 



Fl 



orence 



BELL and BELGRAVEJ-"^ 

in "3 G. M." Bv C. H. O'DOISNELL. LOEW CIRCUIT. THANKS TO MR. LUBIN 



i: 



•V t 









■TW.tfl^W?^ 



Frid#y, Srptei|ibfer 2. Iflgj 



f:a»«ii!iwMi«)gBi)i« ::iMipiiii i i ii i » ip i ! i iiiiii i iiiii i «a 



nm^ Mmm i^ M m » m m nmmw ffi^i9 m mm^ 



f <. M-W -t. 



Compliments and Success to MARCUS LOEW, JAKE LUBIN and 

The Entire LOEW CIRCUIT 



ARTHUR 




and 




In **The Peacemaker" By Emmet DeVoy 






1 



Direction 



MANDEL & ROSE 



a*-**! 



MMib 



^MBiiir-r<''iil » ' l li ll i p || S)t# l»'»^ 



KP 



■ »■! r r i n 



■»i^i—i>ta>i.^ ■■■»«•■■ 



▼^ 



"V' 



Best Wishes 



i 



to 




Loew 



F. RAY COMSTOCK 



jOBNffiE 



EDNA 




dfid 




Booked SoUd 



Loew Circuit 



Direction HORWITZ & KRAUS 



^^ 






!*>■ ■ >**<B^W^ 



S ^ 



ancf 



MORRIS 6EST 



* 

i4 C^mnasUc Gem 

ALVIN and KENNY 

, in "THRILLS aod SPILLS" 

I Personal DSrecti^ 



WE HAVE PLAYED EVERY STATE BUT THE NEW STATE 

HORWITZ & KRAUS, page MR. LUHN! 



/ 



FOR 



'^ 



FRANK 



OLIVE 







> 



SUCCESS 

NORA and SIDNEY KELLOGG 

"THE ]\!USIC ROOM" 

Lo«w CircBit. Dinctioa HORWITZ A KRAUS. 



ROSE ««^ THORN 



iiiiflinmiiiiiii^ 




..f.. -A, 




SELLING LAUGHS 



ON THE LOEW CIRCUIT 

Through HORWITZ & KRAUS 



■^>i''*»-*^i^"*w»' 



ssx:: 



sas: 



4»-^ 



s ' HilllillW illMimilll^ 



SUCCESS 

Booked Solid Loew Cireoit 
Thanks to Mr. J. H. Lubin. 



To Mr. Marcus Loew and Hi» 

NEW STATE THEATRE and BUILDING 

Direction Horwitz & Kraus 



V 

I 



JACK and EVA 

ARNOLD 




■ ^ {i^^S 



RAINBOW 



HEAP MUCH LUCK 
A N D — 

Royal Americans 



MOHAWK 



Presenting "THE 20TH CENTURY SQUAW 



9f 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



(Copyrighted) 




Direction MARK LEVY 

agaags g.e.r r 'zt z s =ir-»"fyrT--T'<'"erg : 



Marcus Loew 



opening: his 

STATE THEATRE 

IN NEW YORK 



Both This Week 

(AUGUST 29) 

Success 

EDDIE CANTOR 



Eddie Cantor 

opening his 

"MIDNIGHT ROUNDERS " 

IN DETltOIT 



'liS-iJay,' September 2, 1921 



V A B 1 Jfi 'if f 



«• H 




WE OFFER THE UNSOLD PORf ION OF 





LOE W^S iTME ATTRiB 

BroMlway mm! 83rd St« N«ir ilTork City '' ^. Broad uid New Str^eU, N«w«rk» R JL 

FIRST MORTGAGE 











Normal 

Federal 

Income Tax 

Up to 4% 

Paid by 

Borrower 




'mm 



Denominatiofii t 

$100, 
$500 ^ 
and 

$1000 

Cash or Partial 
Payments 






By LOEWS INCORPORATED 

Send for the Story of Loew^s Great Enterprise 

The complete story of this great organization and its scores of operating units is told completely in booklets which we will be 
glad to send to you. The soundness of principle upon which this great nation-wide organization is built is related in plain and 
truthful words. We recommend these bonds as a remarkably safe investment — yielding 8% interest. You will want to read 
of this enterprise whether you wish to invest or not. '-■'"-' ' r ' 




BondK 




American Bond & Mortgafe Bids* Telephone State 5000 127 N. Dearborn St., Chicago 

562 Fifth Avenue, New York, Telephone Bryant 960O 
Cofaunbus, Ohio DiBvenpoct. Iowa Omkl Rapids, lyOch. Rockford, DL 




41 'Years Investment 
Bxperience Safeguards 
Our ClienU' Interctta 



*"iii^ 







I*' 



.1 ^JL W- 




•/'.' 

V 



^1 










n.-^ «- •••f •*<• 



»•' 






~m "^^ *^-m v^ 






an 



a CONSTRUCTION CO., Inc. 






■•*' '."rj'' i/'y •' ' f* , ■•• 1 ' -"t! 



r:.' 






' ^ 



now^ having under construction 



■»y ••..•♦..* 






>-• 



LOEWS 

...•■- ' ■ .»■ ■ . 

NEW NEWARK THEATRE 



.;..■■■ ..> . 
■ 'r,. Z^- 



'f 






CHICAGO OFFICES 

■'. ' 

American Bond and Mortgage Bldg. 



1 1 



1 »i 



i '•» 



.*i 



:1 



•.'• - V, 






' «. ; ' ..lU « .^. 



NEW YORK OFFICES 

562 Fiftk Avenue 



f: 



4^ t 



■• ''i -^ . 4 



/ ^^ 



■»v ♦■ 



: i^ 






»» • t i .. >. 4 






•..•»' 



., I 



■MtfiiiM 



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VAEISTT 



Friday. September 2, lf^21 




EDWARDS 





JJ l"'i""W. .1 s^ 




: To MARCUS LOEW 



^^▼▼▼▼▼■▼▼▼^▼▼^T^^Ty^^T^ i y ^TT T ,V . ▼ _ ▼ . ▼ . ▼T / TT 



ancf f Ae 



1 



NEW STATE THEATRE 



\ 



With Best Wishes 

JOSEPH L. RHINOCK 




Compliments to Loew- Acker man & Harris 

IV1ACD0INALD& KAHN 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

Managers of Construction 

130 Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



.' ^,it A A A A A. A lA A A ^ A A A A lA ^ ^, A Ai A A i^ ^ 



PRICES REDUCED 



ON ALL 



H&MTRIJNKS 

Write for New Catalog or Sea Our Acenta 

NEW YORK 

S. NATHAN, 931 Sevtutli Ava. 

CHICAGO 
BARNES T. CO., 75 W. Randolph 

HERKERT A MEISEL T. CO. 

•!• WAAIIINOTON ATK. 



COMPANY 



70 EAST 45th STREET 

NEW Y(^K 

•1 

Some Theatres Equipped by Us 
LOeW^ STATE THEATRE NEW YORK 

lAtir't Offll««tt tiMlM ....^.....^...lliv Tork 

Itfpw^i fcfikg^ i«pm thMlv^*^ ^tir Tork 

Lotw'B Deitiieir Street Theetre ^fMr Tork 

L«nr't iHi ifartH i»d ▲▼oniio B Theatre. . .VfV Tork 

ieierVi0tl(4ttteet1lMetre Neir Toik 

Xowr'k Bie ^iMtre ..,.....: New Toric 

Loeir'e Qtdm A.rmam Theatre Brookly% H. T. 

Loew'e Melrofolitaii .^..Brooklyii, N. T. 

Leew'e Alpine ..••• BrooUyii, N. T. 

Loew's Orpheum llMfttre Bostoa, Mass. 

Leew'e GIoIm Theatre Boston, Iftase. 

Loew's Stale Theatre Memphis, Tenn. 

Leew'e Jiontraal Theatre .Xonlreal, Oanada 

Loevr's Oestre Montreal, Oanada 

I^enr'e Ottawa Theatre Ottawa^ Canada 

Leew's HamiKen Theatre Hamilton, Oanada 

Capitol Theatre New York 

Riiroti Theatre ^ .New Tork 

KftHo Theatre ,:.....,V....... New tetk 

SIread Theatre .iTew ToriE 

Booth Theatre . ^ .% ; ..>.:.. i/«9Mi|t/Teeii. 

Little Theatre Hew York 

MuBC Box Theatre New York 

Selwyn Theatre New York 

Sfanbert Theatre New York 

Shnbert 'ft Ambassador New York 

Shubert's RiU New York 

Shubert's Imperial New York 

Shubcrt's Vanitj New York 

Earl ft Carrol Theatre New York 

Cohan A Harris Theatre New York 

Bronx Opera House New York 

Belmont Theatre New York 

VanderbiU Theatre New York 

Capitol llieatre Montreal, Canada 

Poll's Palace Theatre Hartford, Conn. 

Poll's Waterbury Theatre Waterbury, Conn. 

Strand Theatre Brookljm, N. Y. 

Strand Theatre Worcester, Mass. 

Strand Theatre Portland, Me. 

Strand Theatre Allentown, Pa. 

Strand Theatre Plalnficld, N. J. 

Recent Theatre Toronto, Canada 

Newark Theatre Newark, N. J. 

Hnrtig & Seamon New York 

Keith's Hamilton New York 

Keith's Jefferson New York 

Keith's Borough Park Theatre Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fox's Rldgewood Theatre Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fox's Washington New York 

Park Theatre Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ward k Olynne's Theatre Astoria, N. Y. 

Beverly Theatre Brooklyn, N. Y. 

St. James Theatre Asbury Park, N. J. 

Orpheum Theatre Paterson, N. J. 

Wilmington Theatre Wilmington, Del. 

I'll I n^m^a^n^—M—i— —>»■<■.*» n » \ .m 



f 

t 



fhriaay, Beirt«mber 2, 1S21 



y ABISTT 



^1 



m 



ft 



>B 



"\ 



PLAIN AND DECORATIVE PLASTERING IN 



LOEWS STATE THEATRE 



>.^ 



"»- •■ 



Executed by 



Architectural Plastering Co. 

Telephone Murray Hill 6463: JOSEPH F. DUJAT, Pres. , 624^6 First Avenue, N. Y. C. 



EXPERTS IN THE USE OF PLAOTIC MATERIALS AS A MEDIUM 

OP ARCHITECTURAL AND DECORATIVE EXPRESSION 

IN THE SIMPLEST OR MOST INTRICATE FORM 







^Phone Schuyler 3555 



•^^' 



FALIHEE & McCAUL 



4.. 



INC. 



PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 



b'- ' 



\, 1203 WEST 82ND STREET 

Near Amsterdam Ave. ,.. Newport 



To MARCUS LOEW 

and the NE W 
ST A TE THE A TRE 



TEL. 1800-i80t QLENMORE 



ESTABLISHED 1884 



We Extend Our Best Wishes 



FOR SUCCESS 

JOHN GOLDEN 




I 



MANTELS AND FIREPLACES 

Astfiroiis, Ftiitf«f«, Firtsets, Spark Gvarrft, Gas Lofls, Dame Damfm^, Etc. 

HENRY MILES & SONS, Inc. 

OFFICE ANO SHOWROOMS 

2071-73 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Rockaway Aves "L" Station. 






and 



WDVCHELL SMITH 



^ T „ ^ jr 



Compliments 



LILLIAN SIEGER 



Singing Comettist 

Witk 

FIVE MUSICAL BUDS 



LOEW CIRCVIT 



LEW CANTOR Offices 



. i 



MB. HAKAOEB 
BE SUB£ TO OATOH US AT 

McVICKER'S 

CHIGAOO 
WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 5th 

TAYLOR 

MACY and 

HAWKS 

3 Aces of Comedy and Song 
"Can next-to-close without 
apologies in anybody's the- 
trc." — Jack Laif. 



BuMPUS & Lewis 

SCENIC STUDIOS 

245 W. 46th St.. N. Y. 
Bryant 2695 



DROP CURTAINS FOR SALE AND RENT 

SOME OF THE ACTS WE HAVE EQUIPPED WITH SCENERY; SKELLY AHD 

HEIT REVUE, "FORTUNE QUEEN" 

CANTOR & YATES PRODUCTIONS 

IN VELVET, SILK, SATEENS AND OTHER MATERIALS 



BEAUMONT 

VELVET, SILK, SATEEN SCENERY 
PRODUCTIONS. REVUES and ACTS 
THEATRE &. STAGE DECORATIONS 

STUDIOS 



THE 8TIJIHO OF LNl HI AI, HTAOK MKTIINliM ^... .,«. 

BEAUMONT WAM TlIK KIKHT rifiltMON TO TKEATK A MKAI. ^OOIJK 
FOK HUM. 8ATIN AND VKLVET WTAIilC HKTTIISCiN. HK AI.WAVH WA!i 
AND AI.WAYN WIM. BE A LKAIIKH. NOVKI.TY JIK«;<»KATIONM A-M» 
fJNIQVK IDEAS ARE HIS CRITEKIOM— Ai.WA¥M. IF YOU SEE MhAI - 




AS 9100.00, ATTKACTIVK SKTM TO KKNT— KEM'AiS Ai'l'IVINCi 0« 
rVRClIASE I'RirK. 

230 W. 46th ST.. N. Y. CITY Bryant 9448 ?!T,rii"i*s> 



BEAUMONT 

COLLEGES, CLUBS. EXHIBITIONS 
Sl WINDOW DISPLAYS, TO ORDER 
OR SUPPLIED ON RENTAL BASIS 

STUDIOS 




42 



VARIETY 



Friday, September 2, 1921 





* **, . ■ ' 



^^> 







v:>»Vy ' 




ency 



I ■* '- " 



.••>.y 



A. SABLOSKY 
FRANK KEENEY 



JOHN J. McGUIRK 
C. E. WHITEHURST 

':': ■/.:''''■::''' ^ to 



M. HERSHFELD 
JULIAN BRYLAWSKI 



MARCUS LOEW 



^tf .•,T«-^ 



TTTii: 






^ 



*i 

■I 
1 



<»*■■ 



:%* 



Best Wishes 






a» 1 , wo 



>r 



4, 



. 



■¥':> 



i 



1^ 



(k m 



Best Wishes to Marcus Loew 



SNELL and VERNON 

LOEWS NEW STATC TBEATRE, KEW YORK, NOW (SEPT. 14) 

. , • • ' ■ 

(Originator of the one man feet catch from ttie floor 

to two loops) 



a 



• ^» 



Artistic Diversion 



Direction ABE FEINBERG 



Congratulations to 



MARCUS LOEW 



For His Fine Accomplishment 
The NEW STATE THEATRE 



Winthrop Ames 



Best Wishes to Marcus Loetv 

JACK STROUSE 

"OVER THE WIRE" 



Management Messrs. Sliubert 



WANTED AT ALL TIMES 

LEADERS— Piano or Violin 
Also Stage Hands 

LONG SEASON'S ENGAC.EMENT IN BURLESQUE 

OVKK 

COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT COMPANY 

AM» 

AMERICAN BURLESQUE CIRCUITS 

/\I>I>KK.SK 

BURLESQUE PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION 

Room 305 Columbia BIdg. 701 Seventh Ave.. New York City 

If e Congratulate You 

AL ANGER and ADELON 

Diiortion SAM FALLOW and DOROTHY 

WIW CIRCUIT 



^^»:~>^>vv t■~^Jw^A■v>v>^.v>.>;»x»^t■^^^^^»»»^ 

StandaVd For Twelve Years 
With MARCUS LOEW 

R^sejGarden 

and Her Trusty Piano 

Success to Loew 's New State Theiatre 

Direction HORWITZ & KRAUS 



>5^55<^55?^55555?5^5^55v^?^^ 



WANTED 

For "PETTICOAT MINSTRELS AT fHB' CLUB '* 
"MAMMY'S BIRTHDAY, "'"AT THE PARTY ! and 'DOT^ 
TIE CLAIRE'S REVUE:/ Clever Girls who do Specialtiei— 
Singers, Dancers, Musical SpeciaHies, Violiniste, Harpist; 
Banjoists, Sister Team, etc. Also Several* Ofrls to do Black 
Face. State all particulars and salary in first letter. 

Productions under direction of DOTTIE CLAIRE 

Address all communications ,to €HAS. W; BOYER 

PALACE THEATRE, HAGERSTOWN, 

MARYLAND 



w w w w w w w w w 




^ f ^ y ^ T ^ T . ^ 



FORD SISTERS 

At B. F. Keiths ROYAL THEATRE. New York, Next Week (Sept. 5) 

/\kf: Mio^MXi 

ORIGINAL IDEAS IN TAPESTRY SETTINGS 

- '\i,vi»K in' 

m FLESH FLETCHER SCENIC STUDIOS 

CASINO THEATRE 447 HALSEY ST. 

LAFAYETTE 85 ♦4J BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



MANKIN 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



^ it. 



I^^Jlt 



TROVATO 

"THE ORIGINATOR" 
World's Famous Humorous Violinist 



NOTICE 

SEYMORE HOTEL 

ROCHESTER, N. T. 
Up-to-dat< European — $1.00 UP 

Hotels Catering to Profession 
~ HOTEL ]$T|tAl*HM6RE . 

WALNUT ST., NBAR. 12TH, PHILV 
Home of the Theatriral Profession, n«&r 
all Thoatres. Runnlns water or prlvi|t« 
ibaths in all ,rooms. Comfort and good 
service our motto. Rates |2.6o a d»y, 
with private batti I3.S0. Special weekly 
ratc.i. B. F. CAIIILL. Mrr. 

HOTELS RECOMMENDED 

J. A. Deilisler. Manaic^r 

Telephone Superior 6310 
F.l'ROPKAN IM^AN 

REX HOTEL 

TIIKATKICAL HOTEL 
COS North Clurk St. C'hl«aK« 



CHICAGO, ii.r. 

HOTEL WASHINGTON 

$2.00 a Day and I p. 

With or Without Hath. 
Wakhinrlon St.: Bet. La Salle and WHU 

«'aterliirr \o Orpheuin Art« 

HOTEL ASTOR 

176 N. (Ivrk 8t.. Near Kamloiph Ht. 
CH1CAC.O. 11^. -■ . 
Rntes Jl.&o I'er Day and Up 
l^ne niorlt from Pxlahe Th»»atr» 



HOTEL CLARENDON 

No. Ciark and Ontario Streets, Chleartf 

FIVK MINUTES FRCXM LOOP U 



RATKS $1.00 AND CP 



REVERE HOUS£ . 

tl7 No. Clark i^i.. ro:^er Austin Kr%, 

rilU'AGO 

All njodern ronvonienren. RemodeleU 

and Refurnished Throuflfhout. Five 

Minutes- Walk from lltart of the CUf, 

NEW TREMONT^HOTEL 

21-29 So. Dearborn St.. CHK^AtiO 

Every! hinir New ami Modern 

Rooms 91.50 a Ad np 



SAVOY HOTEL 

fS.OO and I'p Without Bath 
9.1.00 and -Up Ul(h Bath 
J. CL NiniOLS. M«r. and Prop. . 
l7thandBroudmiy.> DKNVKK, COLCl. 



Hotel Hammond and Cafej 

HAMMOND. "IND. 

Very Mod.-rn. Runnlni; Water In. All* 
Rooms— Shower Haths; Rates: |1.26 Sin- , 
»rle; 12.00 Double. One Minuts Wall' 
from Orpheum Theatre. 

Opposite New Parthenon Theatre. 
TIIKO. GUSCOFF, Prop. 



MAJESTIC HOTEL ' 

KUROPEAN PLAN. IIA.MMOND, ISTK 

Running Walt-r in Kvery Room; Also 
Rooms with «ath. Rate: |1.2S and up. 
Located in Center of City. Close to All 
Theatres. N. .SCOFFS. Mgr, 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

$3.00 PKR DAY WITH BATH . 
$2.00 PEK DAY WITHOUT BATfl 
r>00 ROOMS 
Baltimore At. & I2th St. Kansas City, Bfiw 



OMAHA. NFB. 

FONTENELXE HOTEI, 

$3.00 a Day and Up. 

Kvery Room With Rath. 

18th and IH>ll<»LAS STS. 



NEWHOUSE HOTEL 

SALT IJiKE CIT\'. UTAH 

Absolutely fireproof. 400 outside room% 
each with separate bath. Theatrical rato 
— Sinsic $2.00 per day up. Double 12. &• 
per day up. 



METROPOLE HOTEL 

' i OF.' ST. > LOUIS 

Just N. of Washinarton Ave. on 12tb St. 

Special Theatrical Rates 

$7.00 Per Weak Up— Strictly Modern and 

Homelike 



A REAL ENTHUSIAST OF 

MR. MARCUS LOEW 

AND HIS ENTERPRISES 

WISHING HIM SUCCESS GREATER THAN EVER 



jTridny, Septwiib<?r 2, 15»21 



VAEIETT 



43 







OFFICE 







FIRST YEAR IN NEW YORK 

SOME OF THE ACTS THAT I HAVE REPRESENTED 



DAVB MAIIliBY 
MAROONI BROTHKHS 
Ct>RINNE ASli €0. 
KOMA JAPS 
UTTIiB PIPIFAX 
LAVOT^ MODBI^ 
HOUR HaUW AND COM 
MILLER AND OAPMAN 
ROACH AND McCURDY 
CRITERION FOUR 
BBLL AND RVA 



BBNDBR AND IIBBHAN 
CRALFONTB 8ISTBRS 
^VU OONCBAS, JR., Oa 
CONNE AND AJUBRRT 
RRNBIY, MASON AND SCROLL 
KBNO, RBTBS AND MBLROSR 
MORVON BROTIOniS 
ISR MASON AND €0. 
RAINES AND AVEY 
MABBL HARPER AND CO. 
W4n»BROmRRS 



TIME AND TILE 
VALBNTINE AND FOX 
VAN AND VERNON 
WALSH AND BENTLEY 
WOLFORD AND STKYEl^S 



MAX YORK*S PUPILS 
UBO XASmMhL AND CO. 
BMOK AND STONB 
WALnOt BAKER AN^D CO. 
SOIiBBRNS 

BARRBVP AND CUNEBN 
SABRY BtlSSBY 
DOROTHY BARD AND CO. 
CTEDRIC LINDSAY JSf HAZEL 
BILLY BROAD 
HIBGRIST AND DARAO 
TfttX AND MARVEY SPECK 
WORTH WAYTON FOUR 
WASHINGTON TRIO 
BOB WHITE 

ROBINSON AND PIERCE 
SIMMS AND WARFIELD 
ROBERT AND DEMONT 
McKEK AND DAY 
•'PATCHES" 
THE MINECLOS 
MARCO AND CO. 
DB ALBERT AND MORTON 
BONNitiBaSLLB AT?D WILSON 
DAB AND NEVILLE 
••FALLEN STARS** 
BROWN*S MUSICAL REVUE 
BURKHART AND ROBERTS 
BICKNELL 



LINDLEY SEXTET 
BLLIOTP BEST AN» CO. 
FLORENCE BELMONT 
'rO»I BROWN*S INmANS 
CAIU/rON AND BELMONT 
CATALINO AND WILUAMS 
tri/AYTON AND ClAYTDN 
THE CRISIS 

BERT A DOROTHY CLINTON 
IK>NALD*B SEXTET 
DELL AND RAY 
DAVIS ABTD McCOY 
DUEL AND WOODY 
ESTHER TRIO 
BARLE AND EDWARDS 
EDWARDS AND RELLI 
BILL AND EDNA FRAWLEV 
FREAR, BAGCiOTT * FBRAB 
NELL FULTON AND CO. 
hX>X AND MAYO 
FRANCES AND POX 
GEO. S. FREDERICKS A CO.. 
FOLLETTE* PBAllli « WKHS 
EDNA MAY FOSTER AWD CO. 
BUD AND JESSIE GRAY 
f.X'ILLANI TRIO 
C.X>RDON AND DBLMAR 
<;OLDEN BROTHERS 
JACK nODlJE 



GORDON AND LA MARR 
J>A€K AND^JHBBH 
GALIiOWAT AND GAMRBTVB 
GATliOn»AND liANCnPON 
JEAN 6ID80N AND €0. 
FRED HnjGHBS AND CO. 
HARMONY liAND 
fHMSMAW AND AVERY 
HIIjIj AND ^UH^ 



nuTRIINATMlNAL REVUE 
JEAN AND 8BAYNE 
IfUGH JOHNSTON 
JOKifSON BROS. A JOHNSON 
JAPANB8B BEVUB 
jilUiMNNy DVO 
KNOX ANl> INMAN 
KAWANA DUO 
KING REVUE 
KNIGIIT AND SAWT»Aifl 
LAROJSB AND ADAMS 
l>BB AND BENNETT 
MiOYD AND WRITBHOUSB 
tOBiG AND PBRRV 
IAMB AND GOODRICH 
R1SRA MATTHEWS AND-CO. 
MORRIS AND GBBKLBV 
MORRBLLB^ DOGS IN TOY- 
LAND 



MOUntA 



DOV MARCmiJr AND RA# 



Onf H M ra SBXTET 
FAD^N MiHB RSED 
FVRPLB MlNSntBLS 



REDMOND AN» WBLLS 

RQMAB fiiovnPis 

AtiBX RVIiOlhP AND CO. 

RAY Avp mmmfw 

RBNARD AND JORDAN 



RALra SSSNAftD AND CO. 
SMITH AND KMBFE 
STANLMY AND ALSON 

SHAW AND MUC 
SWIFT AND DALY 
SIXMWSMMIi MBNI M O 
MIfflH AND IBWIS 
BOBTHH AND TOBIN 
BBNITA 

MOWABD A flPBXBN SAVAGB. 
MliLR. liWlNBTTB 

li o > DONN» a#L Ams 



r 



L 



John Hyman - - "Wit to Fit" 

Material written lately for Eddie Cantor, Florence Moore, Ben Bernie, Phil Baker, Marie Stoddard, Happy Jack Gard- 
ner, Walters and Walters, Mack and Lane, Cantor and Yates prodncttons. Jack Osterman and many other standard aets 



Have twenty of my own productions successfully playing 

Loew's Annex Building, 160 West 46th Street 



Telephone, Bryant 9496 

f^hkago Office: 

Will Be Announced Ixiter 



N E W YORK 



CaUe Addre&8, *'Cantorit«" 

London Office: 
26 Hanway St. Oxford St., W. I 



44 



VARIETY 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



1 



Oracle Emmett and Co. 



Bryant and Stewart 



Ryan, Weber and Ryan 



Flying Howards 



Zola and Knox 



Rita Shirley 



"Street Urchin'' 



Kane and Chidlow 



Eileen Poe and Co. 



IN "THE CHATTEL 



W 



Will IVIorrissey's 

" BUZZIN' AROUND" 



George Sheldon 



Poly ana 



Dancing Serenaders 



Keller and Herbert 



Norton and Wilson 



Marie Tollman and Co. 



Evans, Mero and Evans 



Andy and Louise Barlow 



. *. .«. .• «•«. W..V ^_ a. *. ^ 



Sylvia Mora 

AND RECKLESS DUO 



Tom and Joe Gabby 



Bard and Pearl 




Paisley Noon and Co. 



IVlolera Revue 



St. Clair Twins and Co. 




... \^ , w i «^ 



■IIHIilllllllliliUiililllllllllililttilH^^ 



Fridav, (^ptember 2. 1921 



V AKIKTY 



45 






Gertrude George 



Paul and Georgia Hall 



Bud Bernie 



Kennedy and Martin 



^'Overseas Revue" 



Babe La Tour 



Emery Quartette 






Royal Harmony Five 



Helen ("Smiles") Davis 



Lynn Cantor 



Wardell and La Costa 



Santry and Norton 



Gordon and Jolice 



Link and Philips 



Murry and Popkova 



Work and. Mack 



Elwyn Trio 



Williams and West 



Frank Bardon 



Tommy Dooley 



Reed and Blake 




m. 






1. 



Walter Fenner and Co. 




iHWWWWiiHwWnqWfTWffwwwtfWTwrw 




4G 



VABIETT 



Friday. September 2, 1921 



Bob 





FISHER 

"TvTO Shades of Burnt Cork 



Jules 



99 



BOOKED SOUD W. V. M. A. AND ORPHEUM QRCUITS 
Thanks to JAKE LUBIN for past favors 



Representatives 



B 



OB BAKER 
EELER & JACOBS 
ERNARD BURKE 



HARRY 



and 



ANNA 



SCRANTON 

"In a Variety of Doings" 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



First Act to Appear on the Stage of the 
New State Theatre 



JOE 



TTTTTTT^l 



GRACE 



WESTON and ELINE 



THEATRICAL 



DOUGLAS HOTEL 



in 



llie Upper Underworid Pair^ 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



ji.^ 





J HI, TAN 



KATHERINE 



HALL and DEXTER 



Ifl 



"What's It All About?" 

Direrti.m ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



>.>.A>.^A^A^ 



lllillllilllilil^^ 

McMahon and Adelaide 



**A Vaudeville Diversion 
with a Punch** 

( Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



BKN DWOBSTT, ,_. 

Rooms Newlr Renovatod. — All Coa- 
vonlencoA — VacaneUs Now Open. 

207 W. 40th St— Off B'way. 

riMMi BttmI 1471^. 



HOTEL SANDEI^S 

CA8S AND COLUMBIA 

DETROIT, MICH. 

FtTO MlBQto Walk to TheatrM. 

k New Home and Headqnarten 

won THKATBICALS. 

Mttdom •■4 fTp t% Palo, 
GOOD RBSTAURANT IN CONNBC- 
TION — WRITB FOR RgSKR VATIOWl 

RirnSIDB SMM 

STANWIX 

S20 Wert 96th Street 

NRAR WBST KND AVRNVR 

Oao aad Two Rooma With Kltekoaottw 

!'.(• U tlt.M por wook. 

Stoam — Wloctrteltr — Photio 

J. P. WALLER, Mtr. 



9 



Beautifully Fumifihed 
Rooms 



Bm Ul KAi«o for Tkoiilrleal reopto 

MRS. E^ BAILEY 



snt 

Stvooi. NKW YORK 




EDDIE 



JULIA 



Schwortz and Clifford 



m 



"Cur It Out" 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



▼ ▼ ▼ ▼ T T 



Arthur Sullivan and Co. 




▼ TTTTTT^ 



171 



''A Drawing from Life'* 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 






After tie PUfy 

ntmlmm. 

MMmlcl* 

AMALAX 

Tk0 Prm4fy Ltatmth0 
AnrMlhr* Ikd* olok ^mcMm-^m « mm tte kos 






— dM Uok mmt Ih(« fika ■■■iiii Inita. Aa 
•fcthflaa f ti>«oo.i ri» hn war — • M «W'Wk 

At dUnmlmmmi itakn 

MpK Keeoti A iioeeiw , inc. 

M fMlM BlVMt. Mmt T«k 




EARL SHEAHAN 



ROUTE OF 

BERTHA STARTZMAN 



Aur- 22 — (irand. Grrrii liar. 
%UK. KH— Mnjmtic, Waterloo. 
*rpt. 1 — Majedtlr. I>rf« Molnm. 



NIFTY TRIO 



CARL DELORTO 



Sept. 4 — Orphenm, Hloai Falls. Hept. IS— ^Vyiiial. 8t. Joe. 

Sept. ft — EmpreoB, Omaha. Hcpt. IK — <ilob«>, Kanaas City. 

; I' •; V I - Hept. St — Noveltx. Topeka. 



Sept. t'J — Odeon. BartleavUlr. 
Oct. » — Columkla, 8t. U»ala. 
Oct. 6 — Alton. Alton. 



Oct. I" r.nr-r B, TJLHl bl, 

Oct. 1»— Kedale. Chicago. 
Oct. !•— Uneoln, Chicago 



O « i. ~U — Kmi>i<^*». tu.cmco* 
Oct. 24 — RIalto. KacliM. 
MORE TO FOLIX>W. 



<**>^>>:yi*<f<^>><»<r>>>^>>^ 



-«-g-M*«*5C 



66 




CREOLE COCKTAIL 

A SYNCOPATED MUSICAL BEVERAGE WITH A- 100% KICK 
Booked Solid Keith Circuit— This Week (Aug. 29) B. F. Keith' a Syracuse 



99 



MATT HOUSELEY, Manager 



- i.^1..* iri ill" itm'r i .:'-i^ .. 



^. ^^ .1* 



Personal Direction ALF T. WILTON 



g>iday. a*pUiiil)»r 2, 1821 



VAEIBTT 



47 
















^^ 




B# 












^ 

^ 

,^^ 

^ 




We 



W 



"THE TWO ORPHANS 

. will be a film 

3 

just as unusual as 



» 






S^Wfiy Down East% 



** i 



*^/*» ^.^ . 



,*• 






D. W. GRIFFITH, Inc. 

A. L. Grey, Gen. Manager 
Longacre BMg. 

JNew York City 








; 



* 







w0 



^ 




























4^ i 



¥^ 





^ 



r>, 




^y^v 





^'^, 




^ 
^ 







^\0 



A • 




^ 








liUMB^iriiAiMMfeniJ^ttiiia 



4K 



VARIETY 



Friday, Sepa.^i»er 2, 1 921 









STAFFORD'S ANIMALS 



GOOD LUCK TO 

^SnL^LJC^ €^^OL^ X^oe 



a 



Ml 



♦ t 



WOULD LIKE ANOTHER SEASON LIKE LAST 



Direction 



HORWITZ & KRAUS 



1 



MAHONEY and CECIL LYLE and EMERSON 



\n 



^'A Musical Breeze 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



99 



BUHLA PEARL 



m 



''It Happens Every Day 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



f^ 



^^^9^ 



m 



Exclusive Song Sayings 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



YORKE and MABELLE 



m 



"That's Too Bad 



yy 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



Louis Modena 

Presents 

Countess Leonardi 



in 



*'The Futuristic Revue" 



Direction ARTHUR 1. HORWITZ 



MASON and BAILEY 



m 



"Two Dark Spots of Jof 



Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



WANTED 

PIANO LEADRUS and MOV- 
ING I'lCTUUK OPEKATOUS on 

account of going into open Khop. 

J. S. BURNHAM, 
Cortland Theatre, Cortland, N. Y. 



WANTED 

LADY AND GENTLEMEN 
BRASS PLAYERS 

Doubling SaxapboncB 

Trumpets, Trombones (valve) Tubt. 

Uapses furnished. Tx>ng Season. 

Keith Circuit 

PRODUOBR, Room 318. 

Btrand Theatre Bldg., New York 



■-< 



,'ii 



WANTED 



ComMlIan, JuTenilc. Prima Donna. Hov- 
llrette. Inirrnue. T:*nor. I>:iDrrr. Kaf 
HlnirrrH aiul CUoruJ* iHrlm for MX 
M'KEKH or lonxer rnKavpinent for MM- 
■kite l>Yolirs Urvur. Clilrn^o. 

OPENINGS HEPTKMIIKR 2C. 1921 

Write CIIA8. U. DOLL. 408 Delaware 
nidir.. Chicago. 

Krnd photon and drnrrlption of a^t. 



FOR SALE 

ONE FINE ARUEHTOS CURTAIN. SS ft 

iTlde, 34 ft. Iilffli. Ono fine Krd Plaih 
Curtain. SS ft. wid«. 34 tt. hiieh, also 281 
upliolHtrrrd plunh neats. 589 plain woodea 
xata; botli curtniM ar« poRlti%-rly in r:o«4 
rondition; seat* frill be sold at a bargain. 
For fall imriicaiars apply 

W. H. HUNTSMAN, 
Rajah Temple, Readino. Pa. 



NEW YORK 
THEATRES 




SHARK 
T -R A N 

*'A National InailtoUoiv'* 

ItKOADWAY at 47th HU 

Direction. Joseph Plunketl 

"SERENADE" 

An B. A. Walsh Production 
With Miriam Coo|>er A George Walih 



R A I F T Y ""'^•w. *• it. «TM. at • Jk 

UHlUl I UatlDtM Wad. aad Bat.. t'M. 
.lOIlN GOLDEN Present* 

"THE WHEEL" 

A New Play by WlncheU Smith 



— ANI 



•t ■#>: 



LI 1 I Lu iiftUaaas Wad. and SaU. *M.\ 

r*« !•« YEARI 

By FRANK CRAVEN 1 

Itaiai to WINCH ELL IIIITH J 



•j^ 



CHIC and TINY HARVEY 



in "THE SURPRISE" 



BOOKED SOLID 
LOEW CIRCUIT 



Direction 
SAlteUEL BAERWITZ 



S 




FRED WE TOO KITTY 

WIFT AND DALY 



Booked solid. Thanks to J. 11. LUBIN and JACK FINE, owl penoufd repre8entativ<e. 



*'ONE FOR 
NOTHING" 



riMii 



ftif < i< :.^U i^M 



4 




mmm 



IPV 



mmmm 




R O 



C. B. MADDOCK 

Presents 






R 




V U 




CHARLES EDWARDS, MORRISON and HARTE, CECELIA KORMAN, JEAN BERKELEY, EVA OARPENTDER BERTHA DUNCAN. HELEN 

MEYi:35-aAY^EV.ANE. ART YAKCR.!»A,40S. XETJ,Y 

Keith's Palace, New York, This Week (August 29) 



ALSO 

THE RETURN OF 




B. A. ROLFE 



(in person) 
IN A HIGH-CLASS PRODUCTION OPEJNIlNG SEPTEMBER 19 

C B. MADDOCK 

141 West 48th Street, New -fork City 



CORRESPONDENCE 

(Continued from page 24) 
sation would be disbanded because of 
a dispute about the closed shop ques- 
tion. 



The liberty Theatre, American 
wheel burlesque bouse, will reopen 
next Sunday with "Little Bo l^eep." 
J. W. Whitehead, formerly manager 
of the old Grand theatre in St. Paul, 
will have management. A reduction 
has been announced in prices. 



'BiUy Hart and His Circus Girls" 

BIGGER, BETTER, GREATER THAN EVER 

BIG SHOW FEATURES 

HELEN MUJIPHY, a Versatile Soubrette 
BETTY DENNISON, a Petit Toe Dancer 
BUSCH SISTERS, a Clever Variety Team 
MRS. E. K. BUSCH, ao the Japanese Wonder 
And BILLY HART with all his own ideas and mate- 
rial, including my original copyrighted comedy 
burlesque mind-reading. 

**The.Loeu7 Circuit is High enough for me." 

Working Steady, Making Money, Treatment Fine, 

Perfectly Happy — What More Can One Ask? 

Now under personal direction of HOBWiTSfi ft KBAU8. 

^^BiSBiiiBiiiill^^Biii 



AERIAL MACKS 

Tlianks to 

MARCUS LOEW 

For Our Second Year on the Loew Circuit 

Best Wishes for the 
NEW STATE THEATRE 

Direction : HORWITZ & ERAU3 



SEATTLE 

By LULU EASTON-DUNN 

WINl^EU GARDEN (Week 22), 
"Over the Wire"; STRAND— "Car- 
nival"; LIBERTY— "Crazy to Mar- 
ry"; CLEMMER— "Luring Lips"; 
BLUE MOUSE— "The March Hare"; 
COIiONIAI^— "Children of Night"; 
METROPOLITAN— "Over the Hill"; 
COLISEUM— "The Northern Trair'< 
CLASS A— "The Lone Star Ranger." 



(4 



MILES OF SMILES 



99 



The Wilkes production of "The 
Prince Chap" marks the return of 
Howard Russcl. Another newcomer 
is Horace McDonald, a young actor 
known in Seattle, and who recently 
has been playing in Tacoma. Helen 
Rice, who ban appeared previously in 
Wilkes' organizations in other cities, 
will also have a role in the new play. 



Orover Frankie's revue, "Frocks 
and Frills," will continue at the 
Bungalow another week. 



Direct from New Tork to £eattl« 
wttbdut a stop, is the scoedule of the 
Scotti Grand Opera Company, which 
opens an engagement of four days 
heie Sept. 12. From SeatUe the 
corapp-^" r^en direct to San Francisco. 



The new season at the Metropolitan 
win open Monday evening, Sept. 6, 
with Henry Miller and Blanche Bates 
in *rrhe Famous Mrs. Fair." 



illi^^^^^^^^^^ 



U. S. A., June, 1921. 
Mr. J. H. Lubin, 
New York City, 

Dear Sir: We wish to thank you for booking us a 
pleasant and profitable 35-week tour on the Marcus 
Loew Circuit. Loads of success and happiness in 
your new offices, with very best wishes, 

Yours truly, 

Newport and Stirk 



GRACE DE WINTERS 

VENTRILOQULAL COMEDIENNE 
Loeti; Circuit Direction MARK LEVY 



Horace McDonald, the youthful 
actor-evangelist, who came into the 
limelight recently by reason of his 
sensational divorce from the wealthy 
Mrs. Catherine A. McDonald of Al- 
derwood Manor, has been engaged fori 
a small part in the Wilkes' players 
and makes his first bow to a Seattle 
audience Sunday. 



Cabaret owners are preparing to 
contest the recent cabaret ordinance. 
An order was signed Saturday by 
Superior Judge Otis W. Brinker re- 
straining Police Chief W. II. Searing 
from enforcing the cabaret ordinance 
againsQ the Breakers and Portola 
cabarets. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

By CHESTER B. BAHN 

B. F. KEITH'S— Vaudeville, with 
Hal SaUct apd Ralph Murphy, local 
stock favorites, headlining m a new 
skit by Murphy, "Lee's Surrender." 

BASTABLI«:— Neal Q'Brien's min- 
strels, Sept. 1-3. 

WlETl NO— Opened Aug. 27, with 
Dempsey-Carpentler fight pictures. 
Legit opening Sept 12 for State Fair 
week vk-ith "Afgar." 

BMPI RE— Reopens State Fair 
week, Sept. 12. with "Oh, Lady, 
Lady." 

TEMPLE— Vandeville. 

ORESCENT— Closed for acTeral 
weeks, this house opened Sunday with 
•*The Four Horsemen." The picture Is 
booked for an indefinite ran. House 
packed. Box office top %1JS0, with 
all seats reserved. 



The Binghamton theatre at Blng- 
hamton reopened Monday for the win- 
ter season. "The Old Nest," said to 
be the first time shown outside of 
New York, was offered. 



A ehange In the policy of the Pal- 
are At Watertown has been an- 
nounced. From now on tha fiat per- 



Gene ^ Kathryn King 

Now Playing 
TOth WEEK ON LOEW TIME, 

for which we wish to personally thank Mr. J. H. 
LUBIN, MOE SCHENCK, JAMES MATTHEWS and 
HORWITZ & KRAUS. 



J 



i 



^ 
J 



We'll Tell The WorM 

That— THE MARCUS LOEW CIRCUIT is unsur- 
passed 

That — WE B^OW because we have been playing it 
all season 



That- 



LEEMASON "r STANSCOH 



is keeping the Loew Patrons guessing 

WHY? 

Direction LEW CANTOR Office. IRVING YATES, Mgr. 

Thanks to MR. J. H. LUBIN 



JUST CLOSED ENTIRE SEASON 
ON LOEW CIRCUIT 

JUGGLING FERRIER 

Success to 

MARCUS LOEW 
and New STATE Theatre 






Booked Solid. 



Agents: HORWITZ & KRAUS 




H. HICKS & SON 

675 Fifth Avenue, at 53d Street 

Have a little fmit delivered to yonr home or 
your friends — ^taka it to yonr week-end onting 



JUST WHAT THEY WANT 



■r. 



K 



BECK WANTS MORE NOVELTIES 
& COMEDY ACTS FOR ORPHEUM 

Head of 'Circuit to Instruct Bookers to Increase 
Hu^iior in Bills— Docsnit Fear SliuberL Op- 
position in New Orleans 

t . - ,' ' >' New Orleans, March 2, 

^fartin Beck, who arriveld here from Palm Beach 
MoncLay en route north with Mort Singer, declared 
present Orpheum bills are lacking in comedy and variety, 
a defect he intends to remedy at once. lie says he will 
give instructions immediately to the Orpheum booking 
department to secure more humorous turns and as many 
nowltieS as possible, averring that pi*ice was a secondary 
consideration. ; .^^ . ,„ 



■ , 



NOVELTY 



\ 



'.v 



LAUGHS 



»« I < A 



FLASH 



'.■ ■•'•... i 



' 




•. '» 



r ; . .1 




•**. 




Fol 










America's Most Versatile Mystic Entertainer 

HEADLINED Leading Theatres with a pretentious 
offering of Novel Surprises in six scenes and with three people. 




1 ^ ^ ^ 

i^J w .iwg Ifm Orlea 

LaFollctte headlined in quick 
clianscs. imporsoDatiaos and illu- 
sions with seyeral beautiful wts 
of scenery. He brought back 
memories of the Great LaFayefte, 
Fregoli and Henry Lee. He fin- 
iijbcd a big Lit. 

BAMUEL. 




■ m I 'itj ti 

I^FMtt 




-v*. 

^ 






^ Vd 

fi^ I^FjImtc '^nib^^P^wo .Wistanti^ook m'r usual sketch 
Rpot. He made the lights seem dull with hia rapid changes, 
magic and eliaraeter makeups. His offering is divided into three 
scoues. His first is a rapid change, portrayiug a iiolicemau, old 
man and a Frenchman. He does his (han^es behind a screen, 
and tliotre he does bef»re the ecowd gives a chance to btudy 
bis wardr<>be. The second m-ene is making up behind a book, 
on the stage, to resemble Teddy, Jeff, Mutt, liincoln, Jiggs 
and Washington. A.h a finale be does a music master bit, bur- 
lesnuing an orchestra leader. His feature and closer is Chinese 
magic, which sent him off to curtaiDf, bows and applanse. Jm- 
Foilette is a neat performer and succeeds in his sincere at- 
tempts to entertain. A great act for any spot on any bUL 

LAIT. 




fcvj- 



T.aFaQette <«f4^the fliist 
pressive act and is a big flasl 
for this class of h6use. I>aFollette 
is an energetic worker and 
hit.^ a fast pace throughout. His 
protean offering at the opening is 
interesting and the rapid manner 
in which. he ipakea his changes 
had the audience applauding. In- 
terest was kept up by his imper- 
•sonations of great men and the 
Chinese magic pretentiously pre- 
sented at the finish held attention. 

JACK JOSKPHS. 



Thanks to ALL MANAGERS for a wonderful season. I only hope 

I have pleased them half as much as they 

have pleased me 



foruiance will be given at 2.15 aud 
will be continuous until 10:45 o'clock. 

The Oem, nt Oswego, will reopen 
SepL 17. The bouse was renovated 
a'nd remodeled whUe .closed. ' It will 
show first run pictures only. 



Frank Hoy» of Port Chester, is the 
new maii^Bger of the Curtbage the- 
atre, at CiirlkAf«. Lawreace J. CS«r> 
key disposed of hia Intercuts to Hoy. 
The Kramer stock comirany will dost 
iti season there this "week. 



Two special shows, one put on by 
I^nnjf Vann, wi^ be the attraciioQ at 
the Jefferson, County Fafr at Water- 
town next week. 



Mrs. Margaret P. Vaughan, native 
I'tica girl, made her professional de- 
but with the Majestic stock players 
at the UUca Majestic this week. Mrs. 
Vaughan for some time haa been t 
leader in Diiut amateur productions. 
"Scrambled , Wives" ; was her vehidt 
for her first profeasional appearance^ 

Frederic B. Bellinger, leader of the 
famous St. John*a Military School 
band at Manlius, N. Y., haa been en- 
gaged for the orchestra at the Af^as 
at Watcrtown. 



With the fall of the Mutual Welfar* 
League at Auburn State prison, in- 
terest wil reviTe anew in Thomu 
Mott Osborne's picture, "Making 
Good." This picture* produced laik 
winter, was woren aronnd the leaiot 
ayatem of permitUag the coDTicta t» 
nu the prlaon. 

TORONTO 

SbM*s theatre' (all TeviieVnre bill), 
inchKhng WilUan Keoi, ami^cd by 
Elsa Shaw presented "Sihivers"; 
I>*Amore Franklyn and Douglas 
Charles, assisted by Zella Goodman, 
presented "A VauderiUe Bttiprise"; 
Marie md Ami Clark, **In What?**; 
In Argentina,** with Garidad Davis, 
Ifarry Ormonde, 'Mello Delirio, hflla. 
Mercedes, Koherto Medraao : and a 
company of Argentine plavers; Peggy 
Cohart; Emmer^on and Baldwin; 
I'awl, T/C Van'and'Mirfer; Bd: Healr 
and Allan Cross, had a wonderi^ 
opening, which is sure to continue aU 
week with such a cast 

Shea*s Hippodrome presented eight 
vaudeville nets, headed by Al. St 
Jobn. a feature film. Bert Lytell in "A 
Trip to Paradiae,*' to good audiencea. 

tiOewN theatre presented a good 
vaudeville bill and feature film. Violi 
Dana in "Puppets of Fate," alao com- 
edy film, Buster Keaton in "The 
(Joat." 

Pantnges theatre for anniversary 
week presented a stronger than usoal 
I)i1l with two big acta, headKBll| 
William Edmunds with *'Not Yet," 
Marie Bairbeck and Co. in a musical 
and scenic novelty, a feature film, 
"Sheltered Daughters." with Justine 
Johnston, and a.^onicdy and news re- 
view -. ,< '^■^ * 




it the! 



atre, l»W o 
ving ujiilerR 



J 



dJIfthe (fitent^$7(V. 
tT»e 27»Will?tlH^ 




' hr 



s t( 
feo|*MHfU on 

minute RtocU burlesque, 
(leorge T. Walsh, with musical num- 
bers put on by "Babe" Griffin and 
scenery by Maurice TuttTe. The 
principals were: Maybelle, Babe Al- 
mond. Dolly \ji Salle, Bessie Miller, 
George T. Walsh, Jack A. Or in shy. 
Con Dailey, Jack Lewis. Larry Larrt- 
vee and a sprendid aioging and danc- 
ing chorus of 22 rcil beauties on and 
off, presonted a really new burlesque 
show without an old bit or any liberal 
stuff, ond pleased a packed bouse at 
two performances, with the vieathcr 
warm and ftne. Manager Dan. F. 
Pierce maintained la^t Reason it was 
not the house but the shows that 
made business bad, so if his satisfied 
fiudiences are any criterion Dju wins 
his argument and will make n lot of 
real money. 



Blut^'h Cooper's "Hello l'>22" co«i- 
r>nny arrived intact on ThursdJ^y, 
2.">th, from New York, under the ^nid- 
auce of Alanager D.ive Posner. They 

(Continued on Page 54) 



Vf 



BROADWAY, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK (Aug. 29) 

MURRAY KISSEN 



,K 



presents his new comedy. 



"THE BARBER OF SEVILLE" 

with MARK ADAMS, BEN RUBENS and FRED MAYO 



A worthy successor to the ^^Hungarian Rhapsojj^ 



1 »— I .. 



li , Not a close shave, but a big hit j 
^ « PirecUan MAX K. HAYES (-. ' 



B P Fri<1a.v, September 2, 1921 



V ARIET Y 



: i! 



ol 



W^ 



ARTHUR S. LYONS, Pres. and Treas. 
T«leplion« Bryant 2464-4661 



HERMAN M. MONOSON, Vicc-Prcs. and Scc> 

BniU 517.518 





LYONS ENTERPRISES, 




VAUDEVILLE 
Kanagtr and Prodnc«r 




245 Wert 47th Street 
Hew York 


PBODUOnOKS 
Dramatio and Mntieal Oomed j 


SAMUEL T.LYONS 




LEW PEYTON 


ROBERT FELDBfAN 




ACTS REPRESENTED ON INDEPENDENT CIRCOITS 




vhamk fat 


HAI4L AND WEST 


ROONB AND EDWARDS 


NORA JANE AND CO. 


Qmom0smvm€m 


FLYING RUSSBIiUB 


CHASOILL 


HARRIS AND kOLLY 


■Dwnf cbohgb 


lAJNETTB SI8TBR8 


JUBILEE 3 


HARRY GARLAND 


EOBMIIiO 


LILLIAN PRICK 


FREDDY SISTRRI^ AND FULLER 


POOLE AND GRIBBY 


MUiTFIBUW , 


<iBNB MARTINI 


BINGHAM AND MEYER 


RIANALDO BROTHERS 


vomma ahd wmatanAU^ 


ORTB AND OODT 


DEPIERRE a 


KLEIN BROTHERS 


^ BATMOlfD AMD SCmiAll 


GBDRGB MAYO 


HEBMAN AND BRISCOE 


HOWARD AND NORWOOD 


Amos AKDIIBBD 


MACK AND NELSON 


HA8HI AND 08AHI 


MONARCH COMEDY 4 


BKRlf ABD AHD VOWHBS 


#BAN AND TOMY BAU>WIN AHBARN AND PSTBRSON 


TRIPOLI a 


JauiiBRr KDnnBT oo. 


WALSH AND EDWARDS 


LIBBY AND SPAROW 


WERNER AMOROS S 


mjWIIAlf AWD WTi;i.IAlf4 


MURRAY VQELK 


/ 




' lAnBiX AND WAnCR8 


FANCHON AND MARCO 


FOSTER AND RAY 


HENRY SISTERS 


BURXB AlfD BURKB 


ARMSTRONG AND JAMBS 


WILBUR SWEATMAN AND CO. 


AL LIBBY ' 


Wm AND WINTERS 


8 CHUMS 


RALPH CUMMINOS AND CO. 


CHAPPELLE AND STINETTB 


VAIJ>0 


CBCILA WBSTON AND CO 


KOLER AND IRWIN 


MARTIN AND GOODWIN 


VOMMT M cRAB AND OO. 


BARRAT CARMAN 


ARTHUR MILLER AND GIRLS 


WILUAMS BBOTHRRS 


HARIU80N AND WARREN 


CAS80N BROTHERS 


• PAGE AND GRAY 


FABER AND McGOWAN 




LET VS ROUTE YOU FOR NEXT SEASON 


» 



EMERY 



THEATRE 



ONE OF THE SPOKES IN THE MARCUS LOEW 
WHEEL OF HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS 



Emery Amusement Corporation 

Majestic Theatre Emery Theatre Rialto Theatre 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



E. F. ALBEE, President 



J. J. MURDOCK, General Manager 



F. F. PROCTOR, Vice-President 



B. F. KEITH 



B. F. Keith's Vaudeville Exchange 

(AGENCY) 

(Palace Theatre Building, New York) 

EDWARD F. ALBEE PAUL KEITH 

Founders 

Artists can book direct by addressing S. K. HODGDON 



F. F. PROCTOR 




VAZIIETY 



PVkky, September 2, 1921 



ONE of life's compensations lies in the pleasure of 
watching a great organization, such as Marcus 
Loew's, grow greater because it rests upon the firm 
and enduring foundation of service and enl'artainment for 
millions. '■'''">';■■.''/ 

The State theatre is an asset not only to the Loew Circuit in 
New York, hiit also to everyone directly or indirectly con- 
nected with the amusement enterprise. ^ 

■ '. '•-' ■''■* ■ "... ■ J ■■: .' ■" ■■••■ ■.■"■ '! •- '■■'-. 
■ - ' . . . ■" • . •• ■ . ■' ..■•,■■■ ■,'•■••■...■;; 

A. E. LEFCOURT, President, 




[0»0] 






Pioneer Film Corporation 



New York, Sept. 2nd, 1921 



Best Wishes and Continued Success to Marcus Loew Circuit 



^ 



U4. 

V 






Can always place good acts for season's work 

Loew Annex Bldg., 160 West 46th Street 

■ Suite 412 

TiEW YORK 



.♦. . iV^ >♦. ^ . ^♦^ . fy. .•». .<>^ ^♦^ ^O^ -♦> ^'TT' >0^ ^♦^ .i»^ .♦. .Yf> A, .f^ A. >Y^ A. >f^ A.. 



Phono: Itrrniit 1944 



THE BERTHA 



Geo. r. ttehBeider, Trop. 

FURNISHED * 
APARTMENTS 



Complete for Housekeepino. Clean ani Airy. 
323 Weat 43rd Streat NEW YORK CITY 

rrivntn Bath, J-4 Kooiiih, CutoriiiK to Uie comfort and convenience of the profesftlon 
Sl4>uin Ilrat and Kl«^rlc lAght - . - $0.50 Up 



IRVINGTOIN HALL 



355 to 359 West 51st Street. 



Phone Circle 6640 



An rlcTRtor. Ilrrprnof Ixilhllnf of iht> iirwpNt typo, having evrrjr dcTlcc and roiv- 

venirnrc. Apurtmrnti* iiro brnuiifiiMy tirrjiiiKcd, uiwl conttist of 2, 3 niid 4 rooinft. 

With kifrli4>n oiul klt<'h<>iio(ti*H, tiled Imtli and 'phono. 917.00 I'p Wccklj. 

AddrcHe all cuininunlratinnii to Charira Tcnrnbnuni, IrvlngtoB Hall, 

No ronncrtinn with anjr other hooKe. 



STAGE SHOES 

Gutire coinpaDicb and individ- 
uals capablj served Iq a 
courteous manner. 

AU iae4eliBg mperrind by I. labr 
L MILLER St SONS 

Incorporated 

New York 
1554 Broadway, at 46th St. 

Chicago 
State and Monroe Streets 

h.irRi^st Munufacturern of Thn.it- 
rie.-il ruu(wrar &ad Ballet Stlp- 
pora .n tho World. 



RUTH GIBBS 



RALPH VERNON 



LONE STAR FOUR 

The Singing Act Beautiful 

Booked Solid LOEW CIRCUIT 

Thanks to MR. LUBIN 
Direction HORWITZ & KRAUS 



PAUL ORTH 



LESLIE BARRY 



ift^>^Vj^>i\^^,i.^^«,j^/ft«^±^>^K^^>^^ - '!^' A^ >w . A^ .w . A. . yy . A. ^f K At ifUjML 



THONR CIRCLE 1114 



SPBClAi: SUMMER KATES 



THE ADELAIDE 

754 756 EIGHTH AVENUE 



Bctirrrn 40th and 47th Street* 



One Block West of Broad ivay 



Three. Four and Five-Room Hlrh-CbiM Fmnlake^ Apartmeata — 910 i # 
•trtctlj rrofcMiional. AlKM, OKOHUB^ §UKUmi*, -Mar. FlMneaT Brrant aMC-l 



WARDROBE PROP. 
TRUNKS, $10.00 

nig Ttarffalaa. Have been med. Also a 
row Second Hand lanovatlon and Fibre 
Wardrobe Trunks. tt9 and $16. A few 
oxtra Urge Property Trunks. Also old 
Taylor and Bal Truoka. It Wast aist 
StrMt, DMwsea Br«a4war aa4 (tk Ava. 
. New Tork 



Lansdale-Canton Apartments 

on Broadway— 1690-1696— Between 53d-54th Streets 

Fl'RNISIIED APARTMKNT8— 1. t, \ 4 ROOMS and BATU 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 

Ulirh Class ■•valor Apartments; Kvery ronaibie Service; With Kitchen and 
KitchoBsttaa; i-roana Suites Espeeiallj Adapted for Two Cnuplen: l.urire 
Kitrhen. rrofraMlonal Kates Quoted. 



$6 



PER WEEK -|/%-| "pnmilQ Newly Renovated, 

yp lUi 1.UUM3 ^,^^ ^,j^^^^ Prlvileoes. 

In the Heart of the Tliealrlcai Distrtcl, Twa Blocks from Penn. HtaUon 



MARION HOTEL 



Plioaes: 
evMtor M7»-4 



156 West 35tli St. 



-• *. 



MARTIK A. GRAHAM. Manager. 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



VARIETY 



53 



You 




<f ' ■ • • "•,■,,..,,■'■ ■■ '. ■ '■ ',...■ • . 

IV Th eu^re Grea t— 



h ' 



>' 



t: r 









T/ie iJex Ingram Productions 



..<., .^1 



The Four Horsemen Turn to the Right 
of the Apocaiypse 



Based on the novel by Vicente Blasco 
Ibanez. Adapted by June Matins; 
photographed by John F. Seitz. 



i-' 



— and that so are 

BERTLYTELL 

IN A Trip to Paradise 

from Franz Molnar's play; screen story 
by Benjamin F. Glazcr. , 



Junk 



:t 



by Kennett Harris. 

A Maxwell Karger Production. 

- ■ J* ■ ■■■■■ -V ,_,■■-■,. . 

Lady Fingers 

from the story by Jackson Gregory. 
A Bayard Veiller l*ro<Iuction. ^ 

ALICE lAKE 

IN The Infamous Miss Revell 

by W. Carey Wonde^]3^ 

A Dallas M. Fitzgerald Production. 

The Golden Gift 

A Maxwell Kargor Producttion. 



From John Golden's Stage Hit hy 

,.;^_<■\.,,■,,•■.r.^.;,•'^..„■ 

• : Winchell 

■-■.-.■■• ..«•■.' . ■ ~ ■ •,.-,.■,.- 

Smith and Jack Hazzard 



The Conquering 
i - Power 

• '..•{■ ■■■ ■•■■ , 
From Balzac s ^^Eugenie Grandet^^ 

Adapted by June Mathis; photo- 
graphed by John F. Seitz, 



The Nazimova 

Production of 

'■ * • • '. . . . " ' 

Camille 



From (he play by Alexandre Dumas fils 

Mi 

/f Adapted Jby June Matljis; ^ ;^.^ 

photographed %5Rudqfph Jv^erquist 



—and likewise 

■ • ■ '■ , 

■ " _ _ ■ V ' ' . . '.'«'. 

VIOLA DANA 

IN The Match Breaker 






but do you know 
they^re 



by Meta White. 
^ A Dallas M. Fitzgerald Production. 

There Are No Villains 

by Frank R. Adams. 

A Bayard Veiller Production. 

The Fourteenth Lover . 

^' by^.Atf^e f). t\, ]ijyiler. 1' 
4 A Harry BeaumoStt Production. 

GARETH HUGHES 

IN Garments of Truth 

by Freeman Tildcn. 

A (icorgc D. liaker Production, 

n ■ ■ 

The Hunch 

by l*crcival Wilde. 

A (jcorgc D. Hakcr Production. 



.V 





. j3 



Controlled by LOEW, Inc 



54 



r':-w,f- 



' nwcaw.'ifw* > fXJ- ' 



VARISTT 



Fftda,v, September 2^ 1921 



i>* 



raeiof. hitcnMthNNil c«t »ad d^ 
bbows auil athor special «i>> tii.ii9««. 
A nrw Urrhtock «r«»a 1m« Juftt bee« 
roin|»)4>te4 thnl coct ooe mlHioa ^^ 
\mr», as w«U a» amny »tber new buil4« 

MlgS. -, 




LOEWS THEATRES 



The Home of Many R-C Pictures 
Watch For Them , > 



i'-- 




/. ■ 
I ■ 



Loew's Theatres show R-C Pictures, starring Pauline Frederick and 
Sessue Hayakawa and directors' productions by L J. Gasnier and 
William Christy Cabanne — ^_. 

. -■.';,"•"•;*■;■ Because :.^'/' ■ ■?■ '■^■•^•■^'.v.: ^ .:--^ 

R'C Pictures are Good, Clean Pictures 

Watch for announcement of the showing of these four splendid 

photoplays at' your favorite theatre. v 



SESSUE HAYAKAWA 

"Where Lights Are Low" 

■ - < .•,•■■._ ...• • -■•"■.. . ■ . ■ '. 

WALSH-FIELDING PRODUCTION 

" Shams of Society " 



« 



AULINE FREDERICK 
The Sting of the iMsh" 



A GASNIER PRODUCTION 



"AW 



1} 



DQRIS MAY in "The Foolish Age" during 






>. ■ 



I 



l%i^\ 



Tb<>- Rf g«Dt theatr«, Tor<Hit(>'s l«aA. 
ing film thmtre and uot«>d for i«| 
splendid large orch«>«tra, is l^oldrng «« 
a"»»jrerj»arjr we^k at t>^««it. "l*kt 
FaolUU M4iiron»" is tbe feature tad 
Kuster KeatoD ia **Tlie Goat*' tbt 
roiDftlj, with special niu«icai r^rtt 
on the atagew 



The *'Four Horsemen of the \p«c- 
ol.rp^c" opened nt Massey Music Ifii 
ou Mondaj to a crowded hjuse. Thla 
s|>eaks well for the siicces<t of tht 
film, as Toromottians na a rule do iia| 
take to a film production before th« 
Qiiddle of the week. 



• 



Exchanges in Twenty^ four Leading Cities 




The leading Allen theatre present 
"McMber o' Mine'* film, and the c^ 
ed7. 'Edgar's Little Saw." supfle- 
mented by the well-known Allen «r« 
chestra and the Allen Quartet. 

The Strnnd theatre presents "Tht 
Mystery Road" and ''The rrineestf st 
New York' fttms. ^ 



1^^ 



■i .lO_ 



R C PICTURES CORPORATION 

723 Seventh Avenue, New York City 



I8ftp>csf- 



TROY, N. Y. 

Altf£ltICAN — D, W. GriAtVi 
*'Dre«M SUrtttr AR we^k. 

HTRAND— Mildred Marria in «0U 
Dad.*' . All week. 

PROCTOR'S ORISWOLD— 'lit 
Journey's End/' first half; **TI» 
Bronze Batt" asd **Reoiorseieat 
Lore," the second half. 



After two asontha. Proctor's Tauii* 
Ti'lt theatre opened Monday iHth 
"The Four Horsemen," the first «f g 
series of ^'super" films to be preseat* 
ed prior to the start of tht regoliff 
▼ariety seation. An augmented or> 
cheatra famiahea the music. The 
price* range from tweatr-fl^a cents !• 
a doHar fai the afternoon and twenty* 

fivf to one fifty at nig|it. 

^ ."■ . • •>? — • 

'Tbaadfrclap.'* the Fox pictnrt 
now at the Central, New York, wa« 
iihown at the Palace. Saratoga. Shm* 
day. Monday and Tnesday of this 
week. Being a racetrack meladraii^ 
it drew well at the Spa. The pictasa 
win not be Hitown in any other eilv 
outaide New York before 1923. 



Mr. and Mra. Ohanncey Olcott wm 
king and queen of a kinneaa stigli 
by the American Lei^n of StratSfi 
in Convention Hall. Angoat 25-26. mt, 
Olcott sang three songs, indudiag hto 
famotta '"Mother Machree." ¥N 
kirmesa was a big success. 






DOROTHY ADOLF 

BEATTIE and BLOME 



in 



DANCE DIVERSIONS 

Second Season on the Loew Circuit 
Direction Al Grossman 



CORRESPONDENCE 

(Continued from page 00) 
wHI rehearse here until the Srd, and 
reopen the Oayety tlieatre on the 5th. 

The 43rd year of Canada's National 
Exposition will no doubt create new 
record*. Last year the attendance 



for the two weeks was 1.152,000. and 
if the crowds ok Saturday last are 
any indication thea 1921 shoold 
eclipse 1920. Lord Byng, who com- 
manded the Canadiana at the great 
battle of Vimy Kidge, and who now 
is Canada's GoTertior-Oeneral. opened 
the fair and addressed the Teterans 
of the war. Auto racing, motor-beat 



Success to Loew Circuit 

BOB WHITE 



<,if 



,'t 



The Whistling Doughboy' 
Booked 8oUd. Directior LEW CANTOR 



JOHN W. GRIFFITH'S 

Theatrical Trtatfer and Storaga 

342 WEST 3rrH STREET 

N«w York City 

Get hit rates afltr yM o*t etatrtel 



FEW THOUSAND DOLLARS TO INVEST! 

AdTertiser, an experienced honse treasurer, seekt openinf 
where lenrices are acce|»table under oonditioiui wh»n cash 
is the medium to guarantee efficiency and honesty in such a 
position or m investment with workinf Intenst. 



ti 



Mabel Garrison, the Metropolitca 
soprano, opens Troy's nnisiral Hessea 
with a concert in Music Hall, Tuei ' 
eveniag, Oct. 25th. 

WASHINGTON 

■y HAROE MEAKIN 

Washington's 1921-22 season 
ofictally opened last night at P^'a 
with "The Four Horsemen." The 
Iiouse was packed and local acrflMa 
praised the pictarixatioa of B>an#i's 
t>oo^ ^e direction of Bex Ing^an 
^ana Uie work of the cast. i 

TbamaA J. Gannon, who has bhea 
directing the orchestra at Loew'a 
Palace theatre for the past three 9f 
four yeara, held the baton oyer feht 
augmented orcheetra aad wilt dilMt 
the orchestra throughout the Wiiiir 
ington engagement of the picture. 

Greenwich Village Follies of 1922 
is underlined aa ^e next attractiea 
at this hoaae, hot with no date ap^ 
peering la the billinc. Three weielBl 
hare been allot! the pictures sbodi 
business hold up, and from all indiea* 
tioBs it will for that period. 

Keith's has Daphne Pollard head- 
lining, this being her first appearanee 
iu America in over six years. 

The Strand is offering for Ifci 
vauder'n. bill the following: "The 
Rose of Spain," Arthur Lloyd, Booth- 
by and Everdaen, M'Mahon and ^df 
laide, Murray and Lane, Feature filBi 

The Bhubert-Garrick opens Ijabee 
Day with Morosco's new produetiM 
"Wait Until We Are Married," hy 
Hutchinson Boyd and Rudolph Bun^ 
ner, while the National opens that 
date also with Mare Klaw's new pro- 
duction, "Other Lirea," the joint work 
of Theresa Helbum and Rdwari 
Goodman. 



Loew^s Columbia — Gloria SwaniOj 
in "The Great Moment"; second week 
and doing capacity. 

Loew'e Palace — George Arliss i« 
"Disraeli." 

Moore Rialto — Bebe Daniels IS 
"One Wild Week." 

CrandaU's Metropolitan — "Salra- 
tion Nell." 



The Capitol theatre, presentiaj 
American wheel burlesque, is set t» 
open Labor Day with Max Sple^ri 
"Social Follies." This hoase is fjjj 
lowing out the ordera of the ^S** 
ind declaring for open shop, as (•JJr 
Gayety. which presents the OolumaiS 
wheel attractions. The Oayety aii 
not as yet announced their apeai^i 
date nor attraction. 

T^ry Lorensi has been P^*<'** *! 
the box office at Poll's, being s»* 
4wra Iraai the Folt ht«<*^ ^ BtM-ior 
SiML MiM. - 



Friday , Septemb er 2, 1921 



VARIETY 



55 



bs 



"Thrilling, Humorous 

. . . •■« ■•■■.' ■ ■ • 

**A Picture Everybody will 



"Better on the screen 

than on the stage. 

, ^ _ ,,■,... 

Never drags — some- 
thing doing all the time. 
Might be called, a film 
Version * of perpeitiial 



99 



'motion. 

New York American 

"Good entertainment, 
with a copious supply of 

• 

laughs mixed with a lot 
of red-blooded fight- 
ing." 

New York Mad 

"Will no doubt be as 
popular as th'a novel.^^ 

New York Telegraph 




mfMMMmMMM 




.^^-^. 








FIRST 

in interest 

in showing the news 

in diversity of subjelcts 



■i ' 



PATHE 




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It was the 



ADOLPH ZUKOR 



PRESENTS 



THiMM MEIGHAM 



It 



in 



» 



CAPFY BICKS 

Cast Includes Agnes Ayres 

Directed by Tom Forman - - - Photoplay by Albert Shelby Le Vino 

. Kyne and the Play by'Edward E. Rose 



FIRST 



It is the 



FIRST 



; From the NdvipJ by Pder $ 





mount Q>ictum 



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k-tr*r*r*i,^ 





FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORPORAHON 

M>0(^M IimOM Aw JCSSI L LASMVmtoAm CtC» ■ Dt Mim ■ Ci I il 



{Three-Column Press Ad 3 A Atxhve — Mats o^ Electros) 




MR. LOEW AND ASSOCIATES 

Wishing you every success and thankinjg; you for 
many favors. 'ij; 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK W. STAFFORD * 



' ; ' ' 



LEEAOCHS 

PRESENTS 



BRYANT WASHBURN 

THE ROAD TO LONDON 

ByDAVm SKAATS FOSTER 




THE SENSATION OF THE DAY- 

You heard -^bout it for- months. You heard 
that it was the n'3we8t thing in pictures. You 
heard that it was a veritable sensation. 
Right now in the biggest theatres it is making 
good on everything predicted for it. It is the 
fastest, snappiest comedy drama ever filmed 
and it is going over BIG. 
Are you in on it? 



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aiiil ^e ii7if{ ^ef/ uou that one 
of the Mg elemeids in 
success has been 




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^K^ T /^^Th TXT 1^ o^^ o* tJ^^ most successnxl 

• V ^"^ skowiaeti m tke ivorlcl to-day. 

No one knows oetter tkan lie w^kat tk^ puolic "ivants m 

tke way of entertainment/ Because ke kas given tkem 

wkat tkey want^ ke is owner or some of tke most magniri- 

cent tkeatres m existence, scattered tkrougk tke cities or 

tke United States and Canada. 






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And Marcus Loe vir ^koii^# < ALLi * tk e 
Pictures ! 



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FqII&w Marcus Loetvs 
^^Mmple nnit get in ori 
Paranumnt Week. Thai's 
the way to start the season 
right — and keep it going! 



, He kas fust made tke largest kook rag ever made on a 

iiotion picture— ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY 

DAYS for Cecil B. DeMiUe^s/Tke Affairs of AnatoF'- 

/■ • '-• ,.•-.»... ■■ • ..,: • , ■ ■-. ' ■ 

All tke otker new Paramount Pictures ke kas kooked 

forONE HUNDRED DAYS. 

': '■' ' . " , ' . '" ./ ■ '■■ " ■■. ' ,- '-■"' ','■-"■■ ■ ■■•• • ■ ''C ' ■ ■ • ■ , "■ ■ 

So dont try to rind out tke secret of Mr. Loew^s 
success. For one kig element in it isn't a secret at all — 




He Skows 



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AN SUA I 

Cpara mount 

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VAIKXKTY 



57 



\ How About This? 



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j. g The Supreme Court of the screen, the 
National Board of Review, gays in its official 
,.-: report: :.'.,.,^ ■r^ ' 

i. V; '*Th%$ ffivid, swift-moving picture is the peer of I 
. .' Oriental dranuts on the screen. It has the true at- 
^« u^sphere of an Ar<ibian Nights* iaU and must rank as 
... one of the ex<}eptional photoplays of the year. It has 
if; both dranuitic intensity and comic relief of an unusiLal 
. . order. The acting of Pola Negri may he said to he the 
finest and most convincintg of her career hefore the 
- American public, cnid the supporting , cast is one of 
'^■; great ability,'' ^i :. ,' '.:;, ;-;^::!^: ^^ ' : ^ A. '\^-;y<:'\ 



It s a 




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Right Knockout! 



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WESTEmt UNION 



NSWCOMa CANLTON, 



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Pola Negri 



"One Arabian 
Night" 




i Directed by 
fimst Lubitsch 



**' 



( 



A First National Attractien 



r: 



A Photo marvel of the 
Super-dreadnaught Class! 



/ A 



THE ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



MARTIN BECK, MORT H. SINGER 

PretideDt General Manacer. 

CHARLES E. BRAY 
"- General Weetera Representative 



FRANK W. VINCENT. 
QEORQE A. GOTTLIEB, 

Managers* Booking D«pt 

FLOYD B. SCOTT 

Pablldty and Promotion. 



BENJ. B. KAHANE, 
8ec*y- Treae., and Counsel 
8. LAZ LANSBURGH. 

Associate Counsel 

JOHN POLLOCK, 
Press Department 



O. R. McMAHON, 
Manager AudHing DepartmeiiL 

GENERAL^OFFICES, 

PALACE THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YOBY OITY 



RECEIVED AT 225 W 52 ST NEWYOBK 3921 AUG 18 AM 2 06 

Y108 SP 7 EXTRA NL ' ' 

JOB BRANDT ■' V ..■.•;:•.:•.::.■/•:.:.-; . ,;,.:\;/:^:,j:\,:m:,. 

^ SAN PRANCISOO CALIF 17 
1600 BROADWAY NEWYORK NY 
HEARTIEST CK>NGRATULATlbNS HEART OP THE NORTH STOP BOUGHT 
THIS PICTURE PROM GEORGE DAVIS ON SATURDAY AND HAVE 
ALREADY PLACED SAME AT ISOBEL RENTALS IN TIVOLI SAN 
FRANCISCO OWNED BY TURNER DAHNKEN ALSO OAKLAND 
STOCKTON SANJOSE FRESNO AND EVERY KEY CITY AND DISTRICT 
STOP YOU HAVE KNOCKOUT AND IP INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS 
CONTINUE TO €1VE STATE RIGHT MARKET SUCH PRODUCTIONS SEE 
NOTHING BUT SUCCESS FOR BOTH OP US REGARDS 

LOUIS HYfllAN GENERAL MANAGER ALL STAR FEATURES DIST INC. 

THE HEART OF THE NORTri 



■•%... 



A HARRY REVIER PRODUCTION 



■^ -,.-<, v^'- 



featuring ^ 



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R O Y STE WART 

' Suiiported by LOUISE LOVELY 



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An awe-inspiring drama of the Crept Northwest, 
where men die for the women they \ovt 

, For information wire U^ 

JOE fiRANDT - — or— GEO. H. DAVI^ 

1400 Bro«dw»7, Hew York (>26 Holbrook Bldf ^ San FnaciMO, 



1 Theatres under direction of HUGO RIESENFELD 



. T - T _ T _. y _ T J T J T _ T . T . T L y : T _ T _ T _ T _ T . Tr . ▼ _ T ..T^ T - '» . » _ T .. » _ f . f 




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THE WVOU ""'"'"" 



at 49th St 



I Pi 
. ( of 



Pre-release motion pictures 
the finest type 



THE WALTO " "" 



Square 



Famous Rialto orchestra 
Rivoli Concert orchestra 



Feiber & Shea 

THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 

Booking Vaudeville Acts Now for the Coming Season 
Suite 912-915—1542 Broadway, (Loew Bldg.) 

NEW YORK 



TELKI'llONE DIIYANT 6530 



THE CRITERION ^r. 



Vocal and instrumental 
soloists 



Extend their hearty greetings to Mr. Marcus Loew's 

NEW STATE THEATRE 
a friendly competitor and neighbor 




BERT LEVEY CIRCUITS 
VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 



JAMES MADISON says 



I •m a demcrrallr author and equiil 
It at home wheDx r writ:n»: monolnjtui ". 
.Idowftlk acta, ram.lip^. soubs. tkcl- Ik?«. 
mualrul comrdion. burlesque nhr w!-. acii- 
arlos. movie titlea. etc 14'jJ i;re..<!way. 

New Tork. „ . . v i« «i 

Madison's Now BudK'-t. No 1^. >'• 



GOOD LUCK TO MARCUS LOEW 

State Theatre Barber Shop 



rhon« I.ONGACKI*: 3S33 

J^imiBhed Apartments 

AM> KOOMH 



ALCAZAR THEATRE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO ! ,, «Syvi?«M ' 

I 310 WEST 4U ST^N^^^^^^^^ ) 10 BARBERS 



PAUL GOUDRON 

BABTKKN riRrRKflENTATIVE. WOODS, THEA. Bl.DO., CHICAGO 



Under the mannqemcnt of HENRI 

(Formerly of the Putnam Briilding) • 

irn \AEST 4J)TH STREET (Near Rri.ailway) 
A l.i(|li-i i;.'"^. shop, ut-lo-iJr.tr in it<; methods and appliances, 

BOOTBLACK 3 MANICURISTS 



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VARIK/TY 



Friday, Sopt^ipVer 2. 1921 



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DI^OADWAYS. 

NEIVXSJ PJCTUqe PALACE 
AKJD EXTCfslDSi ITS CON-: 

^ - GRArnULATlDrsIS TO'f 



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Krittp- . September 2, 1921 



YAEIBTY 



60 



m^B^j(^ 




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537 Riverdale Avenue 



YONKERS, N. Y. 




W. O. HURST, Manager 



Phone Kingebridge 3270 



Yonkerfl 207 



60 



VAEIETY 



Friday, SgPtejnber 2, 1921 



NEWS OF THE DAILIES 



A. H. Woods has put "I'he Reckon- 
tug," by Mnrjoric Chase iu rehearsal 
with a east includinx Goorxe Uaul, 
Felix Kreoibs, Dorothy Shoemaker, 
<veoi'gc DnrDum and John Uharkey. 
Bertram Harrison is directing. 

Aliee Bloom, former choras girl, 
Rued Gforgc L. Triffon for $125, .ind 
he settled for $S0, all because his pet 
/log chewed up Mias Bioom's wig 
whi'e aboard his yacht aod she had 
to go ashore with a sharen head. 

Following a cartAin speech by 
Frank Bacon at the cloaing of *'Light- 
iiin' " Augustus Thomas introduced 
S(H*rctary Davis who read a congratu- 
latory letter from President Harding. 



can still hear the faintest tinkle of 
the dinner bell. 



John W. Steel, the tenor, must pny 
his wife, Sidoni Espero. $250 a week 
and $1,290 counsel fees for their 
separation suit. , a 



Because he came orer third i-IasH, 
Henry Latimer, who acts the title 
role in "Chu Chin Chow," was held 
up at Elia Island this week. 



George Grossmith will play Walter 
Oatlett^i part in the London edition 
of "Sally.'* 



Former President Wilson is now 
fio well he can walk back and forth 
from his seat in the theatre. He at- 
tended Keith's, Washington, last 
v/eck. Oixnipying an orchestra chair. 



Just to put his home town on the 
map, Wiliam Fayersham will open in 
'The Silver Fox" at the Palace, 
Huntington, J*, I. 



Denying reports he had become 
deaf. John Philip Sousa def>lares be 



Cecil Cunningham has bought 
George Gair's home, 37 Pierrepont 
street, Brooklyn Heights. 



"The Demi Virgin" ia the title of 
the new Avery Jlopwood show. 

Adolph Rltuber ha« engaged Priest- 
ley Morrison to stage "Like a King." 

Accusing him of havini^ been too 
intimate with Rlirabeth NelMun, Mrs. 
H. H. Fray.ee has sued the theatrical 
and baseball magnate for divorce. 



GOOD SHOWS 

(Continued from page 12) 

what purported to be a letter from 
Andrew Tombes with Cohan's "O- 
Brien Girl," in Boston, stating, as 
Gillmore read it, that while he held 
a contract with the Cohan play for 
the run of it, if ordered to walk 
•ut by (Equity, he wouM. 

As the meeting was about to ad- 
journ, someone in the audience ven- 
tured to ask about the alteration in 
Clause 18, for which purpose the 
meeting had been called. Stewart 
. answered saying it was newspaper 
misinformation, that Equity had no 
intention of changing their do Ad 
shop position and that only the 
chaoge intended in the contract was 
to protect the actor in receiving two 
week's pay upon giving notice with 
actors to have their fare paid back 
to the starting point under certain 
conditions. The answer sounded like 
camouflage to many in the room, 
though no one appeared to know 
why the object of the meeting had 
been switched about Outside later, 
it was said that the Equity had de- 
cided to remove that portion of 
('lause 18, making the contract with 
the manager subordinate to Equity, 
and in its place substitute matter, 
making it imperative with an Equity 
actor to give two week's notice to 
the management, if discovering that 
management had any interest in a 
show not 100 per cent. Equity, 
even though the show the member 
might then be engaged with was 
strictly Equity. It was for such 
an instance the payment for two 
weeks upon notice with return fare | 
would be provided. 

During th? meeting it was claimed 
a prominent producer had said that 
while he did not relish the closed 
shop, he was not opposed to it It 
required little guessiog among those 
in front or on the platform to de- 
cide who the producer was, if the 
statement had actually been made. 

Among those on the platform at 

, the opening of the meeting wore 

'John Emerson, Frank Gillniore, 

.-ftiul Dulzell, Grant Stewart, Frank 

Bacon, Hal Briggs, George Arli8.«», 

John Drew, Augustin Duncan, Jack 

Doverau, Fritss Williams, Ethel Bar- 

Tymore, Helen McKellar, Edith 

Wynne Math 'son. 

O'Brien, Malevinsky & Driscoll, 
attorneys for George M. Cohan, who 
previously rendered an opinion to 
the Producing Managers' Association 
with regards to the basic agreement 
of Se^jt. (», lOlil, had nothing to say 
on Judge Mack's decision and inter- 
pretation of Equity's tactics other 
than that in their opiuion. Equity 
was not living up to it in true spirit. 
The attorneyH did not profess to pit 



obtained from the fact that "The 
Poppy God" got less than $200 on 
Tuesday night its second in New 
York. 

The Barney Bernard show was the 
only one of the fonr early openings 
of the week to get a buj; from the 
agento. Something like 200 a bight 
were taken. The battle between Sam 
U. Harris and the McBride agency 
reach a point this week where it 
looks aa though the McBride agency 
is to be cut from participating in fur- 
ther Harris shows. Original'y G2 
seats a night were alotted to tho 
agency. Of these he returned 12 and 
stated 60 was all he could handle. 
With the show going over he asked 
that those 12 he returned be reas- 
signed to him and that 38 additional 
seats be alotted his agency. H'bo Sam 
I|arris office was wiling to let him 
have 50 additional seats, but would 
not give him the front rows that he 
demanded so the- McBride buy re- 
mains at 50 for the show. 

There was an advance buy before 
the opening of **The Greenwich Vil- 
lage Follies," which amounts to 
something over 400 seats a night. 

The completed list now numbers 
13 attractions, the buys being "The 
Detour" (Astor) ; ."Tangerine" (Ca- 
sino); "Two Blocks Away" (Cohan); 
"Dulcy" (Frazee); "Follies" (Globe). 
"Six Cylinder Love" (Harris); '^The 
Scarlet Man" (Miller), closing this 
Saturday night; "White's Scandals" 
(Liberty); "Sally" (New Amster- 
dam) ; "Mimic World" (Prom- 
enade): "Getting Gertie's Gart<^p" 
(Republic); "Greenwich Village Fol- 
lies" (Shubert) and "The Nightcap" 
(39th Street). 

The cut rates were thriving be- 
cause of the heat cutting down the 
box office demand. There were 15 
attractions listed headed with 
"March Hares" (Bijou): "The l4»st 
Wall%" (Century); '"I'he Triumph 
of X" (C5omedy); "Sonny Boy" 
(Cort); "Sonya" (48th Street); 
"The Scarlet .Man" (Milter's): "Nice 
People" (Klaw): "Nobody's Money" 
(Longncre); "Just Married" (Baycs): 
"Personality" (Playhouse) closing 
Saturday night: "Mimic World" 
(Promenade): "Getting Gertie's Gar- 
ter" (Republic): "The Nightcap" 
(3J)th Street); "Honors Are Even" 
(Times Sq.). and '^The WWiQ of 
New York" (Winter Garden). 



the Columbia and Star and Garter 
Theatres in Chicago and the dist^urb- 
auccs in Jersey City and .^i wark, the 
National Officers took the entire sub- 
ject up with the various locals and 
an arrangement was made entii^ely 
satisfactory to both aides. 

"Among other things, the much 
mooted 'yellow card' system has been 
e'iminated aud travelling companies 
may now organise their working 
crews without an electrician if ibey 
so desire, here was no i >. Juetion in 
, salaries, but it is known that upon 
this point there never has been any 
stand taken by the burlesque people. 
iieir KiMvaiices it ia said, concerned 
certain demands they considered op- 
pressive and unfair and to a great ex- 
tent these matters have been adjust- 
ed amicably and ^">th circuits will re- 
sume the closed shop s.vHtem at once. 

"As matters now stand, there ex- 
ists an agreement between the heads 
of the burlesque business and the offi- 
cia s of the union that takes this 
branch of the business out of any ex- 
isting group and gives it a class by 
itself. Under the agreement there 
will never be any decision as to differ- 
ences without a consultation. This 
will eliminate any i>08sibility of 
strikes or .lockouts. 

"The papers in the matter were 
signed in the office of L. H. Herk, 
President of the American Burlesque 
Association, Leon Ijsski, general 
counsel of the Columbia Amusement 
Company, acted for the burlesque 
interests and the documents were 
signed by .Tos. Weber for the musi- 
cian^,' James Ijcmke for the stage' 
hands and Rud K. Hynicka and L 
H. Herk for the burlesque interests.** 



ping out a plan of campaign which 
they are keeping under cover until the 
burlesque theatres open: Dick Green, 
of the stage hands; Joe Winkler, of 
the musicians: Frank Dare, of the 
Equity, and a representative of Equi- 
ty's vaudeville branch are holding 
closed meetings daily in offices at tiie 
Dexter Building, but are reticent in 

divulging the '•e^"1lJ5?^t!i*5ft.in*»«»,tiP«li. 
It is said they believe the public will 
respond to their appeal and refrain 
from patronizing the unfair theatres. 
The baggage of *Town Scandals," 
which will open at the Star and Gar- 
ter, arrived in town late last week. 
Considerable difficulty was encoun- 
tered in getting this show out of New 
York; it is fsid. due to the fact that 
non-union teamsters ' were employed 
in handling the belongings of the com- 
pany. 



CHICAGO BLOWUP 

(Continued from page 10) 

The would affect the four local 
houses. 

With the burlesque season due to 
open within a few days, the unions 
have been sniping ones, threes and 
eight sheets about town stating the 
burlesque theatres have locked out all 
union employees; they are unfair to 
organised labor and asked whether 
people would patronize the theatres 
under such conditions. At the Star 
and Garter, Englcwood and Haymar- 
ket the shows were already in. At 
the Columbia the "Sporting Widows," 
a Jacob & Jermon attraction, has not 
yet arrived. 

All of these houses were to open 
Sunday (Sept. 4) matinee 



Newark, Ang. 31. 

The second attempt to move Hurtig 
& Seamon's "Greenwich Village Re- 
vue" from a railroad car on a siding in 
Newark, N. J. to Miner's Empire, met 
with opposition when two trucks were 
attacked Aug. 24 near the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad station. Newark. 
« The drivers were beaten, one so 
badly he was removed to a hospital. 
The mob dragged the drivers frc^ 
the trucks and were only dispersed 
by the arrival of the police. 

Thursday, Aug. 25 Sheriff Wilson, 
acting upon protest from the bur- 
lesque people who had secured an 
injunction against the interference 
with trucks by the teamsters and 
stage hands unions, called a confer- 
ence with Director of Public Safety 
Brennan and representatives of the 
Allied Theatrical Trades' Council. 

Following the conference the union 
representatives agreed to permit the 
"Greenwich Village Revue' to move 
the Kcenery into the theatre, which 
was accomplished under convoy of 
the Jersey police. 



' -f^ 



LETTERS 



Wh«» •••dlMff for Mail to VARncTT 

mddrrm Mull Clerk. ^^^^ 

POSTCARDS, ADVKRTIMINO nn 

CIRCULAR LBTTICKH HILL NOT 

111! ADVKRTiaiSD. "^ 

LKTTKR8 ADVKRTI8RD IN ONr 
1S8UK ONLY. """ 



Philadelphia, Aug. 31. 

Four burlesque houses are opening 
here, two on Saturdiay. September 3, 
and two on Monday, September 5. 

The former are Peop'e's which has 
Sim WillUms' "Girls From Toyland." 
with Billy Gilbert, and Casino, the 
only Columbia Wheel house here now, 
which has Rose ' Syde Tb "liondon 
Belles" with Joe Marks. 

The Jjabor Day openings are the 
Tioeadeio. which has Rube Bern- 
stein's "Broadway Scandals." with 



-Clydo Bates and Dorothy Barnes, and 
The managers held o conference the Bijou where Manager Howard 



last week wit.h (^hief of Police Fitz- 
morris and the latter i>romtHe<l them 
he would furnish all of the police pro- 
tection necessary for the taking in 
and out of productions and guarding 
of the theatres. 

It is understood, in nd<Iit'on to the 
police protection, the managers have 
made arrangeemeuts with a detective 
agency to handle the situation for 
them. 

The union heads are reputed map- 



announces Jimmy Cooper and his 
Beauty Review. 



Buffalo. Au?. 31. 
I'p to Wednesday no decision had 
been arrived at in the stage hands, 
musiciiins and managers' controversy. 
HepreHentatives of the three factions 
were in session Saturday and again 
Monday, hut no settlement was 
reached. The present working con- 
tract expires on Thursday. 



AUbeit Uraco 
"Aiieu nUYi/ 
Andorttuu iklohard- 

•on 
Amaury Dllll* 
AikiUMon Mr J 
AuatrnilMB 1>«1«>« 
AuaCriftHaa tttanUy 

iiall Karnnat 
ilanka Kdn» 
iiarclay L>oa 
liarry John 
Harry Mablo 
IJent.ck Roy 
Ueik«r MatdU 
Bernard Jack 
iiruwn Mr D 
Hry;&u Utta 
Burke Jo« 
Burton A Dwjrer 

CatB Vara 
Call Dorotl« 
Carnell Chaa 
Cartar Dorothy 
Chaae Colin 
Clark Keno. 
Copy Sol 
Cowan Mr M 
Crawford Ann 
Cron Marty 
Crouao Mr H 

Dale Maa 
DeAncelo Carlo 
DeCalve Sonia 
Delmora Geo 
DpMont Evelyn 
Doiiiirih Ralph 
neNull M it 
Donaldaon Will 
Doherty Francis 
Donovan Jainea 
Doro Grace 
l>uffln Roao 
Dunn Vat 

Eden Hopo 
Rdt« Thoa 
Elliott Fred 
Elaine Nell 
Emeraon Chaa 
Eater brook Mr ■ 

Oalnea Chaideo 
Gallander John 
«!autler Jfonore 
<;tbbon8 Edytha 
c;tb8on J C 
viifTen Maye 
Gold T.ary Mias 
Gordon Vera - 
Gould Van^(a 
Gratnea Mr M 
Gr<>ene Mitchell 
Grill D 

Groover RIaneh 
Guluck Miaa M 

H;tle Mlaa M 
fTnllo Emma 
Harvay Zella 
llawklna .lack 
Howard Mary 



Howard Martia 
"iiUanea regcy 

Ulna Mr F 
Inoh Frank 






Jackaon Biiiy 
Jarvia Bobby 
Jenninca Franela 
Jonea A Sylveater 
Jordon J'ay 

Keeley Jule 
Keo Emmy 
Keppler Otto 
Kennedy Mlaa B 
Kins Jack 
KIncaton I^rrataa 

Lake Gertrude 
I^amore Mra D 
L.a More Mra H 
'."onard 8eima 
Lewla Jack 
L.loyd Polly 

Mallet Bell ^ 

Mantell Dot ^ 

Marx Mr J 
Marx T^eonard 
Maaon Bille 
Mathewa Gene 
Mayera Flyinr 
McCormack Lorro« 

ta 
McCoy Mr D 
McMurray Mra ▼ 
McNutt T>ouia 
Mermanda 
Merrlman Miaa Q 
Milhousc Marffrot 
Miller Girlfl 
Milton A Herbeit 
Morettis Helen 
Morrin Will 
Moae A I>eWtnt«r 
Mueller Mr ■ 

Rayburn Stanif 
Raye A Brandon 
Rekoff Helen 
RIckufl Ralph 
RobertM Miaa 8 
Rellina Robert 

Balaa Mlaa C 
Sheldon Roy 
flh4»llnlrk Roao 1 
Siatre T 
Stanton Ernia ' 
Steaer Fred ,;j 

Stephana Harry j^ 
Stephen a Murray ''^< 
SteVena Pearl ~ 

Rteona Hnrry 
Strieker Joo 
Subject Evelyn S 

Walker Mlaa B 
Walker Flo 
Wanlura Herman 
Well Billy 
Weal Irene 



CHICAGO OFFICE 



BURLESQUE PEACE 

(Continued from page 10) 

tofore the burlesque field has been 
linked with vaudeville and pictures 
when the unions made their annual 
wage and working conditions con- 
tracts. 

♦u^- • i .. * . • Thp non-union burlesque crews 

nf L T'r T^"'^''•°' ^^J' ^""^'^ »»^'<> <^^tr^ciH containing a two 

of the I' cderal Court excepting they weeks' "-♦•-- -' * 

think it remains for one actively affili- 
ate<l with the profes.sion to gather a 
true insight on l^quity's tactics. The 
decision does not affect Mr. Cohan, 
Henry Miller or any other of the 
independent managers to any great 
extent, although Judge Mack's inter- 
pretation otherwise would have halted 
Equity's coercive methods in enlist- 
ing new members. 



NEWS OF THE MU SIC MEN 

The music men ascribe the im- tice or nn American address' as proof 



notice clause. The non 
union men received their notices im- 
mediately following the Nettiement. 

The following statement was issued 
by Fred McCloy, publicity director for 
the Columbia C-ircuit, with respect to 
the settlement: 



HEAT WALLOPS 

(('ontinued from page 13) 
"Tlie Hero" with Uichard Hennett 

presentcfl by Ram Harris nt the Hel- | ferences were .settled. It appears tint 
mant; William Favershain in "Tlje | if the International Officers had l)ccn 



Columbia Statement 

"Some of the International Offifcrn 
of the Stage Ilauds and Musicians' 
T'nion have he'd conferences during 
the past two or three days with the 
heads of the Columbia and American 
Hurlesquc Circuits with the result 
that on Wednesday morning their dif- 



provement in tiie industry to a gen- 
eral betterment of conditions nation- 
ally. 'Hiey can see no other reason 
why people sliould be buying *J.l per 
cent greater amounts of mu5?ic than 
they have the past !»everal months. 
Maybe the cooler weather (if it can 
he termini that as yet) or possibly 
the syndicate store idea of retailing 
at 2r> cents the copy as against 30 
to 40 cents has something to do with 
it, but just what is tlie cause iiie 
publishers don't care to conjecture. 
They are Katisfie<l it is picUing up al- 
though as one said. "Its got to ini- 
r»rove 300 per cent to get back to 
what it was." 

Publishers are now selling to the 
trade niaitily at the ir> and 10 1-2 
cent rate. The 18 and 'JO-cent whole- 
Kale prire is now the exception rather 
than the rule. This is ii. tended to 
l)riuj; about a retail reduction in 
price, nit^ough there Ktill remains 
lluit i)rofiicer:ng (luotu wlio prrsiftc 
hitting the I)u.\ing public for tlie same 
old .'•() reiK.' upwards !)rife per copy. 

One jobber prnponmls another rea- 
son for th's inij>rovement in hii'^ine.^a. 
He^fates the dealers had stopped or- 
dering slock for some months past 
iu order to clear their counters for 
the new season and now witii the be- 
U>nning of the fall tlH»v are coming 
to life once nzain. Jobbers geuer.illy 
,\rti very optiiuislic about this coining 
.•'eri'.jMi's condilioijrj. 



of the fact tlie matter was printed 
in the llnited States. Of course, the 
new ruling applies to all printed mat- 
ter, such as books, periodical.s. etc., 
although its application lo sheet mu- 
sic wjH in doubt until K. C. Mills 
of the M. 1». 1». A. received direct 
communication from the Canadian 
(Jovernment to that effect. 



Ambler Bam 
Atklne Jack 
Ambler Broa 
Atlanta Qeo 
Austin Dob 
Allen Edna 
Annenti) Angelo 
Atlanis Trio 
Andru!« Cecil 
AlUntton 
Akin Van Mr 

niondy Paul 
Helniont llelle 
Harto Jainea O 
llyron Hert 
llaldwin Xluy 
HHxnes Stuart 
Ilrown-nff Art 
11iirti> Dewejr 
Itrown & Jackaon 
llantnn i:verelt 
ll»rn:ir«l A IJoyd 
I1urk<^ H«>len 
Jirunston K Mr 
r>arton Uenny 
liernard M J<a 
Ilarry Dixey 

C'ramptnn Ceo 
<'loveland A 

Dowry 
f'lalro .ioaephtne 
ToK 'P.'c Wee" 
i'r'^luhfon * 

Croichton 
('aanoll Sydnejr 
(^IJntun Don 
• luKper Kditti 
*':irr James .T 
raino Hoso V 
«'onl*»o Kihol 
<'un\n)livirs Ray 
C'lioy Stanley L 
i'owlos Rov 
Oowden Harry 
Cusbman W C 
Calvort A 8hayna 



A 



JInka Qeu ' 

Jones Helen 
Johnson C A O 

Kniso Nettie O 
Kelly A Davis 
Kennedys The 
KnIso I. Mra 
Keatias Larry A 



Lewis Barbar Mrs ^ 
Lee Mildred 
liorraine Delia ^, 

Lorraine Bdnc ^ 

Lorraine Sia 
I«aster I^ali 
Lloyd Wilkes 
I..asan Deany 
J.a. Pearl Roy 
I/eonard Leon 
Le Payne Babe 



Silver Fox." Maxine F^lliolt; Lou Tel 
legen in "Hon Juan." Oarrick. O/i 
Thursday night Ina C'sir in "Blue- 
l>. itrd .-1 Eighth Wife" is due at the 

it\tz. 

' A line on general buainess may be 



in a position at tlie out.sct of the 
l)reak to represent the various locals 
throughout the country the troiiblc 
never wou'd have begun. Uut in the 

SCI t ...» ,;l V w.iyiM ,1/, ,n i ii.l I li.l V C i <-<^ c Jl i - 

ly developed, such as the bombing of 



The .M. I*. I*. A. has secured an 
interpretation of tlie new aiuendiuent 
to the Canadian Customs and In- 
ternal Itevenue Departuient laws as 
iv^gard.'i the niuhic publishing boiiness 
making it compulsory for American 
musie firms to imprint "Printed in 
the V. ,"'>. A." on lII their merchan- 
dise sliipijed into the Dominion of 
( 'aua<ltt after Octoher 1. The i)en- 
:«lty for laxity in this matter is ten 
per cent additional duty and impojind- 
;ige tihlil this (wity is satistied. The 
Canadian revenue otiicials will not 
interpret an American copyright no* 



The estate of Col. A. H. f;oetting. 
former owner of the Knterprise Mu- 
mv Supply Co., which is heavily in- 
^lebted t^^ many music publishers for 
merchandise delivered :ind not paid 
for, has prupo.sed a |)ltin to the M. P. 
1*. A. to incorporate the estate and 
issue stock to the creditors in pro- 
portion to the amount of their claims. 

The stockholders are then to con- 
tinue operating the reni estate assets, n''v°''lr „ 
equities and other properties of the * i rank 

late colonel's ownership and thus pay 
off the debts _^]S'o rtn'if'jaJ nM^royjij 
on it lia.s been taken by the associ- 
ation, however, as yet. 



i 



Daly Virginia 
Davia lOdna 
De Vne Dottle 
Davis A McClny 
Davenport Orria 
DicUtnaon A 

DeaKon 
Dyer Hubert 



The local music publishers' claims 
against the estate of A. H. C;oetting 
came to the fore once more this week 
when K. C. MillH of the M. T. V. A. 
went into the Surrogate's (!ourt yes- 
terday (Thursday) to secure an order 
diretting the executors of the estate 
to settle for merchandise delivered 
to the Knterprise Music Co. subse- 
quent to Col. Goetting's demise on 
Oct. '.\ last. There are som* 40 cred- 
itors included in Mr. Mills' li.sf. and 
already hn^ taken the matter into 
several courtq, including Itoston, 
Springfield. Mass.. and here, but this 
newest effort is expected (o be^r fruit 
and enat>le (he music men to recover 
some of their losses. 



iMigene West has embarked in the 
music publishing business for himself 
with offices in the Tilmar building, on 
West 4r»th street. West's prime num- 
ber is a aelf-aut bored foi ttot bal- 
lad. 



.^ ^ . t.f-.4£BA^.^1l 'it t^ A^ 



Kdwards Jack 

*•;-.(,.-. ■ liiMit. T;a*- 

T'oMter May 
Kaber Karl- 
FI»-ldH I>oliy 
Kin lay Bob 
I'^rancla Marie 
Kleurctl«> Mile 
Ford Charles H 

Or<»st Fell I 
(lannon Florence 
tiordon Roy Mra 
Cray * Askin 
<toetz Coleman 
fSiiHcoigno CIro 
ilaaouicnefl Royal 
<JMb«>rt Hobby 

Itallett Ferris 
Ileatt Krnest 
ITenlere IfersfliH 
Howard Mary 
Howard Kdna 

Wejja 
Hasans Dancing 
Harris Abe 
Hale Sue 
Haas Cr M 
H.iric Chaa D 
'•owjiril Hilly 
Hnrvrv Sr Grace 
Huin P L 
Il'nderaon Nor- 
man 

Jjtj*f,n & tIaU 
.J in."<'^a ila.ny 
* Joyce Jjicli 



Morrow Maybolle ^? 
Monohan (Joo Mrf '^ 
Mayborry Shirley ,v 
MansHold & JUddIa 3 
Martyn Maude j 

Mannard Virtinia J 
McKay's Scotch ^ 

Revuo 
M'»'^t;na Paul T 
Mandel Hollie 
Maxon & Morris 
McQulber Dorothy 
Mahoncy Chas 
Muschik Ccrtrude 
X1rCon\as Arthur 
Miller J<^ssie 
Monte Frank 
McOuire Anthony 
Mac * .Macher 
Mitchell A P 

Nixon Carl 
Narder ViUe 

0«s<« V 

Otfdon ft Benson 



Piikard H K 
Prime Al 
Renard ^ Jordan 
Russell K J Mra 
RoberlMon A Roa« 
Rayne Hort 
Rnmanos Anita 

Mile 
Russell .Tack 
Runaell J:i'k Mrs 
Raye Sylvjifr 
R><'harcli« I. 
—i-Jil'-'. "..,!C_Mril 



Sperling Philip . 
Slack DIca 
StafTord K-lwin 
Slasun J K 
Mhipnian H*>l).>n 
Stone (!haM 
Scott John 
Shayne Bobbie 
Shadkowa Anna 
Stone Hildasard 
Sniitli Oliver Co 

Thornton Kstella 
Turner l?olly 
Trovalo A A 
Thornton M H Mra 

Hiridi Carol ne • 
Valle A Vail- 
ValU Ailli'tr 
Vox VaffMi'intJ 
Vans'* ^'c^il 
Van Harold 
Valyda Ros i 
Virffinia Mini* 
Verob'»lle Mfiia 
Van ft Hell- 
Vallalre H 

Yonuff (;eor«« 

Wal.'B Hotlv 
Wells Fern .Mt» 
Wilbur i:iHi.' 
WoNt. 1 1 A A 
"Well^'nilb^rt 



»rt*y, fn^rt ii i i m ^ vm, 



PICTURE S 




4i 




\ 



on NCXTUIIC9 



^^^^U^ Ju'^^Xf* **' expIol||5j ^^« ort^lMl "The Golem- ll^ aa 
prodttttl by J? ^"'•ral niniCSL U 1$15. u waa atased by Bniat 



RIVAL D*A«TAGNJUI THE 3 MUSKETEERS 



ParMWttnt'a curpent ••Qolem" picture, alao a Lubitich prodiMtton. 
|» mJly a tefttMll* Um otl«i««t auHu TH* veovl« task af lUte move 
Cb reiaatta the Geaeral Film Co/s *^Golem'* baT« eenatttted lecai ad- 
Tloe and the consensus of opinion is that (bMifft: tlMy Ma^r iiave 
technical right to the use of the title by right af coibbob 1a^ priority 
aa well aa ccpyrtghtf d priority, it woirid: be cartahr t» etttaii Pe4§ni» 
pieeeedlngB oa charges of ""unfair trad* caaieittiaB." Tie attaraeya 
eaoautted: by these film people fEank^ state tbey would rather b\e 
•ft PaajBOunf* sid» if sucUl actiea evea cmm to saw and sew the 
(ictttra may not aee retasuance alter a^ if legal advice la seriously 



APPEARANCE f Ai-^''"'".':": :;.v.:: : I'^'.^V^-'SiS; 

inl^JJi^K-:* * •/-•♦'••*►•• .»i«»i»* Psltotte 
S? L'^'l*'**' V. »«»»« lrwt« 

1 lanckwt CharlwB 8t«v«n» 

De Trevllfe Willi* R«B*r<l» 

r-tT,.i JoMphs ix>n Poff 

****•••» Mais MacL«a.rt:& . 

CoRKmaes KwctMHta da La Mott« 

*»''"**y B«rl»ttr« lA Warr 

LK>i»to XIII Adolplie Menj«u 



Fairbsblis 



^^Itte Bveadway ballyhoo ovor the 

"'Shm ThM« Muaketscfs" i» boiof ta- 
^. ad«aatafo of by tho B^Um DaHtri- 
bator LoafiH!» Ine., which has the 
eeatract t— tbt diotribatioii of Trian- 
fla raasHift,. 

A stiupcb el tho Trianglo vaults 
Ovouglit to light the negative ol 
"'D'Artagoaa'*' (aamed after the hi> 



STATE RICHTERS FK 
NE:V TERRITORIES 



Delaware Kraw^iJ From 

— Old- Block- —Gi^jQier- > 
. N.Y. Defined 



ai 



biuikif in "The flbree Mkiskcteers 
the Lyiic Sundby ovemiig Aug. 28. 
r or nil hour boforo th« ao winding of 
the At tt reel a crowd liBt«l tlic side 
uuIkH on both 



Rtdkant Walton TuHy U Ib mibfe er leaa of a taasdary about his 
gropoaed filming of **T]ia BAaaqtterader/' wlktoh l^maa Touas ia to 
direct. H« wanis ta star Guy Bates Pvwt in the p«i»cifal dualr char- 
actora ta rou^ the benefit accntlbg fromt Wmtent eaactmet^ af the 
rales ta the legitlmata far Heferal seasona; But Peat won't photo- 



, ^^ „^., •i4te8 anl litcrall? 

•f the famous Dainos romaBco)r in . iM"""*-*'* ^^?^ ■^•^5 ^ BrcwKtw.iy 
which OBHn J«K««»n «b..-^ .i^:'^ ^''^ nwufnot waa the per80Bi»l an- 



which Oetia Jobnaon gla-yod the 
put aa rafobanks. la the saat are 
Dorothy Dalton and Leuiae Qlaiiia 
It waa r s ia sM di ia 1916. 
tt waa olitaed gasopaQy and a 



graph Juat tbe way tbeiy would Hke. 



PMtest wa» aoat by O'Driaa, IMe- 
^Bsfer ft BvisBoll, attanaaya foe 

The Dempsay-eargeatter fight pletuntt weve out aC the 44th atieat Jfill* ^^Sf**' ** *** ^^*»«*>«<'»« 
tjilfr week and becaa> ta make their appaaraaaa ahMwhece la the ctty. !f2!!L Zt* J!"'^' ^ "^ "•**** 
It la poportetf Ttoiea Swam «tf aol tech ta the 4ath street. Tei IJ22S ^ ^^ - •'*^J*^^^« 
Richard and Ftwd: C. Qufmhy. wh» ae« hrtsaeatad te the »ra«iotta». t™JS,."^*^«^;j^ fi^" 



•re iahf to hafe a h^rh Ihgal eptoldtt to the eaeet thet they caa tranaw Z^AmTZ^lZ^^ STt^ Jll"'! 
pan the mm acreaa a*a*Hli»ea bjr paying the legal |1.04M> fine to Sf pJlrwlTiSJ^"!! i! ™»r '»' 



each eaae aad- tbeaaJter ahow ttue fliaa ar aeH tansitiorUI rights 
withatit fnrthai^ praaaeatlaa. 

Batora that oilaia» had hasn aecnred the promotera had evelved 
net wideh ther hopeC woaik^ ataad^ the teat The titoa 
fia aat ap< a laalaettaB oMMhlae elhae ta> a state Una wlthi a afn^ai 
the haasulagy la tha ataaa to which fit waa propeaed ta 
transfer the ilta. A caaieia w«i ta ha aet «» aoraaa the line fiponr 
the ptalectiatt madklna and aa tha flIiBt waa thaewn on the sheet tt 
weald he reeorded aaaw bg the cMBaia Thet second film in thia 
isaf wiavldi he made ia tha atale while the prejactad print could; not 
he aaU to have been traaaaorted: acraaa * atath One. 

ThJtt ftreak propeaiitkm ia said to bare been put up to a legal 
afho waa atitdytng it rather dizzily anif had not yet ex 
Ua epIaJen. 



withi a ricw lo teacaiBg if the new 
^vesshMi: wee san iafringaniCBg uyon 
ate* TrCsagle^ which, U waa uni 
waa mad» andftr the werMag tfclt of 
^*The Three Maafccteecn'*' 

^HWafa' of tho Di Btribiitrng- LmnfiiQ 
hried ta mpt mtn the Eoeiir Stuaday 
Bight, bnt dhalitft Mako it takroutfh 
the aM>lh 



GSraOSS KyiTFIUf 




OfSRATOm TASK OUT 



CxhihilBrs SigBlair UH ladrndaalf^M- 
Cftaaiher Aloof 



ZBENEhXt O^ST 



Pckf ord^ FaMMWhaf 
Leaves IMystcry Areaad Departara 



The Motion rictnre f>j>«rator5* 
Local Snft, having raa<I« a ron'^ffsioti 
ef a S per cent cut oa tlic osMtinsr 
stale in th# motiou picture iiou»os, is 
now Higninff np uh imlividuala u num- 
ber af Biombcrs of the Tli«:iti-e Own- 
ers' Chamber of ComnMrro. Tlu> 
Cdwiaibo* KtepptsI out of tlH! flit4i«ti«n 
after WwlneRday of last week, whou 
the committee held its lant meetinji 
with the d^WJ(ation from tlx* un)«>n. 

At thut time the oprrntoi?* refuRCjl 
to accept tlH? 10 per cent cut that Cbc 
tboatre laaaagotR >vjBfcd. After thnt 



aicmberff' from doini; bnsine^R with 
Loral 30(1 on a >vbol«\ and ii«*(iied per- 
mimion for the uicmhcrsliip to do 
bMRinonfl ;i» individu^iln witii rithcv 
Tjocal .100, the unrerogniMrd union of 
Brooklyn, or with non-union indepen- 
denta in the ficUl. 

Tt was reported at the CImmber's 
••ceR on Wednesrtijy tli-^t a nninber 
•f fhe members hnd resi;;neil witli 
liOml 30(5, bnt tiMit the union oririnil- 
tation had lost itfi hold on abont I.T 
Wisetf in the^ Chumber, where Mi<' 
memherR hnd either nifrned with the 
Brooklyn nnion or taken in indrpe:i- 
deats. 



lioe Angelas Aag. 81. 

BaiBiG 2fied8Min is ao longer eoa- 
aected with the F1«kiard-Faivboiiln 
eeaibinatioi. Soaiewliat of » myatopy 
is ceenected \rith hia rdcaac by tha 
stanr^ whe have leehed after the 
yatiogvter more aa theagl^ ho were 
a- SOB' ratiMr taan. aB CMpiayoe. 

Deag aad Klary oa startiag Seat 
closed their plaat and everyone oa 
the payroll wan had off. According 
to one storj, Ziedteao wae the only 
employee to cemaia aa salary but that 



'■Bad Bs^r SaMa Blhaiiiaaii; fraai^ 



The Nbw Tork cenaors eliminated 
ttiree short scenes froai "Tha Heart 
of the North/' a state rifffat prodhe- 



iM, <Hi;fnbuted by Joe llmadt and , talus the eleaiciita that madb tihc ploy 
jweoFge HI Dtons, aad* marketed as a { do successfid with esaevtlaf flhn elab- 
:*Taarry Rerier'^ feature 



The pfefure deals with twki boya» 
one of whole grows uf> to be an ant- 
raw and^ the ether f Ndrtbweateni 
niounted constable. One view objected 
In ahowe the bad boy impaling a bee- 
tle on s pie; Ae6th«r is the tiew of 
a Kve fbir caught in a steel spring 
trap aad stragg ISag to get free. 

The thtrd shews the outlaw (Roy 
Rtewart) making riofent k>ve to the 
H<M]<?on Bay trader's dnnslrteT (Bet« 



he rcfased' beeaoae aU of ttie ollkera I aetridtf* a horse, wearing lew Khoe!<, 



fy Mamryn). The girl is mounted reachin* the heights of his ambition 



Follewing a prolonfed session et 

,, , , , tbe newly fo*s»ed lB<l«p«adeat Pseduc- 

I erhaps no other picture has been ers nn i DistrilMif - ^ ociation at n 

surrounded with the incidents that gpeclat m«»ennir eaa^ i» ,ii!^ th!^ 

ni.rked tiic opcaioa of Dmicks Pair- II^ m^f.nne ceaea m diseaas the 

i.-«b- j„ Z^Zr^T^r^^^^^l^Jr^^ matter of proper >. . . itorial division* 

in the matter of state right sales, the 
foiouiug <.hangos Irsve beon an- 
nouoced aa beinff sppraved by the 
StamlitrdiiMitiou Committee and the 
Board ef Dirocters of the Assoeie- 
feiou: 

The tercitori known as Crater 
New Terk shall be south of sad eaat 
of aad laehaie Ifie counties of West- 
chester, nistsr, Sullivan, Dutohena 
fftut Oiasfie. NcM'tbora New York shall 
be all -f \r V York State north and 
west of bat not inc trarre of Crreater 
New York» Westrhester, Ulster, 8ul- 
livae, Dutchess ;ind Orange Counties. 
The terntoiy o£ Kaatern Penaaylvania 
is divided so aa te taitc in Baat^ra 
PeDUHylvaniu eu-^t of but not including 
tbo counties of Potter, Clintoa, Mif- 
flin, nuntingtOB. and: Fulton» wbi]«» 
Southern >rew Jersey is to ceneiet'of 
tliat part of the state sonth of and 
iflc oding Burlington) Ocean Coonti«>8, 
^« CHtp ef TrentOBi in. Morcsr Geoa- 
t9. aad also the 8tate of Delaware. 
The territory known aa Western" 
PenneylTaaia is designated tm being 
West of and iacludinff the counties of 
Fetter, <i)liotoa» ICIBb, Huatington. 
Pulton. 

Thonv states' farmerlf cessprisioi 
what i» hBswn. oai the Washington ter- 
ritory hav« been changed so aa to ex- 
clude the State of I>elawaas wMch ia 
now apperdoaed; off with Bastem 
Pennsylvania and Rontheva New Jer- 
gsey. Eastsui and Missouri and Houth- 
ern rHneis bos been indexed aa fol- 
llowa: Eastern MiHROori to consist of 
that part of Missouri including ths 
ronnties of Scatldfad, Adair, Hbelby, 
; Randolph, Boone, Cole, Doughlas. 
I Miliar, Pulaski, Lac'ade, Wright, and 
I Ozark, wluio Southern IQineis ia that 
part of micois seut£ of hot aet^ in- 
<>ltfdiag the rouaties of nancock, 
BrowB, Cass, Sangamon^ BTocoa, Plstt, 
Chsmpien sml Vermi lion. Westera 
IMiHsouri and BLansos has been spper- 
dened as follows: Western Missouri 
is Odiftcd as that part ef Misaouvf 
west of but not inchtAng the eount^ee 



persoaiM afi 
pc: lu-ir of Fairbanks and of Mary 
Vir'kford, andi quits unesperteli Chai- 
lio Chaplin and Jack Dempsey. There 
were demoBshntiana eutside and 
they continued inaide the theatre and 
ihrougbout the showing of the fdm, 
tie ftjor cetehritlee eccae!KtMi{. a- !*i:i<e 
box. Before the picture started 
Fanbenks was called for a speech, 
and .if^atn Airiag intetmission. WUfh a 
tliird rciiueiiua at the eenclusaott <d 
the peefojjMuice. |2 tichetn for the 
initiar sh^mn« sohf as high as |!^. 

The story ef Oumus has- been 
ideally appioxiuiated i» the serem 
rersioM, odtipted hy Bdward Kooblook, 
dire<'ted by Fred Nible aa*! photo- 
Siaplkcd hy Aethei^ Bdssoa. Th^ pre- 
aiiero contained a pseleg provided by 
:Kju)Wock and spoken by Stopl»«i» 
Wright. Aiding was a stage setting 
by John Wenger. with silhouettes of 
musketeers its main components. The 
l>roifram gives credit to f^tta Wbo<I; 
scenarjo editor; Boran Cox, aMeiMtant 
.director; Rdward Laagley, art direc- 
tor; Prank Bnglaad, technical diree- 
tor; Paul Bums, master of costunvefi; 
yfarcy B^dwardh master of properties; 
•Hert Wayne, electrician, and. Nellie 
Mrnson, film editsess. 

Tli« pictare wap i» two parts, siid 
reached the TnXL length of uu cvcuiag a 
cntertalnmenlL 

It hiatorieaDf aad dramatloally con 



succfigsfid with esaenthit flhn elab 
oration. Thers ia m llnre sad swoop 
shout the film, with the asermbling, 
cnttfeg' sad- so ntfn rity* seeaiii^ spot- 
lessly eirrvectL 

hi tiie first ffewa ef Aa palace ef 
F.ou<d :^m there augiic have been 
padding with tlie osoal form foUowedi 
fn this case- there ia Just enough to 
imidnut atmaephere. The entrance of 
D'Artagnaa pick* up the aetiou with 
the ultimate reached ia the elimatcrie 
UMimeutn. The boy from Gascouy 
vnriM riot ^m befits the character 



were being laid off. On the other 
eeeferenrc the Chaiufocr rolease<r its I haed it ie stated- that Bennie was 



ROW OVER FIGHT FILM 

Paris, Aug. .*I1. 
Leon Voltcrra first sheiaed the reel 
^ the Dempsey -Carpentier match in 
France, putting on the film at the 
Theatre de Parts te replace the Rip 
revnc. He secured fhe rights from 
an Boglish eonccrn. the Western Im- 
port, but Vnn Goitsenhoven. n BruK- 
«els renting company with a branch 
In Paris, cont4»mIed they hehl the ♦•x- 
clusivity aad applied to fhe lo.al 
rourts for an injnnetion. Counsel for 
▼clterra, and in the nrnne of the 
Western frnport, "showed the"~"riirter 
distributing concera hsd duly scquired 
**• "^fbl* from Qeimby, the peti- 
•••aera likewise ssserting they had 
••ught the exclusive rights from the 
•asje party. It being proved Telterra 
*• a a proper contract the court de- 
«>n«d to grant an inJaactlMi. 



gWen the gate by Deag 

Beanie has diig an saOM local back- 
ing and is going te bead a company 
which la to produce. He already hae 
a ptetore entitled "My Wanderiug 
Boy,' which Jimmic Ilogan <rirert««d 
as an. iadepeadent. The' First Na- 
tional is reported aa being after it. 

Benjamin Sehnlberg. wlio retuTn4»d 
to New York from IjOs Angeles Uue 
last weeh. statwl that he would h ive 
tlH> placing of the "Wondering Boy" 
production. The picture is said to 
hold tlte heart interest along the linrs 
of "Over The MiU" and "The Old 
Nest" 



and her leg from ankle to knee in tcct«, in natuml smneBce. 



sight. The censors objecte<l to the 



to become oae of the king's muske- \^ Seetlaad, Adair, Shelby, Randolph, 



VnfFbonks aad. BrAvtagnae ace a 



I Boone. Cole, Miller, Pulaski, Lac ede, 
Wrlgbl» Doughlaa andOaark. 



outlaw's iatercst ia tke exhibit. All harp>' conibinetiaB,Ble charecter pro 



eliminations were complied with with- 
out protest. 



aTANLST KARLTON OCT. 5 



IfACDONALO GOITTRAOT 

T-iOS Angeles, Aug. 31. 

The future Kathcrine MacDonnld 
producthins tWt ttrr: to be mode un- 
der the still existiiYg First National 
contract are to be produced under a 
new arronRcment with the star. 
Benjamin Srhulhrrg. who is at the 
head of fhe ^fncDonnld company, was 
h^f^ last week to impress on fhe 
star the necessity of a aew contrac- 
turnl arrangement. 

The First National' has been han- 



PHUaiielphiu, Aug. .SI. 

The new 8ta«lcy house here, the 
Karlton, which has been building all 
summer on the site of the former 
Knglcr's restaurant, which was 
bnrncd Inst xvinter, will of>cn OcMher 
'{, according to an announcement J4»Rt 
nindo here. 

This house, which wiH be only one 
block away from the Arcatlie. snother 
Stanley house, wilt be much bigger 
then the \sttio9 aad will have shonit 
the best, loc.nfion of any theatre in 
i^i>tadelphia ?f?^p« periiui>snFii*r ita»~ 
rick. 



viding the star with whaj; wiU prob 
iiby go dawn ta» ntm lore aa ^•^-^ ^><'Kt 
effort for Fairbnaka ia just a modern 
but of the meld af the Dumas hero. 
M« must have tanad ep hia fanrhig 
considersbly for he ^sprasa work 
vith the sw ord But has naC been ap- 
pr0n<>lied fia the kwidaat where, with 
hia three e o n i pittr leta^ Athoa, For- 
th os and Aramia; the cvacfc guard's 
of tlie Cardinal a^ hambled, there is 
a ftnsh of steel that cannot help hut 
move the aiost cssehordened. It is 
n befitting cffmsa to the end of the 
first psrt aad prod u ce d reoade ef ap- 
plause. 

'Hie coorloding portlos la worked 
up Jn tlai aBair of Anne, where she 
seeks to r ecaver the diamond bncklp 



i 



dling t^c MacDonald pictures' on a 
basis of n guarantee of flO per cent. ' riv^n her by the king and which she 
ef the exhibition value to Schwfberg, has given as a lave tokea to Buck- 
based on a gross of $300,000. That ingham. It wa be recalled tbat It was 



8BBRJ1DIA1I W^ OSPT. 10 

The new Sheridan Kquare will open 
Sept 10 under the mnnagement of 
'Mux llpiegel, oflklal ef the Mark 
! Strand comi>anf. 

CCeorgc Arttaa, ia **f)israeft," wifi^ 

be (he first nfftraction. The picture is 

;said to have bogew its second week at 

jthe Now Terh Btrnod wfth a bigger 

box ofik^e thaa aa the Initial showlug 

the Runday befors. 

The preliminary advertiaiag totalled 
$10^^000 enet |r,000 aa TCperted in n 
print I w error). Mr. Arlins will be- 
gin ew a new fiha with a aiodem afery 
for Distinctive Flhna, fnc:» 
ately. 



arrangement with Bchnlberg has been 
withdrawn by the exhibitor organi- 
zation aad at present there ie no 
gu.Trantce on the Macr>onofd pictures. 
Miss M;)cDonald's contract called 
for the star to receive gTiO.OOO on 
each of her productions, .lust where 
the new arrangement differs cannot 
be ascertained here. 



AGAINST HAHOH FILM 

liOs Angeles, Asg. 31. 

nftutte R rislsen. of the flarrick, 
»t 8th and Broadway, has booked the 
Clara Smith Ilamon feature that h;iH 
been mnde here bt^grnning next week. 
Pressure is being brought to bear 
J»«h a view to getCiitg him to caacel 
we cenfract. 

nalsril is not a member of sny ot 
Ibe exhibitor ergsnixations which 
JJO^ solidtv against showing the pir 
J>* on their screenn en the groun<l 
Jbe foatwre woaM he ia^MHeas to the 
^^^ytrj, becaaee of tke many cen- 
•»y*b]p etteMioas that ara baing 
•■^•e* «t this tTBie. 



WITH OLARA HAMON 

- KanKA!" City, ^^;5. 31 — Word comes 
from Ardmore, Okla.. that the senti- 
It will have an arcade entrance, ' meut agsinst Clara Ilamon, who was 
With two evHiMive shops on either recently married to John Oorman, her 
side. The policy has not been an- director, is changiog sml that where 
neuneed, bnt Chere seem« IHtle chance ence there might have been the cold 
of a vaudeville house ia such a lore- shoalder for the wonan who waa 
tioB. Rxrh>sive pictures, with, a pes- acquitted for the murder of Jake Ha- 
sihillty of the reserved seat idea i men, there are bow many wko are 



spoken of for the Rtanten, ia the | backing Iter in her film verture 
probable policy. 



CHAPUK ooma abroad 

Charles Cbaplio sails tomorrow 
(Saturday) ea fhe Olympic, accom- 
panied by hie poblicity representa- 
tive. Caryl Robinson snd Thos. Har- 
rington, his secretary. The com- 
edian will remain abroad for two 
months, reforning here to go fo the 
coast to complete the two reel pro- 
duetlows still drte First National un- 
der his contract. 

> !! ir arrtui Ohapira will vifpit 
Rngland, trtivvt^ Bpaia^ Germairy, 
Hall aad ^rkey. 



nervssary for IPArtagnan to go to 
fingland and retara in a short space 
.line with the Jewel, to sive tlie 
Queen's hoaor. It is aceeiapHshed 
here iu an engrossin g style lyith the 
ronmnlii* enp<l never at any time cloy- 
ing. One iaeMent eentaias a leap 
from A host tbst for sheer appeal ie 
n bear. 

Of the hiterpretatloBs that of Ni- 
gel de Bralier aa llielielien developed 
a real creation a magnificent dielinea- 
ciated with tlie CardinaL Bhcepthag 
only the r<tar be domhiatee the pic- 
ture. Adolphe Ifenlou does excellent - 
thi:t the star he dominates the p«c- 
t.fre. Adolphe Menjou does excelcBt- 
ly in a role not actor-proof by any 
munnrr of mease. Ills l^ais XIII 
cTi<feDces heth sides af the king, gain- 
mg sympatheCie reepoase where in 
moi^t instancea the oppoaite la the 
case. 

The companions of D^Artagnan, 



OOLiyWTN OOMVO BAOX 

Samuel GoUw^n ia tefnmlng from 
the coast nest week. The bead e( the 
Gehlwyn organiaat'on expecttd te 
spend at leaat another month In Loa 
Aageles, hot orgaalaatlea mattera mid 
the practical ressatien of prodnrtlea 
io the west cut short his stay there. 

He did, hewtver. effect a pr ac tif rf 
reergaeiaation of the prodneing naita 
and the scenario departmeat of the 
Ooldnyn Calver City plhnt and the 
catthag of salariea fe'lewed aR alone 
thA nnA.«fr#ip hie arrival weat. 



A number ef Ardmore Women have A thos. Portho* apd Aramls fond apt 
subscribed for stock in the taara ' tieatiucnt by l.«eoa Barry, George 
IJammon picfnre enterprise and | SeiKTiiann and Eugene Psltette. Mar- 
are "pulliiig'' for her success in life [ Kn^rife De T>a Motte is a sweet and 



and the films. 



8tk Ave. Tivoli Nearly Ready 
The Tivoli, a new 2.'i4)Oseat fhe- 
atre on fhe comer of .^><)th street and 
8th avenue, is schedulc«i to open Kept. 
3, with a straight picture policy. 



Cokea Belldiaf Twa is Newberg 
George Cobea is ere«'ting two new 
theatres fa Newburg, N. Y.. which 
wm be devoted te pif'tnres. The 
hoosea wiH aeat 1,000 aud 1»400. 



wiMHoiM f:^oelaace. Mary Uael^ieu 
•Id nor invest the ifaeen with the 
poise expected leaving ealy a mild 
impression, 'rte locales seem vers- 
ciojin, the seta and screens brmgiu? 
the atmosphere of the Frsncr of oM 
HM it is regsrded, with the costuming 
rn keeping to the minutest detail. 

• The Three Musketeers" is a sple.i- 
dtd pi'^ture giving forth the Lhimss 
«<tory with a gvsto and abamlon. It 
ii* not - hough nor --.- it 

.hold enough to be styled cnoch-mak- 
up. I'Mf as a super- prod«ict ton ia ti»e 



Geo. Walsh*! f^arteaid Appanrai 

Oeerge Walah la trybig te arrange 
a cooatry-wide toor of p e i s Oa al ap- 
pearaaeesL Be baa given Ftaah Daf- 
fey the annagewent ef his ataira far 
the tear. 

No pletare win be siiown with the 
star and the honee snaagers can ee- 
core the star on the baaia of a iat 
salary for appearing. 



East New Yerfc*! New One 

The Boprene, a new 1,500- seat 
house, at fjavoaia and WtOiama ave- 
mies. Bast New York, will open witk 
vaudeville ia October. It ie owaed 
by Herman Rockmore, who ceatieie 
the Kheflicld, a picture house in tfUt 
same section. 

crptod, ami with its star, it TvitI <-.rike 
nniversaily, eK|>ccislIy so In its appeal 
to younger folk, for the Hiararter of 
D'Artagnan is ef youtb and itH mthu- 



62 



PIGTU RES 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



CHICAGO CONFERENCE PUNS 

amm big six exchanges 

Lichtman, Price and First National Franchise Holders 
in Chicago Closing Deal — Ince and Sennett Get 
Preference Advances. 



*- 



Chirago, Aug. 31. 

Al Lichtman, OHcar A. Trice and 
several franchiHe hoUlcra and execu- 
tives of the First National are still 
here, working out the details of a deal 
whereby Associated Troducers will 
c ose up its distribution exchanges and 
release through the First National ex- 
(.hr»ngea. 

There now seems small likelihood of 
a slip-up. Under the proposed agreo- 
ment Ince ond Sennett will be given 
Certain advances against deliTerj of, 
negatives with the remaining pro- 
ducers of the A. P. to be taken on by 
First National on the open -market 
basis — their pictures distributed by 
First National with no material ad- 
Tancea made on the product 

Lichtman, according to arrange- 
ments, ia to be retained as general 
manager of A. P. sales, with Price 
continuing as a finder of finances for 
the A. P. producers. The Associated 
Producers concern Is to retain, to a 
considerable degree, its individnslity. 
merely ntillsing the First National 
distributing machinery instead of 
maintaining its own exchanges. 

•In some quarters it is understood 
some of the parent franchise holderj 
of First Nationa' are opposed to the 
deal, Sut aa the majority favor ** the 
agreement is reasonably certain to be 
consummated. 



AFRICAN TRUST 

RECAPITAUZES 



Dividends of 25 Per Cent. 

Per Annum Look 

Probable 



FILM THIEF OAUQHT 



Qattavt F. Lanzkt Taken 
Fraaelsea 



la Saa 



Ran Francisco, Aug. SI. 
Through the arrest here of Ous- 
tave F. I^nzke and the recovery of 
two films sent from New York for 
Khipment to the Orient, San Fran- 
cisco police believe they have broken 
up a rng of film thieves. Six reels 
of 'The Kid" and five reels of 
**Rud8" constituted the recovered 

loot. 

Snm T. Edwards, San Francisco 
mnnnirer for First National, was 
mainly responsible for the apprehen- 
sion of the alleged thief. 

The case is being handled in New 
York. 

ENJOINING UNION 

Downtown New York Theatre 
Charges Loss Throagh Pickating 



The Em.ipo AmMseinont Co.. oper- 
ators of the rUnton, ;: downtown pn.- 
turc hon^o, hns brouRlii iiijunotian 
procordinRR in the New \tMk Su- 
preme Court n;;nin8t tho Motion Pic- 
ture Thontros Attendants' Union No. 
10J>20. rliarciiiK the union breached 
Us contract with the Motion Picture 
Tft:hihitorp' Association, Inc., when it 
called the strike Aur. 11, In.st. Un- 
der the terms of the agreement bo- 
tweon the union and the exhibitorh* 
association, all employers were en- 
tilN-d to due nolire of any grievance, 
but the plaintiflF rharRO.s "thnt f»nid 
htrike was called in violation of .«'ft*d 
contract without any preliniin.iry de- 
mand or any statement of Rrievsnoe 
and without cause or in.«!tifiration." 

As n result, the plaintiff continues, 
it had to close down its theatre for 
two days to its estimated damage of 
$4,000, and by cause of the picketinj; 
in front of the theatre doors, it is 
losing patronape and box oflire re- 
ceipts to the extent of $500 per day. 



The African Theatrea Trust, Ltd^ 
of South Africa, which recently had 
a reflotation of its stock into the 
African Theatrea, Ltd^ and controlled 
a subsidiary company oAJh-tha title 

African FUma Tnut, Ltd., now aa- 
nouncaa a reflotation of its film ex- 
hibition ally under the name j^f Afri- 
can Filma, Ltd. 

The new compoBf ia to have a cap- 
ital of 20OJ0OO poiinds*and will take 
over the assets and fflm distributing 
basiness of African Filma Trust, hUL 
The consideratloB is 200,000 pounds, 
of which 100,000 pounds goes to the 
vendors, the renwinder of the shares, 
all underwritten, beiaf offered to the 
public, preference in allotment to be 
given to eziating ahareholders in 
African Theatres, Ltd., and to ez- 
1. 

The original capital of the vending 
company in lOlS waa 45,000 pounds. 
The new company will devote the 
entire 100.000 pounds underwritten to 
the further extension of the busi- 
ness. The officers confidently expect 
to pay div'denda at the rate of 25 
per cent per annum. 

The South African Trust is prsc- 
ticslly without opposition in its terri- 
tory through the establishment of a 
chain of circuits that extends from 
the Cape to Rhodesia and from the 
South-West Protectorate to Kenya 
Colony. It has spread abroad to 
Madagascar Maotiriua, the Seychelles 
Islands. Blantyre. India, the Straits 
Settlements. Java and the Far East. 
It maintains offices in London and 
New York. 



WHY EASTMAN CO. 
*TROTECTS** ITSELF 



Laboratory Project Move 

to Stabilize Credit on 

Caab Basis 



ADSTRAUAN FILM IMPORTERS 
PROTEST AGAINST TAXATION 



<i 



ABABIAN NIGHT" TALE 



First National Believes it Will Beat 
"Passion" 



APPEL'S PRGDUCINQ 

Oxcsr Apfel, the director, has in- 
formed the O.scar Apfel rroductions, 
Inc., for the mokins of four or five 
features a year. The corporation hns 
lense<l n studio in College Toint and 
will commence work iinmedintely on 
its picture tentatively called "Jerry." 
He has made no plans as yet for re- 
leaiiing the output. 



HODKINSON'S EXCHANGE 

W. W. IIodkiuKon announced this 
week thnt after Nov. 1 he woi'Id cease 
diatributinp; his picturcH through the 
FatliC I']x(*!inn);(<s. lie Ih e.'^tnbli^iiin.:; 
n rhnin of 20 cxchnnAes of hi.s own. 

He hns hceu role.'iHini; through tlie 

Pathe offices for the pMst threo vonrM 

under a percentnge urrnngcnient. 

i ..(' Ho^lkin.ii.. ..; J ,nfi |.«<^ raieaae 

ifilwo features a mou^ 



Charles Chaplin's latest picture, 
"The Idte Class," is scheduled for re- 
lease by the First National Oct. 1. The 

p'cturc will, as usual, hare its first 
New York presentation at the Strand. 

The first of the Buster Kcaton pic- 
tures to be released by the same or- 
ganization will be marketed Sept. 1{>, 
at the same time that "One Arabian 
Night" will be released. 

The original German yernion of 
"Sumurun" was in 12 reels. This was 
cut to about 500 feet before the 
^(eneral idea of tbe American version 
was arrived at. Then it was discov- 
ered that the entire p'cture wouM 
hare to be re-edited for the Am(»riran 
market., Leslie Mason has lind the 
retttling in charge, and will be givon 
screen credit for the same. 

When the picture is finally shown 
here it will contain about 7,800 feet 
with titles. 

A factor in the editing for this 
country was the viewing of the Na- 
tional Board of Ueview of the produc- 
tion and the suggestions that they 
made to the First Nations! for tlie 
placing of the picture in American 
theatres. 

The feeling in the First National 
organization la that the production 
will top everything that "Passion" d d. 

''One Arabian Night" is to be a 
tinted production throughout, vith 
special art titles in colors. Thp ex- 
ploitation campa'gn that has boon laid 
out for the picture involves a greater 
investment than has ever heretofore 
been undertaken by the distributors. 



SomethiDf further came oat ia 
trade gossip this week to shed light on 
the invssion of the Eastman Kodak 
Co., into the laboratory branch of tiie 
industry. Some of the picture pro* 
ducers approve the Tenture as promis- 
ing a smoother running of the printing 
business. The principal motive for 
the deal is sn effort to stabi'lae trade 

credits. Eastman has been a firm en- 
forcer of the policy of 10 days cash 
in all transactions^ 

It is recorded that stcb in the days 
of the Patents Co., the parent com- 
pany's eight icensees all paid prae- 
tically cash for their purchases of 
raw stock, and that policy has been 
in effect ever sinq^. Eaatman would 
not give credit to any miory men, 
while the independent raw stock man- 
ufacturert were willing to give liberal 
terms in the matter of aettlementa at 
four and even aix montha. 

The result ^s been, so it is al- 
leged, that some of the smaller labor- 
atory men favored independenta, and 
where prints were ordered on Bastasan 
stock, mixed in one foot of Baatman 
to two of an independent maker. Even 
where straight Eastman atoek waa 
used there have been frequent dis- 
putes. The producer wou'd object 
that his prints were unsatiafactory. 
The laboratory man would blame the 
raw stock. The cisim would go to 
the Eastman Company, which would 
reply that the stock wss delivered in 
perfect condition. The battle would 
go on indefinite y between laboratory 
men and Eastman and the producer 
would be held up. 

> Eaatman claims prompt action can 
be had on all such di:spntes where the, 
whole operntion is in the Ksstman 
Company's hnnds. The independent 
laboratory man's grievance is that the 
big company is f;obbling the inde- 
pendents. 

They have nlwnys complainod of the 
strict cssh terns of E:iMtinnn, point- 
ing out that they did business with 
msny specu ntivc producers who took 
a consideraMo ti«tic to mt hack their 
producing investment. nnA ii w.ts up 
to the lab >r:it'>ry man to cf^rry the 
whole finniir ill burden of the irnlustry. 
They (Inbm.Ttory men) hnM to wait 
for thei? i :'•:(•>. while they wore com- 
pelled To >!i.v ilioir rjiw stock for cash 
and tho I)i:r.l! n of finarring a volume 
of business \v;is tremendous. 

liJasfviMii's invasion of their field, 
tiiey say bitterly, is a move to put tho 
screws on and drive a hard bargain. 



Government Adding 100% on Film Imported From 
Any Country But England— Exhibitors Say They 
Cannot Stand It. 



ROWLAND LEA\1NG 
METRO ON RETURN 



Sailing Sept. 22 — ^Marcus 
Loew May Succeed as 
Metroes President ' 



For some time paat rumors have 
been persistent in declaring that 
Richard A. Rowland, Prealdent of 
Metro, would withdraw from the or> 
ganisation, turning over the oper- 
ation of the company to Ifarcus 
Loew, who financed the concern for 
something fike $4,000,000. 

It ia undentood he wQI head a 
separate company and handle Metro 
distribution. 

Mr. Rowland anils Sept. 22 on tbe 
Berengaria for an extended atay 
abroad, to arrange-^or the placing 
of "The Four Horsemen*' in the 
foreign countries. Report has it 
that ' immediately on his return he 
will tender his resignstion. 

Visited in his office this week and 
asked about the report, Rowland was 
non-commitsl. 



SEEKS GHOST PBOFITB 

Sehaaider Asks Coart ta Award Earn- 
tof a of Films H^vw Mada. 



"BOHEMIAN GIRL*' 
Harley 



Knolcs Will 
Abroad 



Make It 



London, Aug. 31. 

Ilarley Knoles, managing director 
of the Alliance Film Corp., has 
started production on his next big 
picture feature, to follow up his auc- 
CC88 with "(?nrnival.' It i« to be a 
film vcrHion of Balfe's opera, "The 
llohcniian (Jirl." 

After tint Knolcs will offer to the 
trade "Tiic Mciace," a picture not 
made by the A Mian -e but which will 
be relcnacd by that company. "The 



When is a law suit not a law suit? 
When seryice of the complsint is 
msde on the wrong person. Accord- 
ing to pspera on file in the Supreme 
Court, Albert A. Schneider, ss ss- 
algnee of the Amerir:,n Bioscope 
Films Co., is suing tbe Vi.tor Kremer 
Fihn Features, Inc., for $20,000. aer- 
rice hsTing been inndc on .Tacob. Shen- 
field, who ia allowed to he secretary 
of the defendant C(»r]>(»r:ition. Iy>uis 
^V(M•lbcrger. counsel for Victor Kre- 
nirr. however, Rtatrs thnt Shenfield .s 
no longer connected with the corpora- 
lion, and as a matter of fart ia suing 
^them. 

The papers in the County Clerk's 
office act forth that Kremer agreed to 
produce a series of 2ft two-reel come- 
dies for ttie American Bio.scope, of 
T;;mp}i. I'l.i., production to start on 
ten davft' ii(»tife fmin them. Kremer 
waa to rcceiv4» $.".000 a picture after 
three were completed and turn them 
over to the Bioscope Company, which 
wns 7uarantee<l to realise s $1,000 
mnrkfting value. Although ready and 
willing to fulfill the agreeuient. Kre- 
jMor in nlleired to have bresched it, 
and Schneider claims the $26,000 
profit they might have realized. 



OPPRESSIVE BOND 



Picture Managers of Hoastoa Ask 
Sl.oeo Bonds be Canceled 



Sydney, Aug. S. 
A general meeting of the English 
American and Continental film Ua. 
porters, Australian film producers, 
and a "^ " executive of the Federated 
Picture Showmen's Association of 
Australia has made emphatic protest 
against the 100 per cent increase ol 
duty imposed by the Government of 
fihna niade in countries other than 
Great Britain. Present- film import- 
er* are paying Id (2 cents) per foot 
on subjects made in England and 
ll^d (3 cents) per foot on subjecta 
made in other countries, the highest 
duty paid in any pnrt of the world. 

The Oovemment haa increased the 
already heavy rate of duty by 100 
per cent, making a total oC 8d ($ 
cents) per lineal toot 

This places the majority of the 
importers in the serious position of 
considering the closing down ^ their 
business in Australia unleas the tax 
is passed onto the public. 

It is known in the trade that for • 
long time past some importers have 
been having a hard time to break 
even. This has been caused by hi|^ 
c*Bt of production. The executive eC 
the showmen*s associatiou maintafau 
it ia practically impossible to past 
the tax on to the public, owing te 
their already being burdened with the 
federal amusemeut tax, and the fact 
that the pricea of admission have had 
to be increased from time to time te 
meet the heavy increases of wages 
find expenses. 

The majority of the exhibitors 
maintain they cannot shoulder the in* 
crease themselves, owing to the small 
margin of k>rofit under which they are 
working. 

.\fter a long discussion it wss de^ 
c:de<l to take the matter up with all 
possible energy with members of the 
Oovernment rnd piece before them 
facts and figures proving thst tke 
jhity would not in any way increase 
local manufacture. 

Present at the meeting were rep- 
resent itives of Paramount Australian 
Filma, Mason's Films, First National, 
Fox, I'niversal. Csrrolls, Selznick, 
Hciumont Smith, J. C. Williamsoa, 
Willinms Pros. 



i 



Houston, Tex., Aug. 31. 
Piiti;i(^ mnn:iL'eiH of the city have 
•Miited in petitionin:: the Mnyor to 
••aurol their bonds of $1.(r{>0 eiich, re- 
Hobemian (i'wV pio.luction will be fol- ' 'mired to insure t!iry will operate 
lowed by -The Little IJrotlier" and '"^'^ bonsfH in rood m.Tnner, includ- 
"Thc IJroad I: 



Jijiiway. 



OPERA AND FILMS 

Snn Kr-n 'b'"o, Auir ^»l. 
Harry Siebcrt Smith, general man- 

ager of the Sonora (irand ()[w'ra 
Company, is in Han FrnnciHco nl t'l 
head of five of the principals from flic 
company wiio have been booked :u 
leading picture theatres in Northern 
Cjlifornia. The atsra open at tho 
CaliforMin next week with an clob- 
ornte (>p(M-:\lo°;uc as a i»iwi(i|^uc to 
a feature nicture. 

■ t - ■■•..a.. ..■■■■ ■ 



ITALIU^ HOUSE S PLAN 

A wealiiiv Italian corporation 
headed by AiUjdh.v Uo.s.srtti, erect- 
ing at West J Illusion and lllet* ker 
ft reels a li :,:>;) svaL pictuie hou.se lo 
enter < hid .> to the Itul.ai.s in liie 
ne.|;hborii' imI uili give high-cluH8 
piogiam la.o.ls patterned after the 
Uialto, K voh and Strand linen. 
bojiHtinjc iMipular prired aiimiss on 
fiinle. The lund purchauc couHidera- 
*ion waH .52(»('(00. 

Incidentn ly the sale of the land 
incurred a Inwsuit which for a time 
held UT) the n tnal erertion of the 
theatre but whi-h was settled last 
urok. When Uossetti acquired the 
propc'ty from the estate of N. Lowe, 
both thcKo prin-.ipul.s were nanwrl 
defendun'.: ,•;:., ' |.; ,.,■, ,',!;■•,- ^ 

by Vincen-'o Ma^cngnano and Car- 
mine De.sozaro, who refused to be 
di.t^posso.ssed from their stores and 
ten«'mrnt.s on the site of the pur- 
chnHed tract. This suit was n'l.iusted 
KaliMfnctorilv ofit of court InMt week, 
with I)ittenhoi»fer &, FiKhel and Inn- 
hruiii, ii:it(;i &, Shcehan as asuocl- 
ate counsel for the uncnae. 



i;i!r <"!e:'n sl.ows. 

T'm- mj'i:;-: .it" (•• li' fll;if i«»n will gO 
before the f'nmmon Connr il. 



(I' 



/ 



FATE" NEEDS CAPITAL 

Okl:,I,.,rii;i City. OKI,,.. Aug. 31. 

^^'ilIl '-rMte." '"i.r.i SPiirh llam- 
mon's firHt picture, due f.» Ivo released 
i-i ;'!miiij 111; »lil.\ .«*. tJie «)r^;iiir/,:ili(»n of 
.: -i.wk r.-.riij.nny wifJi t|tl()0,()()<» rnp- 
it .1 is 1. "■!;•: f.ijslicd I.y a Tort Worth 
firm of IitmImts. 

Tlif i!vil.iT:;i «»f tlie i-i«'ture was fi- 
iir-.i.red ]-.%■ iiivii.'c cnpitnl. the CX- 
pi<)it«>i's; -!iy, :uiii ilie cr^Mt of market- 
ing will re.niiir addition.il capital, 
and it is pro)»o»««Ml to organize a ct>m- 
Miny to linM(Ile the bnoinesa end with 
rnpitnl only Inr^e enough to cover 
the a'^tual ovf^fri <• of m-irketing. 



**YOU MAY WIN" BID 

Washington, Aug. >!• 
Mutual Productions, Inc., Wasb* 
in.^ton's own producing firm headed 
hy T.. Mont\ 'Rell. George Ma'-'^hall 
and T. Arthur Smith, Jr., are present- 
iii.^i ill liKii- .i'.iia-iive eircul;;r. whiA 
i.s headed "Inreat $1^00. You may 
lose it — You may win a thousand," 
\ letter from David Belnsco to Mr. 
Hell. Mr. Belaaco tells Mr. Bell thst 
»ic thinks his pi n an excellent one, 
ind that he will be interested to see 
the outcome of iL 

The drndsr slso sets forth s lofkg 
list of well-known plsyers, and plays 
1 1 resented by the men behind the new 
• 'Itanizatlon while directing the des- 
tinies of the 8hubert-Gnrrick stock 
•-< mpany in this city two summers 
ago. 



$11,000 TUDGBIENT 

Leah Baird, One of Jadonent Bebt* 
or*j la Defanit 



HATTOMS WRITE FILM 

Frederic and Fanny Ilntton. the 
legitimate playwrights, have completed 
a new five-reeler. in which Mae Mur- 
r.iy AMil be starred, and which car- 
ries the title of 'Tut and Take." 



A default judgment for |11,402.8S 
wa.s entered laat week by Louis Burs- 
ton, film producer, sgninst the Gibrsl* 
far Operating Co., Inc.. Artco Pro- 
ductions, Inc., and Leah Bsird, film 
• rtress. The sction revolves about a 
series of 28 $riOO notes dating from 
.luly 28, 1020. and each maturing at 
weekly periods. The Gibraltar made 
the notes out to Artco, which en- 
dorsed them in turn to Miss Baird. 
Burston discounted them for M»»* 
Baird, but when matured they were 
not paid. 

The transaction back of this series 
of notes is a film deal with the Hod- 
kiuHon company ^aggregating S16,UOO» 
of which $5,000 was paid, leaving the 
balance due sued for. Hodkinuon fo' 
some reason had refused to satisfy 
the balance in the defendant^' favor. 



The film is the se.ond of the series 
of fcMinies st:irring Miss Murray to and thus heW up Iturston's en«i of '^ 
be piudiK-cd D.v i iilany i^roductiona. I llurston waa Kucre**Hfuily reproHi*nt- 
Uobcn Z, Leonard will direct. led in tbit> adton by ilayry G. Koack 



Friday, September 2, 1921 



MOTION PICTURE DEPARTMENT— PAGES 35 TO 39 

PICTURES 






63 



9 








Theatres 



i. 






Commission 





i^ 



^ >w^ ^ ".'■ ■■■'"■■ ■■ ^ ^. 

Tb« Famons piayers-Lasky Organ- Avcragc Housc OH Paramount String Shows Intake of Only $90 Over Cost 






ixatioa is unJoading its theatres in 
whatever territory it can manage to 
rid i^M^f of tb« bouses. Tli« corpora- 
tion iMt aomething like 400 theatres 
deVoted to the exhibition of motion 
pictnrea. 

Generally, H i« the belief that 
Adolph Zukor wa« holding the fact 
that the corporation was anxious to 
rid itself of the houses in the dark 
until BOoh time that be could unload 
and at t6e same time make it api>«ar 
that the corporation was exteudinc a 
tremendons favor to the M. P. The- 
atre Owners of America and genially 
placate that faction which bas been 
harassisg the interests/ and grace- 
fully retire from the exhibi^g field. 
• The issuance of a complaint by the 
Federal Trade Commission in WaHh- 
ington against the Famous Pliu^ers- 
Lasky Corporation, charging them 
with Tiolation of the Sherman Anta- 
T^ust Law and other offenses, it is 
believed was one of the reasons that 
the corporation was willing to forego 
continuance in the exhibiting field. 
From another source, however, it was 
learned HUt ovor a penod of one 
month 200 of the houses tkat the eom< 
paa^F controls skow«d a profit of only 
118,000, or sometliing like $00 a 
honse. Indndad in the averaging 
were several of the biggest houses 
that the organisation oontrols and 
w1ilch»*trc knowl^ to be'money-ma'kers 
of no minor degree. With that in 
mind it can be readily figured that a 
great number of the houses in the 
list lirast have been operated at a 
loss. 

A digest of the charges brought 
against Famous Players by tbc Fed- 
eral Trade Commissioii is given be- 
low. There are eleven other respon- 
dents. 

Unfair competition in violation ot 
Section 5 of the Federal Trade Com- 
mission Act and the purchase uf Htoek 
in competing concerns, in violation of 
.Section 7 of the Clayton Act are the 
charges contained in the formal com- 
P^nt, 

Others Named 
The respondents are gtrfem SO days 
to answer the specific ancgations in 
the complaint, after wbich date will 
be set for trial of the charges. 

The respondents named with the 
Famous ^layers-Lasky Corporation 
are' the Stanley Company of America, 
Stanley Bookinj; Corporation, Black 
New England Theatres, Incorporated, 
Southern Enterprises, Incorporated, 
Snenger Amusement Company, Adolph 
Zukor, James L. Lasky, Jules Mast- 
bnum, Alfred S. Black, Stephen A. 
Lynch and Ernest V. Richards, Jr. 

The complaint allegcR that "as a 
result of the conspiracies and com- 
binations herein set out and the ac- 
quisitions and affiliations made in 
pnvsaance of said conspiracies and 
coohinations, the respondent, the 
FAmous-Players-Lasky Corp., is now 
the largest concern in the motion pic- 
ture industry and is the biggest the- 
atre owner in the world, owning more 
tiiJin 400 theatres fn the L'tiitcd Statos 
•iiKJ (Canada, and has numerou.s others 
nff.liated with it. It has formed pr.)- 
ducinff companies in Great Brifnin. 
France, Belgium, Spain, Scandinavian 
countries, Poland, Czccho-Slavakin, 
nnd a $.'^,000,000 corporation for the 
production and distribution of motion 
pictures in India. It has branch 
offices in 28 of the pri^ipai cities of 
the United States and in Canada, in 
London, in Sydney, Wellington, Mex- 
ico City, Paris, Copenhagen, Barce- 
lona, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro. 
Santiago, Havana, Tokio, Shanghai 
nnd Munila, mnd it has 140 Biibsidiary 
corporations engaged in eitbii i,fo- 
dncing. rlistributiug or exhibiting mo- 
tion pictures." 

The charges of the complnint Rerved 
on the Famous Playersi-Iiasky Cor- 
poration, its RiibBi<Horiea and officers, 
arc contained in 15 porn graphs. Par- 
agraphs one and two allege the dis- 
tnbtition of more thnn 80.000 rilm*« 
*vcry week by the respondent through 
the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. 

It is Rtnted !n paragraph 3 thnt in 
the calendar year lf>aO there wore -np- 
proximately 1R.000 theatreM exhibiting 
moUon pictures in the Unite<i Statfs; 
thnt about 20,000,000 people . everv 
Jtay spent approximately $4,000,000 
in rash to sec exhibitions of motion 
pictiiriM. 

Pnracrnph 1.^ allege?! that in 1020 
J ''Out (».000 American theatrcB Khovscd 
laramoiint nnd Paramount Arfrraft, 
pictures exclusively, an«l that about 
J'l rents of every dollnr thai was pnid 
to eutor motion picture theatres was 
paid fo enter theatres showing Para- 
J^oijTit and Paramount Artcraft pic- 
cxclusivehL 



Famous Wanted to Get Credit For Sak With Cohen and M. P. T. O. of 
A. — Commission Names Eleven Other Respondents, Including Black and 
Ljnch — Given Thirty Days to File Reply^ 



tail Low motion piocnre films are dis- 
tributed through exckanfes which are 
the agencies or oflk*<es wUch directly 
aegotiatc and place thm sMtiou pic- 
ture iiims with exliibitors, who own, 
control or direct the theatre in which 
the pictures are displayed. It is fur- 
ther eaplained tbat the *«fcookiug" of 
a picture is the making of a contract 
between the producer or dlstribu^r 
and the exhibitor. Ttds explanadon 
goes on to show that first showiligs 
of a film are released in "key citici^*' 
there being 38 such Mky dtles in the 
United States. These dtaea are 
named in paracrinh 4. '^ > . 

la tf 16 

Piasagraph 5 sets out tiiat in 1016 
the motion picture in<histry was com- 
posed of three nnits, producers, dis- 
tributors and exhibitors, none of 
which were affiliated with the others. 
It sets out, allK>, tluOt the three lead- 
kig concerns in tlie industry were 
Bosworth, Incorporated, with a cap- 
ital stock of $10,000; Jesse I^asky 
Feature & PFSy Company, Incorpor- 
ated, capitalized at $300,000, and 
Famons Players FBm C-ompany, in- 
corporated at $2,000,000. These three 
corporations at that time produced 
respectively per year 12, 36 and 48 
feature photo plays. They were in 
competition with each other, and they 
bad among their artists the itiost 
prominent and most popular motion 
picture actors and actresses and the 
Biost efficient and skilled directors 
then known In the tednstrj. Adolph 
SSukor was tke owner of ^le Faifious 
Players Film Compsny. 

Pamgrapfa 6 of tlie complaint de- 
clares that the Famous Players-T^sky 
Corporation, Adolph Zokor and Jesse 
L. Lasky combined and conspired to 
secure control and monopolize the 
motion picture indu^ry and to re- 
strain, restrict and suppress competi- 
tion in interstate commerce in motion 
picture films. In pursuance of this 
conspiracy and combination the com- 
plaint i^argCR that tlie respondents 
acquired in 1916 Bosworth, Inc., Jesse 
L. Lasky Feature Sc Play Co., Inc., 
and Pamons Players Film Co., -and 
that since the time of such acquisi- 
tion the Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 
has, and still owns, the whole of the 
stock of the firms mentioned, and that 
the effect of such acquisition han elim- 
inated competition between such cor- 
porations and tends to create a 
monopoly In such commerce in the 
motion picture industry. 

Cfosed Booking 
Paragraph 7 sete out that prior to 
incorporation of the Faraouo Players- 
Lasky Corp. In July, 1916, the three 
concerns mentioned released and dis- 
trft)uted all of their picture films 
through Paramount Pictures Corp. of 
New York. The Paramoiint concern 
at that time was distributing 104 mo- 
tion picture films annually, and being 
at that time the only distributing 
agency having facilities for nation- 
wide distribution, its trade-mark name 
of "Paramount Pictures" became well 
known among exhibitors and the pub- 
lic. In distributing these films for 
first runs and exhibitions the Para- 
mount concern pursued a' plan known 
as "closed booking." whereby these 
pictures were leased to exhibitors on 
the condition that they would Tease 
the entire 104 pictures and would not 
lease or exhibit pictures of any com- 
petitor. Under this plan ro*,*»,Tbibitor 
could lease a single first run, but os 
to the second and third runs, a dif- 
ferent policy was pursued, exhibitors 
not under contract with the Para- 
mount Pictures Corp. being able to 
contract for any picture they desired, 
and while thero was no competition 
among Posworth, Inc., Jesse L. Las- 
kv Feature & Play Co., Inc., ai>d 
Famous Players Tilm Co. for the 
leasing' of films for first runs, there 
was free nnd open competition for the 
second nnd third runs, or repeats. 

About Artcraft 
It Is charged fn paragraph S that 
the respondent. Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp., in furtherance of the 
ronsJiiiracy and combination charged, 
through its pre»»<ident, Adolph Zukon, 
souglit to acquire the Paramoujit P'C- 
ture Corp. Failing to do so and to 
evade former contracts. Zukor incor- 
porated the Artcraft Pictures Corp. 
in July. lOin, which corporation en- 
gaged "in competition with the Para- 
mount corporation in leasing aad dii«- 
tribating ^^lamaiiffiBttJlB^ At 



the respondent, the Fanijous Players- 
(Asky Corp^ employed many popu- 
lar film stars, axKi tn the contracts 
with certain of these stars expired 
they were not re-engaged by the re- 
spondent; instead, the respondent and 
Adolph Zukor origanized "certain new 
corporMJon^i and induced these stars 
to make service contracts with these 
newly formed corporations, wlJch 
corporations the re<^ood«nt and 
SSnkor caused to contact with the 
Artcraft Pictures Corp., whereby all 
films depicting these stars were ex- 
clusively leased and distributed 
through the Artcraft Pictures Corp. 
Instead of through the Paramount 
Pictures Corp. Shortly thereafter 
I'aramOunt o<vnorf?, because of the 
threatened- impairment of the value 
of their holdings through the loss of 
pictures depicting these stars, be- 
came . desirous, of disposing of their 
hoKdinga, and. in U)16 the .Famons 
Playefs-Lasky Corp. acquired the 
whole of the stock and Fbares of the 
eapitiU of the Paramount, the concern 
whidk had been in competition with 
the Artcraft Pictures Corp. The 
compiniot declares that the effect of 
this acquisition of the Paramount 
corporation by the Famous PPftyers- 
I^sky Corp. has been and is to elimi- 
nate competition in interstate com- 
merce, and that it tends to create n 
monopoly, and that aftfr the acquisi- 
tioti mentioned both the , Paramount 
corporation an«j[ the Artcraft Pictures 
Corp. ceased to function and were 
dissolved, and that thereafter the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp., in ad- 
dition to producing films, entered the 



and in the same manner as the re« 
-iuudeut'a films, and that these in- 
dependent productions are advertised 
and displayed as Paramount-Artcraft 
picjtnres and Paramount picture?:. 
These imiepeudents are: Thos. H. 
Ince, Mack Sennett, The Cosnopoil- 
tau Productions, Mayflower Produc- 
tions, Lois Webber Productions, AVm. 
D. "Taylor's Productions, (3eorgc Mil- 
for^rs Productions, William A. 
Brady's Productions. 

Restart 

Paragraph 10 charges that in May, 
1919, in accordance with th^ conspi- 
racy already described, the rospeu- 
dents, Funous Players-Lasky Corp., 
Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky, iu- 
coi-porated the Uealart lecture Corp., 
which corporation is engaged in pro- 
ducing, leasing and distributing films 
in coimucrce throughout the United 
Btates.' The respondents named 
caused tlie Realart Pictures Corp. to 
maintain offices, exchanges and a sell- 
ing organiatation eeT»arate from that 
of the. Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 
and, concealed the ref<pondent's own- 
e^rship pf the Hoalart Pictures Corp., 
holding the latter out to the trade 
and public to be wholly independent 
and not affiliated or connected in any 
way with the respondents, and that 
many exhibitors who did not desire 
to lease Famous Ployers-Lasky films 
did feasc Realart IMctures Corp. fihns 
in the belief that they were not made 
or produced by the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp. 

Key Cities 

Acquisition of motion picture the- 



buaaness of leasing and di«tributinR : „tre8 through coercion and intimida 



such films directly to distributors 
without employing the medium of any 
distributing agency, and advertised to 
the trade and public such films as 
Paramount Artcraft pictures and 
Paramount pictures. , 

Old Stuff 

In paragraph 9 it is set out that 
after the respondent had acquired the 
concerns mentioned, and pursuing the 
conspiracy and combination to control 
the motion picture industry, it inaug- 
urated a policy of afliliuting with it 
certain independent producers whose 
productions were of such quality awl 
popularity that they were in great, 
demand. It further declares that such 
independent producers by contract 
leased and distributed their films 
through tho respondent corporation, 



POLITICS SEEN 

IN PICTURE TRADE 



Senator Myers Wants 

Prospective ^Threat" 

Investigated 

Senator Myers bas introdnrrd n 
resolution to investigate tbe "p<^l'tif':»l 
activities" of the motion picture in- 
dustry. 

Inside reports have it that the Mo- 
tion Picture Theatre Owners Associa- 
tion of America is planning tho es- 
tablishment of a bureau in Wiishing- 
ton similar to the one mninfaincd 
by the I'rohihition party prior to the 
nassnsre of the Volstead etfict. for th«-^ 
purpose of card-indexiiij? all' pu!)Ti<' 
ofiicials and keeping tabs on their 
views in regards to the picture in- 
dustry. The picture pfK>ple arc oit 
primarily to repeal the film footiigf> 
tax I'aws. the Sunday closing, tl.e mu- 
sic royalty tax, the heavy tarilT on 
foreign films, cenwrship and tho 
amusement "wnr" tax. Active re- 
pri.«fnl is threatened via the screen 
on any and all public oflirijils who 
dre knovtii to oppose the industry's 
wishes and they, arc fully aware of 
fhei Congpcssinen's dislike to ptiMic 
caricaturing through the medium of 
the motion picture screen. > 

Senntor Myers' pljiiiit fs thnt 
should r.ny Congrcs?^man or oilier of- 
firial from any particiiln- state ^r 
•listrirt attempt any si^^h t.'irtics it 
would bring a focused att;i(Ic from 
tho picture people direofly to the 
state or section ho is best known 
and that is bis native henth where 
tbe concentrated damage would hurt 



tion of owners into selling their the- 
atres after threats of erecting com- 
peting houses and of interfering with 
their film service as a furtherance of 
the conspiracy alleged is charged in 
paragraph 12. It is declared that in 
1919 the respondents entered Into a 
comprehensive T»lan of extending the 
corporation's activities by tbe acquisi- 
tion of theatres, particularly in the 
key cities. In piirsuance of this pro- 
graxn. ,the respondents consi)ired. tho 
complaint alleges, with the Black New 
England Theatres, Inc.. of which Al- 
fred S. Black is president, to secure 
control of the distribution and exhibi- 
tion of motion pictures in Maine, New 
Ifampsliire, Vermont ai>d Massachu- 
setts, and that by acquinilion of 50 
per cent of the stock of the Black 
New England Theatres, Inc., tbe re- 
spondent controls more then 00 the- 
atres in the states mentioned. This 
has. it is alleged, either entirely ex- 
cluded independent producers from 
that territory or caused independent 
producers to lease their films at a 
los«» or upon nndcsirable cqnditons. 

The complaint declares that fur- 
ther pursuing this program the re- 
spondents conspired with the Stanley 
Co. of America, which owned or con- 
trolled more than 57 theatres in 
Pennsvlvania, western New .Tersey 
nnd Delaware, and with the St.inley 
Booking Corp., owned by tht» Stnn- 
lev Co. of America, to secure control 
of the motion picture infbislry in this 
territory, and thnt as a result of this 
considrricy the Paramount pictures 
nnd Paraniount-.Vrtcraft i)ictures ar? 
<'ither shown exclusively or are given 
a preference over others in this terri- 
tory, nnd thnt we'1-known independent 
prodiicrrs ^ro eitlier "ieTitIrr!v erclnded 
or nre (^ijy ahie t'l^.leii'-e thojr films 
at a loss or under undesirable con«li- 
tions. It is <lerl!ired that in ac^pprlng 
this confjf)l theatre owners have been 
coerced atjd intiniidat.ed into selliu;? 
their theatres or into giving the re- 
ypondeiiis the exilnsive rights* to 
hooking motit>n pictures for their the-' 
atrcs. 

* Lynch Deal 

The same program wa<« followed, 
the complaint <-harges, as regards the 
Stcplicn A. Lyncli Knterpriscs Corp., 
which own and operate theatres in 
the Atlantic and Culf- States, from 
N«»rtli Carolina to Texas, and in Ten- 
nessee, Arkau'^as and Oklahoma. The 
same program was carried out, the 
conifdairit nllcges. in tli<» aceiuisition 
r^f cQnt:i)l .of ti:e, S.'eng<;:' .Xrn'.isciuf'.it 
Co. to confifd and doininate distribu- 
tion find exliihitiim^ of niotion p'cture^- 
Ml the Southern State--: and in fu:- 
theranee of tliis conspiracy the Fam- 
ous Plavers-lasky t'orp. created a 
lnuhsidiary coritoialion with a c-M'ifal'- 
/at ion of .$:;«. fir » ruK). wl'i<b 40iTknia- 
tion now owi off^Mp and * U 



pal cities of North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, 
Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Lou- 
isiana, Texas and Oklahoma, and likc- 
vrise owns 40 per cent of the capital 
stock of the Saeager Amusement Co., 
of which finest V. liich.nrds, Jr., is 
vice-president and general manager, 
and which owns and controls moro 
than 26 theatres and has the exclu- 
sive right to book pictures for more 
than 6S theatres. 

The complaint declares that acquifd- 
tion ot many of these theatres wujI 
accompanictl by coercion and intimi<la- 
tions of theatre owners into selling . 
their theatres or into giving re spoil- . 
dents exclusivo rights to book pic- 
tures for their theatres by threats of , 
erecting competing houses or by in- 
terfering with film service and cans- . 
ing cancellation of contracts nnd , by 
other means. ,, 

Paragia^u 13 of the complaint dc<4 
-Clares .that in furtherance of the con- 
spiracy charged, the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp. acquired the New York 
Theatre building, contoining tbe. Cri- 
terion, the Ney«r YorTc^tlieatre and (ho 
New York Roof, at a cost of $3,200.- 
000; that respondents acquired tbe 
Rivoli and Rialto in the same district 
of New York, aa well as the property 
on which the Putnum building is lo- 
cated, where it pr<u>osed in the near 
future to erect a '32-story building to 
tost $8,000,000, apd to contain a mo- 
tion picture theatre.. 

•The Famous Players -Tai sky Corp.,**' 
this paragraph states, '*als6 acquired 
the stock of Charles Frobman, Inc.. 
which leases the Empire theatre and 
has an interest in the Lyceum the- 
atre; it has recently completed the 
construction of^tbeatres in Canada to 
cost $3,000,000; it leases the Majestic 
theatre in IMroit, and owns port of 
the stock of the Star Amusement Co., 
which holds a 90-year lease on tli# 
foiglisb Hotel building at Indinnapo- | 
llri, upon which site tbe Famous Pl'ay-| 
crs-La.sky CorpL proposes in the near" 
future to erect an office building ami 
theatre; the respondent recently pur- 
chased 17 theatres in Missouri, known 
as the Kopler Circuit, and has ae-i 
quired theatres in Los Angeles and 
San Francisco, and has recently in- l 
corporated the Famous Players Cali- ' 
fomia Corp., with a capitalisation of 
$12,000,000, to take over the Impc- j 
rinl T'nrtaV theatres in San Francisco " 
and to acquire theatres throughout 
California. It has also acquired or 
controls theatres in Colorado. Massa- 
chusetts, New Ham |)>ihire and an in- 
terest in Loew's Ohio Theatres, a 
corporation owning ond operating six I 
tlieatres in Cleveland and theatres in 
other cities throughout Ohio." \ 

Paragraph 14 sets out that the po- , 
licy jnu Mjetl by respondents in ac* | 
quiring and affiliating with its pro* , 
duccrs, distributors and exhibitors 
has been adhered to with the effect 
that ,;.i;ures of independent pro<liic- | 
ers are kept out ok p. .showing in \h«- j" 
ntres in many big-cities of the coun- ; 
try, and the continuation of this i>ol- 
icy will resnilt in tbe ipliminatiort of all 
independent producers on accounU.wW' 
their inability to nec^ire theatres in 
which to exhibit, their Ttletures, " 

Paragro|)h 14 continues: "Thu^ as 
the theotres owned, c<)ntrolle<l or 
operatetl by Famous Players I^iifky ! 
Corp. arc permanently closed to all 
competitors, the producers of iiniuy ^ 
prominent artists who are not aflili- , 
oted with Famous Ployers-Lasky , 
Corp. are denied n showing of their 
pictures In. the first-run down-town 
theatres in New York City, where 
three of- the five first-run theatres 
are owned by the Famous Ployers- \ 
Lasky Corp. and show Paranwunt 
pictures and Paramount.Artcfnft pic- 
tures excliisivelv. nnd the remaining 

coMfTolled by conu'cting producers, 
who likewise exhibit their own pro- 
di'etions exclusively. In Philadelphia, 
tl;(» iirodueers of many prominent ar- 
tists have been denied a showing of 
nny of their pictures in tir>t-nin the- 
atres on account of Famous I'iayers^- 
LaMky Corp.'s interest in the Stanley 
Co. of America. whi(!i f)wns and oi»cr- 
nlcM every fn'sf-riin theatre in Phila- 
dr'It)h!a. Similarly, in the 11 Atlanfi'? 

rr>d fj'l'.f S(:i'e<i nj[ th'^ SJmilli. iiu-liid- 

iii;; Arkaris.;uf and Oklahonri. tlie pu-- 
tiires* of iiidepriident ]>ro(liicer': are 
eiilir r d"iiied a sliow'nir. or if exhibit- 
ed .'Tt h11 are bo(dved uiion term-- arl 
'■oIl(litiop^ dictated hy Southern 1]:'!- 



i 






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atres in the principal e|tie« hki town«« 
of ti.i. 4. ) litnrv, ttiMl a lUmilac situa-^ 
tie; la 




04 



VARIETY 



aess 



Friday, September 2. 1921 % 



'■mm&smm^rm. 




7 ^^'^ y / VW/ ,^.'77*J^^'^.^/^~ '• 






ARTHUR J. 



.■i 




{All By Myself) 



TAKES THIS MEANS OF WISHING 





• 



MARCUS 



<r 












^ 



i 



AND THEIR ENTIRE STAFF CONTINUED SUCCESS 



Upon the Opening of 

LOEWS STATE THEATRE 



AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE 

GREATEST VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT 

■ . » ■ — . - - _, v _ 

IN THE WORLD 



Ik 



Harry Shatter 

NEW YORK 

W. 46th St. 

Bryant 557-558 



Sam Roberts 

CHICAGO 

177 ,N. State St 

Central 5318 



Louie Lavine 

BOSTON 

232 Tremont St 

Beach 2303 



Frank Wolf, Jr. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Colonial Trust Bldg^ 13th & Market Sis. | 

Spruce 7956 1 




PRICE 20 GENTS 






t 



^ 




Published Weekly at 164 West 4(th St.. New York, N. T.. by Variety. Inc. Annual BabBcr(T>tlon |T. Single ropieo. tO centik 
■ntcred a« aecond oIam matter December SI. li»Oi. at the Poat Office at New York. N. Y., under the Act oC March S, ItTI. 



|yOL.LXIV. NO. 3 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 0, 19?1 



48 PAGES 





HOME 



STAGE HANDS TAKE LESS FROM 
: .VAUDEVILLE, MORE FROM LEGIT 



' f ^ 



Agreement Brings Five Per Cent. Reduction 
'Approximately^ — list of Increases For Others — 
! Agreements Till September, 1922. 



BOSTON'S CENSOR 
OUT FOR "MECCA" 



< The New York and Brooklyn sUfe 
ktndt, throufh their loctli Thea- 
trical Protectire Union No. 1 and the 
Brooklyn stafe hands nnion hare 
■ifaed a new agreement with the Taa- 
deriUe managera, dating from Sept 
1, 1921 to Sept. 1922, and caUing 
for approximately a fire per cent 

wage . reduction. Stage carpenters in 
Taodeville houses such as the Palace 
New York, Bushwick, Brooklyn and 
Inclading the small time houses. Tike 
the Locw and Fox houses, receiring 
$65 , weekly heretofore, will receire 
under the new agreement $52. Elec- 
tricians in the same houses, both big 
and Hmall time, receiving $50 will 
receive $47.50, property men, receiv- 
ing $50 will receive $47.50, flymen 
receiving $48 will receive $45, and 
gripH receiving $45 will receive $42 
weekly. 

Theatrical Protective Union No. 1 
ratified the new scale at a meeting 
held Sundny. The Brooklyn local 
took up the matter of ratification at 
a meeting held Wednesday. 

The legitimate managers rvpresei:- 
ted by the new International Thea- 
trical Managers Associntion and 
Theatrical Protective No. 1, (New 
York local stage hnnds) arranged a 
»ew agreement, last week, as regards 
wage sroles and conditions, which is 
(Continued on page 2) 



DETROIT CHANGE 



Famtui piayart Let Go of Majas- 
tio, Detroit. 



The Majestic, one of the group of 
three houses in the downtown sec- 
tion controlled by Famous Players, 
v,«Il be taken over by Coutts &, Ten- 
nis for musical comedy stock. 

The house has been playing straight 
Pif^tures. The change of policy is due 
to the large number of picture houses 
»n the vicinity, it is claimed. 



The Terribly Clean Casey 
Making 'Em Dress Up-^ 
Watching Hub Greeting; 

Boston, Sept. 7. 
City Censor John Casey, who com- 
piled the now famous code of "Bos- 
ton morals for theatre managers," 

which has been adopted by more than 
a dozen other cities, is preparing for 
a drastic dry-cleansing for "Mecca" 
when it opens at the huge Boston 
opera house next Monday for an in- 
definite run. 

Chester Rice, here, ahead of 
"Mecca," is trying to figure whether 
Casey's rulings, already laid down in 
black and white to the Sliubcrts, 
will bring out the expectant mob or 
whether it will kill the npoctacle after 
opening night, which now seems as- 
sured of capacity. 

Casey has ruled that the Gcrt- 
Comstork production must play minus 
bare calves or thighs or other un- 
ncccs.sary display of fcininioc figure, 
unless it be the case of a "recog- 
nized soloist of acknowledged merit." 

Casey started a rumpus last year 
when he would not let Ann Penning- 
ton show her bare knees but allowed 
a minor soloist dancer to wear a lit- 
tle less than something because hor 
garb was "true art." "Mecca," with 
(Continued on page 43) 



^ 



Yonkert Gets Sousa After 12 Years 

Yonkers, N. Y., Sept. 7. 
For the first time in 12 years John 
Philip House and band will play Yonk- 
ers, N. Y. Sousa will give his con- 
cert at the Armory Friday night, Sept. 
30. A local syndicate headed by John 
McGrath has guaranteed the March 
King $2,000 for the appearance. 



ARMY CALLED THE SHDBERTS AND LOEVIiT 
OUT IN HIS CALL EACH OTHER "OPPflSmom 



HONOR 



W 



Protection Necessary — 
Never Such a Furore 
Before Except Over Vis- 
iting Monarch — Cofc- 
umns in Press — ^Threat- 
en Winik 



RPW DUE TO "KID'' 



London, Sept. 7. 
England has gone literally insane 
regarding the coming visit here of 
Charlie Chaplin, the British-born 
American film star. Not sidce the re- 
turn of the Prince of Walog have 
(Continued on page 4.3) 



AL JOLSON WILL BE 
VAUDEVILLE STAR 



I 



Agrees to Appear For F^w 

Weeks For Shuberts — 

To Have New Play 

The Shuberts will present Al Jol- 
son in vaudeville for a few weeks, 
prior to the star's appearance at the 
liead of the new production he will 
()I>on with at the Winter Garden, New 
York. 

It is not unlikely Jolson will be 
the headline for the opening of Shu- 
berts* Imperial, Nev: York, slated to 
start Sept. 26. The other New York 
Shubert vaudeville house is the 44th 
Street, opening Sept. 10 and which 
also may have Jolson. Another Shu- 
bert big feature turn. Nora Bayrs, 
win open the Shubert vaudeville 
house, Apollo, in ('hirago it is said. 
Miss Bayes will not play New York 
vaudeville until considerably later in 
the season. 



Shubert Office Notifies Acts Not to Fkqr 
Or American — ^Loew Bookmg QSee 
Retaliate — ^^Aiea** Oanae PawlB 



WOMEN SMOKING IN 

LOBBIES 



riT 



New Mode Growing Fa- 
miliar at Broadifay's 
First Nights 

Women smoking in the lobbica of 
Broadway theatrea and on tke side- 
walks during intermiasiona is growing 
to be a familiar sight at first nighta 
of the new plays. 

At tbe Lyceum Toeaday evening, 
on the premiere of the revived Be- 
lasco's "Easiest Way," several wom- 
en of the audience contentedly puifed 
at their eigarets during the inter- 
ludes, some strolling up and down 
with their escorts, who were alt4> 
smoking. 

The habit was formerly confined to 
the ladies' room in the theatres, but 
appears to have received its open- 
air impetus through the wife of a 
New York daily dramatic reviewer, 
who, early in this new sesson, had 
her smoke on the sidewalk. 



EARLY CLOSINGS 

Three Passiao Out This Week Oa 
Broadway. 



The early season closings are 
coming along. At least three of the 
new productions on Broadway paaa 
out tomorrow night They arc 
"Sonny Boy" and "The Poppy God,** 
which the Selwyng have been preaent- 
ing at the (3ort and Iladaon thea- 
tres, and "Nobody's Money,** which 
has been holding forth at the Long- 
acre. 

In Chicago another Selwyn produc- 
tion, "The I/ove C^hef," with I-eo 
Carrillo aa the star will be with- 
drawn. 



fznvc ia vamirvile 



IV 



to (fkv 
^ilui>c^xs 44lfc tHj egl L , oni Inqpisuii 

(581^ KtxN-i uni TIJb tnraMwI. 

Clnyton aai lueam^ at IiAcarV Asa* 
crJcaa tbe* fnt halT «ts« mcftJiel 
by AiHiiir KTcsi. btal hoakn-, Snr 
the Miiilirrts^ Oat flkie iShnflMeit nnBalt - 
xSitt route -w-lntli'lW act tirli -vjcoM 
be caiJMiicd aa IW ervat thmz &zit< 
died Iheir AmerwKB fcanftiqga. 

Tke*IiC»ew oOce ntsJiatel Icr ia* 
foraauv tb» not Sliry \vwxAi ht HirQI 
to the dote. 1W ad a^ppcarrd .an 
scbcdnled. 

Orth and Gojy, Jua i M fcer act Bibldtaa 
a Kbubert vaiiiifMe voaKv'., iivnia 
"penciled" into IW Htxlr lissHi Int 
rerused to *\s^ •rrmHram^. vSHkt re- 
rcirJng not ire rrooi flke T^lnftinis tkcf 
would forfeit IkeSr Sfk dbi e.1 rmtja 
by showiag. 

Klcia in rrsjraBsie to 
cnt his .1' tUuile said ia 
nets i\hi(h liad brcn tlTai 
roatrai'U for tW 44tt Slmt 
Imperial woa'd be forbiMea la 
<he Sr:ile aad Aaacricaa oa 
of tbe uUieireaue ia iW a-hrr-rr^; 
scales prevaiDag at Ibe 



2> 



nrcBusoH 



CaBBvalty t T oa aa vf Ui 
UMikT 



oa West 4Mh 



Tbe FnioB Charcb 
street. New York, 
promlaeooe with tbe ins f alls tisa 
large electric sign 
to advert ise its semera, is r 
tbe rhor^ hall for tboaCrieal 
Bsln. 

The rbnrrb. with its 
tion, hsa been getthig a big ^Isr 
prodoeers with its rehearsal 
several p i o datti aas as 
vile tans brcakiag ia 



cC« 



rcatvai! I 



'ifia iiliidihiini ii" I [ III 



2 



VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE 

26 HANWixY ST.. OXFORD Si , W. I. 



GABLES 



Friday, September 9, 1921 



HHE. BERNHARDH COMING OVER 
FOR AMERICAN FAREWELL TOUR 

Agreed on Terms Witli Shuberf«r^V?^i^<Ieville and 
Road Tour, Then Broadway — Cables Sollivan — 
She Never Was "ffl, My Dear.*" 



8arah Bernhardt hAfl afrcecl to 
make another fareweD tour of Amer- 
ien. This time it will be a Shubcrt 
raadeville appearance folowed by a 
run in a New York houae, with a 
possible road trip thereafter. The 
dramatic engacemcnt was an essen- 
tial part of the contract, aa it hns 
lone been the ambition of the dWine 
one to reai>pear on Broadway in a 
full play. Her vitality ia said to be 
noiaxinsly Kound at this time despite 
bor age and disabilities. 

Mm(>. Boinbardt cabled E. J. Suli- 
vj>n, manager of the local Orpheum, 
XN-ho was her Amer:can manager un- 
der Dillinghom and later under Mar- 
tin Keck, as follows: 

**I have never been ill, any dear. I 
have offers with attraction, Shubert. 
If I have good answer I ask you come 
with me. Best regards to wife and 
you." 



At the Shubcrt office it was stated 
that, although contracts had not yet 
been signed, the terms had been 
agreed upon. 



ANOTHER REVIVAL 

Paris, Sept 7. 

Trebor & Brigon reopen the Thea- 
tre Michael with "La Danseuse Epcr- 
due," by Rene Fauchoia, which waa 
created last year at the Mathurina* 
next door. Albert Braaseur holds the 
lead in the three acta, which will 
not have a long run. 

"L'lngenu,** from the book of Vol- 
taire, has resumed its run at the 
Cupucincs. 

"IJn Fil a la Tatte," by Georges 
Fcydeuu, haa been put on at the 
Scala, after not having been seen 
here for 15 years. It was one of 
the host Palais Royal farces of the 
old days. 



"PEG" IN PARIS 

Paris, Sept. 7. 
•Teg O' My Ueart," in its French 
version rctitled "Peg" was given here 
nt the Vaudeville Sept. 2 and went 
over nic«'ly. The adaptation is by 
YvoH Mirante and Maurice Vnu- 
cairc. 



L. Dt: FREECE DIES 

London, Sept. 7. 
Lauri DoFreece, well known eomc- 
diflii, (lied in Trouvillo, Aug. 25, of 
poritotiilis, followini; an operation. He 
was 4') years olfl and married to Foy 
Compton, widow of Prlissier. 

••TIMOTHY SLY" 

London, Sept. 7. 

'•Timothy Sly" at liie New AuR. 
:\\ v'ji:? ;i( cordoil a IrrilliniU recf^ption. 
It is a one man show built around 
a ni('(li:n>val popular joko ending in 
a trni:<'ly. 

.M:itl.rs(»n T;an;< in a rharacter rolo 
Hforcl ns 111.' (Irmikt'n i)oct. triinip wlio 
iiMwle b'liivr ho v.-.i:; a r.obleiiian. 



SHOT HIMSELF 

Talis. Sff)!. 7. 
;\no(her love trncMly saw tlic light 
tli'"^ W(M-I: wJM'ii l{cMi(> K<»f^lnM-. .'50, 
ni'-tiiher of the ('oniciie Francaisn, 
attciniited sui«i(lc beciuiso M'le. 
M:!il-<'i). ^lotres-^ did not love hUu 
lie shot hiuT'ell' in th«' shoiildci l.c- 
fo'c luT |toin.> :ifte" Iv.' )>;iren(^ rr- 
fused liini admittaiif-e. The wo'.ind 

is not. sCflOHS. 



Cjn.MTTm.o.V'P'.R 

r>'.r u. S'|i\ 7. 

n> )f- Kh:: -i' fiM'ii hrv ■ S^i t. 
V.) ,.:. i;,r i;:.; !o .• ■ :, ■.vith Sln- 






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O •♦. n. wh- II ! f .^•■': ,: . «• r nt A '.. rf 
Ihill foHo-A ir:;: n r.roAi.ic;;:! ^'^\yy. 



OOOHRAN'S OFFER 



Waata All-Calarttf 8kow FroM Ntw 
York, an Qaanatao. 



London, 8apt 7. 

The all-colored afaow, **SlHifne 
Alonf,** now playing in New Tork» 
baa recciTed an offer of C. B. Coch/- 
ran of |S,000 weekly to aiove intact 
to London and appear here in a 
theatre as a regular show. Cochran 
offered farea both ways for the en- 
tire troupe, including the chorus. 

It ia said over here that John Cort, 
who has the show in New York, re- 
plied he would not consider London 
for less than fO.OOO weekly for the 
"Shnffle" show, and that he expect- 
ed it to run in New York util New 
Year's at the earliest 



II 



EAST'* BIO 



Grifflth'a Film Opana la 

Tremendous Reception. 

London, Sept 7. 

*^ay Down East" opened Sept 5 
at the Kmpire and was accorded a tre- 
mendous reception. It is bobked at 
that bouse for an indefinite run at 
regular theatre prices. 

D. W. Griffith sent over half a 
dozen people to participate in the 
handling of the film presentation 
here. 



II 



HULLO A, CANADA" 



Do Courvlle Rehearslog Show for 
Canada Hi Eatlaad 



London, Sept 7. 
De Gourville is rehearsing "HuUoa, 
Canada/' here. The company sails 
Sept. 30, numbering between 60 and 
70, including Shirley Kellog and Har- 
ry Tate. 
The opening is Oct 10 in Quebec. 

QUEER ATHLETE 

Ijondon, Aug. 31. 

*Trhe Game," prodnced at the 
King's, Hammersmith, Aug. 29, is a 
bad play, showing the author's inade- 
quate knowledge of football. He 
makes the hero an impossible char- 
acter, quoting poetry and doing every- 
thing a professional player would not 

The actibns of all the characters 
are unreal. 



BUTT & VEDRENNE 
COMBINE FOR LEGIT 



No Stan^-Fint Prodac- 

tion Will Be on 

Oct. 6 



London, Sept. 7. 

Sir Alfred Butt i^nd ^. B. Vedtenn 
kove joined f rocoi' aad wil prodveo 
kgitlBMite playt la tko Woot Bad 
<l»o«iac at cbe Qaooa'a Oct « with 
an adaptntion of a French co|iodlF. 

With tliia new ibin the 8t«r lya- 
tern wil give way to all around tMM 
work. Hany firat daaa people kova 
already been engnged. Vodrenn* iHIl 
look after the production end 'oad 
But after bnsiness matters. Ooeor 
Barrett wUl act as their general maa- 
agcr. 



WROTHE IN VAUDEVmUB 



Stirrino Toor Off for Soaaoa— Will 
Do '*Tho JiMitor.'' 



Ed Lee Wrothe, leading comedian 
with Hurtig ft Seamon for acTcral 
seasons, and before that a member of 
the old variety oomlbination of Bickel, 
Wataon and WrotlM, ia to enter 
vaudeville with his comedy akit, "The 
Janitor," playing the Keith time. 'Rie 
aet haa a cast of five. 

M. S. Bentham ia handling Wrothe 
for vaudeville. The deal whereby 
Wrothe was to have starred in the 
legit tills season is off, arrangements 
having been made for a starring tour 
for Wrothe next season under the 
management of Mr. Bentham. 



"RING UP" BAD 



Show at Royalty, Loadoa, Thor- 
oughly Booed. 



London, Sept 7. 

''Riog Up/' at the Royalty Sept 
8, was very disappointing. Described 
as a revue, it is really a collection 
of vaudeville turu& and an unsuc- 
cessful attempt to imitate "The Co- 
Opttmists" without that offering's 
intimacj or talented performers. 

It was thoroughly booed and will 
probably fail. 



POLLOOK CHEERED 



Amorican Author aad His Play Sploa. 
didly Reoelvod In Londoa. 



London, Sept. 7. 

"The Sign on the Door," at the 
Playhouse Sept 1, got a very fine 
reception. 

Gladys Cooper had a big personal 
success. 

Channing Pollock, its American 
author, was greeted with cheers. 



SUBBING FOR DU MAURIER 

London, Sept. 7. 

E. A. Matthews is playing in **I?uU- 
doK Druniniond" at Wyndhanj's dur- 
ing Gerald du Mauricr absence on a 
holiday. 

Matthews sails shortly fi»r New 
Vork to pluy under Dil inghara's man- 
agement. 



RAYMOND AT APOLLO 

Paris, Sept. 7. 
Raymond, tlie illusionist, is (akin;? 
a theatre hero for two uionlhs to 
present a show. Possibly the house 
will be the Apollo aiinoiinced to re- 
open fcfeiit. I) with v.iiideviiie. 



AUTHORESS "BOOED" 

London, Sept. 7. 

Baroness Orczy's "Legion of Hon- 
or," which opened at the Aldwych, 
.\ug. 24, is poor melodrama with con- 
ventional situations and characters, 
high-flown language, some bad acting. 

The nuthore.ss was "booed" at the 
fall of the curtain. 



VOLTERRA'S MUSIC HALL 

Pjris. Sept. 7. 
Leon Voltrrra's new rn'.isi,- hnll 
will i'r(»bably be c.illed Eden and is 
ex;)e<r((l to open ot the end of Sep- 



♦ r'i'»»V»4»»» 



"Threads" Ordlnnry 

London, Sept. 7. 
**Thro;M);." prodtir-r.l ftt St. .liirne's, 
Anjr. L\'5. ;n( v'cd to be a very ortiiiuiiy 

j I'lijy. 

I \ iiinii r»-iMriis fr(i';i [i:ivf)ri r.fter 17 

'.".J-^ l-rcv."' in'.oTi.t. (;t:,;s irs fiirii- 

iy :'i :» f.ii' 'i iM'ttfT- pusifio.) .tixJ b;is 

I t'. ..o u;. lilc ;.!i«".v. Thf p!:i\ x\\v^% 



ROSIE DOLLY HURT 

London, Sept 7. 
Rosle Dolly injured her back dur- 
ing the show Sept. 5 while doing the 
mecluinical doll act with Lupino. She 
was taken to a nursing home, where 
it was announeed the injury was not 
perious. She will be able to reappear 
iu a few dnys. 



"PUSS PUSS" NEAR END 

Ijondon, Sept. 7. 
"Puss Pus.-!," at the Vaudeville, fm- 
ishes itH run Sept. 10 and will be fol- 
lowed by nn extravaganza by Hast- 
ings Turner, with George Graves as 
the star. 

BALLETS AND SKETCHES 

London, Sept. 7. 
Plans are in preparation for a sea- 
son of b-ilot and one act plays at 

the Kii!j;><way. 



SAILINGS 

-■ 't 1<» (I. nil!.,,, to New York). 
!!;! y T(,/.fr (It.-iltid. 



'-•'I'l l'> (Lm;,:.mi f.ir .\'e\v York) 
I'll.. Kin;; ( r. • ' ! i ( ■ I . 



i 



Sf,,*. |'» (i* i,s t'.ir Xew York) 



DEATHS IN ENGLAND 
Lydia Yavorski, Prinee.ss P.aiiatin- 
sky, (in'il at PrinbU.n. Engliind. Sept. 
.1. of an illness contracted from pri- 
vaf (ins endured during tlie war. She 
was rnnnled Ia«t year to John Pol- 
lock, journalist and dramatist, and 
made lier List profesnional sppear- 
nnce nt the Coliseum, London, in 
1!>-J0. 

Henry Dana, general manager for 
Mar!(> Lohr and for 20 years general 
1^1 Mi»;:fr for the late Sir Herbert 
U(»rltoi.n Tree, died luddenly in 
ICt ;;laii(i Sept. 5. 



FAMOUS PLATERS UNSHAKEN - 

BY GOV'T INVESTIGATIOM 

Trading Amusement Comes Tbrq^|^^ Hojirfaiy WltKI 
Pfioe Fum — Obstacles Passed and Traders Look! 
For Bettermeiit— Orpheum Recovers. 



Fluona PfaqFers stodt «une 
throogb lh« tkna-^aj gap Sn bttai- 
neaa over lk« kalMtTi with prkaa 
BBcbanged anUMl ST and tradlBf 
•aatimeat te refartnce U tbe iaaot 
took on a mora eptimistie tone *tbaa 
at uu tima jAboo aarly aumatar. The 
gaMfal view waa that the company 
woold emerga ▼ictorlous from anj in- 

qciiy by the FedenU Trada Gommia- 
aion into cinirgaa of reatrakit of 
trade and thia derelopmeut waa re* 
garded as hafing been thoroughly 
diacoQBtad. 

The other amaacment securities 
praapered duriaf the week, both 
Loew and Orpheoaa morinf into new 
high ground. Loew at 12 and Or- 
pheum at 21 in New York and 2H 
in Chioago. 

The improvcmtnt' in all three is- 
aoee was in part due to tbe general 
advance of the whole list although 
as usual individual circiimstflnces 
plajed some part In the case of 
Famous Players, It appeared from 
the greatly curtailed Tolvme of busi- 
neoo that profaaaional anrket oper- 
ators were leaving the atock free to 
find its own level. From a daify 
tui'fiover of 15»000 to 80,000 aha res 
the average dropped to 0,500 a day, 
presumably repreaeuting the normal 
give and take of buy and aelling of 
the investing and speculating groups 
without any big campaign of manipu- 
lation. 

Shorts Lay Off 

Profesaional shorts had gone aa far 
as they could with the sto<^k and had 
retired defeated. Company inaidera, 
who had been bard preiaed to sus- 
tain prices during the long period up 
to the dividend action and thereafter 
while the propaganda inspired by the 
Trade Commission action waa on, and 
apparently they were glad of a chance 
to rest and take account of their 
position. There was nothing to indi- 
cate that the supporting pool in Fa- 
mous Players waa overloaded and 
disposed to retire. The steadiness 
of prices seemed to reflect a strong 
position in that quarter. 

With volume of aalea normal it 
was plain that the short aide was 
not disposed to renew its pressure, 
at least during the current uptourn. 
The bears liave been pretty well 
beaten all along the line in the laat 
two weeks and for tbe time beiag 
bearish sentiment has switched to the 
bull side. How long the rally will 
last is another matter. Opinion dif- 
fers as to its probable duration, but 
pretty much all views are that it will 
not last more than a week 'nore. 

The majority of traders was as- 
tonished at the firm showing at the 
opening Tuesday. For a year now 
the Monday opening following a week 
of advandng prices hfis been char- 
acterized by a reaction and the mar- 
ket looks for a dip, especially as 
trading had been auapended for two 
sessions. Nevertheless, U. S. Steel 
got above 77 Tuesday; Studebaker 
was better than 76, 10 points better 
than the Tow and Baldwin crossed 81 
and Mexican Petroleum waa a sensa* 
tlonal performer at 112 from its re- 
cent bottom of 84 or thereabouts. 

Reduction Daa 

In spite of these impressive ad- 
vances there are few market obscr- 
ver.s who look for a continued climb. 
'i'h(^y" beiicve thiTt the buige Is due' 
to inside manipnlation and is not 
harked by fundamental improvement 
In the bupinesB Ktrncture of the coun- 
try. A mnscnsus of trading opinion 
of a top this week and then a broad 
would probably siiow the expectation 
of a top this week and then a broad 
reaction to Bomewiiere around low 
levels already established ("a double 
bottom" na the market phrase haa 
it). an»l then n long bidl earapaign 
depending for its duration and extent 
upon tax and tariff IcKiRlation in 
Washington or some other basic 
businesfl imnrovementa. When this 
will start and when it will ctilminate 
is snbjeetfvto widely different belief 
ranging from six months to more 
than a year. 

In epite of this inclination to re- 
gard momentary improvements as in- 
significant there ia an undercurrent 



of balief that many lines of tradi 
are Mghtaning and this is especially 
true of tbe amusement busincttk 

The teOUant opening of the new 
lioew 8tat« on Broadway and ita 
splendid Iproaf^ta aa reffected fro« 
Its very btglw^g are easily diKeern* 
ihle In tba tortnnes of the com;.aBy 
stock. In tht ease of < >ri)heum, re- 
sumption of Inislness at the box ofliti 
and the annooaeement mailed SeHi 
1 to stockholdani of the declaratioa 
of the regnlar diMdend of 50 cents 
on the common and |2 on the pre. 
ferred for the Oct 1 quarter, were 
anfllcient to stop cautious bear seH^ 
ing and encourage new buying. 

The Curb developed nothing new« 
Trading waa at a minimum. 

mary •€ tnuiMeiiotta Sepl^ t 

ve ia %m follow*: 



Th« 



to 7 Inclusive 

STOCK BXOHANaB 

Ttaarsdays — Sales Htrh Liow 
Pam. Py-L..7Me MV^ ftl 

Do. pc aao tl14 UH 

Losw. Ine 1*0 ISH \%% 

Orpliaoiii MO SaiA 19 V 

Boston sold ItO Orpheum 

MM- 

Prlday— 

Fau. PyL..liaa ST% l(U 

!>•. Pf ^tM IIH IlK 

Lmw. Inc....ilM IIM 14 H 

Orpheum tea 10% tS^ 

Boston aold tt Orphafttm at 



T^etChg; 
W%+ % 

t«14-% 

10^+ % 

at \%\% 



MH+1 






1. 



%\ 



Py-L..TSaa it 16% 

pf tee ti% 10% 

Loew. Inc....lSee 11% 11% 

Orphevm ISO U 10% 

Boston sold ti Orptaaam at 
oaaa. lao at 11%. 

THE CTBB 

Thursdays — 8al«a Hlsh \jorm Laat^Chgi 
Ovldwyn tea 1% S% t%-i- 1 



Ml 

•01 

itL 
10%: ^^ 



STAGE HANDS 

(Continued from page 1) 

to run from Sept. 1021, to Sept 4 
1922. The atage handa under fhi 
terms of the new agreement received 
the folowing incre as e s carpenten^ 
electricians and property aaen receiv- 
ing heretofore |45 weokly are U 
receive $55. Grips or extra Ml 
receiving $3ifi5 a performance are tt 
receive $3.75 a show. The hesds el 
departments esrpentera, property 
men and, electricians had aaked far 
$60 a week, and the grips $4.00 • 
performance. The scale Is for eight 
performances weekly, with a provi- 
sion calling for a minimom of $8$ 
weekly The committee representing 
the managera association In the eon- 
ference that resulted In the signing of 
the agreement included Bam H. Har« 
ria, Lee Shubcrt George Broadbyntf 
Henry W. Savage, Wintbrop Amef 
and Abraham Levy. Harry Abbott; 
preaident of the N. Y. local of the 
atage hands Edward Gately and 
Oately and Joaeph L. Magnolia re- 
presented the stage hands. The 
agreement was ratified at n meeting 
of the Theatrical Protective Union 
held last Sunday. 



SHUBERTS AND LOE^ 

(Continued from page 1) 

and the proposed Shubert stands. 

The Shubert pay or play contract 
contains an area dause which makes 
tlie cancellation possible. At the 
lioew headquarters It was Intimated 
similar tactics would be adopted aa 
regards Shubert acts if the present 
attitude was continued. 

Another ang> is the possibility 
that lioew may declare the 44th 
Street and Imperial "opposition," 
which would automatically suspend 
relations between Loew agents and 
the T^hubcrt booking staff. As most 
of the independent agents are af- 
filiated with Loew, the Shuberts 
would be forced to seeure their acta 
by booking or enfranchising a group 
of new agents. 

lyce Shubert is reported as one of 
the largest individua' stoek holders 
in the l^new fironit. When tbe TiOeW 
stock hit 10 during the reeent slump, 
Sbidiert uns said to have ae«nmnlnted 
nn ad.Htionnl 10.000 shares nt that 
fipiire. 

PEGGY O'NEIL^ 

SAVOY THE VTl-':, 

LONDON 

2nd YEAH 



Friday, SepttMnbcr !>, lirJl 



VAUDEVILLE 



SAM A. SCRIBNER REPORTED 

SELLINGCOLUMBIA STOCK 

Holdings Valued at $100,000, With $300,000 Quoted 
As Selling Figure — Friction Among Columbia 
Officers, With Scrihner Standing Alone. 



^ 



The stock held by Hum A. ScclS- 
Sfr of the Columbia Ainusomeut Co. 
and ittf subsidiary corporatious is 
•n market for sale, it was reported 
this week, with Max Spiegel said 
to have bad a price of $300,000 
placed on the Scribner holdinga if 
be cared to buy. The par value of 
Bcribner's Columbia stocks Is said 
to be $1(>0,000. 

With the story of the Scrihner 
stock offer came the tale Hcribner 
was preparing to leave burlesque. He 
Is the general manager of the Col- 
umbia Amusement Co., and has been 
with the organisation since its birth, 

stepping into the executive position 
when liawrence Weber left. At the 
same time J. Herbert Mack- became 
president of the Columbia, a poai- 
tion he ret.iins. It. K. Hynicka of 
Ciaciun.iti is treasurer. 

Following the settlement of the 
open shop movement inaugurated by 
Scribncr, with the unions apparently 
having their way at the finish after 
Tftrbal protests bad been made to 
Bcribner by the influential men of 
the wheel against continuing the 
•pen shop policy to a finish, it is 
•aid the Columbia executives were 
split into two factions. Hcribner 
stood alone as one of the factions 
while lined up against him, accord- 
ing to the story, were Mack, Hy- 
nicka and I. II. Merk. the latter 
the leader of the American Circuit. 

The Columbia Amusement Co. is 
the controlling corporation of nil 
the Columbia properticH. Its cap- 
ital stock is $275,000 with Scribner 
said to hold but a tithe of this 
amount in the parent company, while 
Mack and Hyiiicka with the stock 
holdings of the Slt*gmund Kslate are 
reported as in voting control. The 
Siegmund l^^state is said to be the 
brgest single stock lioldor in the 
Columbia Co. 

To what length the breach would 
extend between the two sides in bur- 
lesque could not be forecast early in 
(Continued on page 11) 



GEO. H. HICKMAN 
KILLED BY ROBBER 



Shot to Death in Office ut 
Palace, Jacksonville, 
During Performance 

Jacksonville, Fla. Hept 7. 

George II. Hickman manager of 
the Palace here was ahot and in- 
stantly killed by a robber Sunday 
night at} 10 in the oflice of the 
theatre. Hickman and Elbert S. 
Harris, treasurer of the house, wer^ 
counting up when the gunman ap- 
peared in the office and demanded 
the money, amounting t« $1,200. 

A desperate battle followed be- 
tween the three men In the small 
office, while 2000 people were watch- 
ing the last performance of the 
vaudeville bill, unconscious that a 
tragedy was being enacted almost 
within sound of their voices. 

Hickman reached fo. his gun in 
a desk drawer when the robber 
closed with him, catching his gun 
hand and shojting him in the left 
cheek near the nose. Death was 
instantaneous, the bullet ransing up- 
ward and coming out the back of the 
head. Harris meantime had his arms 
locked about the gunman's body but 
relinquished his hold when the mur- 
.dcrer twisted loose and ordered him 
\o hold u,) his hands or he would 
kill him. Backing into a corner the 
desperado scooped up $800 from the 
desk and dashed out. 

H«. .>'as captured a few blocks dis- 
til ut and lodged in the county jail 
to prevent lynching by the infuri- 
ated citizens. He gave his name as 
Frank Rollins. 22, mechanic. A 32 
calibre gun was found in his pocket 
in addition to the .noney. He ad- 
mitted his Kuilt after crosj-exam- 
ination by the police. 




FIRST SHOBERT PROGRAM 
PLAYS KURTZ'S. BETHLEHEM. PA. 



-.0|>ei>'?4-~Labo»'. Day — Five Acts, Two Shows Daily — 
Scale 75 Cents To{> — 35 Cents Matinees — Man- 
agement Pleased With Show. 



TWO LOEW AGENTS 

LOSE PRIVILEGE 



-^ 



Decidedly 

Different 

Headlincr 



BIG PANTAGES OFFER 
MADE FOR "SINGLES'' 



Instructions to Pan Offices 

To Engage "Single 

Women" 



Chicago, Sept. 7. 
The Pantages Circuit of vfiiide- 
ville theatres, maintaining its own 
booking offices and working thor- 
oughly independent of any afii lat'on, 
mostly competing with the Ornheum 
Circuit in tJie west and Lo'^^v m the 
south, has issued instructions to its 
bookers to obtain all the headline 
single women of vaudeville who are 
available. It is understood Pantages 
has set the top salary for single 
women at $1,500 weekly, although 
last season it was reported that in 
exceptional instances Pantages made 
larger offers. 

The Pantages proposal is for the 

singles to do three shows daily. 

I When it is felt the headlincr has suf- 

I ficient strength, she will be held over 

two weeks in a house. Nothing has 
eun disclosed whether the customary 



Duffus and Michaels ii; 

"Jam" — Booked Acts 

Into Keeney's 

Two agents holding Ix>ew fran- 
chises were barred from the booking 
privileges of I.»oew office this week 
for booking acts holding Loew con- 
tracts into Keeney's Brooklyn, a 
house in close proximity to Loews' 
Metropolitan, Brooklyn. 

The agents were Ilruce Duffus and 
Joe Michaels. Duffus placed two 
turns, the Artcraft Revue and Ruby 
Ray, in the disputed territory after 
J« N. Dubin had verbally agreed to 
take the acts for Locw. The Loew 
people take the stand tliat Duffus 
took ^vantage of the technicality 
allowed by the verbal arangement to 
book the acts in the competing house. 

Michaels became "jammed" when 
he placed *The Six Whirlwinds" in 
the same house. The act bad been 
routed by the I^ew office under an- 
other name. When the "hide away" 
was brought to the attention of the 
lioew office, they cancelled the time 
held by the turn and revoked Mi- 
chael's franchise. 



,_L - —3 



IJethlehem, Pa., Sept. 7. 

The first regular Sbubert vaudeville 
program opened here [jabor Day at 
the Kurtz theatre, W. II. Ileiberger, 
nianuger. The show plays two per- 
formances daily but the house is not 
considered ns a part of the regular 
Shubcrt circuit. It is used more by 
the Shuberts as a break-in theatre and 
is the only Shubert-booked vaudeville 
with a split -week policy. 

The running order of the first half 
program was Jolly Johnny Jones, Har- 
per and Blanks, Frances Renault, 
Three Chums, Ziegler Twins. The 
management exprcHsed itself as well 
satistied with the show. It plnys for 
75 cents top at night and 35 cents at 
matinees. 

Mr. Ileiberger said he had sent a 
wire to the Shubert booking oflSce con- 
gratulating it on the first bill sent in 
before the regular circuit opened. 

The last half bill this week baa 
so far James Tliornton, Althoff Bis- 
ters. The Rials, Libby and Sparrow. 

The Kurtx seats 1.300. 

Arthur Klein, the Shuberts' vaude- 
ville booking manager, when asked 
this week if his office intended supply- 
ing outside theatres with bills, said 
that while the Shuberts had received a 
large number of applications, nacA 
would be given attention until aftvr 
Shnbert's own circuit had thoroughly 

started. 

— ^ 



The deceased manager has been^ 
•'uiploycd by t]\e Lynch Knterprises j 5 

./t«-ur «TT^r*. «^«m *«^^ /v/n/. 1 fl'''- ^^^^'''fV''^?" and . was one f I policy of Pantages acta to play four 
•OPEN SHOP' COST $200,000. ^^''•r'nost highly rega»ced managers, i^ five shows on Saturdays and Sun- 
He but recenfly regained his health days, in the northwest and on the 
after be.ng incapacitated for a num- ,.oast. becomes a part of the special 
ber of weeks by a stroke of para- contract. 
'y^^^- ' The first singles approached after 



The recent "open shop" contro- 
versy between the burlesque inter- 
ests and the st^ge hands and musi- 
cians, is reported to have cost the 
burlesque people in the neighbor- 
hood of $li()0.(»(K). The guards I'.Rcd 
by the burlesque people to protect the 
niovemcntM of the shows' req»)ire- 
meuts to their opening points dur- 
ing the two woelvrf |)rior to the set- 
tlnu;«nt are said to have cost .$0.00(1. 
Publicity expenses incurred by the 
burlesque maaagprs are reported at 
$0,000. The cost of paying off the 
non-union house .stage crews and mu- 

^cinn.s and traveling show crews, 
wljich were given two weeks* pay ami 
diwuisaed. are reported at approxi- 
mately $ir»0.000. Incidental expenses 
caused by the strike are said to have 
totaled .51.^.000. 

The Columhin producers were each 
assesed $1,000. 

Neither the American Wheel nor 
any of the American producers con- 
tributed any money to the burlesque 
"open shop" war clieat. This was 
•greed upon prior to the Anieric.in 
entering the "open shop" light, the 

-VoI;in,hi;i ,,vapie hKtct-iitg {c, stand 
the expense of the battle with the 
unions. 



Ihc Palace IS one of the Lynch , the receipt of the orders here were 
string of vaudevdle Southern houses Kne Samuels and Nan Halpcrin. The 
booked through the Keith office by Samuels proffer developed into a 
.Jule Dehnar. The house wes dsrk I contract that has become a matter 
^loml.iy ns a mark of respect for „f rontroversy with the Keith-Or- 
the dead manager. The body was i,he.un ('ircuit.-J. Mish Halpcrin i;s 
removed to Ilichmond, to the Hick- with "The Midnight llouiwlers." 



niau residence, for burial. 



STAFFORD KILLED 



Daring Aeronaut Drops 1,200 Feet to 
Death at Hoosao Fair. 



Pui)tag< s is understood to have 
made an effort to secure single i)ic- 
ture stars as attractions over h's 
time.. The picture people are cither 
to ninke a |)ersonal apj;carance or do 
an a<t. In the latter event they 
were to receive doultlc the salary 
asked for a i)ersonal appi'arance. 



RUTH SIGNED 



HEAVY ON "1922' 



Two Shows In Toronto This Week 
Have It in Titles 



Tito Star, Toronto. T>laying stock 
this season, nnnounccs its current at 
j^raetion ns 'How Do You l)>. 10J2." 
The Columbia wheel hous«». (be Ciiy- 

l.Vo*. !'.'''' •^"""'^ *'^- Cooper's -llello. 
l.»22." ns tiio week's ul tra.-tion. 



COLORED VAUDEVILLE 

The Regent. Baltimore, started 
*ol'>red vaudeville this week play- 
Ing bvp folor.d actH on a split week. 

•'•>•• liouse wbirli i;* owned by ('. 
^ HorMstein is seruring its bills 
«fou-h ti„. j.„.k Mnior office. 



IJoston, Sept. 7. 

Kiigene \. Stafford, the most dar- 
ing membor of the entire Stafford 
family of aeronauts, was killed f.a- 
bor Day by a 1.200 foot fall at the Baseball's Attraction Reported Re- 
lloosac Valley Fair (jrounds at North 1 ceiving $2,300 on Big Time 

Adams, Mass.. when his parachutes ! — - 

failed him. one failing to oj»en aJid The signature of P.;ibe Unth to a 
the other failing to stand the HMnin ' vaudeville agreement lia« been reiort- 
(►f a late openiuff. He landed on ; p,i ^vith the Keith o(li« e. accordiTig to 
rocks and every bone In his body was i t|„. report. baviiiR >aiil it would play 
broken. (|,f. ^(.,r of baseball at the concliixion 

In 1012 his cousin, Lawrence Staf- 




EDWARD MILLER 

Late Feature of "Passing Show of 1019" 

IN A SCNG CYCLE 

Artistic Direction LOU SILVERS. I'.usiness DiierfioM LEO FITZGERALD 



ford, was klled in a parachtite ju:r.|t 
near P.oston. and Camille Stafford, 
his aunt, w.is killed a few years a;,'o 
by a fall from n balloon while pr''- 
parin:; to nmke a fair ground jump. 
ills brother is president of the Slaf 
ford .\nui'<on)pnt Co. of Hoston. 



HUSSEY-SHUBERT ACT 

.TiiMiny Hiis-;ey will become a Sbu- 
bert vaiulevile aet, continuing nn«ler 
the contract held by him for a Shu- 
bert |)rodiictioii. 

Afler leavinij the Century roof 
show, Hii'^seT nprdied to the Keith 
oirn-e for booluncs and was given an 
opening date, it w.ts said. Tbe Shu- 
!)erts objected, threatening llnssey 
witlj legnl f>rore(>dings if he attempted 
to [ila.v elsewliere. 

Iliissey will do hl» boiing ^<euc as 
I an act. 



of tiir diamond season. ;:ivinK him .$-.- 
.'"»00 a week. An act is being pre- 
pared at present for tiie baftinjj 
l*.ab«'. Last ^.nmme|• when Uuth's 
name was |»r(»pose<| to tlse bi^ timei-s. 
it WPS rejected aff«r a c uiference of 
tl>e booking tnaT);i>jers. with the Pal- 
;;ry ;ix!<««f| said .".t the tiin;' to ba^'c 
lierti the canyf. The same arnoiiTit 
\\!tv thfii demjir.ded. 

.limmy Dnnedin p.-fed r'.'^ Kiith's 
Mpciit in tlie present negotiations. 



BOOKING MIX-UP 

Pantages and Keith Offices Claim 
Rae Samuels 

A tliree-sidcd conlioversy brlwej-n 

Kae Samuels, Pantages <'ircuit and 

the Keith olTiee w::s broM}»ht before 
til" manager.i' association this wcI: 
f'M ;rii/if ratiov.. 



the matt T was simfdy a case of an 
offi'r made and reject e<l. 

Asl^erl .'.bout a report that Forklna 
or .Mis.s Saminds had delivered bill- 
ing aiifl jdjotographs to the local Pan 
ofhee, W.ilter Ki»('fe saitl they had 
not. 

In rci opse to further questi lUB 
Keefe intimated the matter laid be- 
fore the as.Hocint ion was to nettle 



PRIZES FOR GOLF 

Chicaqo. .Sopt. 7. 

The Miiw.mkee .Toiirnal «.ffered 
jrold medals to the \Niiiners of a llien- 
tii-al nolf tournament in which oil' 
pe-formers jdaying in that city were 
eligible to romiiete. 

The runners up were Mike ('os< ia 
(CoHcia and Verdi > Al Kanh (P.ris- 
roe and Uauh) and Al Woblman. 



wbiti^cr Forkins liad the authority to 
A'TTd.'ng to the principals, P:»i»- | ,„.j,,,,jt,,,,. f.,r Mi«H Samuels out.side 

tales' l„cal representative mode n . ,^f ^,,^. j^^^.j^,, ^^-^^ 

veilml arraM;;ement with Miss Sam- 

neis for a Pftn route. Marty Forkin.s. 

an agent and Miss Samuels* husband. 

meanwhile bad se( ur«'d a Keith and 

DiplMMin route siid to have been 

■Sl.'ioO a week. 

; Pan accepted the tentative terms 
! by wire and the contracts were mailed 

to ?.IisH Sanniels by the lltin Circuit. 

Miss Samuels thereupon notified the 

local Pan ofTice she had signed with 
I the Keith and Orpheum peofde. 

Pniitages countered with a c>m- 

■ plait t to the association, contendins 

irior verbal Agreement and asliinj 

tli.1t Miss SamiielM be held to it. "^I'l) 

to Wednesdsy t)te nssocintion had not 

lendered a decision, .Ml |)arties con 

Cirned seemed reticent to discuss the 

uiii up, with Forkins ontending that 



ETHEL LEVEY AT $3,000 

Kiliel Levey will not open her 

forlhcomiuK Amerie;in four in the 
!!;;dd!e 'veut n>* nveviouslv repo! ted, 
but will start at K'itli's. \V tshinRfon. 
Nov. H Mis-: Lovev's r"tur?i b(»ok- 
injjs fMi tlie Keith lime emt)r.?c" 20 
weeks. .She is repoiI'MJ r">'eivinjj 
.Sr».(K)0 weeKly. M S r."nt!>,i:n ar- 
ranged the eiiyas M'.ri.l •< 

•FLORA DORA' IN VAUD3 

The S'liili.-riH placed a road com- 
pany of "I'Iorad>r i" i»i rehearsal 
Tuesday. In .iddition to the regular 
company the Shuberts are preparing 
a tabloid version of the piece (o( 
vaudeville, . > j 

I I (II 



VAUDEVILLE 



Friday, Seplembtr 9, V)Ji 



WELFARE LEAGUE OF SING SING 
APPRECIATIVE OF VOLUNTEERS 

Requests Variety to Express Gratitude Through Tem- 
porary Suspension of "Sing Sing Bulletins- 
Regular Friday Night Perfornianees. 



Ofsir.ing, N. T., Sept. 7. 

'rhroi]);h tlic temporary suspension 
r>f tlio "SiD^ Sins RullftJu," the of- 
firi;;! publication of the local institu- 
tion, 1 1)0 Mutual "NVolfiire League has 
n;ciiioslr(l Vuriily that pending the ro- 
Ntiiiiittioii 01 (!ic iiiisuu's paper, it will 
pu'oiisli ill-know IcdguionlH to the art- 
iuls wlio voluntarily appear here eafli 
Fiidwy ni^Thr. for the auiuseme'.U of 
ihi' p^^'^):)(M•s. 

\ ;ui«'t.v aprepd to print the ap- 
pr.' iutivr' coninient and Edward T. 
lAiirh, tliirotor of entertairiUjent for 
thi' Ii<':»^np here. submitH the follow- 
in;; on i!.«' porformnniT of last Friday 
•'vrn;t»g: 

Vod-/-Vil at Sii:g Sing Prison 

'J'iif Knterlainment Department of 
Mi(- .Miiiiial Welfare League of Sing 
Sin« Piison wisheii to express its 
hiMtiuK };ratitude to the members of 
the tlicatric-iil profession for their 
kitfdin'ss in the past. We sincerely 
lu.jM' and trust that they will continue 
ilu'ir pcrfornianoeB as they have here- 

1 ofol'l*. 



No one factor has been greater than 
the stage and the silver sheet, fn 
bringing a fay of sunshine into the 
lives of the "men in gray behind the 
walls." 

Through the generosity of Messrs. 
Briggs & O'Netl of the Victoria the- 
atre, as well as the artists, we again 
had another pleasant evening on Fri- 
day. Sept. iJd. 

The first act was Hart and Francis, 
novelty jugglers. Uolh men performed 
exceptionally well in thfir juggling of 
straw hats and aeroplane hoops. 

The second act was Dorothy Dahl 
in "Artistic Nonsense," Mitis Dahl 
has a very pleasing voice. She sang 
a number of original songs and gave 
an imitation of a "flapper" at a movie 
show. 

Both acts played to a capacity 
house of 1,100 and were exceptionally 
well received. 

We finished the evening's program 
with Priscilla Dean in •'Reputation." 
a very good Universal feature. ri*Ro] in 
Comedy and the Internationa? News. 




FOREIGN ACT ARRIVING HERE 
TO ESTABLISH ORIGINALITY 

^. T. Selbit Claims ' SaHing*Th^inygh"-Woinrri^t=rj^^^^^ 
leges Coldin Doing ''Copy Aet" — Chesterfield 
Renders Odd Decision — Keith and Shubert Clash. 



JACK NORTON 

''BUBBLES" 

Latt Star of Tfo-Flo." Sopt. 5, St. 
Uouls: Sopt. 12, Memphis; Sept. 19, 
Now Orleans. 



4CT BOOKED 4 YRS.; 
$750,000 INVOLVED 

Casey Agency Closes Rec^ 
ord Deal for Singei^'^s 



Midgets 








The booking of the Singer Midgets 
for a four years tour of the Keith 
end Orpheum Circuits by the Pat 
Casey Agency, represents the larg- 
est individual vaudeville contract 
ever negoiiat*»d in Ameiicav The 

' Ringer a«t opened at Keith's Indi- 
anapolis this week, with bookings to 

, follow on the Keith and Orph*«uni 

I riiiie that will keep tUem busy i:ntil 
l<)i:5. 

The gross amount of moncv that 
the Singer act will n'coive umle.* 
the contract approxiuiatcs ^liTwtj.ODO. 
A. contract of these proportions ap- 
pears significant in the Mght of an 
announcement by British vaud«*ville 
Linnagers recently that they would 

; make no engagements for a period 

, exceeding one year. 



This week will see P. T. Selbit in 
New York, cominf here from England 
to cstabllsli, as he . says, bis creative 
right to the act known as "Sawing 
Through a Woman." Selbit allegea 
that Horace Ooldin, who is doing a 
similar turn called "Sawing a Woman 
in Half" is using a "copy" of hi» 
origination. 

Selbit held a contract for Shubert 
vaudeville with his magical novelty. 
Upon Ooldin producing a similar act 
the Shnberts cancelled upon th<« 
ground Selbit had agreed to furnish 
a new act, whereas he would have t) 
follow Goldin who was then appear- 
ing on the Keith time. Goldin is 
said to have received Keith bookings 
after it became known Selbit had 
been engaged by the Shubcrts. Upon 
Selbit being informed in T^ondon of 
the cancellation, he replied he would 
bring his novelty over here anyway 
and at the same time make food his 



assertion he had created the "Sawing 
Woman" illusion. Some years ago 
Selbit was the originator of "SpU'it 
Paintings" and presented the turn at 
Uammerstein's Victoria, New York. 

Selbit. who says he is a member 
of the National Vaudeville A.listi in 
New York, of which smiety (Joldin is 
also a member, filed n complaint with 
the N. V. A. against Coldin, claiming 
a copy act infringement. Henry 
Chesterfield, secretary of the society, 
says the matter was threshed out and 
Cioldin awaidpd priority rights to the 
illusion on the ground Goldin was the 
first to* perform it in this country. 
A.sked what inve-^'tigation was made 
a»- to Selbit's claim of origination, 
Chesterfield replied that pha<ie of the 
dispute had not been gone into. 

It ia possible that shortly after Sel- 
bit reaches New York he will give a 
private demonstration of the "Saw- 
ing" trick. 



SPORTS 



TECK IRIS 

MURDOCK and KENNEDY 

LATE FEATURES FROM MUSICAL COMEDY 
Now Playino the Paataiet Clreait 
Jiie MinneapoliH TRIBL-NF/' said: "MURDOCK AND KENNEDY, 

):itc stn's of musical comedy, prove the biggest hit of the entire bill. 
I loth of these eutrrtainers are favored with immensely pleasing person- 
iilitirs and they romp through several songs and dances in big time style." 
Vaudeville tour direettoa EDDIE RILEY. 



ACTOR CHARGED 

WITH KILLING 



Harry Bacheldcr, Club 

Entertainer of Phila., 

Arrested 



'AUDIENCE ACTS'' 

MEMBERS CLINCH 

Stiin Stanley Tries lo 

Punch Charley 

Granese 

Th<' controversy between "audi- 
rii«««' a<ts broke out afresh Monday 
aftt'rnoou at Keith's Alhambra when 
Stan Stanley waited in the tirs:t en- 
trance after the completion of the 

Jean iivanoso act and took a i<^Mich 
at t'harlry <traneso, one of the iriaK* 
members of his ^ister'^ turn who 
raalies an "audience" entrance. 

Tlic <iran«*so act Ikad been added to 
the bill at the last moment to replace 
HoiiH> and (Jaut >\lio were ill. Stan- 
Iry was on the projjram in fourth po- 
riljon u;i^ ixxt lo closing and did ex- 
• cjf ionall} well at the matinee. 

Mon<l:i,v night t!)e turns remained 
i?i the .s:itp." positions with no further 
d;rMM»'iic<s rrpoi'leil. 



a sketch in which Mitchell Lewis is 
to appear. The Shuberts have been 
negotiating with Mr. Lewis to pre- 
sent his playlet on their circuit. 



PAUL MORTON IN EEVUE 

Paul Morton (Morton and Naomi 
Glass) will head a new tabloid musi- 
cal comedy called "The Love Hunter" 
written by Alan Brooks and produced 
by George Choos. Sam Ilearn wrotp 
th#» music. 

The cast in'"ludcs four men and 
thrre women. 

Miss Glass will not appear in the 
turn. 



FOR ROSE COGHLAN 

Rose Coghlan will re-enter vaufje- 
\ill<» for the coming season. Lewis 
& (iordon have secured a sketch in 
which i*he will start rehearsals short- 
ly. 



HART'S BIO TWO 

Presenting Gcarce Walsh and Char* 
lotte Walker In Sketches. 



Joseph liart has placed George 
"W'llsh. tlie pi. ture star, and Char- 
lotte iValker under contract and will 
pre-oMf tlieni in vaudeville in 
tl(ct<hes. 

1'he Walker vehicle is to be en- 
titled "His Affinity' and will have 
four people, while the Walsh act is 
lo be 'The Killer," also with a four- 
people cast Albert Cowlrs is the 
author of both playlets. 

The same author has also written 



MARRIAGES 

Virginia Lee, Ajllage Follies, to 
Carl Stedmnn ^^^leeler, non-profeg- 
.•'ional, Boston, Aug. 3L 

Genevieve Provost to Joseph Brail- 
Ipy, Sept. 1, in Youugstown. Ohio. 
Both arc members of the Santos and 
UaycH Ucvue. Adele Ritchie to Saul 
Afnryhal!, with the act, were married 
ut liie same tiine. 

Mjidolino Biehcrs, former 'Tlnra- 
<l<'iii'' Kirl (the revival) to liana 
Stenjcel. the cnrtooni^t. They are liv- 
Ii)!,' ill Woodstock, N. y. 

Alan Brooks, by the Sl)ubert«», to be 
starred in a new play entitled "The 
nangrrous Man," by A. Washington 
IV/et. 

Gladys Cahlwell. prima donna, with 
the new Al. Jolson show. 

Fred Ililebrand, to be featured in 
"The Rose Girl" (Shubcrts), Louis 
Simon and Shep Camp also re-en- 
gaged. 

Warner Gault replaces Warren 
JackKon in "The Broadway Wbirl" 
at the Illinois, Chicago. 



Camden, N. J., Sept. 7. 

Harry Bachelder, well kuewu ia 

Philadelphia as a blackface comedian 

and dub entertainer, was arrested in 

Tuckaboe near Atlantic City Aug. 30, 
charged with the mortal shooting of 
Constable William F. Cramer of Cam' 
den. 

Cramer went to Tuckaboe, where 
Backelder runs a bathing beach to 
serve a writ of replevin and to oeize 
an automobile owne<I by Bachelder, in 
satisfaction of a judgment for |20 and 
$20 court costs. 

It is alleged that Bachelder warned 
Cramer not to come near him and 
when the officer advanced shot him 
three times. The constable died in 
an Atlantic City hospital the next 
morning. Bachelder gave himself up 
after going to the home of a friend 
in Audubon. The police say he ad- 
mitted the shooting, but declared he 
ilred in self defense, Cramer having 
drawn a pistol. 

Showmen in Philadelphia speak 
well i<{ Bachelder's reputation, lie 
is considered wealthy. 



George Page (Variety! now playing 
centre field for Grccnvile, S. C, in 
the South Atlantic League is burning 
the league up hitting, 318 and fielding 
sensationally. In a recent game be- 
tween Greenville and Charlotte, 
Page climbed a tea-room sign on the 

centre iield fence and balancing him- 
self witJi his right hand, speared a ter- 
rific drive with his left. It was voted 
the mo.^t remarkable catch ever see:i 
in the history of the South Atlantic 
and probably in baseball. Page is a 
graduate of the New York sand lots 
and was the semi-pro Babe Ruth 
with Jeff Tesrau's Bears where he 
hit li> home runs early this season'be- 
fore reporting to Lew Wendell's club 
in the south. It's a pipe that this sen- 
sational youngster will be in a big 
league uniform in 1022. He's the 
best prospect since Rube Oldring 
flashed around the local lots with the 
Murray Hills and Ontarios. 



LIGHTS' LAST SHOW 

The nist show of the season was 
held at the Lights Club, Freeport, L. 
I. Saturday niKht. The bill was sup- 
plied by the Keith office. Leo Morri- 
son handled the stage. 

Those to appear were Sharkey, 
Roth and Witt, Lcipzieg, Lidell and 
Christie and the McCarthy Sisters. 



"Hapa to Die" for Miss Goodrich 
Edna Goodrich will return to 
vaudeville for the coming season. 
Miss Goodrich will do a two-people 
sketch entitled "I Hope to Djf," 
which was recently tried out by Jane 
and Irwin Connelly. 



St^incr and Rose Disolva 
The partnership between Doc Stein- 
er and Max Rose, was dissolved this 
week. They had joined In April with 
ofHces in tAw Romaz Building. 



With an opening that was anything 
but encouraging, tbe Saratoga Racing 
Association closed its mid-sumroei 
race meeting at the Spa last week in 
a blaze of glory. The attendance at 
the Spa the first two weeks was not 
up to expectations, but the crowds in- 
erased the latter half of the season 
and pleased the racing officials. The 
meetinf was soccesaful in all ways. 
President B. T. Wilson declared. The 
efficient policing of tbe Pinkerton 
agency was commended on all hands 
by turf patrons, Captain Duhane com- 
ing in for a large share of the praise. 
Early in the season the Pinkertons 
made a drive on suapidous characters 
and drove 50 pickpockets out of town. 
But two arre^Tts were made at the 
track, "dips" being nabbed on both 
occasions before they had a chance to 
"operate." Morvlch was crowned the 
champion of the year when he handily 
won the rich Hopeful stake from a 
big field, the value to the winner be- 
ing $34,000. The champion, which has 
won nine straight races, is owned by 
Benjamin Block and is the first horse 
he has ever owned. Block, a gener- 
ous sportsman, is reported to have 
given half of the purse away. John- 
son, who rode Morvich, was given $3,- 
000 and Trainer Burrell received 
$10,000 from Mr. Blocl% it is said. 
Maxie Hirsch, the trainer^ drew down 
a commission of |3.0(X> on Morvlch's 
victory. Much of the succes!^ of the 
Spa meeting was due to the efforts of 
Chris Fitzgerald, who handled the 
publicity. Fitz instituted an innova- 
tion In the press stand this season by 
writing a story on the repnlts of the 
day's big races, together with the list 
of the celebrities in attendance, and 
passing the "copy" to the turf writers 
before the last race was run. Tliis 
"copy" greatly aided the writers, 
especially the paragraphcrs. Fits Is 
also handling the publicity for the Bel- 
mont meet. 



According to Jtsa Willard, the de- 
lay in setting a definite date for a 
match between him and Jack Dempsey 
is due to the latter's hesitation lo 
signing a contract While In Tope- 



ka the ez-ehampion stateil that he 
was already training for tl»# pro<ip^. 
tive fight and will sea e his present 
weight, 2<K> pounds, down to 238. his 
weight when he lost the chamnionship 
to Dempsey in Toledo in 1910. He 
said, "I am doing about three miles 
of road work daily and besides thin 
some gym work. I have been doing 
a lot of Outdoor work on the farm 
this summer and am in ])retty good 
shape right now. I am trimming off 
c.bout a pound a day." He also said 
that he was in constant communica- 
tion with Tex Rickard and Ray Arch- 
er, Willard's former manager, and de- 
nied that the dc ay in fixing a date 
for the fight was due to any doubt 
KiVkard might have as to Willard's 
condition. "Rickard knows that I 
am in pretty good shape light now, 
and that I can be foUy prepared for 
a fight within a few months," he de- 
clared. "The delay is dne to getting 
Dempsey to sign on the dotted line. 
Once Jack comes across with a con- 
tract business will pick up." 

Boxing received another setback in 
Albany Tuesday night when Referee 
Claude Tibbita declared a "no con- 
test" in the seventh round of the bout 
scheduled for 12 between Barney 
Adair and Mickey Donley at the Chad- 
wick baseball park. Donley refused 
to fight and the fiasco sickened the 
.\lbany fans, many of whom left the 
park before the referee halted the af- 
fair. To Adair's creilit it must be said 
that he was willing to fight, but Don- 
ley was content to stall through the 
mill. At the termination of the sixth 
round. Referee Tibbitts warned both 
men that if they did not show more 
fight in the next session he would st'»n 
the bout. The fighters failed to heed, 
the official's warning, and he sent them 
to their corners before the seventh 
round was a minute old. The fans 
filed out of the park <lisgusted. In a 
slashing semi-final of ten rounds. Red 
Mack received the judge's award over 
Lefty Pierce for the lightweight cham- 
pionship of Albany. 



Christy Matthewson went into Sar- 
anac vil'age for a haircut last week — 
the first time "Big Six" had been 
there since he was taken north as a 
sufferer from tuberculosis. The fa- 
mous pitcher looked "all to the 
merry" from a physical point of 
view. He strolled around a little and 
was even allowed to watch a few in- 
ningR of an amateur ball game. Hi!* 
delight at that can well be imagined. 
Matty has his heart set on a fishing 
trip, which is almost as near and dear 
to him as a battle on the diamond. 
If his condition continues to improve 
his wish will probably be fu'filled. 



"When Dreams Come True," the 
speed boat owned by John Contts, 
won tbe annual five-mi'e race held 
by the Lake Hopatcong Tacbt Club 
last Saturday. "Paddy," owned by 
Bert Baker, was also one of the en- 
tries but did not finish In the money. 



Mille Cade, Danish champion, ptnrt- 
ed to swim from Albany to New York 
this week. 



Friilay, September 1>, 1021 



V AUDE VI LLR 



SHUBERTS OPENING FIVE HOUSES 

WITH VAUDEVILLE ON SEPT. 19 



<«y- 



Five More Each Week After Until Circuit Is Fully 
Opened — Names of Engaged Acts Withheld— 
Managers For Vaudeville Appointed — Shows Are 
Carrying Own Musical Director. 



Shubert vaudeville ia scheduled to 
get under way beginning Monday, 
Sept. 19 when a unit of five bousea 
on the circuit will throw open their 
doors with Shub«rt Select Vaudeville. 
The houses marked aa the first 
are the 44th Street, New York; the 
Shubert-Crescent, Bro klyn; the Ma- 
jestic, Boston; thi EuHid Ave. O. H., 
Cleveland, and the Academy of Music, 
Baltimore. 

The present plon of T<ee and J. J. 
8hubert is to open five houses 4>n 
each ancceeding Mond:iy Until the en- 
tire circuit if in operation. Of tnc 
theatres that are t> cp'^n SepL 20 
there is but one selected at present, 
the new ImptM'lal at 59th street and 
Seventh avenue, New York. The 
houses listed are the Forest, Phila' 
dclphia; Chescnut St. O. U., in the 
same cky; Woods* Apollo, Chicago. 
Sam S. Shubert, Pittsburgh; Academy 
of Music, Ba1tinf«)re; Sbubert-Bclas- 
co, Washington; Uialto, Newark; 
Capitol, SpringtieM, Mass.; Strand, 
Louisville, and also, according to a 
statement made in the Shubert of- 
fices, houses which tiie firm controls 
in St. T^uis, Kansas City, Buffalo. 
Rochester. Syracuse, IndionapoliH. 



Shubert -B«'lasco, Washington; Wil- 
liam Ma.saud, Strand, Louisville; Al- 
bert Walle, Capitol, Springfield, Mass., 
and C. J. (Jross the Liberty, Dayton, 
O. The Imperial, New York and the 
Apollo, Chicago managers are yet .o 
be named. 

All told there are 15 houses listed 
as those that are to form the open- 
ing stands of the first three weeks. 

The Shubert producing depart- 
ments are engaged in readying the P*.- 
tractions that are to form the big 
features of the entertr.inraent. The 
plan is to have a dran:atic punch at 
the conclusion of the first part of 
each of the bills and a tabloid ver- 
sion of one of the musical comedy 
successes as the conclud ng feature of 
each of the shows which are to travel 
the circuit intacL Each one of the 
organizations is to carry a musical 
director which may obviate the neces- 
sity of the players oppearing for the 
usual Monday morning rehearsal. The 
director will rehearse the orchestras 
in each of the new houses played. 

Standard vaudeville acta are to 
complete the halanoe of the bills. To 
date it is said that upward of 200 
v:uideville turns have b»'en placed un- 
der contract to start at various points 




HUSTON RAY 

"AMERICA'S YOUTHFUL CONCERT PIANIST" 

Re-enoaged a second week at the Strand. New York as concert soloist. 
Next week (Sept. 12) B. F. KEITH'S PALACE, NEW YORK. 

Management HARRY WEBER. Steinway Piano exclusively. 



Toledo, Providence, Toronto ami 
Montreal. 

The in.inagors of the honsos fir-t 
to open will be Sam Tnubor at th- 
44th Street. Frouk L. <;irard at tlic 
ShuberL-Croscent. r.rookt.VH; ('has. 
McCrmtoJ-k, at tiie Haltiniuro Acixl- 
emy, ilniry Taylor for the Majrstu-. 
Boston, and Robert .1. M«La!ij;hlin at 
the Kuril,! AvfniK'. Cievclaiul. 

Mr. M«*LaiiKhliM, in juldition to be- 
ing the manager nf the Clcvoland 
bouse which \h to play Shubort vatido- 
ville, is also inLrn'stiul in the now 
Ohio, tho lOrlanjcr legitimate st.md 
there and holds the framhise direct 
from A. r,. Krlanger. McLaughlin 
bad the Knclid under lea^ie for tlw 
Iftf'L ye:ir takitic ir (.ver in Mav. ini'O. 
*or a stock suniMU'r scas«)n and llien 
I'etaiiiinjT it |,> piny the legiL athac- 
*''"'^ niitil t!i(« u"\y house was v.im- 
plpted. 

OthfM- niaM:»;:(M-s placed f.»r Sholx^rt 
vnii,|,.villr ;,,-.' Whitiakr- Kay at tiie 
'''"'-»niii. n,ila,|ol,,i,ia: Loni> All •- 
*^f>nii for 11,,. Sam S. Sliuhcrt. I'i(t> 
''•"*kIi; Ciiiis (). lJr(»wn. I><'trt»il 
J\' II.. l>.|i(,it; Frank L. S.nith. 
Uialto. Nrwark; Ira J. LaMoUo. 



Bm BERNiP. NOW iJ3USL.MOS3:j5:ttAI!SKI IN 

Will Succeed Frank Fay as Major OPENS IN THE BRONX 
Dome at Relsenweber's. 



Hen I5ernie, the vaudeville violin- 
lug monologiHt will sueeced Frank 
Fay as major domo at Reiuenweber's 
Paradise Room. ■ Fay's contract ex- 
pire.s Sept. 18. The following night 
Rernie will inaugurate his *'Mid- 
night Club" which will hold forth 
from 11 p. m. until 5 a. m. 

Rernie will install a 10 piece baild 
which he will lead and also do bia 
''wise cracking" specialty at inter- 
vals. Several other "names** are be- 
ing angled for with Sally Fields, PL.I 
Raker and Aunt^ Jemima mentioned 

as possibilities. 

More prominent Friars have re- 
served tables for the opening. Rer- 
nie intends playing vaudeville later 
with the band as an added attrac- 
tion. 



KEENEY PAYS BONUS 



Takes Lease of New Bay Ridge From 
Fox Sept. 19. 



along the Shubert circuit as the 
h Mises oj»en ni). Many of these acts 
are now idayin;; other cir<uit«< and a 
number aie with fairs and «)th('r out- 
door amusement i»!aces with their con 
tra<-l» not to start until October. 

The opening hills at all of tlie 
nouscV arc Loin^ k, ,ft- r "-a Kr n<.« 
Shulx'it oruanizatinn. Altliiuijh an 
■dvanco i:c\\ spai'tr ad\ imI i-<in;: cum- 
Itai^n is to he started this Sunday 
n.'i;.' iif tl;.^ mimes <»f the acts will In- 
j;iv(Mi. The news|>ai»cr anI>ounc<>mcnt^^ 
;nc to l)c hut a formal notification 
that tli'> hoti'^es oprninj; nn Sopt. 11> 
are poing to present a <han::e of pol- 
; i( y. Tlif w '-"k foilowiiiK t lie names 
! of the acts ;<n' to be niiide pufdie. 

FOREIGN ACTS ARRIVE 

'I'lie Mmpiess of India, which ar- 
rived here Suri'liiy. l»ronj,'ht over the 

, ;^,;'. rll V ri;;it<iiis and the .t'diaiilivs. 

i wh.i \mI1 l'l;iy 'he K":lli «''m< 'lit. ;iiid 
(ilinr. IimmN- .1 hy liie S'lidjerl-. 

I Torino had .•il>') cn;;.i;;el p l^-.•l^'e 

I I, III fui cd to put in an appearau' e 

j in lime for . :iiliiig. 



Frank Keeney takes over the for- 
mer Fox Ray Ridge, Third Ave. and 
72nd St., Rrooklyn, Sept. 10. Keeney 
wi.l install a seven-act and feature 

picture pop vaudeville policy, bimilar 
to that played ot Keeney's, Rrooklyn. 

The new Keenly acquisition, al- 

tn(»ugh in Rrooklyn, is approximately 
six miles from Keeney's Livii.gstou 
street house. 

Fox had the Ray KIdge until .Tune, 
1022, with Keeney having leased the 
house, following the expiration of the 
Fox lease. Keeney, however, ar- 
ranged for immediate tenancy by 
raying Fox a bonus and taking over 
the Fox lease up to next June. The 
Amalgamated Rooking Office, with 
I.ouis Pincus taking care of the book- 
ing, will supply the new Keeney 
theatre. 



New Pop Vaudeville The- 
atre Seats 3,000 — Fes- 
tivities at Opening 

The Franklin, the new R. S. Moss' 
vaudeville and picture house opened 
Monday night with the usual flare and 
festivities. The new house \k a. ,^,()00 
scater at IGlst streel and Prospect 
avenue, (Rronx) in a densely popu- 
lated neighborhood. It is booked 
through the Keith office. 

In addition to the regular bill of 
six acts the following appeared during 
the evening: Patricola, Sam Ash, 
Ford Sisters and Rand and Van and 
Schenck. The regular program con- 
sisted of The Royal Gaacoynes; Wells, 
Virginia and West; DeWolf Girls; 
Handls and Millis; Jimmy Lucas and 
Dave Harris and Rand. 

The house is a beautiful example of 
modern ^theatre construction with a 
front of light brick and architectural 
terra cotta. The vestibule is 20 feet 
square. 




"OPPOSITION" 



Colonial Preparing to Combat the 
Imperial. 



BROOKLYN HOUSES 

The Majestic and Academy, Rrook- 
lyn, open their Keith Sunday con- 
certs this week Snndoy. Sept. 11. 
John McNally of the Keith office 
will handle the books as usual with 
the policy of eight acts at the Ma- 
jesMc and six at the Academy rc- 
uiaming the same us last season. 



NEW HEIGHTS HOUSE 

I^Iox J. Kramer heads a new cor- 
poation called the Rroadway-Ilamil- 
ton Place To. that will erect a ne'v 
2,'_M'0-seat theatre on the j^quore b'ock 
running from Rroadway to llantilton 
Place and l.'lSth to i:V,)th street, New 
Yiik. 

The Montifiore Hospital former y 
occp.pie<l the site. The policy of the 
theatre has not been announced, but 
i'. will probably be straight pictures. 



CANTOR'S LAND DEAL 

I'Mdie Cantor is now a real estater 
on a lar^^e sca'e. having recently i)ur- 
<hT>ed a 4(M)-acre tra<M on Luke Lu- 
(■t".\o in the .\(lironda«'ks. 

('anlin*, according to report, will 
make tlie Lucerne purchase the nu- 
clei .- <»f a new theatrical sumtncr col- 
oTV. with the bui'.diLg of bungalows 
in time for occtip.nicv next .summer. 



NELLIE DALY RETURNS 

Nellie l>;ily, of tho variety te.im 
of <;n\rr and JJ.aly. a standard Inrn 
fur many yenis will l>rt>ak in a new 
sii.«^l>> Inrn shortly, consisting of 
( !i;n:iifer bits, eccentrie d;uicing and 
>l».\ i;il c(»riie<ly ^<»nK immhcrs, writ- 
ten hv Wil iam K. Meyers. 



Keith's Colonial at ^roadway and 
C2nd street, which opens SSept. 10, 
will have Shubert opposition at the 
Imperial at Seventh avenue and 58th 
street. The Imperial is scheduled to 
open Sept. l'l>. 

The l^olonial will receive special 
attention from the newiy created 
Keith booking committee and will 
start off with an "all comedy" nine- 
act bill. 

According to officials in the Keith 
office it is planned to make the Col- 
onial the ''banner" house of the cir- 
cuit, in so far as strong bi Is are 
concerned. 

The house will be booked by Leo 
Morrison under the personal super- 
vision of I. R, Samuels. 



BdtS. CARROLL APPEALS 

Kstelle Carroll, wife of Harry Car- 
roll, the songwrit<»r, has retained 
Kendler &. (JoUlstein to contest the 
confirnmtion of the referee's opinion 
recoinmend'njj the reduction of Car- 
rol 's alimony from $liO() to .$.^0 a 
week. 

Referee Leighton I-»obdell on turn- 
ing in his findings to .Justice Vernon 
M. Davis stated that Carroll's in- 
come prohibited the $200 alimony and 
.$1,000 counsel fee decree under an 
order signed by .Tusticc Nathan Ri- 
jur, following Carrol. 's appeal from 
the court order. 

House, (Jrossman & Vorhaus ap- 
peared for the uppelunt. 



Mlbs FLO SHERLOCK 

of the SHERLOCK SISTERS AND 
CLINTON 

International Favorites In "Songs, 
Style and Syncopation" 

After returning from a most suc- 
cessful Kuropcun tour we have been 
playing 50 consecutive weeks of Ix>ew 
time; pleasant surroundings, cordial 
treatment and good theatres. Rest 
wishes to Mr. Marcus Loew. 

State Theatre, New York, Now (8-11) 

Direction— MARK LEVY, America, 
nnd HARRY BURNS, Europe 



AN ENGLISH OPINION 
ON AMERICAN ACTS 



90% Dressing and Scen- 
ery — Salaries Keep Best 
Americans at Home 



GOLDIN'S PRESS STUNT 



Two Hundred Film Trailer at Pro- 
logue to Magic Act 



Horace (ioldin in using an innova- 
tion for a vaudevile act, in inf^^rin- 
ing patrons of the different Keith 
housen of his future engagements, 
in the form of a moving picture 
trailer of ap[)roxiniately 2i)0 feet in 
Icugti), whicli ^llows Coldin doing 
some preliminary stutits. wliicli cut 
off just as lie is about to start his 
'SuNNiiig a Woman in Half Trick." 
Carroll Tierce, of the Keith pub- 
licity staff, worked out tin; iMihlicily 
i'lca ft»r (luldin. 



JIMMY DUFFY'S ACT 

.liuimy I ifTy and liis vaudeville . t 
of four ^'iils "The Ilorrow^ of 1:>LM" 
urril ii't'» ill'' "(IiTcnwich \'ill:tge 
]•',.! ir:-;" Tii'-s'L-iy iii.-lil 

DiilTy \\i\\ <io liis \ ;iiiilc\ iilc rut in- 
tact l»iit will not Mi'P'''"' cl.vi'wlirie 
in ll)o i»ri fniiii:ui<p. 

SIX-YEAR-OLD PRODIGY 

Mi-s Mikcc (Jr.il.Miii. a -i.x \«':ir 

(ij'i I'i.ino iniiilii'v I/.iili;!:; ffi.n 

' Miiiii.M|i..li-, li.M ait:»M:;<>'l to tii;il. • a 

, s«Miiv-> i»f I ii'ii' ?■'»!'• !•', (lid-; for I'lC 



CONEY'S MARDI GRAS 

The t'oMcy I<;|and Mar«ii <Jras be- 

gins Monday night (Sei)l. 12} and 

• •outiniics until Sept. IS. There will 

he parades t!ic first live nights, with 

lloai^, etc. A concentrated slaui will 

!,.• u:ade :it the 'lihu' Law.s" by most 

of the Coats and tableaus. Saturday 

aileiiioou (Sept, 17) there will be a 

j liiil'V e.iiii:!:;*' iiarade with prizes for 

I !h" he-t looUirig \ouiigslers. No 

j |i;ira(!c Siiliiiday night. 

j I Iciid'-i si.u's Coney IsI.-jimI will run 

I inidn'iihl sliows duriiig llic Maidi 

j ( ; •■ - \\'<K-. ^howiriij picliii"- for t!i'' 

■ l.it e vt ;i \ cr^. 

ENGAGEMENTS 

j ^^'i!li;ll:l l>.'Miforih, l<>ii(liim < nine<|y 

rule in "IT;..- "..i 'riinc" (' ."^im!!' i t .). 
I .I;iiicl Ad.iir, .\1 .loU'.n .-^liow. 



An English theatrical publication, 
in a lengthy article headed "A Few 
Thoughts on Modern American 
Acts," makes the following comment 
on present-day American vaudetiUi 
importations: 

There is quite a large importa- 
tion of American acts Into this 
country going on again Just now. 
From what we see of the majority 
of them, they will not be able to 
teach our performers much, ei- 
cept, perhaps, sometimes in the 
way of stage dressing and scen- 
ery. In fact, some of these Amer- 
■tan acts appear to be rompouna- 
ed of 00 per cent scenery and 
dressing, which does not leave 
much of a percentage for real tal- 
ent. In the past we have had 
American acts over here which 
have stood out and created sensa- 
tions. They only had to appear to 
make a genuine success. Some- 
timrs, fiow-a-dayn, things of this 
kind will still occur and wben they 
do they are exceedingly welcome. 
On the whole, however, the real 
big acts in America do not seem to 
come over here. Ponsibly we 0« 
not pay the money they get on the 
other side, although it is a matter 
of regret in many qnarters that 
foreign acts can, apparently, al- 
ways command more money in this 
country than can British acts of 
equal or even superior merit. 

According to accounts we re- 
ceive from America, the vogue of 
the net which is practically all 
dressing and scenery is very great 
and. as a result, real talent is not 
being Nliniulated, it if; K.tid, out 
there to the ext<'nt that it form- 
erly was. It is difficult to say 
conscientiously that the present 
American performers are, on tho 
whole, half as Rood as were their 
prcileccssors. Over here, of 

cr)urse, we stand more for talent 
snd less for dressing up, although, 
as a matter of fact, there are mau.v 
IJritish acts that <'an be improved 
I by a little more attention to >;ce:i- 
' ery and staire r-ostume.^. 



ILL AND INJURED 

Illness resulted in lleinice C-am- 
erer of tlie .larvis "Wheel of Mirth" 
on tlie raiii.ii^c-; ciriiiit. b»*in.::» ^-on- 
liued to the |io.-.;.i?;jl for a week dur- 
iu'.' her ."-tiiy in San I'r.'ineisco. She 
WjIs (.uI of the ;i' t hist week uN«», 
ret iii»cr;i( im; li(»iii lo-r ailriicuf. 

l);iui''l .1. IIni i:i«t..ii. a;{«'iit, brol-.cu 
:iriii. iMiw i»'( '(Vci in^,^ 

M.irie h.i,\. with I'.iisi.^'s "Whirl 
i.f Mirtli." ii;;- had to ;;ive up her 
v.itik duo <<» '-> scii'iMs oprration in 
S| ol.;iiie. She is now on her w.iy to 
li.T lioiiie Ml Wayne, K:in. 

•lolin riiilip Sousa, thrown from n 
liiHsc at NoMe. Vt\„ suffered a ^ra'^h in 
the head and r)ihcr .serious injuries. 



rvi^r'/-: 



•*, < - • 



VABIETY'S 8AK FRANCISCO OFFICES 



^att Mtwxtmn 



Friday, September 0, 19J1 ';| 
PANTA0E8 THEATRE BUILDINO 






SAN FRANCISCO SHOWS 



STOPS BUILDING 
THEATRE IN FWSCO 



THE WILL KING CO. 

San Kraovisco. Sept. 7 
^^'•f-H. T-'> j.Jur.v in l^^c.Kf.ii.i; r«Mfu»l.v 
tiiv* Mill- Arthur and prior to Ihnt 
liiiio th<! Yo Liberty, reopcnc<l with 
>\ill King's origiuul i-oiiipaiiy an tbr 
tiUi-u<-liuu. ]{iihitii;»:i uU «lay Suuiid.v 
uiA at uigiit Mus ovcrflovins. Mou- 
•In J foiiud a full downstairs and 
tlirrc-fuiirths baU'Ouy to gioet King':< 
K'turn to Oakland. Although rborr 
wusu't a writing line for the seooDd 
show Monday night is looks iis though 
t'le house will pack thcni in after a 
t\ri>k or two when the Oakhinders 
icaiixe wlrat a show they are receiv- 
ing for their money Price of ad- 
niis.sion is 60 cents including war 
lux. Besides the King show there 
iij a feature pictur*? nnd film news. 

Hollo Oakland" waH the title of 
King's initial Oakland production. 
'I'ho .•settings were beautiful. One of 
u gard«*n site with gi"aH« circles stand - 
iu^ straight ui) in the air some 10 
or 12 feet was especially good for 
applause, de%>pite King uned this at 
the Casino here last season. A 
(■l;orus of 30 pretty girls rival iai( 
Ikis Han Francisco line adds great 
r^trcngth to King's OakIan<l company 
\v>iich has quite a lead in itself by 
King's pre!»ence in the cast. 

The offering for the week although 
devoid of anything connecting it with 
the name was a suitable one for 
ushering in the season. It was a 
typical King production and had 
ntaterial good for continued laughter. 
King and Lew Dunbar as the old 
Ikey Leschinsky and Mike Dooley, 
respectively, did the delivering in the 
i>inches and earned strong approval. 
King's enlranoe on the stage after 
the opening number by the girls 
brought a litt'c Kpeech front the 
comediau as a token of thanks to 
(taklanders for turning out and was 
taken ho \\ell the applause lasted for 
fully two minutes. All of the prin- 
ripals came in for np[dau^e as they 
n:fide their debut on the Century 
stage. 

ICeece (Jardne^r eontioues as the 
straight man and h«is his old person- 
ality to win him an Ooklaud wel- 
come always. With Jackie Bninea 
the new ingenue he lead a musical 
number. Miss Brunca has a classy 
appearance for her new part biit tlie 
absence of Glair Starr will no doubt 
be felt. She seemed to win with a 
Kpoiialty song. 

Will flayer remains as character 
man and for the first time in months 
he appeared ah plain Will Kayers 
working in straight as one of the 
lovers in tlie play. Incidently. 

leading one of the numbers Hayes 
displayed a fini? voice more of a li^ht 
bans yet somewhat false, Singin<L 
"Moonlight'' he scored a well carurJl 
hit oud now that the ice is broken 
will probably do some singing right 
along. 

(larret Price who joined the Ain 
Farnciftco comp.Huy a week bA)re 
us juvenile was.switchr>(l to Oakiund 
and displayed a nice voice. Ucssio 
Hill as the soubrete and Honora 
llauiilton doing characters- look as 
ROO(V as they did last season and held 
u|> with H<*me fine work. 

As in his San Fran.'i^'co appear- 
ance Diero carried away the applause 
)\t. of the evening. He went <»ver 
tremeudously with a few selection;-» 
on Iiis piano flfTo^dion. "* 

'Hie poMen (Jote Four. King's nifty 
<inartet. still know how to harnionizt- 
well and aidcti jreotly in several of 
Hie numbers, Dorothy Neville easily 
Jan off with the singing honors of 
the evening dsplaying an exi-olleur 
voice for light ojteru nunibers both 
in IJnglish and Italian. Little (irace 
Astor and Alnni Holloway look good 
in a specialty dance :is does Alms 
Asiov singing 'I'm Nobo<ly*s liaby" 
her type of a song. Nell Harding 
is in charge of the numbers. 

Class is written all over the show. 
It is really something entirely new 
foi- Oakland. Fornn'r musical shows 
in that city have Hlway,s been of the 
mediocre type and Inni? never before 
been staged so elaborately as King 
is doing. As soon as the people 
disc'.iver Ihot the house is there to 
stay and when advertising announc- 
ing the opening of the Century its in- 
ereased business is a rertainly to 
climb. Thf music is excellent. Her- 
man King in charge of the orchestra 
is working fine. At the piano he 
given a decided fovor:ibl'» taste. 

The house has heen renovated 
mostly where the old boxes formerly 
were ond on the slji.c:?'. The boxes 
bnvr beep replr^rod !)v glns'< nlnt 

We Cater to the Profossion 



forms for the glr's to dunce on and 
have been arranged so neatly that 
it i«i dicult to dete«t tJieir purpose 
!M>«'i <\ nMiiiber revenls their \ise. 
1 Jic i<lea has been carried out to 
make the house as close to the 
Caiino in San Francisco as possible. 
Lew New«'o:nb, formerly with the 
Casino, commenced as manager of 
the house along with the first King 
j*how. 



Proposed Loew Union S(j. 
May Not Materialize 



FRISCO ITEMS 

Ban Frtudaoo, Sept. 7. 
William Kellner has been manager 
of the Stockton Hippodrome from 
last Sunday, when the musical com- 
edy company aponsored by Max Dill 
opens for a season of stock. 



ORPHEUM, FRISCO 

Sau Francisco, Sept. 7. 

The Orpheum bill this week ran 
through in capital atyle. It held a 
couple of sketches, serious and far- 
cical, and good specialty turns. 

Sarah Padden and Co. had head- 
line space and was the big thing of 
the show. Miss Padden appears to 
better advantage than crer in this 
dramatic playlet which held rapt at- 
tention and was yigorously applauded 
at the close. 

Holdovers occupied the early sec- 
tion. The Marion Morgan Dancera 
opened, n position below their 
deserts. George Ford and Flo Cun- 
ningham, second, landed in good 
shape. William Qibdon and Regina 
Conneli in "The Honeymoon," always 
good for big laughs, re^atered in 
third position 

Edith Clifford with Koy Ingraham 
at the piano, following, was the first 
of the new arrivals to garner a hit. 
Her routine of good lyricill numbers 
was enthusiastici^ly r^ceiyed and her 
her exquisite ermine wraps and her 
gov.ns won admiration. Miss Clifford 
rinnonneed she was the proud mother 
of a little girl who sings surprisingly 
well from an upper box during a cos- 
tume change. 

Franic Forren was received with 
much warmth in fifth spot putting 
over batches of stories, mostly an- 
cient, in clever style. His soused 
saleslady gags at the finish landed 
solidly for a hit. 

Artie Mehlinger and George W. 
Meyer furnished the bright spot in 
the bill next to last, while Clairmont 
P.rothers, with clever ladder work, 
had enough daring to hold in the au- 
dience closing. Josephs. 



HIPP, FRISCO 

San Francisco, Sept. 7. 

The first half bill here had nothing 
big to offer, but made up a pleasing 
small time entertainment. 

Appier and Appier, a mixed couple 
with bench and beach <^rop, offered 
songs with a sprinkling of kidding 
along familiar lines and some danc- 
ing. They opcnetf quite well. 

Itita Shirley has a sweet appear- 
ance, neutly delivered comedy num- 
bers and changed gowns in view of 
the audience, shining particularly 
with a jazz dancing number at the 
finish. She was liked hugely and is 
a comer. 

Burke and Burke offered a messen- 
ger boy talking skit to gooti results, 
getting away big with a dandy finish. 

Frank Shepard, billed alone,' gets 
excellent comedy returns from an 
as.sistant whose silly exprension.s had 
the house howling with laughter. A 



San Fanci.HCO, Sepi. 7.^ 
Construction work on Ix)ew'8 Un- 
ion Square theatre. Post and Pow- 
ell streets, diagonally opposite the j 
St. Francis hotel, will not continue 
when the bur'ders' strike is settled 
here, according to a report about 
town. Despite that ground was 
broken several months ago for the 
erection of a theatre and .office build- 
ing on the site and that ^ans were 
exhibited in several .parts of the city 
it is understood Ackerman-Harris 
(Iioew's western representatives) are 
having new plans drawn up for an 
exclusive office building. 

Everything was in readiness for the 
second new Loew theatre. Another, 
the State, is half through on Market 
and Taylor streets. The fact that 
the Hippodrome runs vandevil'e and 
pictures and that the new State will 
have a similar policy besides the Ca- 
sino's vadeville and musical corned* 

policy are taken as the reasoa for the 
stopping of work on another and al- 
leged unecessary Loew house here. 



LwfPZiJ!!»3i&UlS9IL-U nd mpmbers of her 
"Manly Revue" reoei>'ed gold police 
whistlea appropriate!- engraved from 
the White Plains, N. Y., police de- 
partment duriug their stay at the Ijo- 
cal Orpheum as a token for their 
part in a recent benefit show held 
back east for the "cops." 



George Allen la the Valley 

Sau Francisco. Sept. 7. 
George Allen, formerly assistant 
manager of the Ooaklaod Orpheum 
and later manager of the Salt Lake 
City Orpheum, who was scheduled to 
succeed Manager Harry Cornell in 
Oakland, has been appointed manager 
for the Orpheum Va ley shows at 
Fresno ond Sacramento. 



Wilbur Mack, who has been vaca- 
tioning out this way for several 
months, opens at the San Francisco 
Orpheum Sept. 11. 



Bobby (Uke) Henshaw. the Den- 
ley Sisters. Loring Smith, Natalie 
Du|an and Ed Reese set a precedent 
during their engagement at the 
Seattle Pantages when they mo- 
tored 85 miles up. 



Pete Pinto of Pinto and Boyle 
vialted hero last week on his way 
from New York to Honolulu where 
he will apend a vacation. 



Jack Cook, Oakland newspaper- 
man, formerly press agent for the 
Orpheum, Ls the press agent for the 
new CenTury in Oakland. Wood 
Soanes ia handling the Orpheum 
news. 



FEATURE FILMS FlU 
3 LEGIT HOUSES 

Curran, Columbia and 
Savoy Playing Feature 

Pictures '. 

'Rl 

Sau Fancisco. Sept. 7. 

The Curran reopened Saturday as 
the I'entury with Fox's "Queen of 
j Sheba" film. The original plans for 
interior decorations were temporarily 
abandoned due to strike eonditions 
and booking contracts. The first 
road attraction ia scheduled for the 
latter part of October. 

**Quo Vadia" picture, opened Mon- 
day at the Savoy, dark since the fail, 
ure of the McCarry musical comedy 
company. 

"A Connecticut Yankee" opened at 
the Columbia Sunday following "Over 
the Hilt" which was eight weeks at 
the Geary street house. 

With the three pictures now ron- 
ning San Francisco lacks a road at- 
traction. 



I 



failed to make an impression mainly 
because they have no material worthy 
of consideration. The woman has 
beauty aud a {iretty gown while her 
partuer looks fre^h and clean and 
gives the impression that he could 
work to good advantage with new- 
goods. They close with uncalled for 
get-away dance and nut song that 
takes the cla.'^s away. 

Two women, both the possessors 

of a jdoasing voit e, a man with a 

good clear baritone voice and a third 

woman who dances exquisitely, are 

Madame Verobell and Co.. fifth on 

the bill. The man should be allowed 

to do' at least one solo; he shares 

a duet with one of the women. His 

voice culls for more than this. The 

danc'ng girl billed as Virginia looks 

! like a million dollars in an Egyptian 

I number and goes better yet with a 

' special number kicking over her head 

I cither frontward or backward. 

I The two final acts w-ere the class. 

Frank Rogers colored is a ventrilo 



Harry Hume who replaced Phil 
Furman with Berlin's local offices » 
few weeks ago haa been the recipient 
of many favorable reports in a local 
musical magazine the past few 
weeks. 

Ed Flannigun of Flannigan and 
Morrison Towered Lynn Cowan's 
9core of 80 in the Orpheum-Spalding 
golf tournament when he hung up a 
new record of 88 for the round. 



Ptrry Maaagiiif Statt, Frisco 

San 1 taii« i.>i'o, Sept. 7. \ 

Eugene L. Perry, manager of the 
Loew State in Oakland, is slated to 
become manager of Loew's State, Saa 
Francisco, now under construction. 
The new theatre will be lioew'i 
largest western house. 

Paul Aah and his orchostra may 
accompany Perry to the new house. 



The Savov theatre, which closed 
after three weeks of Lish musicol i *^'^.""y« ^'<'^**'y 
comedy, reopened Sunday with "Quo 
Vadis," feature picture. 



Levey VauUevllla la Reao ' 

San FrancifTo. Sept. 7. 
The Rialto, Reno. Nevada, will 
commence with a Bert Levey vaude- 
ville policy Sept. 23, using four acta 



«V S.'W.OOO fashion show will feat- 
ure the l^eatrical Mutual Associa- 
tion's 81.st entertainment aud ball to 
be stage<1 at the Civic Auditorium 
Saturday evening, Sept. 3. 



The house is Levey's latest western 
acquisition. 



San Francisco, Sept. 7. 
Mark F. Morris late of the Chicago 
Fred Fisher musig offices now heads 
Fisher's San Fransico headquarters. 
He arrived last week. 



mp GOING BACK 



Chad Rosebrook replaced Sara New- 
man ns leader of the Hippodrome or- 
chestra last week. 



Bill Kohler ia assistant manager 
to Lew Newcomb at the Century. 

Oakland. 



SAKG KILLED 



Reverts to Former Policy — May Ba 
Again Weak Stand 

San Francisco, Sept. 7. 

Business at Loew's (*asino haviog 
fallen short of expectations !*inee its 
opening three weeks ago, Ackerman- 
Harris have decided to reverse the 
house back to its former policy of 
vaudeville, a comedy picture and Will 
King's musical comedy review. At 
present the house is using a f«:uture 
picture — Will King review policy. 

Next Sunday will find the old week- 
ly program in vogue. It is expected 
that with this change the Hitipodroin9 
may soon be back to its original i ol- 
icy of full week vaudeville instead of 



Chinese Female Impersonator Slain ' the present split -wei^k 



kid plant in the audience for card i nui»t of merit. In next to closing 

and magic stunts also figures in the . h« registered a solid hit with a col- 

|.p^,jlf^ , ored dunnny "and a white one on his 

TheKoyal Trio, males with bal- ' J^n^es an I brought .<ome hearty laughs 



nn-in.<; and strong feats on somewhat 
diflfetent apparatus. <'Io.«-ed well. 

Josephs. 

HIPP, FRISCO 



By Unknown Assassins 

San Francisco, Sepf, 7. 
lycon Quie Sang, aged 40, Chiuesn 
theatrical idol known as the Julian 
Eltinge of San Francisco's China- 
town, was murdered Jnst week at his 
apartment near the Chinese theatre. 




The House With n Cdiiscicixe 

III Powell 285 Washlneton 

8an Francisco Portland, Ore. 



in arousing an argument between 

t'neio. To (lose he gives an imitation 

of .'i cit iiis announcer some hundred ] A fusillade of bullets end^'d his life. 

feet a\M:y. i The slayers escaped. 

Artos I)i:p, male bar co:Mi.|nes at- ^ Sang,' a female impersonator, wa% 
tire<l a. clowns have appearance per , ^ „,^„^5^r of the Suev Don Societr, 
. - ,, . I sonnlity. stiowmauship and difficult . , ,, • » * r n. i i /-.l* 

' "I^ ,^ri^T,r^' •^'J'*-,7- ' stunts for a successful showing. They i "'"^ ''[ <'"' 'l'"f.»***t "^ »»»* '^^ 5^^- 
The seeond half bdl at the Hi|»p i <.|n.Kj»d the' show with a strong bit ! ^^^*' tongs, which ns a whole have 
is far from even pleasing. For <he j „£ " j,ppi.,„^p f^^ j]jj.ir <.oniedv and | *>c«*n warring during t»>e last year. 

str.nght efforts of the bars. Neither; For this reason the police first 
talk l-ul: their smiles make up for; thought he wns a victim of some tong 



first time since the Hippodrome's 
opening several years ago when it 
was known as the Gaiety, the theatre 
appears ready for a genrral ov<*r- 
hauling. During the past months tiie 
ho|ise has gradually beeoine a topic 
fur discussion concerning the ragged 
condition of the wall trimmings and 
the seats, some of which have "moun- 
tain peaks" protruding. 

The Stutz brothers, hard working 
gymnasts, opened the vau<leville with 
s(»me new and highly entertaining 



the stillness. 

"Al Souls I''v«>" and a comedy pic 

tare ( oinplet e the bill. 



but since his murder it 



The doing away of the vaudeville 
at the reopening of tlie Cu'iino was 
more or less of an experiment. Had 
Will King and his original compiiny 
remained a different story mi^l t he 
toM. With King and L^'W iMinbar in 
Oakland, the new company did not 
prove the same magnet as the original 
one. 

Sunday will bring another bif 
change at the Casino, Lew Dunb.ir, 
King's opposite, who has heen de- 
lighting local audiences with ii's Irisli 
comedy <lialect for several se.ison", 
will return from Oakland Hud the 
original comp;my to he fer.twietl at 
the head of the new co;ii,»any. He 
replaces Henry Simmer. .Tack Ilus- 



higljbinder- 

has developed he was court'ng the , j,^,, ,,,j„ ,.,.jn„in to ph.v opposite Dun- 
! wife of another man, / y^^^ J^ j^ presumed Russell will work 

in Dutch while Dunbar will continue 
with the Irish charach'r. Further it 
is announced that Dunbar will return 
from the Ontury at a salar.v d<)ablc 



balancing stunts. Th'v show a few i 
difficult strenglh-tesling fenls but 



PANTAGES, FRISCO wAi^rmo ««« «»««,^^mir 

San Kraiicisco. Sept. 7. ! ^ANTS HER FREEDOM 

The Pantages bill gave good satis- ; ^'»n Francisco, Sept. 7. 

faction this week despite the presence • Comparim; her husband with Nat 

in the show of only a coui>1e of the I Goodwin ns having n penchant for 

pretty wives. Mrs. AVilhelmina Go'^- 



fair sex. 



in.r, <'i»»'*"" I''«"^V'' ^"'! "'" ^^T^ ^''V^-l '>*''•' formerly known as Hiliv Deso^a 
, . i. .. . . .• . V P»*"K'">'"<'d next 1o » losing, closed the -„i.__ „ .r.«r„K«.. «* xf..«u \j ^ ..♦ 

lark woefully ni showmanship. AdaKoocmd show Snmh.v. the Italian ' r^*!^.? * l"?"'^'^'^^. ^^"^!^ .^''""'^V 
>Niiamfl 'plugged two .-ongs in hoc- q^,^,,.,,,,,,. ^^^ appe.iring jit this show, " ." 

ond spot and was followed bv decree ^.-.y;.;^ *.. |i,p Ur.-ih of the bill i " ^'^orco pt Wallkuku. Maui, from 
V. llandall Co., a comedy sketch en- i.:,„„,y's clever <hatter and manner of | Harry M. (;esncr, automobile deoler 

putting the dogs through a speedy j of the Hawaiian Islands, 
routine landed solidi.v. ( rcating iu-i Mrs. Gesner is Gesner's fourth 
teresi aud laughs .vurpassing' th<ri wife, having married him in San 



title<l "Mr. Wise" which has a few- 
good lines for laughs furnished by 
Kandall himself. Two other mem- 
bers of the company. Uomh Marslon 
and Kelcey Conboy fail to show up 
well. Miss Marston displayed a ward- 
robe whicli had plenty room for im- 
juovement. Kandall carries tlie act 
f;uillle>^ despite the inrff icieiiey of 
his sui>i»ort. 

(Jenr^je Kred and Aliec T.uey »las- 
sy nripearinif couple, the woman work- 
iiii: (Ml the piano and liie male mem- 
1)( r sing.r.p familiar song-J. They 






A. C. BLUMENTHAL & CO., Inc. 

REALTY BROKERS 



usual dog art. 

Slielton liiooks, with corking ma- 
terial was an easy hit. but the med- 
ley of his own songs coiild be an- 
nounced more emi)hatically. 

Scatni) and jTcanip opened exceed- 
ingly well, the clown injecting some 
regular comedy for biij laughs. 

S.'»n(uc(i w;;s (utnijelled to play 
nuiuereiis cn(ores. slopjiing the Hb<$w 
completely 



thai of his p:( sent. 

The change is cjuite a sacnliee on 

King's part. With Dunbar. King has 

mi.de thousunds of friends in the bay 

bathing girl revue, has filed suit f.,r j •t^'gion- l<'»tl> are well liked. King 

i.s of the belief that Dunbar will put 
the needed punch into his new com- 
pany, and in this respect he is cor- 
rect, as Lew's following numbers sec- 
ond to King alone. 



Francisco in 11)1!) after a whir'.winci 
courtship at a hotel. She said. *'IJe 
simply vamped mc from the start." 



YIDDISH AT SAVOY 

Sau Francisco, Sept. 7. 
Samuel Grossman, leasee of the 
Savoy, has taken over the Uepublic 
in the Fillmore district, 



where he 
(;iis Khiiore and KviImt in second I plans to open with a sound Yiddish 

stock company. 



SPECIALISTS IN THEATRICAL FINANCING. LEAC-iNG 
I CONSTRUCTION IN THE WEST. 

68 SUTTER STREET 

I ^_ 



AND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



spc;, witli (J\is's wil(lin;in foolishness, 
got niany laughs. The girl is cute 
and r<'n(lers valuable assistaiKo in the 
routine including songv. 

"The Hiindii" proved an interest- 
ing sket'h with Edward lirown giv- 
ing an excellent account of himself 
ns the Mexican roLb'T It scored 
Htrongly , Joscphs. 



Opened in "Inspiration' on Coast 

San F^anci^:4'o. Sept. 7. 
Jack IToldon replaced ?:imer (iediles 
with "Inspiration' (.u tlM> Loew cir- 
cuit last week. He opened at the 
Wigwam. . , 



USE BOTTLE AS PLUG 

San Francisco. Sep!. 7. 

Thr* manager of Loew's Stnfe at 
Oakland. Kugene L. IVrry. cuised to 
be distributed all over town last week 
blue medicine bottles carrying a Libel 
advising the people of O.ikland to 
take the State Komrdy. "twice week- 
ly, every week, fait-hfully." 

The '-State Itemedy' was drs< ribed 
as a bi-weekly vis*it. to the Sia'«' »he- 
atre for ''men, women iind « lu'lreii 
who need a pleasant tot.i«-." 

Despite the openitig nf the \^ 'I' 
King company at t!ie ('mtniy. i"^^ 
across from the Stiue. bn-ii'ess ut 
the latter house did not fcufTcr. 



Friday. Septembei* 9, 1921 



VARIETY 



LOEWS STATE CONTINUOUS 
ITH NEW WRINKLE IN SHOWS 

Four Performances Daily With Extra Act in Last 
Show — House Doing Business All tlie T>hh> — - 
Keith Office Reported Keeping Close Tab. 



<^ 



ip 



l^ere i9 a new wrinkle in the ran- 
nioK of the vaudeville at I^ew's 
State, New York, that opened last 
week. The State plays aeven acts, 
givinf four performauceH daily in the 
continuoua showing, haying five acts 
to a show. The final pcrformoDce at 
night Ivas six acts, iu order that all of 
the turns nhall appear three timi's. 
The acts do three shows each, mak- 
ing 21 turns on the day, while five 
acts to n performance would but eqnal 
20 if the odd turn were not tacked 
on to the final performance. 

With pictures filling in the iuteriiu, 
the Htate runs from 11 in the moin- 
in;; until midnight 

The Keith office is reported to have 
had three or four men daily visit the 
£tate since it opened to note the 
business. The State sella numbered 
tickets. The Ketth people through 
purchasing a ticket early in the morn- 
ing and another late at night would 
•have a direct line on the businesii. 
It is said Marcus Loew had his al- 
'tention attracted to this possibility, 
with the .^iug^estion the strip tickets 
be changed about to confuse number 
getterf". Loew, according to tlie 
story, replied there was no need to 
change tickets: if the house did bu'^i- 
ness those outsiders interested might 
as well know the truth, and if it didn't 
do business, he f:aid it would speak 
for itself. The strip ticket sy^t.^m 
remains unchanged. 

The State has dune bi^s.'oess C9»> 
stantly niuce opening, oven during tha 
hot weather of last woek, when near- 
ly all other theatres along Broadway 
soemed to suffer. 

The Ix>ew people profess ignorance 
of whether the State is drawing on 
its show or through curiosity 6t 
amusement seekers over Broadway's 
newest house. Showmen, however, 
unbiased, say the State's scale of 50 
rents at night and 30 cents in tlie 
afternoon is the theatre'a drawing 
headline r. 

No one has made any claims that 
the State had hurt the business of 
any other theatre, including Loew's 
New York, just across the street. It 
has been said, though, since the State 
opened with its 50 cents top, that 
eventually other picture houses in 
Times square might find it expedient 
to trim down their idmiaaion prices 
to successfully compete with the State 
and its split week policy of pop 
vaudeville. 



REPORTED FOX TIMU 
WILL GO TO KEITH'S 



CHAS. HODKINS PUT 
IN CHARGE OF EAST 



Becomes Pantages Per- 
sonal Representative 
This Side of K. C. 



Chicago, Sept. 7. 

The appointment has been made by 
Alexander Pantages, of Charles 
Hodkins, to be rantagcs* personal 
repre!<entative east of Kansas City, 
includiug New York. The represen- 
tation takes in Pantages affiliated 
bookingfi. such as the Miles houses. 

Ilodkinswill headquarter here but 
otherwise it will have no effect upon 
the local Pantages agency, of wliifh 
Jimmie O'Neal is the booking man- 
ager, nor the New York Pan office, 
whore Walter F. Koefe reipns. 

In the general representation llod- 
kins will have authority to adjust 
^ controvorsles and misunderstandings 
i' of nny nature arising on the Pan- 
tajjos time within his jurisdiction. He 
will nlso make inspection tours of the 
Pantages houses and offices within 
his territory. 

Hodkins formerly was an independ- 
ent booking ngont of this city, siip- 
PiJ'ing a string of southern vaudeville 
'[•'"''i^ros that Inter bernme linked with 
tbo Pan rirrult. Hodkins at the time 
'>f fuming over his houses to Pan 
, efff.ftp,! ,,n understanding through 
'fhich he remained with thorn. 



KEITH MANAGERS SWITCH 

Willinm Wright, la^t st.itionod nt 
th'^T ^'"''^^''"'> has boon switrhed to 
\/' •''^'T'^rson as housr manngrr. Tom 
' onnoliy. formerly at the A. Mnr- 
jno'I. jina , onnfMiod with the Sh.i 



Fox Vaudeville Houses 

Said to Be Aimed For 

Keith Agency 

From reports around this - week it 
seemed as though the Fox vaude- 
ville theatres will sooner or later, 
and most likely sooner, be booked 
through the Keith office. To sup- 
port the reports a circumatantial 
story circulated that the members of 
the Fox staff in favor of Keith's 
were outweighing' the inclination of 
William Fox himself to cast the 
bookings with the Shuberts. 

Lee Shubert ia said to have asked 
Mr. Fox for ■ conference early in 
the week to go over the matter 
again. It was also stated the sub- 
ject of the Fox bookings would have 
been concluded last week with the 
Keith office the objective, had not 
E. F. Albee left the city for a few 
days. 



#• 






f - •; 


/• 





NEW YORK FAIRS 



^ 



Agricultural Fairs to Be Held in New York State 
During September, 1921. 



EMPRfiSS, ST. LOUIS, SOLD 

Picture Mea Purchasers Will Con- 
tinue Pantages Vaudeville. 



m. Louis, Sept. 7. 

The Empress (only Pantages house 
in this city) has been leased to the 
Skouras Brothers' Enterprise, which 
now control two of the picture thea- 
tres here as well as a string of 
neighborhood houses. 

Spyros Skouras, president of the 
Skouras Brothers' Enterprise, made 
the announcement ot the lease by his 
firm, and sUted that the Empress 
under the new management would 
continue to present Pantages vaude^ 
ville as in the past, but that there 
will be a feature picture on the pro- 
gram from now on. The Skouras 
brothers also own the Missouri fran- 
chise of First National. 

Skouras' entrance into the vaude- 
ville field was made, he stated, in 
order to protect his picture interests 
from strongly organized competition. 
The new management will taf(e ef- 
fect Sept. 11. . ^ 



KEENE Y '8 BAY RIDGK 



Takes Time of Fox's Brooklyn House 
for This Season. 



Fox's Bay Uidge goea uuder the 
immediate control of Frank A. 
Keeney, who will operate it as a 
split week vaudeville theatre, in con- 
junction with Kceney's Brooklyn. The 
addition gives the Keeney office a 
week and a half around New ^ork. 
with the other Keeney theatre iu 
Newark. 

Some months ago Keeney bought 
the Bay Uidge property, subject to 
Fox's loHfce that had another year to 
rim. In securing the Fox houso, 
Keeney is said to hnve paid Foi a 
bonus and may have ii;;reed to oper- 
ate the Bay Kidpe on sharing terms 
with Fox until the actual expiration 
of the Fox tennacy. 

Koeney will take possession after 
a fliort run iu the house of Fox's 
••Over the Hill" film. 



VAUDEVILLE AT AVON 

Waterfown. X. V.. Sopr. 7. 

The Avon, formerly the City opera 
hou.««e. reopened Monday with a vnu- 
dovillo and !'ict"r'> nolicy to bo fol- 
lowod daily save Snndnys and 
Wodnosd.iy. The Sunday i)ropr.Tms 
will be devoted pxcln.'ively to films. 
Legit nttraftions will ho offered 
Wednesdays whon nv;iil;il)le. Should 
it be possib e to sor-nro iiormission 
from the city nnthoritios, ^n^nloville 
will be nddod to tlio Stuidriy sliows 
later. Cut prices arc offortivo f(»r 
the split policy shows. Adults will 
p:iy 'J'» ront«« rmd rlii (Iron will pay 
11 colli s, w:ir fax incliidod. 

Edwin F. Kiissoil of Ito.ston will 
numago tlio lioiiso. nTnl(T tlio snpcr- 
vi'ion of H. C. S -sonsky of tlio Nova 
Oprrafins Co.. lossoos. 

'Tlio (iroHt Mnnunt." wns tho in- 
itial film foMtiiio tins wook. tin' I>ill 
< li;Mit;iMi; 'I'lrii > l.iv to * r.\iM'ri«'M '•" 



THIS IS 

LEO FLANDERS 

and 

GENEVE BUTLER 

In t "VaiHlevlllo Concert'* 
Another soperlor act which enters 
In « dass with the best. BURT 
CORTELYOU AGENCY booked tbis 
act for a fnll route over the W. V. 
M. A. and B. F. Keith Western Cir- 
cuits. 

(Wateh this space) 



NON-UNION MANNED 
ORCHESTRAS FILLING 



Murat, Indianapolis Legit 
House, Signs Under 
. Protest 



Indianapolis, Sept. 7. 

Rurk'sqiie and vaudeville orchestra 
pits gradually are being manned with 
non-union musiciana. while the movie 
houses are getting along with pipe or- 
gans and pianos, following a walk-out 
of union orchestra members Sunday 
night The old wage scale agreement 
ran out at that time. The union men 
refused to accept a twenty per cent 
lower wage agreement. 

The Murat was running with its 
regular orchestra, having s'gned an 
agreement at the oUl scale under 
protest. This matter, it is under- 
stood, is to be threshed out in New 
York. 

House owners and managers are 
charging that the musicians refused 
to abide by orders from their inter- 
national headquarters in New York 
City that they continue work under 
protest and submit the argument to 
arbitration. The employers declare 
the strikers will not be taken back 
under any circumstances. 

In order tJbat the available supply 
of noD-union musicians might do the 
moat good the movie men agreed to 
let the burlesque and vaudevi^e 
houses reorganize their orchestras 
first. 

The contracts of the stage hands* 
and operators' unions also expired 
last Sunday but both signed new 
agreements, carrying an average wage 
cut of 16 per cent. 

The managers originally stood for 
20 per cent, but made coacosHioDs in 
the <cnd. 



GUARDING ORCHESTHAS 



Fox's 14th St. Theiitres in Strong 
Union Neighborhood. 



The, ma'nageraenc of the two Fox 
hoiiso." on 14ih street aro taking 
still further precautions with the or- 
chestras of their Academy and City 
theatres to counjteraet any inovo by 
union sympathizers. The lobby en- 
trances are being guarded by three 
policemen and entrance is to be had 
only through one f<lde of the box 
office. The other sido is b.'irrod off 
by nionns of the^olo.sod untc The 
City also has ropod off tUo lirst throe 
rows of the oroho'^trn fl »or to kj'op 
patroiif* at a (lisUnioo fr<Mn the imisi- 
(iana* trench. 

A ".'<nndwirh man" pirhot prome- 
nades the street in froitt of the thea- 
tre sotting fortli (li" usual plaint 
\ about unfainwss to union hibnr. That 
i patioular dowutown sortiou is noted 
I for its do(i(h'd pr'> ;ioiMjiisin in nny 
j field of endeavor n^.l thrso «":tia pro- 
j o.'iulionH have bcoome itrp'rntivo 
tlHTofore. 



New York State Fair, Syracuse; 
:^r-I:>aij A».kerii,..:i, Jr., Secy., Syra- 
(ijse. N. Y.; Sept. 12-17 inc. 

Albany County Fair, AlLamont; 
Walter Scverson, Secy., Altamont; 
Sept. 20-23. 

Cuba Fair and Racing As.sociation, 
Cuba, N. Y.; George H. Swift, Secy., 
Cuba, N. Y.; Sept 13-lG. 

Ringhamtun Industrial Kxpo.<iition, 
ninghamton, N. Y.; Henry S. Martin, 
Secy.; Hingharaton; Sept. 2-30. 

Chautauqua County Agricultural 
Corporation. Dunkirk, N. Y.; .\rthur 
B. Maytum, Secy., Fredonia, N. Y. ; 
Sept. 12-16. 

Chemung County Agricultural So- 
ciety, Elmira, N. Y.; M. 15. Heller, 
Secy., Klmira, N. Y.; Oct. 4-7. 

Afton Driving Park and Agricul- 
tural Association, Afton, N. Y.; 
Harry O. Horton, Secy., Afton. N. Y.; 
Sept. 13-10. 

Clinton County Agricultural Soci- 
ety, Plattaburg, N. Y.; Stewart J. 
Frazier, Secy.. Tlattsburg, N. Y.; 
Sept. 12-10. 

Delaware County Agricultural So- 
ciety, Delhi, N. Y.; M. L. Fuller, 
Secy.. Delhi, N. Y.; Sopt. 12-15. 

Dutchess County A^^.'ultural So- 
ciety, Rhinebeck, N. Y.; IJonjamin 
Tremper. Socy.. Hliinebeok. N. Y. ; 
Sept. 7-10. 

Franklin County Agricultural Soci- 
ety, Malone. N. Y.: S. M. Howard, 
Secy., Malono. N. Y.: Sept. 20-2:t. 

Cenosoe County Agricultural So- 
ciety, Rata via. N. Y.: Fred B. Parker, 
Secy., llatavia. N. Y.: Sept. 20-21. 

Livingston County Fair, Avon. N. 
T.: William H. Clark. Secy., Avon, 
N. Y.; SepL 13-10. 

Hemlock Lake Union Agricultural 



Society. Homlock, N. Y.; Uurnard 
Roach. Sooy., Hemlock, N. Y.; S^pt. ' 
28-0(L 1. 

Vernon Agricultural Society, Ver- 
non, N. Y.; A. D. (lordinear. Secy., 
Vernon. N. Y.; Sept. 21-24. 

Ontario County Agricultural Soci- 
ety, Canandaigua, N. Y.; Floyd D. 
Butler, Secy., Canandaigua. N. Y.; 
Sept. 5-17. 

Morris Fair Association, Morris, N. 
Y.; D. F. Wightman, Secy., Morris, N. 
Y.; Oct. 4-7. 

Oneonta Union Agricultural Soci- 
ety. Oneonta, N. Y.; W. Earl Parish. 
Secy., Oneouta, N. Y.; Sept. 12-23. 

The Agricultural Society of Queeus, 
Nassau Counties, Mineola. N. Y. ; Lot t 
Van de Water. Jr., Secy., Hcmps.tead; 
Sept. 27-Oct. 1. 

Agricultural and I«iberal Arts So- 
ciety of Rensselner (*ounty, N.i.ss»»i, 
N. Y. ; James A. Iv.'lly, Secy., Nas- 
sau; Sept. 13-10. 

Cobleskill Agricultural Sori'»ty, 
CobleskilU N. Y.; William H. Gold- 
ing. Secy., Cobleskill, N. Y.; Sopt. 
20-30. 

Schuyler County Agricultural So'»i- 
ety. Watkins, N. Y.; J. Earl Be.^rds 
ley. Secy.. Odessa, N. Y.; Se:>l. 
12-15. » 

Seneca County Agricultural Soci- 
ety. Waterloo. N. Y.: J. W.llard Huff. 
Secy.. Waterloo, N. Y.; Sopt. 12-1'>. 

Steuben Countv Agricultural Sori- 
ety. Bath, N. Y.: Robert J. MAiiW. 
Socy., Bath. N. Y.: Sept. 27-30. 

Palmyra T^nion Agricultural Soci- 
ety. Palmyra, N. Y.; W. Ray Con- 
verse, Secy., Palmyra, N. Y.: Sept. 
22-24. 

Dundee Fair Association. Dundei*. 
N. Y.: H. L. Woodruff,- Secy.. Dun- 
dee. N. Y.: Oct. 11-18. 




BETTY WASHINGTON 

The Sweelheart of the Violin and Her Bow 
At Keith's Riverside. New York. Next Wook (Sept. 12) 

BOOKINQ DIRECT 



ORLEANS VAUDEVILLE 



Union Problem. 



N. 



N. V. A. COMPLAINTS 

The following complaints have boon 
filed witli the National Vaudeville Art- 
i.sts* C^omr'laint Ruro.'iu: 

Billy Cl.'i.^on iitjainsr .Mel Kleo, 
(iia.'^on allogins Klro i.s irifiinitinc: on 
till* roinedy lifn^: '►Slu'"* be.nunful, but 
< Ml. > » d!iii)t»." . 



f»\v OrloaOK, Sept. 7. 
T!ie rt';;i;lar vatidoville season be- 
gins lioro Mondf\y. with the r<»oponin5 
of the Orpheurii and Palac**. Pan- 
tages will not get under \vi\y tmtil 
October. Manager Leopo'd of l*;in- 

tn2o:< is in Now York and Iia.^ not 
y<'t (lcfiriit<ly decided as to what 
policy ho would maiutain for llif* (om- 
inp veiir. 

The iii.Tnagom<*nts of llic local 
honsos remain ns formerly. Bdi Pinz- 
fa will have (Ii;»rj{e of the Orplicuiu. 
with Howard .McCoy and Wa tor 
KnttDinn t'iking care of the i'.iliico 
and lioows, respective y. 
N-»lIiin:4 III-* 'n yet b'-'Ti <loti.' !i ii' 



iu r'^^ard la the union nituatiea. 
Some .sotlloment will hare to be ar- 
i.'vu] v* «Im«4 Kcpk if the tlieatres 
aro to continue in the usual way. 



ASTORIA ST0R7 

Report around is to the cfToct tlio 
Sliuhort.H have been negotiating for 
the .\storia, AKtoria, L. I., to cither 
hxi*f or book the lio;.He witfi vaude- 
ville. 

W.Trd i^c Cilynn are llio owrn rs ntid 
op.T.'itors. They have booo |>l:i>io<; 
v.uiilt 1. illc. bookiug in»lo|>j«ndonlly. and 
usinir liitjli priced turns when avs'l- 
;iM<'. 

'I'lio Sliuborts are said to want tlie 
AsioiJM liou^o for v.uidovillo break- 
in^, ilitoiijh its nearness to New 



— TT 



:rwi^,'-- 



>.» ff."!! I liUm ■»! 'yr- ^/a- 't-TI' 



VARIETY'S CHICAGO OFFICE 



OBITUARY 



ROBERT E. NEWCOMBE 

Uobort li. N('\v( il)p, ag«' ~i\, diod/ 

A;;;-;. 27 :\t I-'onl'Miiiii Uo-pital. New 
York, of plural pncMuiunia nft.'r an 
iKi,; ss of U'>s tbaii a wt-ok. Ili' was 

!; l!:.-(! Iiy li.'- A'.tol's Full:! of AllMT- 

i( ii ill l^vi'i t'li-fii (.VMin'tcry. For a 
mill. her of yrars he had been mana 
iH'i of the May Di'sinoiul Stixk. 
riiliadt'lphia. Duriiij; hi^; lif»' he h:id 
ill pi iiivil ill a cliara.ti'r roIi* in "Way 
I)..\vM Kasi/' '•Lila- Tim;"." "('licit 
ill- ('heaters," "Feol There Was." 
'•T!m' Art;yl ' Case" aid otlin- piodiic- 
ti '!;s-. He liad nNo been m;iiia-er of 
••I'air and Warmer" for si-ver.il i^.-i 
sur,^. Hi- is survived by a v.:(h>w aswl 
pon of whom no traee ooidd be fom.il 
[,y Wi:i;;;i:i li.-it mt'icr of tlie N<'\v 
York World, willi whom he resided 
n;* lo the t:me of his illness. 

EMILY SAMET 

i:m;iy S.imet. better known in the 
r.'ibaret world as *T;id>e" F.mily. died 
ill the ai)ariment of Ilazo'. (Jrah.-.m, at 
'JJ(; West noth street Aug. lU. 
Miss Saniet, aeeotnpanied by Miss 
(Jraham, made a tour of va- 
rious cabavetv o;^ Monday ni}:ht and 
);i an Italian restr.'irant in the lower 
part of the city :; duljred in soMie rod 
W'i'e. mixiiii; it witli olh<M- liipKM-s 
that th.ey liad had at various other 
pl.iees. 

r.i.th b( :i!iie vii'lrutlv ill diirin- the 
iil;,h; and Mis>^ Samet dieil b(>fore 
he p eoi;ld r.yv\\^\ T)r. TUodsUy. of 
l'"i(.\V(<;- llM^nitnl. worked over Miss 
(;ri\l»am :iiid maiii'L'vl to sr.ve her life. 
The Samet z'^v) lad reeeiitlv finished 
a ionr of tli'> ('a: al Z-ne in the Ma- 
1 ie Kelly <-aban Is. 

LILLIAN HALE 

Lillian Ila e. i:i privsit.^ life Mr^. 
H«n S. l>e.i:i. died s"i;dden\v in Plrda- 
(idphia S.pl. 'J, e;i route from Cnli- 
fori'ia to New Y.irk. ]>iilian Hale 
was best known for her aetinj: in 
' Tiie I'.el e of ^^^n\^\ Street."' in 
whieh Satn liernard starred.. She 
nlso appeared in several Kolb and Dill 
[,rodueti''ns on the Coast. 

She was a nister of F.dwin T. 
Iv'T ry. produeer <;f musienl play^ and 
sliorl sioiy writer, now nianapin;: di- 
1. ■tor of tlw Xev.' Sheridan Scpnire 
tlieatre in (;ie;'nwi(d» VillnKe, New 
Y..rk, whieh oi^.ened lliis week. 



ear. He leaves a wife nn<l three- 
year-old daughter. 

In 1 oip* of serviep and number of 
actor friends Sohlberp was a rival «»f 
Abe .laeobs, stage man.iger^ of the 
M.a.iesti'-. rh!-::.;o. The Iwo veterans! 
well' fa.^l liieuii.;. 

CLINTON A. HYLAND 

Cijiton A. Upland, former memb'M 
..f t!i" (piartet in the "Ohi Uiime- 
sti;d" "ii-.pauy ef ;!i' late Denman 
'ri...i,;;is<i:'. eoMimilt" 1 -.'»i<.ide ^ u! 
K le,.'. N. H.. Mondi'.y. !Ie lud liV'en 



In liivinr metu.n-.v 
of our clt'ur frlriid. 

WILLIE COLINI 

(Colinl'M Variety DiincerB) 

Wlio l*ume<l Away AuffUMt 3Ut, 
1921. 

BOB CABNA and FAMILY 



ilespondent for some lime over faibng 
health. Hyland was with Thouipsoi: 
for several seasons, but left the HtRge 
15 years ago. He was 5!i years old. 



Mrs. Thomas Kino, mother of Mol- 
lie, Nellie and Charles King, died 
Aug. M of heart complications at hor 
home, Great Neck, Long Island. 



The mother of Jessie Huston, aged 

TCi, at hor home, Braidwood, 111., Aug. 
18. 



Tho mother of Albertina Rasch, in 

r.iiden, Austria, Aug. 8. 



John Sutherland, retired Shakes 
pearian actor, died Aug. 31, aged 7C. 
at his daughter's home. 340 Ninth 
street, Brooklyn. Ho last played in 
"Tin r.lue Bird." coming here from 
Scotland oO years ago. 



Frederio Starr, for tho last 8i\ 
I years in coast pictures, died in Los 
An<;eles Aug. 20. He had boon for 
20 years on tho stage. Mr. Starr 
b»Hves a wife, Blanche Rose Starr, 
and a son. 



EDWARD A. SOHLBERG 

Kdward A. ^'oli boru', for 20 years 
st;\f-:« mann^".' an<l oleetrieian of the 
O.p'.eum. Krt!is;'s Cily. was killed 
?!..t!rlay in'Miii;:-.: in that city when bis 
.v;!s in Miii wjoM v.'th -^ ''i-eet 



Frank P. MInnelll, for several years 
coi:nect<Ml with Minni'lJi l»rothers' 
Show, coir.mitted sui<'id«' by shooting 
hims-elf Se|)t. 1 in I>elawaro, Ohi'>. 
The deceased had been in ill health 
for some time. 



i:f' 



UttlVAN 



The mother of ('arl Hite <Hite and 
Ueflow) and Sadie Hite, a New York 
ne\vs[)aper woman, died Sept. 4 at 
Lake Hopatcong, N. J., after a heart 
attack while in bathing. The de- 
cease,? was no years of age. 






Emmy Gillette, sister of Olga Grey 
and KIsio <;il!etto, ditsl Aug. 24 after 
a short illness. She was with several 
B.roadway shows, but retired four 
years ago when she married kitim 
♦ loileti. ♦iiiht promoter. 



IN THE HEART OF THE BOHEMIAN QUARTERS 

BELLA NAPOLI 

•Dinmond" Joe Er.pcsito ITALIAN RESTAURANT A. Voipe, Gen. Mgp. 

850 S. Halsted SL, CHICAGO 
Real Italian Cooking — Ravioli and Spaghetti Our Specialty 
High Class Music — Dancing and Entertainment 
Open Ail Night. Special Attention to the Profession. 



••A NFW FKATl liK K\ KllV UKKK" 

Fritzel's Friars Inn 

Northeast Corner ^Vubnt*h ami Van Our«n 

i:\( KM.KNT CUIHINE, SKKVICE AM) DANriNG— PROFESSIONAL MtillT 

KVKRY WKnNESII.W 



M. J. FRITZEL, PROP. Wabash 6815 



CHICAGO 



'ST. REGIS" 
516 i^. Clark Street 



HOTELS 
CHICAGO 



"MARION" 
505 W. Madison St. 



'ROFESSIGNAL WEEKLY-RATES 



t'llANUR OF KATES 

HInrle, with'iut bath. .. .fS.OO and 19.00 
Double, without bath. .flO.nu and il'i.OO 

HIncle, with both 910.50 nnd 912.00 

Double, with bath 914.00 and 910.00 



Thorouf hlj modem. 
Newly furnished. 
ConTealeat to all theatre*. 
Pree rehearsal haO. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 



HAZEL RENE 



HATS— GOWNS— COSTUMES 



806-308 Btate-I^ke Bnildlnr. Chicago 

IRENE DrHITQVE I 
HAZEL RANOUS f 



Tel. Cent. 1898 



Ollytrago 

EVANSTON DAILY 
RAPS WOMAN SPEC 



Friday, September 9, 1921 1 
STATE.LAKE THEATRE BUILDING 



Publishing Guide to Chi- 
cago Theatres — Says 
Evanston Patrons Sub- 
ject to Hold-Up 

ChitMgo, Sept. 7. 

Tlio ICvuu.stou Ni'ws-Index started 
Monday to riiu a daily theatre guide 
ill it.s paper, suiierintended by the 
dramatic editor. It wijl give the 
resideuts of that fasR^nble suburb 
a liue on nil ("hioago attractioiiH. 
Tlie p:iper last week sent a letter to 
Chi'-ago theatres asking if they were 
against the domination of theatre 
soalcH by .>frs. Couthols, the "Queen 
of the Specs" ns per the stories 
published iu Variety. 

The News-Index prefaced its let- 
ter by reprinting Voriety's story of 
the domination by Mrs. Couthoi% 
heading it "Evanston patrons of (Chi- 
cago Theatres Must Stand Hold-Up;' 



TWO SHOWS FAIL 



Chicago's Opening of Season Records 
First Failures 



The theatrical seabon of 1921-1022 
which has just gotten under way has 
already registered two failures. Leo 
Carrillo in "The Love Chef" at the 
Playhouse and "Three Live Ghosts" 
at the Shubert Central will respond 
to the Gnal curtain on Saturday. 

"Tho Love Chef" came in under 
a disadvantage as the second art 
was rather crude. All of the critics 
picked on it from that stau<Ipoiut. 
Had this piece been kept out 4^r a 
few weeks' soa'^oning and the second 
a<'t put into shape it might have, sur- 
vived the hot spoil lu'i*'. The bhow 
will be taken to Now York with no 
announcement being made as to where 
it will reopen. 

Charlen L. CiiliMn. in "Emperor 
•Tones" is scheduled to succet'd "The 
Love Chef" Sej)t. 17. 

"Three Live Ghosts" got off to a 
bad start a^ far as bu-^iaess and the 
daily r«wie\vs were concerned. With 
the heat of last week it was deemed 
advisable to withdraw it. The show 
will go on tour ojieiiing Monday at 
the Murat, Indianapolis for three days. 
Further than that point no route has 
been alloted the show. 

Helen Hoerle who man.iger the at- 
traction hero left in advan<'»' an<l Her- 
man Woods replaced her as manager. 
No show has b.^en aniioumed to re- 
place "Three Live (Jhosts* at the Cen- 
tral as yet. 



Formerly with 
Edith Strickland 



TREASURERS' SNAP ENBS 

Singer Stops Sale of Program Space 
By Box Office Man 

Chicngi), Se[)t. 7. 

Harry Siiik't. upon takiii'^ ejinrge of 
the Orpheum Circuit hoM«<es here, to- 
day, issued an order taking nwa.v the 
privi eije of rhe puhlisliii:^ and pro- 
curinj; »tf .•\(lvertiseni"nts for the lioiisr 
programs in the .Maji^stif ami Talace 
theati^s by the treasurers. 

The treasurers in the p.ist have 
had tlie pro;^.aiu privilei:es in these 
theatres and iiuufe n pood iin oun*. It 
is said that to keep in good stead 
with the spaef bu.ver-^ iu \\\o pro- 
grauis the treasurers alvv;i.vs placed 
at IJM'ir dis[)osal the choicest seats. 
A regular program (oncern is to be 
awj.nled this privilege. 



talk, with a second disadvantage of 
having the outside doors open direct- 
ly into the theatre. The bouse 
h.i* two lobby cLt ranee"', on? on 
Jackson boulevard and the other en 
vjiiinty street. 



DAILIES REVIEW 



SOHLBERG DEAD 

stage Manager of Orpheum, Kansas 
City, Killed in Auto Crash 

Kai- .:s City, Sept. 7. 
Edmund W. Sohlherg, stage mana- 
ger of the Orpheum theatre, this city 
wa3 instantly killed Monday morning 
while on his way to join the Labor 
Day parade. He was driving ah Over- 
land car and crashed into a street 
car. The auto buckled in the middle 
catching Sohlbcrg in the wreckage. 

His skull was cru.shed and his spine 
fractured. He died almost instantly. 

With him was S. C Bailey, formerly 
stage manager for the Orpheum, Den- 
ver. Bailey escaped with slight 
bruises. 

The deceased was the oldest stage 
employee of the local Orpheum, having 
been one of the original crew when 
the house, the second of the great cir- 
cuit, was started here 23 years ago. 



KNICKS ON WAITRESSES 

(Chicago, Sept. 7. 

Pete Sotero, who operates the 
"13th Chair," a popular theatrical 
eating house, has clad his waitresses 
In knickerbockers in keeping with the 
fad which the Chicago Tribune is at- 
tempting to establish here. The 
Tribune played the fact up heavily 
with stories and pictures and the 
news weeklies also ran off a bit of 
footage on the stunt. 

This is the first restaurant in the 
city where the waitresses have 
adopted this mode of attire. 



COAST'S BEST OFFER 

San Francisco, Sept. 7. 

An offer of $2,000 per week for 
two seasons of 40 weeks each as a 
guarantee, with a possible five »en- 
sons' contrart, wa.s turned down bv 
Kolb & Dill from Will King las't 
week. The offer is by far the great- 
est ever made on the ra<-ific (^oast 
for a three-a-day pojuilar j)riccd con- 
densed musical comedy stock show. 

It was the plan of King to use the 
Dutch comedians in the Casino with 
his new <ompany. 



Harry Singer Swings Chicago Trib^ 
Milwaukee Houses In His Charge. 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 

Two more theatres have been add> 
ed to the Orpheum houses uiulcr the 
direction «»f Harry Siru^rr, \mio was 
recently placed in charge uf the eir- 
cult's three Chicago houses. Xbe 
added theatres are the Palace and 
Majestic, Milwuakee. Sirjvr [laid a 
visit to his new houses early this 
week and it is anticipated an a re- 
suit of hia tour of inspeetion a num- 
ber of changes will be made in tht 
operating policy of the theatres. 

Since Singer has taken over the 
Chicago houses for the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit he has managed to get the daily 
newspapers in line to hove their 
critics review the shows at the three 
Chicago vaudeville theatres— State- 
Lake, Palace and Majestic. All of 
the dailies last week vr] fi,^ 

programs at these houses and al< 
lotted coDsiderab'e space to the re- 
views, instead of dwelling briefly. 

The Tribune, which in the past 
two years has refused to review 
vaudeville, had Its new critic, Shep- 
pard Butler, give the shows the no- 
tice last week and Mr. But'er epoke 
In pleasant tones. At the same time 
the 8tnte-T/ake had Its first review 
In that paper, as Percy Hammond^ 
its critic, refused to Mst this house 
as among the number of his "stopping- 
off" places. 



WHITTAEER LOSES MIND 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 

John C*Scotty'') Whittaker, a for- 
mer cafe entertainer, is an inmate of 
the Chicago State Hospital for the 
Insane. Physicians there say his 
condition is very serious and they 
hold out little hope for his recovery. 

Whittaker, prior to coming to 
Chicago, worked in a number of New 
York cafes as an entertainer. 



JOE HOWARD'S SHOW 

Chicago. Sept. 7. 
.Toseph K. Howard (HowartI and 
Chirk > is working on a new musical 
comedy \vhi<h he expects to produce 
sh<?rtly under the /itle of "Cliild 
Town." He anticipates having it 
pro<iuced under the direction of (ius 
Solke of London. Howard intends 
having the premiere of the piece in 
Chicago at the pre-war sca'e of $1 
top. 



Ed La Vine Returning to Stage 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 
Edward La Vine, who retired from 
the stage three years ago, will re- 
turn to vaudeville shortly with a 
monolog. 




There 

Is 
Only 

ONE 

MAYBELLE 
SMART SHOP 



LENORE BERNSTEIN 



Room ftO.1 



MOniSTK 

146 N. rinrU Stiw* 



HYATT'S BOOKING EXCHANGE 

Booking Belter Tahloid8-~36 Randolph St.. CHICAGO 



GREAT NORTHERN OPENS 

Chicago, S«pt 7. 

Shuhi'rts' Great Northern, forju- 
crly the (J-eat Xorthern Hippodrome, 
was c'aimed by the drama whori F!or- 
<'n«',« Heed opened her s<'asou there 
Sunday night iu K<igar Sclwyn's 
clraina. •"/'he'~-Mirag'V''" ~ "iMie hoiise 
was renovated and overiuiuled in its 
entirety. A new steel and aet curtains 
of artistic designs were installed, 
and the general «l"corat'.)ijs of the 
auditorium proper were in dull grey 
itnd old gold, making n magnificent 
appearance. 

Those of the daily papers who re- 
viewed the attract ion predicted a 
prosperous future for the play des- 
pite the plot is convo:)tiopal and based 
on the eterrt.il tria.i;','e. 

It is doubtful whrihe* any more 
dramatic shows will he shown here, 
as the house \^ to large for straight 



We Don't Like to Boast,— J5«if 

PLEASE GLANCE AT THIS UNSO- 
LICITED LETTER. YOU "ALL KNOW 
HARRY" AND "JOHNNIE'S NEW CAR" 

We can Satisfy You^ Too 



PLUSH 
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SATEEN 

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|D.I«auk*« Wl«. 

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Vabrle Studios, 
177 M. Stat* Si. 

Chlo«co» 111* 

D<«r Birpi 

I nH^lvflA the A««i«r7 '<*>' "7 **'* '"^ *^*7; 
•DA X «aat to thank you ror ih* pro^pta***' 
you c*T« ih* aatttr la wf bateir* 

I alao «ut to oeapllaant you on tho t*o4 work 
you did oa «y •oaaory* ii ia adjairabla f roa artry 
atand point, aad la aatiralj hatlafaotory tc ••• 
It la tk* bast I luva arar hat. 



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THE FABRIC STUDIOS, Inc. 

SUITE 201 177 NORTH STATE ST. CHICAGO 



UgCBNSBY 
NIVERSAL 



S DROPS 

CENIC 



A8RTH 
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Meaa and plann nubmittcd. 

0«r prlcaa and terms will Intarcat yon. 



DRAPBA 

TUDIOS 



YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD •-.'-hu ». 



BTATE-LAKK BUIIJ)INO. CniCAflO 
PHONE DKAKBORN 1771 



Friday, September 9, 1921 
VARIETY'S CHICAGO OFFICE 



(Ulltfagci 



STATE-LAKE THEATBE BUILDINCI 



CHICAGO VAUDEVILLE SHOWS 



MAJESTIC, CHICAGO 

Chicago, Kept. 7. 
Melody galore, as a mnttcr of fact 
•uouxh lyricizatioQ for a big musical 
c<iini(^«. aud to offH<>t this auuet there 
wtK as brlMiant n, display of coatumea 
•8 baa b«ea aeen on any vaudeville 
bill, and it would do juaticc to any of 
the better clasa musical ahowa. The 
ahow in itaelf was one big flash, and 

even though there was a tornado of 
song there was enough comedy inter- 
spersed to make it a wholesome and 
likable ^ntertainmnt, which was man- 
ifested by the holiday matinee throng. 

Quite noticeable was the fact tliat 
every act with the exception of Boyce 
Coombs had women In it. and it ap- 
peared as though the women, begin* 
ning with Norton and Melnotte on in 
the trey spot, tri«d to outdo each 
otier with respect to raiment. How- 
ever, the honors in this regard must 
be awarded to the Santos and Hayes 
Kevue, whic'h wccmed to reign su- 
premoe in that respect. Another very 
noticeable fact was thtit this audience, 
which is known to be rather chilly 
on a Monday afternoon especially, 
thawed out from the appearanc'*' of 
l*oombs, unleashed their digeta from 
thei-r sides or side pockets, and gave 
an ovation to every turn on the con- 
clusion of thoir offering. Probably 
the mild weather might have ^bad 
something to do with this, but it la 
more than likely that the caUber and 
standard of the show was actually 
resDonsible for their interest and ap- 
probation. 

The Santoa and Ha^es Revue after 
a 50-minute entertainment grasped 
the stellar honors of tlie bill, collec- 
tively and individually, and it seemed 
as though dope to C o'clock that Joe 
Af orris and Flo Campbell would have 
a hard task in holding them. But 
such was not the rase, for Morris 
stepped out with his clowning right 
at the start, and had them in stiched 
throughout to the finish, running the 
former offering a very close second 
for the anplaufte honors. 

Lea Ke1iorf«, man and woman. 



"EU," The Jeweler 

TO THE PROKESSIO>r 
Sp«clal Discount to Perforinvr* 
WHE.V IN CHICAGO 
Hiato-I'Sfc* Tliratr* BIda. Ornniid Fli 



opened the show. They have an un- 
usual novelty for the big time, aa 
upon the ride of the curtain, when 
the exterior of a side show is dis- 
closed, the audience are amiized »i 
to what is to be offered. The man 
«>^>K;.*P--ov»*.*n^ t'^^n leotur**^ an the 
various subjects to be seen inside, 
with the Avoman appearing at inter- 
vals, depicting soma of the charac- 
ters of the side show. The man'i 
"bnllybo" is of the hokum variety, 
and seems to please this Audience im- 
mensely. Finally, after eight min- 
utes of the side show talk, the couple 
reveal the fact that they are a bal- 
Aucing turn with the man ral.*»ing the 
woman about, and concluding the of- 
fering in one minute by balancing the 
woman seated at a table by his teeth. 
As a novelty this act should hold out 
nicely in the opening position on any 
bill. 

Boyce Coombs, with his '"Talca and 
Tunes That Tickle," with Burton 
Brown at the piano, was in the 
"deuce" apot, a poor position for 
Coombs, aa he belonga farther down 
on a bill. As this program was ar- 
ranged the spot waa the only one 
suitable to him. Coombs, wiCh his 
character sonca, ^ot off to a good 
start, and built bia offering up with 
each number, and at the finish made a 
most creditable shoeing, gettlxif an 
nbundanoe of sincere applause. Dixit 
Norton and Oortl Melnotte, next to 
appear, presented a lyrical romance 
in three epiiodes, entitled, *22 Waah- 
ington S<(Uttre/' It is a novelty, and 
a refreshing one for vaudeville, away 
from .conventional lines, and the idea 
is one bound to appeal to all classes 
of audiences on account of ita sweet- 
ness and sincerity. The story is that 
of two girls arrivinx at the homo of 
one oi them, being locked out aa the 
chauffeur bad the key to the honse. 
The girl then tella her mate they will 
have to wait a considerable period 
unti* her brother arrives home. Her 
friend asks hv^r why ahe livea in this 
place in Woshlngton Square, adjacent 
to Greenwich village, where the long- 
haired men ana the short-haired 
women abound and thrive. She says 
it is for sentimental reasons, aa her 
grandpa relets and parenta resided 
there. Then she narrates the story 
of her grandmother*8 courtship In 
1S30. with Miss Melnotte taking the 
role of the giri and Miss Norton the 
boy: the next episode is that of her 
mother in 1870, and the third is in 
1921, with the modern *fresh" beau 
and the present-day girl. The lyrics 
are all special and fit the vcnicle 
nifelv. The dnncp st»»ps evented 



-^ III tla .Heart at tba Iftl W^rf* 



CiTRO's Restaurant 

1014 SOUTH HAL8TKD STREET, CHICAGO 
Italian TaMa ^Hatt 

fliarley Q t mw » »f H al « s r D« I-«xe 

|IOTB:~Th«r« h»T« b*«n six muraars and ten bomka within tea bUoks ot taia 
pime* in alz nioiitti»— but, doa't l«t that lnt»rf«r» with your dlttftM^ 
piM »» Bilfe«MlL w Uh the Apaehts •( Chj^avo. 



260 ROOV*» 




TRANSPORTATION: 
10 Mia. from Looi^— "l<" and Surface. 



Under New Management 

HOTEL SAVOY 

3000 Michigan Ave., Chicago 



A Home for Theatrical People 
at Theatrical Rates 

TeI>*phon«: CAI.UMBT SS53-6I63-SCS4 

91.se Per Dajr; Wreklj Rata fl.oe and Up 
Cafe In Connertlon. Moderate I'rioea. 



NEW YORK COSTUME CO. 



COSTUMES MANUFACTURERS Vn WEST GOWNS 

137 N. WABASH AVE., CHICAGO Central 1801 



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"THE 1 3th CHAIR" "PETE'* Soteros 

Nexi Door to Colonial Thtatr*. 30 W. RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO 

THE lOLI.OWINO HEADI.IMCRS ATE HERE I^ST WEEK:— 

ROOSTERS FOR STEAKS 
^■' '•>■«. l:iiiv Frlsh. norne CroMman, Will Donaldeon, RMly Jorm Kranli 
•'"'iiiio. Murry sibi -y, \.^on Flatow. Uurtrom and Snxton. Harry Co'>i»if, Fr-^Jdle 

(It.)nee) Uaclitnsin lo-l Al Wohlnvin. 



were staged bj Ilert French, and they 
atH)t'ar to be the ucme of terpsirhore. 
The costuming is of the period and 
the sotting in two Hhowing the exto- 
nor of tho Washington bqirare home 
18 \-erj artistiij, wir.h its flowery 
adornment and other enibellishmenttk 
The act in its entirety was one to 
tho likening of thia audience, and 
they evinced this fact by recalliug 
the couple for numerous bows. 

In the fourth position wero Georgo 
F. Moore and Mary Jayne. It waa 
!•:» '; ►4^v.\t>3 for tni'i toam, Moor« 
with his comedy getting right down to 
the core of tho laughter ar.ery and 
keeping the audienco in Hpasms 
throughout the turn. Mary Javne la 
a pretty, winsome tniss, and knows 
how to show clothes, too, and the 
audience liked this about her as well 
as her vocaHzation. 

Coating on tiext it looked as though 
Mary liaynes, with her bag of exclu- 
sive character songs, would have hard 
sleddin*. But such was not the case. 
Mitf9 Ilaynes just drew the mob to 
her with the opening lyric and held 
tl\em within her grasp up to the con- 
clusion of her turn. It looked us 
though Mary would capture the ap- 
pVause honors up to this point the 
biU. but when tne Sontos and Hayes 
Revue, a Moore and Megley offering, 
with an abundance of songs, dances, 
costiuncs and a gorgeous flash of 
scenerv came along after her, they 
sort of treaded on Miss Hayes' toes 
and seemingly stole the show away 
from her. This act is made up of 
individual artists headed by Buster 
Santos and J-aoques Haves, and it ap- 
peared that every member of the act 
iicored individual triumphs with their 
work. The act* has been seen here 
before, but on account of its mag- 
nificent settings nnd talented cast 
appears to be a welcome repeater, nn 
welcome was it that at the end of TtO 
minutes every member, including the 
two stars, got an individual ovation. 
In the next to nhut kpot were .Toe 
Morris and Flo Campbell, with their 
song and comedy skit. If there were 
any pcKsimists in the audience they 
certainly must have felt sorry for 
this couple in having to follow the 
Santos and Haye4 act, especially at 
the Inte hour they were on. But 
sympathy was not necesMiry. Morris 
(Stepped right out from the start and 
simply "goaled" the mob In front. 
He kept working at top speed dui-iug 
the 18 minutes, and it appeared that 
there was not a single second he did 
not Irave his guests in spasms of 
laughter. Tho reception accorde<l 
them at the conclusion was almost as 
big as that given their predecessors 
on the bill. 

The Rios, with a posing and equi- 
libristic novelty were compelled to 
doae the show to tho passing throng 
who had had just a bit too much of 
entertainment This act was a worthy 
one for the position, and those who 
walked on it missed a very entertain- 
ing novelty. 

I PALACE, CmOAGO 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 
A whirlwind of a show is offered 
here this week and tho holiday crowd 
certainly had their fill of entertain- 
ment in a rather long bill Monday 
night. It seemod as though the show 
was "studded" witli show stoppers for 
Hevcn out of the nine acts hit the 

border mark, with Clark and Berg- 
mon ond Nat Nazzarro and Co., with 
Buck and Bubbles, running neck nnd 
neck for the stellar honors, with juHt 
a shade \n, favor of the former. 
The bill had an avalanche of song 
and dance and the old trusty grand 
piano being wheeled back and forth 
on the Htoge doing yeomen service 
in five different act 8. 

The show got off to a lightning 
start with Frank and Milt llrittou. 
The Brittou boys have a tact of 
dispensing music in a most entranc- 
ing manner and their edort-s ou the 
piano, xylophone, cornet nnd trom- 
bone took the house by storm and 
tho boys had all they could do to 
make way for Cliff Nazarro nnd the 
1>nrliDef Sisters, who trailed them 
with the inimital»le offering, *'.Tuve- 
nile Frolics." Nazzaro is a clover 
comedian who puts his '^ong.s and 
dances over with zest nnd ease and 
he is assisted by two pretty and no 
complishod girls who are valuable 
jiid.^ in tho vocal line. Tlioir r«i)or- 
toirc of ballads and syncopated m*'lo- 
(lios started ofl tho song carnival and 
again the show was on the bor(h;r 
of being stopped. Wallace liradloy 
and (Irotta Ardiiio, coming on m-xt. 
had a smooth pMss;igo with their < har- 
aoter songs nnd dances. The terp- 
sichorean efforts of this cou|)le 
pleased immensely .nnd tiiey iiau ilir 
house with them at tbe finish. .Julio 
Irving Fisher, wlu) is at tho piano 
for the couple, in liis solo lias n 
i habit of W(»rking to tbe i^^ienco and 
sbowini; bis "Cecil LeMufSkfit every 
opportunity, Oiue or l^k'O this 
pleased hut he persisted. Fislier is 
an iicconiplishod i)iauist and tins by- 
play was uncalled for and unneces- 
sary. 

McCrath and Deeds injected the 
fust cornody elements in the bliow 
with ^bcir songs and comedy. 'Jbe 
boys are brimful of personality aud 
have ft routine of son^s and comedt 
befitting any bill. They grind away 
from the start and kept going ou 
"high" right to tho finish. Tbe com- 
edy bits they do are well constructed 
and get over with a "whang." The 
Hmaller of the two is botlj a cipital 
(une'liati and vo'-alisl us he ir(>:,s»"s.'.eji 



a remarkable lyric tenor voice, with 
the other chap being u very good 
baritone. lOven though their 

predecessors on the bill hud gone over 
as whirlwinds these boys wont them 
one better and had the show all but 
••Tied-l'p" at the finish of their act. 
Then along came Cladys Clark and 
Henry Bergman in the "goaling" 
spot with their "Tunes of the 
Hour." They seem to be old favor- 
ites at this house for they received 
a big ovation on their entrance and 
justincd this through subsequent 
work. They had scores of songs 
and everyone hit home. Bergman 
seems to have developed into a most 
capital comedian and his comedy ef- 
forts and mimicry were just to the 
taste of the house. He does a bit of 
dialog and song with Jack Landauer, 
who is planted in a box. Landaaer 
i.s first used to "plug" a popular 
song, after which he Hings it in char- 
acter and then goes into a "Swedish" 
dialog repartee with Bergman thot 
all but tore the house down. The 
talk here is fast and snappy. A 
new dancing team, the Dale Sieters, 
have been added instead of the Crisp 
Sisters and on first sight they look 
as though they will do. They are 
a pair ot good looking girls, lithe 
cf limb aiiU do their dancing Hpe> 
cialties in goed taste nnd step. The 
costuming of Miss Clark an<l the Dale 
Sisters is very appropriate. After 
doing 28 minutes' work Clark and 
Bergman with their aides just tied 
the show up in a "knot" and left 
a very hard road to travel for Artnur 
Stone and Marion Hayes, who fol- 
lowed. This couple present a comedy 
talking skit called a "Carnival Fpl 
sode" 'and entitled. "Green Goods." 
Stone is a small town "boob" who 
comes to the circus lot and playn the 
part of the "wise-guy" but fallo into 
liie iroshes of tho wise side show 
woman who .itteniptii to extcrt his 
money from him by having him pl.iy 
the various games of chance on the 
lot. The dialog is all of a crisp 
and wise nature, but the act was un- 
fortunately placed following the 
Clark and DeiKmuu > uu and uiffe-ed 
nreoidingly. Had they been plncol 



a little earlier in the program they 
undoubtedly would have gained much 
better results with their oflering. 

Nat Nazzaro with Buck and Bub* 
hies, in a Variety '>f Varieties," ( 
picked up the threads of the show 
here and set it in motion again. | 
Nazzaro and Charlie open with theie 
ground tnmbliug and head balancing 
feats and after three minutes wore i 
call for Buck and Buckles, and when 
the "n]sk-hue<l" Mutt and Jefl made 
their appearance the audience just 
howled to see iheae be-rngged col- 
ored urchins sie^** IRTrtlC ""VAtu i.I.,.lr 
hair liberaliv coated with brilliantino. 
The boys lost no time in getting 
to work for little Buck pounded the 
keys industrially while Bubbles cut 
loose with syncopated melodies nnd 
eccentric dances. Then Ruck who 
gives promise of developing into nu 
ecentrfc comecV.in cut loose with liis 
comedy efforts giving imitations of 
Nazzaro and Charlie which seemed 
to bo to the likening of those out 
front. The oct furnished 30 min- 
utes of entertainment and left the 
house gasping and applauding for 
more — but there was no more. 

Next to closing Dolly Kay i-ame 
along with more song. Dolly had 
her friends out front and they gave 
her a big reception on her entrance 
and this encouraged her greatly in 
what was apparently a disadvantag- 
eous spot. However, Miss Kay went 
riiiit into ker syncopated songs and 
came out a winner at the tape. Bas- 
so and Co., man and woman, after 
a long and exceptionally good ahoir 
managed to hold the crowd in their 
juggling feats. 

RIALTO, CHICAGO 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 

Entertaining bill I^abor Day. Tbe 
new show came in on a Saturday and 
Sunday schedule, seven acts to a shift, 
six shifts a day, ten acta to a bill. Tho 
second shift coutained much comedy, 
singing, and each act waa well re- 
ceived. 

Following the two- reel comedy and 

(Continued ou page 35) 



YOU CAN'T GO WRONG BY PICKING 
ANY OF THE AGENCIES LISTED BELOW 

They are authorized to book you exclusively over the best time 

In the Middle West 
W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and ull their Affiliated Cir- 
cuits 



C. W. Nelson 



Aaaacy 



Suite 609 
Wood* Theatre Bldff. 



Charles Crowl 



Suite 301 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



PoweD & Danf orth 

Affaoey 

ua. 

Suite 302 
Loop End Bldg. 



Eagle & Gokkmitb 

Suite 504 / 
Loop End Bidf. 



Tom PoweU 



Ayaacjr 



Suite 304 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Earl & Perkins 

Suite 302 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



The SimoD 



AsMicj 



Suite 807 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Jess Freemaa 



A»««ey 



Suite 1413 
Masonic Templo 



Harry W. Spingold 

Suite 405 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Lew M. Goldberg 



Affoiicx 



Suite 305 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Billy Jackson 



Aseaey 



Suite 504 
Loop End Bldg. 



Beehler & Jacobs 

AgMiCJ 

Suite 307 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



John H. Billsbury 

Ajf^nry 

8urrc«]inr Ilrlrti Murplij 

Ajcenr.T 

Suits 306 
Woods Theatre Bldg. 



Burt Cortclyon 

At»ncr 

1607-08 
Masonic Tcmpio 



The above agencies, in Chicago, booking exclusively 
with W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and all affili- 
ated circuits. 

YOUR NEW YORK AGENT CANNOT BOOK HERE DIRECT 



WV K L 



BURLESQUE REVIEWS 




Friday, September 9, 1021 1 



COLUMBIA.NEW YORK 

The l)urle«quo bcomod op«'urd for 
211.*- Momlay. It in the lutcKt of- 

firial opi'i.iii;: vrgular burl«'w<r.H' has 
hnd. Hiu« •• it b«'<amo ifgular 
h'h.iUj- 'l''u' oi»< mill: 



bur 



erat.ion of i^obor took noti<*o, noti- 
fied the r. A. T. S. K. to go as far 
an it liked and the stage bandH' bead- 
quartrrM xriit Riinilar iDStrurtious to 
all of i(H locals. 

The inoidcntals leading up to the 
sottioiaout of thr lock oiil, whieh only 



ot«urn*d Jifter i ocnirrcd iasl wrek no jIouIh inter- 



up«ii hhop bn«'k 
orchr^tra pit 



of 



M " H r r A' > ill l" ■» I n I » . 

drclaratiou of nn 

ii(.ii:«- uiid in the 

all tl.tat.t> i>u tin i'olr.nibia wheels 

'i'lir (>pen sli(»ii aiiiiouiHemcut was 

ijuulr euil.v lu tlie sununer. It waw 

pK.tla iimi hi Ihe L'olunibia Aiuusr- 



preparing for this season. Another 
thing it did was to cause the shows 
to open "cold" in whatever city the 
routp called for. In con.sequeuce 
Variety's reviewers who may be as- 
slKi'.cd to catch burles(pie shows and 



1.1 



iii( i-t Co. iliKUJt'h a laiidlv oij:anr.-.t(l j Variety's correspondents who are 

aiMl wtlioiit I permitted to coniineut upon them 
will kindly bear thip in mind for 
the first four weeks of the season. 

The current and opening attrac- 
tion at tlu' Cohiinbia, New York, is 
I. II. Ilerk's Mingle Jingle," calcd 
the second edition on llic program. 
It li;is held over Harry OXeil. Stel- 
la Morrisey and Frank Hughes froni 



Km ( ty rt .ts piocrjcers, 

l>r.\ni;i>- i.otK-f to or com:iiiii;ic;'.t on 

>Mtli aiiv union. 

'1 }i( 11 i; '^o inmli iiis'.ilc stulT on thf 
V. l.olr nffiiii- iljiit s;>m(' of it f;l»o-,ilil 
be !>; iiiffi fiT liio infonnation of all 
|>;;;li s;i;i(' irt>|i!»' who aii' aiid liiJve 
hiMMi i^lt♦l«^1e(i in llic stand iikkIc by 
tl,.' (\iluml. a aua'i.st t'le unions. 



eccentric putty noft* type, lapsing oc- 
♦ asionaliy into u mild 'Dulcii* dia- 
led, but for the belter part reading 
lines minus accent. Kolb has n like- 
able comedy uiethod. going after 
laugliR without strain lu f<»r them, 
and getting plenty of m i us A din- 
agreeable feiture of Mf. Kolb"s work 
that should be thrown out immediate- 
ly is n piece of busine.s^ that has him 
blowing his nose and emitting a sound 
that is disgusting. Another is Mr. 
Kolb's habit of spitting - never a 



:it t IC.-lllt <»f tliC lo:'k out ( fo!" 



lot 1< 
tiic: V 

^ 1 t'o: 



out 
1 



hands and musi 
liikrL" rule by tin 



vvhl« li 
niti-a I'- 



ll attiially was) is tliat 
s lu'cn i:;' i Iiant'"' in the \v;tKc 
(,i the sl:i,;c 
n.»- ' yi il<*u 

li;;ii(i> union has ln'cn snspend- 
lliire r;oi;tii 
tin 1 (•(•nf( rej.i L' to 
s.; i((t) shows M'c n!l<»wc(l to cnrr> 
( i.,> !i ss man in tlie crew (eit!»er n 
j.K'j.tity man or ele<trioianl 
J^ a saCii'p i'.i .S('>LJ.r)(» for the 
ti( ::. n:i(l neither member of any crew- 
is Ic 1 •"(>(]% e pay wh'.Ie a show is lay- 
ing off. 

As It standi, it looks ns though 
the unions had necnred the best of 
if, for t'rn" nnisicians' scale is also 
nndiangid. The i»al inside stuff is 
thnt th" n'.iions did not want to set- 
tli. Thry were .intriy. nt the bnr- 
1» ;. ii:i" i:ianai;ers in general and 
riarlrs Wahlroii of lioston in parti- 
cular. Waldron was .ailed from Bos- 
ton hy the Columbia to handle the 
Kt: he s:tiu'.:icii as tlie cp vjit(»r. He 
nij!! ii^cd tiie (jiay«'iy, r.oston. a Co - 
UM i. a h( ;is". The unions aUeg*' that 
'W'.'ih.'ron ;•-- manager <tf (In* Hoston 
house held a contract with the stage 
hniKs union wl.erdiy and unth^r 
v!mi») l.c ).!i ! hi>- st;;^e <Tew S'JT.- 
r,l) a i:;;:;: a week. Tri«* union f?ent 
i( jii I t n?.'.t;ves to i;ee Wahiron. th* y 
cia ID when his coiitvaet ha<l ytt a 
year to run but at a time when every- 
thi: ;r in living wa-- at \''- lie'ght. The 
nn . 11 asked Wa'.dron to grant an 
ini ease to his stage crew. Waldrou 
was said to have de;lined insisting 
tin union men live up t(» their con- 
tract which the men d;<l, working 
lint. I the finisJi. The 'J.') per cent 
retlnction asserted by the Columbia 
it w jM insist ujion in the wage 
H(a1e also took in Ito-ton and the 
(niycty with its $27.o() we.-kly stage 
nnployees whwh would have reduced 
the scale there to n little over $*J0. 
Hesides. t!i. onion headquarters in 
New York had the gross receipts 
for t)ie his! season of every house 
on the Columbia and Ameriean cir- 
cuits with the net profits of several 
ns well. 

Ak this writing (Labor Day) the 
(Columbia JiaK three open weeks for 
the ^easotl through Youngstown, Ak- 
ron. T'tica and <.t]ier cities being out. 
It was also reported to-day Young- 
stown an ; Akron will not be allowed 
to return to the Columbia Circuit, 
while th»' American will not take 
back Seranton. 

'J'he instgator of the open shop 
an«l the dictator of the open shop 
policy annonnoe<l for burlesrpic was 
Kam A. Seribner. It was Scr bner 
all th way and against everyone 
who ojiposed him. Seribner guided 
tlw biiriesrine peojde in the strike. 
A large majority of the hnrlesipie 
managers wi re <|i'ad ogainst the open 
(fJioM 'niea-'iiro. The producers as 
M( II. on hoth wheels. Some sai«l 
ro: otlM'is dared say nothin,*:. Ar- 
guments grew wiirm toward the last. 
Ti e Chicat'o boaib throw rig. when 
two C(»;nmba houses were struck, 
while the American wheel theatres 
In that c ty were left entirely aione. 
brought the lockout to a focus., 
with .1 meeting between the faction 
resulting, although a [irevio'is nwet- 
inj: hefore the trouble starte<l t(» 
break had brought no peace terms, 
thou^'li peace could have been iicr- 
ic( ted thi'ii. 

Th«' Cohonhiji pro«]iieers were 
taxed for the expense;: of tln» strike 
and tiie (*olunibia exitense was prob- 
ably around $10<).(M1(). The American 
prodiice-s would have been taxed had 
it net been for the prote-lifui "'x eu 
t.lie.Di by 1//V Jlerk.. nresident nf the 
American wheel. When the Ciduni- 
bin asked the Amer Can for its sun- 
port. Herk. it was refwuted at the 
lime, (and never denied) demanded 
the American wheel jnid producers 
be Ke<'iired against loss. The Ctd- 
un>hi.i Circuit agn ed. 

Herk hnd been reported es opoosed 
to the ovu shop lock fcit. He i< 
also said ♦ > have exerted Irs influ- 
rn<'«'. whirl) was considerable, with 
th*' nriion»< to effect tlie sotllement 
and it wjis through Herk's efforts, 
according to tlie story, the first con- 
frrr.iee wa« held. 

V>'hi|i< the burl«"^'ine hick out by 
itself niii'Itt have been looked upon 
as a small matter by the unions for 
the number nf oeople eniraged. and po 
on it ol'taincfl national imnortnnce 
j throurli the number <if eitirs involve«I. 
' lifi, or -U) ^^y m.'>rc The r<dumb'n*« 
onerj slum proi>.""aT>dn was sent to nil 
thone cities until the American Fed- 



hist season. The remainder, with 
IS choristers,* are new. Harry 
Steppe is one of ih.e two featured 
principals, with Mr. O'Neil the other, 
one of the few straight men, 

. (O'Xeil) in burles'iuo who is fea- 
(pei-ling a fur- | t„re(i jn the billing. Stepp? is a 
be held on that '• Hebrew comedian, formerly of some- 
what rough methods but he seems 
to have toned down and judging by 
his first performance Monday, Mr. 
Steppe wi 1 be a likable laughmaker 
along the Columbia line of travel. 

At the initial showing tlie choruei 
made the best iinjiression. They looked 
well especially the front linft, were 
tastefully and nicely gowned but the 
impression was made through their 
well drilled work, which must have 
been accomplished by Fred Clark 
who did the staging in short time. 

There arc some special songs, with 
O'Neil the lyric writer and Jesse 
CIreer the composer of the numbers. 
The "Love Dreams" number, used 
for tin* linale of the lirst part, is 
a good song, specially written, and 
works out a pretty production ef- 
fect, made more so through lighting. 

Among the si)<>cialists are Eddie 
Murray aiul I'rank Hughes, singer.s, 
(one at the piano > and ICvyle, n llam 



singers and 



sey and Ilillie I'urctdla 

danii'rs. The latter get most with i cim ion is n joy to listen to and his 
their dancing. leading on > number | t>ersonality gets rizht over the foots, 
for a tough dance that got several The show is divided into the rc-u 



recalls. Margie Coates alsQ does a 
single singing turn, ragging and jazz 
ing. 



.xlessrs. Steppe. I lughes and (VNeal j «tage. the show could not hnng fou 

got quite a good dea out of a three I , ^^^ „f j^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ 

shell game scene in one and the • ^„„ „„ , . J,. - ,» ' 

i • 1 cs*. 1 /-i«v- 1 -iu ' in one and two. The 'ult stncrp Rof 

trm, also Steppe and O Neal. with , 1 , "/ ^"' suikc ser 



j>romisi 
after the show has been working for 
awhile, 

A more detailed review of the per- 
formance will be given later 
season. 



setting for his per.sonal return with 
the old banj'». There was lilu'rnl ap- 
plause for the clean comedy and new 
melodies. And the clever principals 
that Ueeves now offers had little dif- 
ticiilty in stopping the show alniost^t 
will, fiive Reeves two weeks' time 
at the most, and his musical melange 
will be bitting a pace that few (Co- 
lumbia Wheel attractions can hope to 
attain. 

The new Reeves vehicle is split into 

doses of comedy woven in by Harry 
(Heine) Cooper, aided and abetted by 
Frank Pickett and Charles La Vine, 
both contributing several characters. 
There's not much plot to either "His 
Mayorship," tlie first burletta, or 
"Home Hrew," which forms the sec- 
ond ncf. But there's plenty of fun, 
plenty of melody, plenty of dancing, 
and "heap much good looking women," 
a sure indication that the eye of Al 
has not lost its cunning anymore than 
has his banjo hands. 

Cooper, a graduate of other Colum- 
bia shows, evidences decided improve- 
ment. His comedy methods are 
smoother and more effective. His fa- 
miliar "recitation" bit and his souse 
bid fair to become burlesque claaaics. 
There is a decided change for the bet- 
ter in the drunk scene. It is realistic, 
yet free from offensiveness. The card 
game bit has the appearance of new- 
ness even if it may not be. And the 
house liked it immensely. Among the 
other old friends recognized were the 
vamp scene, the "I don't know" pat- 
ter, the use of the mirror to aid in 
phtting over a song number and a 
devil monologue by Pickett that re* 
minds of ."Experience." Cooper does 
not make his appearance until the 
show is some 17 minutes old, but he 
scores from start to the finish. 

Reeves has been especially fortunate 
in his selection of all principals. Mae 
Jane.se is a well formed, lively sou- 
brct. and has a voice. The same 
tribute goes to Marcia Compton, the 
attractive ingenue. Flo Bogard is a 
pleasing prima donna, and Iliibby Jim 
is a fine straight Piekett is one of 
the best character men in burlesque, 
and his work is ably seconded by La- 
Vine. Then there are Peggy Dean 
and Evelyn Reade. two recniits with 
musical ability that takes them far. 
Cooper. Miss .Tanese, Miss Compton 
and the Dean-Reade duo all stopped 
the show Monday night. 

There are musical and dancing num- 
bers galore. "Jealous Moon" is one of 
the former that is going to be hummed 
hereabouts for. weeks. "Strut Miss 
Lizzie." "Looking for n Boy." "In 
Wrong With the Right Girl." the 
Bogards' Moon Rong, "Sweet Hor- 
tense" and "It Takes a Good Man to 
Do That" are others that size up as 
sure fire. 

Reeves has not stinted on produc- 
tion. There's a chorus of 20 and most 
of 'em are under 20. Two pony pages 

There's a costl> 



tlicT HtK.ge. \Vi*h one or two minor 
exceptions Kolb is clean otherwise as 
far as his comedy is concerned. 

Frank "Rags" Murphy, who shares 
the comedy honors with Kolb. does a 
tramp character that has a touch of 
individuality in makeup and manner- 
isms. Mr. Murphy also has a bad 
habit that shouhl receive the atten- 
tion of the pruning knife. This is a 
cotchline. "What the he—" with the 
final sound, never spoken, but regis- 
tering the same us if the word Had 
been completely pronounced. Once 
or twice it's funny, but it's too fre. 
quently repeated to be effective. 
Murphy is a good dancer and a first- 
rate tumbler. Both Kolb and Mur- 
phy (ITidorstand burlesque values 
thoroughly, work together well and 
get excellect results from everything 
thoy handle. 

Betty Palmer, a little red-haired 
soubret with a shapely figure and a 
nifty pair of dancing feet, lifts the 
show when she is lending numbers, 
and generally puts pep into the pro- 
ceedings whenever she Is in view. 
Miss Palmer has a rather naughty 
little wiggle, which she managed to 
keep fairly well in control Monday 
afternoon. Emma Harris, a good- 
looking bninette. is another of the 
soubret type, and still another is Mil- 
dred Br.ndley, bfonde. plump and pos- 
sessed of a likeable presence. 
Evelyn Pryce. the prima, is a bru- 
nette, fjiir voice, but a pippin when 
it comes to wenrine clothes. 

Tom O'Brien and Andrew White 
handle the bits capably. White has 
1 pleasant Fijiging voice and O'Brien 
a sweet tenor, that is used effeitively 
in a ballad or two. ns well ns a spe- 
•iiUy with Mildred Bradley. Miirrav 
P.ernard. the straight, know*! his busi- 
ness from the ground ui>. His enun 



hition two parts. The first oct has 
six scenes .nnd (he second three. At 
the Olvmpie. beeinsp of the small 

r 

s 

.<i 

the girls or without them^d'id teim I '^'■<; clfan nnd good to look at, with 
work that besjioke future oromiHe ""^ standing out particularly 



The 



oi»ening is novel. Mildred Bradley aj. 
nenring in one. and spei-king a pro- 
log, the ?.1iow in that way getting 
in the I away from the conventional choral 
: opening, with the girls singing an 



ticorgc Collins is now leader of the ! en«;emble. Sixteru choristers, eight 
Columbia orchestra of nine. Mr. 1 mediums and eight sbow girls, all 
Collins some years ago was at the j willine wo-kers. nnd with a smile that 
Murray Hill, when J. Herb.-rt Mack. ' v. in*:, help th.e general effect 
who continues as the Columbia's^ There is no monev chin-in- but 
manager (Mr. Mack is also presi- „,ore nre several veteran hits^su.^ 
dent of the (.dumbm .\musement ,.j,,^ „,^ ^ ^ ., 

(,o.) ran he Murray Hill. ( oU.ns „^,, „ tra«'n«tv boxing bit with lie ' ^'^^^'^^ « "*>^''^>' 

succeeds Ld. Morebach. the Cobim-i^, ^^; .^. ,,^",, "f^^.V;^^ 7,, ,,"','! i splash with costumes and with scenic 



bia house leader for several seasons, 
where he was noted for his over- 
ture orchestrations. Mr. Morebach 
could have returned but preferred 
to remain with the professional de- 
partment of Shapiro. Bernstein & 
Co. 

"Jingle Jingle' 'is ]»rograining its 
principals in tliis manner: 

Hurry Steppe .Tewlsli Coiiifiillan ' 

Harrv 

Sti-IU Morrlm«'y 

MaiRle Cofttes 



of that word sufBcient for 20 



mm 



effects. The orange and gold color 



iites." A very funny b't is that whic'i I scheme for the first act's finale. "In 
has ^fu^^ y Bernard and Evelyn j Biibbleland," is especially dainty. The 

eight settings are done on a scale 
above burlesque's average. 



I ryce in a quarrel !*cene in n re^- 
raurnnt. and winding n > n wordy :::• 
^ument by bre.il<ii7 :•]] H^ frocM-vr 
*n Piirhf. A l>i» whir-b brines Kolb 
into the Pudit'.T'iuni v itl, n h.immer 
, will undoubtedly work into a wow 

IV^'*"?' ^SlrHlgl.tman • ^vhen tie show ire(v, set 

..rrlMKi Donna fp.^ .., _» ,, ,,' ' • 

Ingenue I . T^'": •' '''■^- PnMes" Is nn avemre 

St.ubrettp Amene.iu wheel frolic, as it stand*. 

Tuvenilp , Tf should Prow better fl^ if 

.(^harart^r Mar. ; „),,„ .,^ j^^^^ 

. . . Dancer , . « 
o * ' nl 



Bahn. 



TOWN SCANDALS 



Kvyloon Ilanip* y 
Kdillo Murray. . . 
Frjink IIupli^s. . 
n Ilii' rurrelhi. 



JAZZ BABIES 



Snlrlt of llurNnoue. r»J :.«.<? Mildred nrndU'y 

.Mephii<(o Mutr.*y Urmard ; 

O. n. Ctond Tom ORrlrn [ 

•Inlinny Wi»«* Amlr^w While! 

Misi M'Gaye P^Jvflyn Trice' 

Kyty I>I<I«1 ]\cXiy IVilnier 

Iva Mill On i:miM;i ITjirrls 

Hn j'.o IToiiliriiii ... Frank (UaK-'> Murphy 
Ignale I'liipf Matt Kolb 



goes 
is n producer with 
' nieiq. Avho h:'s the linnwledge and 
•'hilitv to fd! fbo Tirevei.* wenk spot" 
The Olv-npie l-H.l eljghtl 

h ilf n iiouse Afoiid'T nfternoon. the 
• '-psanf weather nnd the comnetition 
of the holidar outings and the bfaches 
"uttinrr n hcivy crimp in th 
t'Pdan'e. 



Ctiicairo. Sept. T. 

Petit Bebe Helen Iludaon 

Blushing Rose Ola HudRon 

Jack Lnve Jack Dur>Iey 

Mile. NlKhtlngale Corinne Wilson 

Mlaa Whiniakal Ethel Shutta 

Peaty Pete Charlea Fairan 

, Ilexiklah Sap Joe Vaii 

^ more than | oick Dead-Eye Norman Ilanley 



nt- 



The Olympic g(»t under w.iy for the 
veasoii Monday :!fleriioon (liabor 
Day), with Ted; an. I Jennings' "Ja/,/. 
Babies." The show opened "cold" at 
the mat, unlike other seasons, not 
having li.Ml the advantage of a week 
or two of preliminary hreak-in play- 
ing, both Cidumbia and American 
wheels calling off the pre-sea^^ou time 
this yea'* because (»f the 'open shop" 
situation, terminated Ia>t week by a 
peace agreement that brought the 
union stage hands an<l musicians back 
into I he burlesuue houses strain. The 
elimination of the "break-in" tour was 
very noticeably re(le« ted in the Mon- 
day showing c»f the ".la/.z Babies." It 
ran for two hours <ind Tm minutes, 
some li'i minutes too long. Consr?- 
ering the lack of a previous audience 
try-out. the show went over very 
well, there being no hitches or waits, 
.such dull spot's as noted being due to 
the length of the bits and a number 
or two that meant nothing. 

Matt Kolb put the show together 
and Frank "Bags" Murphy is fea- 
tured in (he billing. Kolb does an 



nrij. 



AL REEVES' SHOW 

Syracuse. N. Y.. Sept. 7. 

"r;:ve me credit, boys," again chants 
Al Reeves, fwle owner and prop, of 
the "Big Beauty Sh'>w." which made 
its debut of the new Columbia Wheel 
season at the Bastable here Monday. 

And "your old pal. Al." deserves it 
as he perhkps has never done before. 

For the Beeves Show is simon pure 
•'clean." 

With the emphasis upon legitimate 
comed.v, song and dance, and with the 
suggcTtiveness of other seasons erased 
to the extent that not even a whiff re- 1/ollow in the footatepa of ^c"ark 



mains, Al's new combination comes 
under the wire as a sure-fire winner. 
And this in spite of the fact that the 
threatened labor difficulties made re- 
hearsals few and far between and put 
the Jinx sign on some of the produc- 
tion necessaries. 

The second performance Monday 
night saw the show with mighty few 
rough spots. • It saw, moreover, the 
viiidieation of Reeves* decision to wipe 
off the slate and givf himself a new 



Irons & Clainnge are again this 

season sponsoring "Town Hcandals" 
on the Columbia Circuit, but from 
first sight it is hardly likely that the 
attraction will "Scandalize" the pa- 
trons of the circuit to the extent of 
making it one of the leaders on 
the wheel and being up among the 
big money getters of this season 

There are a good many reasons for 
this. First of all, the show is the same 
in its entirety as it was last season 
and through -the demise of George 
Clark, who was its principal come- 
dian, is devoid of humor, as none of 
the three tramp comedians is up to 
the first-wheel standard Then, there 
is no book and the bits and "gags" 
can well be said to have .a score and 
more of stripes about them. Two of 
the comedians, Norman Stanley and 
Charles Fagan, were with the attrac- 
tion last season and Joe Van, the 
added starter, is hardly qualified to 



nlno contribute largely in Bu;Md>ing 
the ente taininent in n vocal and lero- 
sichorcait manner and they' with Misn 
Shutta make the attraction a "toD 
heavy" woman show. 

This to some extent may be quali- 
fied as an asset, but hardly from a 
box-ofllce standpoint, for even though 
pali ns come to sec a burlescnie 
show to faze at the "girlies," they 
expect a little more, too, and when 
Irons & Clautage get them and sup- 
ply them with goo<l and substantial 
material they might round the show 
out P« r' X"-'^'"- „ ,^ , ^^^ 

From a production standpoint, even 
though the scenic invest u res iK «f 
last bcascn*s vintage, "Town Scan- 
dals' can stand well up to the fore 
among the beat. The costuming 
which is plentiful, is also of the pre* 
vious season but has been fresh- 
ened up and will look good for its 
early trials, but eventually will have 
to bo replaced for. newer raiment. 

The chorus does not seem to be 
up to the standard in appearance and 
endeavor. The girla have passed the 
early stage of chorusdom in seasons 
gone by and most of them have ac- 
quired weight with age. Their work 
shows lack of rehearsal, as far as the 
ensembles and dance steps are con- 
cerned, as none seem to work or 
care to work in unison. 

Two of the scenes seem to be well 
chosen, one is quite reminiscent of 
the "Extra Dry" vaudeville act, which 
had a vamp number introducing the 
vampires of yesterday and today. 
This scene is an exact replica, both 
as to costumes and dialog. The other 
scene is "In Hades" which recalls 
Tom Teriss* vaudeville offering "The 
Devil." The only difference is the 
injection of rough and low comedy 
which ia hardly acceptable to refined 
burlesque audiences. 

The show is in two acts and eight 
scenes, billed at a fantasy and pro- 
duced under the personal direction of 
Arthur Clamagc. On its inital per- 
formance it ran almost three hours 
and will have to stand a lot of prun- 
ing.. This can easily be accomplished 
an a number of the bits and gags are 
stretched out n bit too much. One 
scene, "StVeet in Chinatown." can be 
eliminated altogether without impair- 
ing the progress of the show. 

It is more than likely that the pro- 
ducers, * who are seasoned sh'jwmen 
and realize the value of a good com- 
edy show, will probably recast the 
offering, ex purge a lot of unwhole- 
some and unrelishable business and 
whip it into a satisfying vehicle. 
Really one "tramp" in a show is a 
plenty, but when you have three, the 
road is tough, loug and weary. 

STROLLING PLAYEPiS 



Ben Zeen 

Prop. Hop 

Henri 

Johnny Jones 

Alphonso 

Qeorffe 

LiUpIn 

Judgo Blue 

Panrhette 

I>a Btlle Marie 

May Canh 



. . .Jaek Cullahan 
. . .Eddie Stiubrrt 

Matty W)iit« 

Sxl (Jolrt 

. . . . Julen Howard 

Otto (luhl 

Ed Gold 

liob Jarkson 

Julia (fiftord 

Ann Myers 

. . . .Haxt 1 ItHrffla 



The major portion of the work 
falls upon Ethel Shutta, who is fea- 
tured. She works in a bard and con' 
scientious manner and does every- 
thing possible to put oyer songs, 
dances and dialo|. Miss Shutta is 
relied upon a gooa deal to work with 
the comedians and does her utmost 
in attempting to "feed" them along 
for wholesome laughs, but to no avail 
as the men do not seem to respond 
to her entreaties and efforts. The 
Hudson Sisters, especially Helen, a 
buxom little aoubret and Miss Wilson, 



Jacobs & .Termon have an un. usually 
well dressed show in "The Strolling 
Players." Its numbers are lively and 
its equipment in costumes and set- 
tings are scaled on a generous meas- 
ure. Likewise its payroll must rep- 
resent a considerable sum for a 
Wheel organization. In its present 
state of development, however, it 
falls down lamentably in the comedy 
department. 

Of course, it is early in the season 
to pass Judgment upon a burlesque 
outfit, but Jack Callahan and Kddie 
Shubert seem to have so little of a 
basis upon which to build as they 
go along that the prospect for suffi- 
cient betterment is not promising. 
Callahan plays a sort of genteel bobo, 
made up with blue chin and a sug- 
gestion of red nose and running to 
gaudy clothes. 

Shubert does an Ed Wynn, horn 
spectacles and the appropriate ges- 
tures. The latter charocter has no 
burlesque tradition behind it and the 
characterization misses fire. WTieel 
audiences take it as a sort of "nance' 
and that type never did play anything 
but a subordinate "feeding" part in 
a burlesque show. For a prin<ipal 
comedian he has no command over 
the situation. Burlesque fans are a 
conservative lot. They get accus- 
tomed to an accepted line of comic 
types and they resent innovations. 

There isn't a dialect character in 
"The Strolling Players" and itp laugh 

fercentage suffers in consequence, 
t's harder to make straight Knglish 
funny than when the language is 
strained through eccentricities of 
speech. There seems to be some- 
thing innately humorous about bent 
pronunciations. 

The situation, then, gets down to 
this: The comedy being weak, the 
straiffht singing men. the women 
principals and the ensembles take 
command. This makes Sid Gold, a 
singing straight man with rather too 
energetic a method of -f<»rcing him- 
self upon the audience, the feature 
of the proceedings. He is every- 
where and holds the center with 
record frequency for his type of pla.y- 
er. As a straight man there ian't 
a thiiig the matter with Gold. He 
can get his stuff over and he does. 
His number, "Mr. Booze," was per- 
haps the applause hit of the evening 
a Hurtig & Seamon's this week. Only 
there is rather too much of him. ll<* 
goes after his audience hammer and 
(Continued on page tt5) 



-ti:. 



Friday, September 9, 1921 



BURLESOU E 




COLUMBIA WHEEL DECLARES 
SHARING TERMS INCREASE OFF 

-^Tswoft- Given as A4aadoi«R?nt4rf~0.pen Shop Pbi?— . 
Producers Invesfad More Through Expected In- 
crease of Their Share This Season. 



The plan whereby the Columbia 

^hecl attractions were to receive an 

bicrcaBC of from five to 10 per cent 

in tho fibaring terms by a number 

of Columbia houses boKinning with 

the current season, has been with 

drawn. The reason ascribed to the 

producers 4)y the Columbia Amuse- 

ment Qo. for calling off the incrcus- 

•d pcrcontnges is that the increases 

were to be granted the producers by 

the houses because of the "open 
■hop" situation, which the Columbia 

.was to have maintained this season. 
The announcement calling t>ff the 
percentages sent to the producers 
by the Columbia states in effect 
that inasmuch as the *'open shop** 
)plan has been abandoned and the 
Columbia houses are to operate on 
the union or "closed shop" plan, the 
fncrcABcd sharing terms, as contaii^e^ 
in n letter dated Aug. 29, doesn't go, 
with one exception, the Burchell, Des 
Koines. 

The terms on which the Columbia 
•hows will play the Durchell this 
•eason are 0?S per cent to the show 
and 35 to the house. The Columbia 
New York, wiH continuue as In for- 
mer seasons to play the traveling 
nhowf on A basis of 45 per cent of 
the gross to the show up to $5,000. 
'After $5,000 the show and Columbia 
•plit RO-50. The Increased terms 
plan called for the Solumbia this sea* 
■on to play the travelling shows on 
a straight 60-50 basis, with the 
$5,000 thing out. The Colombia, 
Chicago and Hurtig & Seamon*s New 
York will continue with the same 
■haring arrangement as heretofore, 
45 per cent to the show and 55 to the 
house, up to $5,000. The two fore- 
going houses were to have'declared 
bff the $5,000 thing and played the 
travelling shows this scsMon on a flat 
60-50 basis. 

Shariag Terms 

The increased percentage plan also 
Included better sharing terms to the 
shows of approximately five to 10 per 
eent by the Columbia houses in Bal- 
timore, Kansas City, St, Louis, Gay* 
»ty and Casino, Boston, Casino and 
Kmpire Brooklyn and the G'ayety, 
Washington. The shows were to 
liavo played these houses on a basij* 
of 50-50 up to $0,000, with a pro- 
Tision calling for CO ner cent to tho 
■how, after $6,000. These as well as 
an increased percentage for the Ma- 
jestic, Jersey City, which was to have 
ployed the shows on a G5-35 basis 
kave been called off by the Columbia. 

The rescinding of the Columbia's 
fncreased porcentago plan for the 
■hows has caused considerabU feeling 
on the part of the producers, it is 
••aid. The producers, according to 
Topnrt, were told to go strong on 
production this sonson, in view of 
the increased percentnges. Most of 
them took the Columbia announce- 
ment of increased perc*»ntj)gC8 at 
face value and phinged heavily on 
mounting their shows, as well as en- 
gasinp rnsts thnt called for a bigger 
*al:iry list than heretjofore. Witli 
tho c.nlling off of increase In per- 
contairn the producprB fool they have 
a grievance, which, Attiiough un- 
spoken officially, has resulted in a 
fooling of resentment. 

The letter announcing the cnllinj: 
off of increased percentages, refers 
to a letter sent out by the Colum- 
t^ia. Aug. 25, informiug the producers 
of the increased sharing terms. The 
^decision to increase the sharing terms 
for the shows, it is' understood, was 
arrived at a meeting of the Coluw- 
Ma Amusement Co. held on April 
IS, last 



OARBIOK OPENS 



After Dark for Yeart, St. Loult 
Hoate Takes Burlesque 



Tree., Phllly, Not PermaRent 

The Trocadero, Philadelphia, will 
net play the American wheel attrac- 
tion regularly this season, although 
'Broadway Scandals" and "Some 
Whow," both American wheel shows, 
•re Hsted for a wdek each at the Troc, 
the booking having been made direct 
»y the shows. 

The Americon has the People's and 
Bijou in Philly &;; regular stands. 

The Trocadero la scheduled to put 
m a stock company in a week or eo. 



St. Louis Sept 7. 

TSie Oarrick. which formerly 
housed Lo^w's vaudeville and which 
has been closed for one year, after 
being remodeled and decorated mos 
opened this week with burlesque, tho 
corporation which recently purchas- 
ed the Butler holdings. Is operating it 

Although the bouse seats about 
150 less than the old Standard where 
the shows ployed American wheel 
burle8<]ae in this town, it has not en- 
joyed such attendance as filled the 
Garrick to capacity at both 'per- 
formances. Despite the hot weather 
and rain, crowds lined the lobby. 
"The Bathing Beautie^ rehearsed 
here and the opening performance 
was faultless. Jack Ilunt the tramp 
comedian with the aid of Bd Baxter 
gave one laugh after another. Lola 
Austin the prima donna (new m bur- 
lesque) registered a hit with her 
numbers. 

,The chorus worked welt but failed 
to make themselves heard in sing- 
ing. The settings were very Attrac- 
tive, with electrical effects worked 
in. 

The opening for the season ef 
"The Bathing Beauties" registered 
a hit 



GERTBUDE KNOCKED OUT 

Gertrude Hayes Jr. soubret of 
Barney Geraril's "Follies of the Day" 
was knocked unconscious by a de- 
scending drop curtain at the final 
dress rehearsal of the show, held at 
the Empire, Brooklyn,. Sunday night 
Miss Hayes was put out for 10 min- 
utes. 

A physician called from a nearby 
hospital made an examination, and 
found that Miss Hayes, while escap- 
ing serious injury, has sustained a 
badly bruised cranium. She is play- 
ing this week with plaster under 
her hair, concealing the wound. 

One of tho men of the show also re- 
ceived a bad whack on the top of 
the head by the same drop, sustain- 
ing a severe laceration. 



HOUSES ADVERTISING 

Chicago, Sept 7. 
For the Inauguration of the bur- 
lesque season the four bouses here 
went very heavy in their advertising 
in the dai les. They made big 

splashes in the Saturday and Sun- 
day papers, with the Star and Gar- 
ter and Columbia (Columbia Circuit) 
using 100-line copy and the American 
Circuit houses (Englewood and Hay- 
market) using 50-liue copy on both 
days. 

The average these hou.scs general- 
ly use is 25 lines single for Satur- 
day and Sunday. 



STARTING SUNDAYS 

The Columbia, New York, will 

start ploying Sunday vaudeville tliis 

coming Sunday. The bills, as in 

previous .seasons, will be booked by 

Dick Kearney of Fciber & Shea. The 

<C*olumbia has onnounocd a Susdaj' 
price reduction to $1.25 top for the 
first eight rows of the orchestra, 
with $1 behind thst The Yorkville 
and Hurtig & Seamon's resume Sun- 
day vaudeville shows next Sunday, 
with bookings by Billy Dolsney of 
the Keith office famfly department 



FEIBER & SHEA IN 
COLUMBIA TRIANGLE 



Ordered Off Wheel, Union 
Men Demanding Re- 
turn to Circuit 



JOHNSON AT HOWABD 

Jack Johnson, the colored ex-champ 
has been engaged as an added at- 
traction at the Howard, Boston, next 

week. The Hosrard ploys the Am- 
erican wheel shows, with a vaude- 
ville o'io. 



Caaoel Before Dpening 
The Rosar Sisl* rs, listed for this 
season's Jack Singer Show, have 
cancelled. 



An unlooKcd for tangle' f-nmo p>» nn 
aftermath of the settlement of the 
Columbia wheel'" proposed open shop, 
in the order of Sam Scribner of the 
Columbia to remove the Foiber ic 
Shea theatres at Youngstown and Ak- 
ron, Ohio, from the Columbia route 
sheets. Previously the Felber St Shea 
houses bad been withdrawn when the 
Columbia general manager said he in- 
tended to go through with hie open 
shop program, regardless of conse- 
quences. The Ohio house manage- 
ment along with other outside houses 
on the Columbia circuit were informed 
by the nuione all of their theatres 
would be termed unfair if they played 
burlesque in any of them. 

With the Columbia's settlement 
with the union, it was expected the 
houses withdrirwn would be restored. 
Felber & Shea are said to have re- 
ceived a notification from Scribner 
their bouses were oflF the wheel for 
all time. 

The unions heard of this order ac- 
cording to report and remonstrated 
against Scribner*a action. The unions 
are aaid to have called attention to a 
provision in the settlement agreed 
that embraced the contingency, in as 
much as the agreement stated all 
locked out men, crews and musicians 
would have to be restored. To re- 
store the men it would be necessary 
to restore the theatres, the unions 
added, and they are reported to have 
made a damend upon Scribner to rein- 
state the Youngstown and Akron 
houses; also it is said the Qayety of 
Wilmer db Vincent's at Utica, N. Y., 
has started a pop yauderille career 
this week. 



BHRLESP SEASON'S START 

SAID TO BE OF AVERAGE 

Columbia Reports of 0at-of-Town Business May 
Bring About Publicity Campiugn uTlnfui^M Jact 
Public Union Trouble Has Ended. 



*« 



EXTRA NIGHTS OUT 



Olymplo, New York, Will Try to 
Draw With Shows Only. 



Wrestlers, freaks, amateur nights 
and all such business boosters have 
been declared out for the current 
season at the Olympic, New York, 
by the Krauses. 

The Olympic, which plays the Am- 
erican wheel shows, has made a fea- 
ture of extra attractions of a'.l sorts 
for years. 

The decision to eliminate the freaks 
is a tentative one it Is understood, 
dependent on how the house does for 
the first few weeks with Just the 
shows to draw business. 



Reports received at the Oolambia 
and American circuit offices up to 
Wednesday indicate the opening of the 
burlesque season of 1021-22 as being 
up to last year on a general average, 
btfth circuits classifying the first two 
or throe days business as "good." The 
matinees of the western houses open- 
ing Sunday were generally very good, 
but some of the Labor Day matinees 
of both circuits were rather light with 
tho Labor Day night shows getting 
money all over the country. 
. All but four of the 38 Columbia 
shewB opened either Sunday or Mon- 
day, the four not opening being '*0dds 
ari Ends" ' (Hurtig ft Seamon) 
changed its route with 'Tit for Tat" 
another Hurtig ft Seamon show, a 
couple of weeks ago, "Tit for Tat" 
opening in Rochester Labor Day. 
"Odds and Bnds" will not open until 
Sept 11, at St. Louis. The "Garden 
of Firolics" (Irons ft Olamages) was 
scheduled to open In Dos Moines last 
Sunday, but could not because of a 
street car strike resulting in the 
dosing 0t all Des Moines theatres, 
"The Gardens" was listed to open at 
Omaha yesterday (Thursday) Sept. 
10. 

The postponement of the opening 
of the Dave Marion show was due to 
two reasons, first because of the pro- 
duction having been so badly damaged 
in the C^met warehouse fire in Brook- 
lyn two or three weeks ago, that re- 
pairs could not be made in time, or 
tho damaged scenery replaced by new 
stuff and secondly because of the 
dropping out of Feiber ft Shea's two 
houses off the Olumbia route. Mar- 
ion's show wHI get under way Sept. 
11. "Harvest Time" was to hare 
opened at Plaiafleld, N. J., but that 
house dropping off the route, canaed 
the show to lay off. "Harreat Time" 
was scheduled to open Thursday. 

Pla infield and Perth Amboy, and 
Stamford are back on the Columbia 



was desided a campaign of billposting 
' or newspaper advertising throughout 
the eitlea pf the wheel, would be ad- 
visable, to inform the public the open 
shop lock-out had been settled, to the 
satisfaction of the unions and bur- 
lesque people. It was beheved unless 
this were done tho icspression might 
remain the lock-out was still on 
through the large quantity of publicity 
sent out by the burlesque offices; alao 
the three-sheeBng done in many cities 
by the unions declaring the burlesque 
houses unfair. 



K. 0. BUBPBISE 



No ProvloM Notleo of Durlotqiii 

SottlOMOBt 



Kansas Oity, Sept 7. 

When the first rumors reached here 
laat Tuesday that the burlesque ui ag- 
nates had got together wit^Uie stage 
hands and musicians unions, none 
were more surprised than the local 
managers as no intimation had been 
given them of such a move. Both 
burlesque housei were all aet and 
ready to go with the non-nnion crtwa 
and orchestras. 

The move was alao a surprlso to 
the members of tho different thea- 
trical unlono. Titer' had the town 
plastered with flaming red one-sheets 
"Notice. Goyety and Century thea- 
tes are unfair to Uiganized Ijabor." 

The first news of the adjustent 
came to the labor aniane who had 
the information aereral honra before 
the house manogoro. 

After the non-union men had boot 
paid and difmlssed to al'ow the rer* 
ular union employees to get back 
on their old joba, it was learned 
the unions had several of their mem- 
bers planted in both houses, where 
I they would be in a position to see 
and report everything that occured. 



ACADEMY, SCRANTON 

The C. H. Miles Academy, Scran- 
ton, Pa., will be added to the Ameri- 
csn burlesque wheel for the ch* ir 
season, replacing the Majestic, which 
withdrew when the burlesque inter- 
ests announced an open shop policy. 

The Academy was formerly a Miles 
vaudeville house and has been plsying 
muoicsl comedy stock during the 
summer. It is the second Miles house 
to be added to the American wheel 
this year, the other being in Sche- 
nectady. 

Tho new Miles, Scranton, which 
will be completed within a month, will 
play (lio Miles vaudeville in place of 
the Academy. 



SCRIBNER SELLING 

(Continued from page 3) 

the week, though it was said to be 
a Hcrious one and further aggra- 
vated through Scrlbner's arbitrary 
action in ordering the Feiber ft 
Kliea houses off the wheel. This 
would have given the wheel an ad- 
ditional open week on its route for 
the senson. 

Scribner hss been a coromandini 
figure in burlesque Lor years, hav- 
ing assumed the opersting direction 
of both wheels until Mr. Herk became 
the head of the American when Scrlb- 
ner's activities were conQned to 
the ('ohiinbla circuit. Mqssrs. 
Mack aud Ilynlcka have given the 
roost of their attention to the in- 
tricacies and financing of the vari- 
ous Columbia enterprises. Their at- 
ticntion to those mAters was so 
strictly confined that eventually 
Scribner assumed the domination of 
the producers. 

While the outbreak among the 
Columbia executives has not been 
heard of very far outside of their 
own offices, it Is reported to have 
reached the point where either one 
of tike factions must win out. fs't\ir 
connection, if any It may have had 
with the reported offer of Scribner 
to sell his holdings, isn't 





0"^ 



"^^^ BLOOM and SHER ^"-'^^ 

"THArS MY HORSE" 

FAMOUS MUSICAL COMEDY STARS 

ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF THEIR SEASON IN VAUDEVILLE 

Booked Solid — Kotth, Interstate and Orpbenm drtaHs 

Broke All Reoords Last Season 

Presenting the Somewhat Different Comedy Aot la One-* 

"A TALE OF THE LONESOME SPINE" 

A BOX OFFICE STIMULANT 

Permaneat Address, 803 Timet Bidg.. New York 



route, following the settlement of the 
•*opcn shop" controversy. The Ma- 
jcHtic, JerHcy ('ity, which was to have 
played stdck if the open shop csm- 
psign continued, o^/i^ned aa per rcbed- 
ule with the Frank Finney show La- 
bor Day. 

All of the 33 American wheel shows 
opened as per schedule, Sunday and 
Monday afternoon. While the open- 
ings were satisfactory on both wheels 
the hot weather Tuesdsy and Wednes- 
day put a dent in most of the show's 
grosses. 

The past season 1020 was the best 
that burlesque ever saw In the matter 
of gross receipts despite ths slump 
at the end of the season. It was not 
the best year for profits, however, 
the high overhead, railroad fares, pro- 
duction costs, etc., cutting down the 
profits considerably beneath 1010 and 
1018 rated as the most profitable 
seasons ever known in burleique. 

Early in the week after the businesi 
reports out of town commenced to 
reach the Columbia headquarters, it 



ONE-NIOHTEBS RETUBll 

The Stone opera house, Bingham- 
ton. New York, and the houaea in 
Niagara Falls. Oawefo and Klmirs. 
which dropped ont of the Amcricati 
wheel route owing to the "open 
ahop" situation, went back into the 
American route sheeth Isst week, 
following tile aeUlement of the stage 
hands and musicians mstter. Five 
houses of the American Penn circuit. 
Cumberland, Tjancaster, York, Union- 
town and WllllamspoJt also retumcf? 
to the American route, as a ^ - i!t of 
the settlement. All of the houses are 
one-nighters on the American wheel, 
playing combinations when not oc- 
cupied by the burlesque showik 



Qayety, Roohester, Mutleal 

Rochester, N. T., Bept t. 

Joe Monk, who recently Mt the 
Temple after being musical director 
there ever since that honae openod, 
is leading tho ianrie ft! tho Oayoty 
this week. 






4 



-Wi^r^^ 



12 



VjfT(» 



EDITORIALS 



Friday, September 9, 1921 




Trade Mark RfClilrred 

r'ubliHhrd UVrkiy bj 
VAIIIKTY. Ine. 

filMK HIl.ViaKMAN. Protldont 
IM WcHt 461U Mrcct New Tork City 

sniiirr.irTioN 

Annur.l V . Foreign IS 

Slrslr roploB. 20 cents 



\«>I- ],\l\' 






jjpt. 



No. 3. 



Tlip intcrlomtorj- docreo of di- 
vorio of Ev.i r<jek Kcsslor from 
Anion Ki'ssicr, the booking agent, 
w:>.s si;;ii(l last week by Justice Gan- 
non in tilt* Miiicola Supreme (/curt. 
The plaintiff is luiown us i:va I*uck 
jtit-Tc ssiuii;i]i\ .nul sued on statutory 
gr uruls. The nciiorj was iiiMlcfend- 
(\^j!inl thr wife allo\ve«l .$10 weekly 
■fcioi.y. Tiu'ii' ono chihl was given 
iiilij (lie custody of the mother. 



Magistrate McQuade in the West 

?».;!.' ('(Hiit last week dismissed the 
tiiMi.v Society's complaint Qsain«t 
Jii'cs r.ernheim. manuK^M' of the "Tut 
.'.Md Take." flll-cojored show at the 
Town Ilall, Avho was charged with 
pciinitting a minor to ni)pear in the 
phw. T!ii- sill is the sliiinmying kid 
( f the ie\iM\ Florence I'arkham. The 
defrndnnt shtwed a license granted by 
Mayor Ilylnn's committee for the 
girl's njipearaLcc. 



William A. DracJy takes exception 
to the s::it(inent that Alice lirady's 
new pioce "Driftinj" hais been 
shelved. " Drifting' .showH promise," 
lu' s.i\ s "of havMii; the material for 
« g/cat suf ess. The coutral incident, 
however, does not have an American 
apiteal. It is being reconstructed by 
the aiiLlior. and will shortly begin new 
rehearsi;ls for its production in New 
York Cty." 



Daoiel Frohman corrects the Btnte- 
ment that Xazimova refia.sed to aa- 
siKt at the Actors* Tund Festival in 
HoMyv»ood recently. Certain con- 
siderations, Mr. Frohman Bay«. pre- 
vei^ted her personally participating, 
but she contribute*! liberally to the 
car.se in money at this time and on 
previous occasions. 



SHUBERT VAUDEVILLE 

Now th«t. the start of th« Shul)ert vaudeville circuit is a certainty, 
the, many t^oubtera that this would ever eventuate may continue to 
have their doubts In general, but there is no denying the fact. Many 
j]id. doubt that the Shuberts would open with a regular vaudeTiii^ 
circuit. We were among that number. The Shuberta didn't atari 
nor operate at first as though they seriously Intended to go througn 
with It. If there was an object behind the Shubert vaudeville au- 
lio u 11 cemenf , It fi as not becuuie couumon kuowieUge.**'" 



INSIDE STDFF 



ON LEGIT 



'i 



Adeline Leitzbach, phtywrigbt and 
scenarist, wishes to. be known hfere- 
ttfter as Adele Hendricks. She says: 
**AMy reason for cbimging namos is 
that Hendricks looks better than 
Leitzbacli and it's easier to read and 
pronounce." 



Lee Kohlmar returned last week 
from a two months' trip - abroad, 
v.'here he went in search of material 
for either a legitimate starring 
vehicle or to form a foreign alliance 
for making pictures. 



Tiie new prodrjction Helen and 
Josephine Trix will be starred in, in 
Ijondnn. will hnvp jf^ rlonr-po jf. 
ranged by Jack Connors, who sailed 
for Knglaud Sept. .'{ on the Olympic. 

The Will Morrisey acts 'Buzzin' 
Around" and "Overseas lievuc" 
started their second year on the I>oew 
(/ircnit last week. Abe Feiubcrg 
bandied the bookirif^s. 

At'vices received in New York soy 
the Palais D'Ete, the r^rincipal vaude- 
villr theatre of I'.nisscls, Ilelgium, is 
playing to cafiacity business. 

John Cumberland will not be a 
nicnibcr of one of the "Iiadies' Night" 
conlpallie^: as reported. 

Heion Namur has returned from 
KuioiM' and is now rehearsing for a 
serond road s'v.'.!sou with "NighLie 
Night." 



Richard G. Bosch, f(.rnierly assis- 
tant nt Loews Avrime H, is now 



manager 
Bronx. 



o; 



Loi.'WH IClstiiere iu the 



Harry Crawford, (ormerly in vaude- 
ville with tlic Baroness di* Ilollub, ii 
njw connected with the Tat Casey 
piu«lii« iijg d^'i^Ai tiiieiit. 

Walter Windsor's new 'Musical 
Artists" revile oi)ei.cd last Tliursdaj 
at the Mayflower, \ew York. There 
are M\ peopl«» ii\ the show, including 
the followinjT F^rincipuls: Jack Young. 
Velma Addison, Lillian Tearl, Fred 
Cirsou and Kvel.vn Van Dell. A, L. 
llaase wrote the special lyrios and 
Busic. 



The Shnberts are entitled to notice for taking the poorest proipoc- 
tive theatrical season of years to Inaugurate a new venture. But 
vaudeville Is not unfamiliar to the Shuberts. They have been deal- 
ing with It in one way or another for years, though not having actu- 
ally operated during that time any kind of straight vaudeville other 
titan Sunday concerts. 



with the newly formed International Managers* Association a fact, 
the hairline upon which ita-fatetrang dttrtng the first half hour of Uh 
formation li still dltcusaed by many of the several hundred manaKera. 



mum 



The big time of vaudeville which takes in the Keith and Orpheum 
circuits have bad a monopoly in that field ever since Klaw it Erlan- 
ger's Advanced Vaudeville venture, excepting the brief effort of Wil- 
liam Morris to combat the Influence and millions of his opposition. 

The big time may not have monopolized all the vaudeville patrona^o, 
but it has the big time operation, the internal affairs, where the big 
time as reprot^enteci by those two circuits has been as absolute lu 
dictatorial power as any monopoly could be. 



Opposition may not affect the big time's business and It may 
brighten all big time theatres and attendance, and opposition moy 
not cause the big time any undue concern, km the big time still con- 
trols by a powerful majority the larger number of playing weeks. 
That is an inducement and incentive to.tfn artist that could not bo 
wisely overlooked, but opposition does decrease the power of the big 
t^me, for it composes a place where acta can go If they do not satis- 
factorily deal with the big time, or the opposition may make offers 
the big time dees not care to meet or compete with. In other words, 
oj'positiou in big time vaudeville opens up a closed field. 



Previously there was a"* market for certain vaudeville artists in 
musical comedy, ' but they necessarily must have owned talent or 
turns adaptable to that market. All vaudeville artists are not so 
equipped. Therefore, the big time acts otherwise situated and also 
big time producers of skits and sketches, also revues, have had no 
place to turn after the big time unless going to the small time. 



The small time Is slowly but surely developing big time booking 
habits. It ficcms it must come, though its approach has been too 
filow. Even though small time engages but here and there a big 
time act, the combined bookings In days to arrive should make some- 
thing of a booking opposition to any strictly big time organization?. 
In the visionary distance and perhaps too far future is another threat- 
ening element against big time control. It is the useless picture 
tbeatro. Many ueeless picture theatres are helpless. One here an.l 
another there must try something else. If nothing else has been 
overbuilt, the picture house has. When the overflow finally seeks a 
more profitable policy it's going to be at some time or i^notber, prQb 
ably at first pop vaudeville, which takes in a picture, tfien straight 
vaudeville of the small time brand and after that, when the regulc^r 
small timers that are established drive out the newcomers, the big 
time will be tried, may haps also with a big time picture. Many 
believe this to be the future vaudeville show of the big type, bis 
time acts and big time features. 



Meanwhile all show business has seen the picture theatre increasr., 
spread out and dot everything that had anybody. The town wltho'it 
its picture place is now a novelty. If the cheapness of the entertain- 
ment invited the extensive building and could stand the heavy compe- 
tition, then there is good reason to believe that all kinds of vaude- 
ville can stand more theatres than are now devoted to it, for vaude* 
ville is not expensive, other than when Judged by former admission 
p? ices. 



In the Shabert opposition to big time vaudeville. Variety intends 
to be strictly impartial; to 'report the news as it gathers it; to review 
all bills as it sees them and keep right in the middle of the road. 
If it leaves the middle of the road, it won't be Variety's fault 

. The Shuberts thi;ik they havr a chance. Others think as they do, 
if they are sincere in playing opposition vaudeville and have no oth>r 
object in mind, at present or in the future. The Shuberts r.re show- 
men; they know their busln<)ss; they have proved it from the time 
Sammy Shubert leased the Herald Square theatre and up to when the 
Shuberts made Klaw & Erlanger admit they had become a factor; ap 
to this time when they are the leading amusement purveyors of the 
world, in gross, and all the^e things count in their favor if they are 
cincere. We shall see. 



EQUITY PLAYING THE OSTRICH 

Tlic Acton* Equity Association is still playing the ostrich on 
Variety. Some of Its officers seem to be doing the same thing on its 
members in that same respect. We have told the Equity before and 
often, If it doesn' like what Variety prints about Equity, to blame 
rjqulty, not Variety. 



Likewise we have told Equity we have no means of ascertaining 
whether our news reports on Equity are wholly correct or not. 
Equity removed that means from us when It barred our reporters 
from its offices. We do not dream news, neither can we dream veri- 
fications nor denials, so if the Equity officers who seem to be so an- 
noyed because one paper Is publishing such news as It obtains about 
Equity, want that news to be authentic as published, the way is to 
pull their faces out of the halo of supppfi^ed power they believe they 
have, and tell Variety to come around. Otherwise It's the old White 
Hats stuff all over again, old stuff to Variety and tried long before 
there was an Equity, even to the "obey your officers" and "be loyal" 
.'lyidcs. 



Another thing Equity seems to have overlooked through hiding Its 
head. How can it sue Variety for damages or libel for such publica- 
tions aa may displease its officers? When Equity posted its notice 
all Variety reporters were barred from Its offices and its staff re. 
fused to give Variety information of any character, It shut the door 
to damage suits, for Its very name of Equity could not carry it into 
a court of equity under that condition. 



Equity officers had better wake up about Variety. If Variety 
means nothing, why pay attention to it, and if it means something 
why not use common sense and at least, have the paper give it a 
break? Variety goes where any Equity organ will never get, it 
covers the circulation of any. Equity organ, ft reaches the real people 
of the theatre air over the world — and Bquity aays: "Keep Varlet/ 
men out of thia office.'* Uow simply sUlic 



i^ one 

present during that first half hour in the Pennsylvania Hotel's ba!l. 
room Several weeks ago but ha J a few moments' suspense wh'en WIN 

Ham A. Brady grabbed the floor and In the familiar Brady-Demos- 
thenes manner proceeded to raze the strXii'tiire then going up. ;. 

Nf-'io of the published repeats of tbo first day's meeting gave a hint 
of what happened or what might have occurred if three producing 
managers present hadn't- sensed danger with Brady's hat spinnin.q Ui 
the arena, and' thrown metaphoric quirts that cocked it. The reasun- 
no accounts of the contretemps got in the papers was that the 
organizers of the meetings had anticipated outbursts of one sort and 
another. To prevent the (i reworks getting printed and thus blocking 
the plana of the builders of the body, it was decided to exclude the 
press. 

Brady's iconoclasm seemed unpremeditated. His verbal spurt fol- 
lowed constructive talks by organizers upon the platform. Brady' 
was of the au(}lenc<i. Hib old confrere, George Hroadhurst, was in 
the chair. A 14-page pamphlet outlining a proposed line of pro-' 
cedure had been dlKtributed, the information it contained being obvi.- 
ousiy designed merely to facilitate the swift absorption of the plan 
and the quick corsummation of the obviously necessary parliamentary^ 
structure upon which the order would be founded. 

E. F. Albee had communicated his own enthusiasm to the body 
present by a clearly expressed £.rgument for organization In all fields 
of commercial endeavor. Albee had departed, and the chair found 
Itself confronted with the standing form of Brady posed for linguistic 
action. Up to this moment perfect harmony and understanding had 
existed generally. Everyone knew why everyone had come tosjether,'. 
and everyone was alert for the rapid flow of currents that might end' 
In the formal creation of an association that might Insure the i Itfmate 
emergence of the theatre and all it represents from the many corro- 
sive acids gnawing at It. 

Then Brady spoke. He had left only about 200 words behind him 
when everybody's hopes went panicky. 

The sp'el In Iti reduced effect Informed all members present that 
they were atop a volcano. "If this proposed association means It's* 
for non-unionism," declared the speaker, "I warn you it's a dangerous 
foundation, and I withdraw !" More than half of the body present 
consisted of managers from out of town, a portion of whom knew 
Brady only as a name. When the mental connection had been estab- 
lished by these that the speaker was the W. A. Brady whose attrac- 
tions they had so often played, serious ear was given the Brady dic- 
tum. It was clear to calm observers familiar with the Brady forum' 
scenes that this visiting element would lend an inflated interpretation- 
to the Brady opposition. The Brady positivism proved so moving to 
these pilgrims from the outer pales that a ripple of applause started 
for ^the speaker and his vision. Instantly It was palpable to the 
widely lnforme<l present that another 500 words from Brady and the 
organizers of the meeting and the planners of an association of man- 
agers for offcuslve and defensive lubrication might have. to fade out; 
with the correlative deduction W. A. B. would take the chair and 
tell everybody present Just what might be, could be, should be and 
would be done. 

IBrady started on this second 500 words. "I wish Mr. Albee hadn't 
gone." he said. "Td like to tell him and the other speakers I've 
listened to what I think of their speeches." 

And then the three managers hopped Brady. Broadhurst leadln?,' 
Herk following, and Vincent ripping In for the clean-up. Broadhurst 
turned the first laugh by deploring with fine dissimulation of regret 
that the men who had been laboring for many weeks on plans for 
the meetings hadn't thought of the necessity of first submitting the 
working scheme of the meetings to Brady for his approval, Herk 
addressed the self-respect of everyone present by a pithy declaration 
that If unionism meant the surrender by men of the theatre of tbo 
freedom of lawful individual action vouchsafed by the constitution and 
the trespass by thought and action of organized opponents to the 
business of the theatre, then he proposed to withdraw from that 
business. Following the Herk and Broadhurst retorts, Brady sought 
the floor, his speaking pose resumed, his hand in the air. Herk cut 
in again at this stage with a demand to the chair that Brady was out 
of order, a parliamentary point apparent to everyone. The chair 
silenced Brady. Vincent asked for the floor, got it, and, preliminary, 
to a spirited and cogent analysfs of the purpose of the meeting, dis- 
posed of Brady with the comment that "meetings designed to further 
the best interests of the theatre as an institution wouldn't sound no',<^ 
mal unless Mr. Brady were present to f arnish the laughs." Exeunt 
W. A. B. not to again appear at any of the meetings held during the 
successive days of the gathering. It is freely conceded by the 
analytical among those present that first day that it was Brady who 
made Vincent president of the association, for it was the Brady atti- 
tude that had spurred Vincent to the demonstration he gave all those 
present of his qualities fitting him for the Job. 



\ 

I 

■J 



Florenz Zlegfeld, Jr.'s two months' lease of the 120-foot yacht, 
which he rented from a Philadelphia millionaire for $10,000 a montli, 
expires Sept. 15. He has been cruising in it along the Atlantic coast, 
accompanied by. his wife (Blllle Burke) and Mme. IieClaIr, the cele- 
brated beauty specialist. Traveling on shore and keeping pace with 
the yacht are Ziegfeld's three Rolls-Royce and one Cadillac care, 
leaving his Dodge machine at his country home for depot work, 
Mme. LeClair's red Packard has also been following the yacht. 



Al Jolson owns 10 per cent, of "Back Pay," A. H. Woods' money, 
hit at the Eltinge with Helen MacKellar. Woods gave it to the 
comedian for nothing. They are close pals. * Jolson bought in on 
"Getting Clertle's Garter" after the farce had failed to excite much 
patronage In Chicago. Woods still liked it and Jolson put in his 
money, backing Woods' Judgment against Chicago's. This pleased 
Woods so much that he made him a present of a tenth of what looked 
like his foremost dramatic winner of the season. While Variety 
reported in good faith that Jolson paid |25,000 for 25 per cent, of 
"Gertie's Garter," as a matter of fact, on better information, Jolson 
paid but 15,000 for his share in that show. 



Mrs. Sima Elisberg's prayer for a 
writ of mandamus agamst John F. 
Gilchrist, the I^iceuse Commissioner 
of the City of New Tork, was denied 
by Justice Burr in the Supremo Court 
last week. Mrs. Blisbcrg sought a 
license to operate a motion picture 
place in the Hotel Lorraine, Edg- 
mere, L. I., pavilion but was refused 
because of several tedmicaUties, in- 
duding that of the Building Depart- 
ment laws that pictures cannot bt 
exhibited In hotela The various 
other BBuaidpal department^ indod- 



ing the fire, gas and water supply 
bodies, found several discrepancies to 
prohibit the granting of such license* 

SaansI Qeild, formerly of the 
Hotel Pennsylvania and Reiscnweb- 
cr's, is now stationed at Yoeng's Res- 
taurant (formerly Churchiiri), where 
he has two orchestras eperating, one 
for the afternoon and the other for 
the evening. 



. Bek Sliafer Is -., 
Bese Garden shew. 



featured in the 



FrJcJay, September 9, 1921 



LEGITIMATE 



13 



NORA BATES' AMERICAN RECORD 
Fm HIGH YAODEVILLE SALARY 



TWO REVIYAUS HIT BROADWAY, 



FAUNTLEROY AT 
APOLLO THURSDAY 



"^^■w ^— »Pfiifc » ^mtt^t»f0ttjmm 



'^■••imimmt a «■»«« ^-t^ 



^•♦■*-^«*»» wa»— 



Shubert Contract at $3,500 Weekly Signed — Opens 
Tour End of September — ^Bernhardt and Lauder 
Best Paid Foreigners. 



Big 4 Take It From the 
Selwyns for Mary 
Tickford-- 



"MERRY WIDOW" LEADING WAY 



-•<•«•*«■.•» ' 



' The AmericAn to rcceiire the high- 
est saUry cTer paid. in vaudeville to 
an American ia Nora Bayes. The 
Shubert contract proposed to her, re- 
X>orted in Variety while the negotia< 
tioDS were on, calls for a salary of 
$3,600 a week to Miss Bayes. It Is 
'for 20. weeks, with an option held by 
the Shuberts for a similar and fur- 
ther term at the same rate. 

Miss Bayes commences her Shubert 

yaudpvillc route the end of thi4 
month. When lately in London, Miss 
Bayes was said to^ have cabled ask- 
ing Lee Shubert for an extension of 
|ier opening date as she desired to 
remain nbroad. Lee was reported to 
Lave^ replied the Shuberts could not 
postpone Miss Bayes' starts 

Two foreigners have exceeded the 
JSayes wage limit. Mme. Bernhardt 
received $7,000 a week when first 
playing over the Orpheum Circuit, 
receiving $500 a performance for 14 
ahows weekly; and was paid in cash 
after each performJince. At the con- 
clusion of the night show Bfme. Bern- 
hardt paid off her company. In the 
Bemhart support at that time ap- 
t)eared I^u Tellejcen. 

The other foreigner was Harry 
Lauder, who received $3,400 a week 
when ' appearing in America, during 
and for Klaw iV Erlanger's Advanced 
Vniideville. Later, when playing for 
Williim Morris in the Morris houses, 
lisuder received $4,000 a week. 
When touring under Morris* manage- 
ment as a special road attraction 
amidst a vaudeville program, Lander 
received $6,000 a week, with virtually 
all traveling expenses charged to the 
show. Wilkie Bard, when first ap- 
T>earing for the late Willie Ucmmer- 
Btein, was engaged for Hammer- 
stein's, New^Tork, at $3,000 a week 
for two weeks. 

Twenty-five hundred dollars weekly 
in vaudeville are not uncommon, and 
solnries from $l.r)00 to that amount 
«n ordinary daily item. Lillian Rus- 
sell received $2,760 a week on the 
big time. It was a net salary, mean- 
ing no commission deducted, thai 
Tonllv made her vaudeville earning? 
$2,887.50. 

A foreign act that has been ap- 
per.riu^ continuously on this side, on 
the small &n& the big time, playing 
repeats In Orpheum Circuit houses 
after having playing Pantages the- 
atres in the same city, is Singer's 
Midgets. The act's weekly return is 
unknown, . but often said to have 
reuclicd $3,600 5sd as often «»TO<»eded 
that figure, through Mr. Singer often 
making a percentage contract of the 
groKs. 

The Shubert-Bayes contract was 
engineered by Jenle Jacobs, repre- 
sontinjc Miss Bayes. Miss Jacobs 
has gained fame among managers and 
agents for securing big stars and big 
salaries for vaudoville. When with 
tlie Casey agency, Miss Jacobs at one 
time had appearing in big time vaude- 
vill<^, Miss Bayes, Miss Russell, Olga 
f Potrova and Valeski Suratt, all head- 
liner, known as "nnmoa." bc.«?ides the 
many other artists she simultaneously 
ropro.«cnted. 

Miss Jacobs left the Cawy ngcncy 
some months ago, and when refused 
an oi^ont's franchise on the bijc time, 
opened her present independent 
agency after a brief experience with 
the Edwnrd Sraoll office. Miss Jacobs 
is said to have booked more standard 
>vaiidoville acts with the Shuberts 
than any other agent, excepting Davi- 
dow & Le Maire. 



BMPIRE'S 8T00K 



Syraottsa Honat.Wlii Havt Wlatar 
Company. 



Syracuae, N. Y., Sept 7. 
The Empire Players will take pos- 
session of the Empire Sept 19 for a 
winter season of repertoire. 

After six seasoiia of summer 
dramatic entertainment the Knicker- 
bocker Players pass Into local the- 
atrical history. 

Arriving in Syracuse to whip his 
new organization into shape for the 
new theatrical season* Howard Ruin- 
sey, leasee of the Empire, and owne^ 
of the Knic, and also of the Man- 
hattan Players, an annual feature of 
the summer season in RocheMer, an- 
nounced his new plans for Syracuse. 

Under Mr. Rumsey's personal di- 
rection the Empire will reopen Mon- 
day next, offering *\)h. Lady, Lady" 
as the State Fair week attraction. It 
will be played as a regular road mu- 
sical comedy, the Empire Players 
opening being deferred for one week. 

Coming to Syracuse to bead the 
Empire Players is Nancy Fair, who 
has just closed a run at the Alcazar, 
San Francisco. 

Mr. Rumsey's first plan was to 
return his wife, F.orence Eldridge, 
to this city to head the Empire Play- 
era. Miss Eldridge, however, has 
signed to plaj^ the leading role in 
the next Theatre Guild attraction in 
New York. Hal Salter returns to 
play the heavy leads. Wa'.ter Abell, 
a newcomer, will handle the light 
leads. Alice Hanley, a musical com- 
edy' recruit, is a newcomer to the 
ranks of tl^ Players. The o'd Syra- 
cuse favorites Include Margaret Cu- 
sack, Mabel Colcord, Philip Sheffield 
and Ralph Murphy. The latter will 
be stage director. Miss Cusack and 
Sheifie'd were not with the Knicka 
this year. 

The Empire will have a new or- 
chestra. A ten-piece combination, 
under the direction of George F. 
Wilson, will be one of the house's 
features. 



The United Artists has taken the 
ApoUo from the Selwyna. They are 
going to present the latest Mary 
Plckford special "Little Lord Faun- 
telroy" there beginning next Thurs* 
day night. The management will be 
for eight weeks at least 

Originally it was planned to pre- 
sent "Fauntelroy" at the Lyric fol- 
lowing four weeks there of Fairbanks 
in the "Three Musketeers", the 
House having been taken for eight 
weeks all told. ^ The business the 
B^airbanks film has been doing how- 
ever leads to the belief the picture 
can remaUi there about t|iree months. 

The Sfihvyns had planned to move 
their production of "Sonny Boy" 
from the Cort of the Apollo, but in- 
stead accepted the rental offer from 
the United and will dose ''Sonny 
Boy" Saturday. 



Frances Starr Also Returns in ^EeTSSStST^fTKf "^^ ' 
Savagie Prod'uetion Performed Here by Foreigne -8 
As Never Before — Should Clean Up. 



-sZ> 



EQUITT'S QUEST 

loitnicts Representative to Inquirt 
^boHt Chorus Girls. 



MODEL MARRTF.8 



Vlrgiaia Lee Glover Weds Sob of 
We«lth> Laundry naa. 



B07S "SMOOTH AS SILK" 

Chicago, Sept. 7. 
Ta.\lor Holmes, star of "Smooth 
As Silk," which just concluded a long 
engagement at the Cort, has pur- 
chased the touring rights of the play 
from Harry Frazee and Willard Mack, 
tbc author. The show under the 
Holmes management opened its sea- 
son at Benton Harbor, Mich., this 
week. 



MAE MARSH'S PLAY OFF 

The stage production to be used 
•s a starring vehicle for Mae Marsh, 
under tbc management of J. D. Will- 
Wins, has been indefinitely cnVed off. 

An advance man was to have gone 
•ut a h ea d , i ill. i l »if yoek. 



Boston, Sept. 7. 

Tht Tr«irriage this week of Virginia 
Lee Glover, the Christy model who 
posed for George Gray Barnard's 
statue of "Eve," and who later 
achieved considerable fame in the 
"Greenwich Village Follies" chorus, 
was given about a doaen columns of 
publicity by the Boston dailies. She 
ukarried a non-professional of con- 
siderable wealth named Carl Stedroan 
Wheeler, whose father made his pile 
in laundering towels for barber shops, 
hotels, etc. 

Barnard, in selecting her as his 
model, charocterized her as "a little 
more than an undulation, a white 
rosebud to unfold some time to the 
radiance of love, nn exquisite being 
not yet awakened to th^ knowledge 
of existence, a delicately slender child 
mniden. the soul of eternal beauty 
and youth." 



LONGEST JUMP— ALMOST 

JaiBk Mason Takes Revue From Now 
York to Mexico City. 



Kansas City, Sept. 7. 
Frank Delmane, Equity represen- 
tative here, says he has been in- 
structed from the New York office, 

to ascertain the standing of the chor- 
ua girls coming here with the bur- 
lesque companies. He says his In- 
structions are to send in the names 
of all who do not belong to Equity 
but not to' take any action. The fact 
that a great many of the coinpunies 
were organised outside of New York 
this season and will not reach that 
city for a number of weeks, seems 
the reason for the Equity's interest 
in trying to 'line 'em up.' 



EAST- WEST SKETCHES 

The East-West Players have be- 
gun rehearsals of their first program 
of the season. They will present four 
one-act plays, opening about Oct. 

15. 

The sketches selected arc "Au- 
tumn Fires," by Custav Weid, from 
the Dani.sb; "The Potboilers," by 
Alice Ger.ster.berg: "Sweet and Twen- 
ty," by Floyd Dell; "The Eternal 
Judith," from the Roumanian of J. L. 
Caragiale. 

MME. KALICH TO APPEAR 

Mme. Bertha Kalich is to return 
to the stage this season under the 
management of (ieorge Mooser. Her 
New York appearance is to be made 
(luring November in "The Kretitzer 
Sonata." 

In the meantime a number of 
plays are being read with a view to 
furnishing her with a new vehicle I 
some time in the spring. ^ ^ . [ 



Jack Mason left New York late 
last week on what he believ^^d on 
the word of the Pennsylvania rail- 
road people to be the longest rail- 
road jump for a theatrical company 

on record. The Jack Mason New 
York Review is moved direct from 
New York to Mexico City by special 
train. 

While this may be the record for 
time in transit, longer movements by 
train are on the ords. The New 
York-Mexico City leap is 3,149 miles 
by land route and 2,898 by land and 
water. Los Angeles is '"''^0 miles 
by rail and San Francisco is 3,191. 
Both jumps have been made direct 
In the case of San Francisco one 
of the minstrel organizations made a 
transcontinental record in elapsed 
time early in the 90' s. 

Mr. Mason has added Senorina 
Carnejo to his features. She Is a 
diva of note in Mexico, having aung 
with several of the Metropolitan 
Opera Co. stars on concert tours in 
her home country. She will give 
two song recitals weekly besides 
twice in the Mason review. There 
are 15 people in the roster: Senorina 
Carnejo, Pratov and Natalie, dancers; 
Duncos Bros., comedy musicians; 
Eddie Moran, singer and dancer; 
Miriam Folger, prima donna, and the 
following chorus: Lillian Rich, Elea- 
nor Russell, Dorothy Kennedy, Irma 
Kane, Zelma Muxray, Murray I^von. 
Elizabeth Rohan, Flo Williams, Lil- 
lian >Vhite, Cora Dorsay, Winnlfred 
Herriott. CJretna Warberg, Muriel 
Kay. PhilHs Cameron Fina Orloff. 

Mason's staff is made up of Wil- 
ton L. O'Brien, electrician, and Man- 
nie Ruben, musical director. 



SHELDON IN OHABQE 



GIvoa SapervlsioR of Five Shubert 
Houses In Bostoa. 



SEYMOUR mCKS COBONO 

Seymour Hicks, the English pro- 
ducer, is preparing to visit New York 
within the near future. 

The Hicks visit will be largely iu 
connection with the American pro- 
duction to be made of 'his London 
play, ''The Man in the Dress 
Clothes," to be produced in this 
country by David Belasco. 



ORCHESTRA BACK STAGE 

The Selwyns have a piece written 
by Martin Brown, tit'ed "(ireat Mu- 
sic." of a quiiKi-musical order in that 
the theme concerns the compositic'n 
of a greot symphony by the hero- 
musician. 

The production will entail a 40- 
piece .syniphony orchestra back stage. 

John Wengcr is doing the Huttings. 



JEFFERSON, PORTLAND 

Portland, Me., Sept. 7. 

It is announced the Shuberts have 

obtained a lease of tlie Jefferson, 

this city. 

Road shows will be prcseuted here 
(his fall. 



"THE DEMI-VIRGIN" 

A. H. Woods has the new Avery 
Ilopwood farce, "The Demi-Virgin," 
in rehearsal with Hazel Dawn, Ken- 
neth Douglas, Constance Farber, 

Glenn Anders, Alice liegeman and 
iiomer Barton in the cast. 
The y>cc^ i* iv> i>i>c;. >ur weeks. 



Boston, Sept 7. 
Ed Roland was unexpectedly re- 

T>^'^ced Ijabor Day by Arthar J. Shel- 
don as resident manager for the Shu- 
berts In Boston to fill the berth left 

vacant by the illness of A. Toxen 
Worm, who left three weeks ago for 
Denmark to recuperate. 

Frank Hoyt of the Shuberts' Wil- 
bur was temporarily placed in the 
Shubert general office and then, after 
a visit from J. J. Shubert, Roland was 
sent over as general representative, 
his appointment coming as a sur- 
prise locally, as rumor had slated 
Will Roland of the Shubert staff for 
the job. ' 

Ed Roland, who is the son of Ro- 
land, of the firm of Clifford & Ro- 
land, western melodrama producers, 
remained on the job less than a week 
and waa withdrawn, Sheldon being 
sent over from New York Labor 
Day. Sheldon has been with the 
Shuberts for a number of years and 
formerly was the manager of the 
Shubert house here for one season. 
Since that time he has been acting 
in a general supervisory capacity for 
the Shuberts, handling upkeep and 
maintenance on all Shubert houses 
throughout the country. 

The berth ia a highly desirable 
one. and covers the five first-class 
Shubert houses in Boston. ^ 



NEW ORLEANS HOPES 



ErIanger Representative Can Make 
No Definite Promise. 



New Orleans. Sept. 7. 
Returning from his annual vacation, 

T. C. Campbe'l, manager of the Tu- 
lane here, gave the press a list of 
bookings for the coming season, but, 
as Erlanger's representative stated, 
attractions were so scarce he could 
not definitely promise any shows. 
Campbell attributed the conditions to 
union troubles and the fact producers 
were not inrlrned to ^vander far from 
IJrojidway with their offerings. 

Meanwhile the Times-Picuyune car- 
ried un editorial the other day titled 
"Theatrical Hope," welcoming the 
advent of the Sliuberts at the St. 
('harles here, and bewailing the fact 
New Orleans had been neglected. 

$450,000 BUILDING LOAN 

The Lawyers Title & Trust Co. 

has loaned to the Broadway Hamilton 

Place Corp., of which Max J. Kramer 

is president, $450,000 as o bui'ding 
loan contract on the property situ- 
ated on the cast side of Broadway 
from 138th to 139th streets. 

A three-story tax -payer is to be 
erected on the site, together with a 
theatre to accommodate 2.200 people. 



MISS SUNDAY SHOWS 

Deroit, Sept. 7. 
The Neil O'Hriau Minstre's niissc i 
two shows here Sunday, due to o 
baggage car being lost en route from 
Syractise. The car did not orrive 
until eleven o'clock Sunday night. 



Two revivalii ui successes of yes" 
teryear made their appearance on 
Broadway this week. The first waa 
the presentation of the famo'is Lehar 
operetta, "The Merry Widow," \^h»''H 
Henry W. Savage revived at iho 
Knickerbocker theatre Monday after 
14 yeara; Tuesday night David Be- 
lasco followed in his footsteps by pre- 
senting at the Lyceum a revival with 
Frances Starr of the Eugene Walter 
play, "The "feaslest Way." * 

The revival of "The Merry 
Widow" had been in the air for btv- 
eral years. It was a question in Mr. 
Savage's mind whether or not the 
public would be in readiness to ac- 
cept "The Widow" again at a time 
so soon after its original production 
in this country. , With that in mind 
he laid out a route for the attrac- 
tion that would make it possible to 
hit all the high spots the country 
over in a tour that Is to last but 40 
weeks. Of this time New York was 
allotted seven weeks. 

The opening performance Monday 
night found the house scaled at $5.50 
top with the subsequent performances 
at $3.85 and $4.40 for Saturday 
nights. The scale seems a little 
f;tiff for the current season and it 
hardly seems probable that the pub- 
lic will crowd to see th» piece. The 
real theatregoers who will want to 
see the revival won't be in town nn- 
til the run is practically over and 
in the meantime business at a high 
scale seems doubtfuL 

The score of the operetta remains 
as tunefully attractive as ever and 
although the comedy seems a little 
weak in this day, the tour should 
prove a triumphal one. The cast 
which Mr. Savage selected raaMi 
and sings 'The Merry Widow" hi 
such fashion as it was never per- 
formed in tills country heretofore. 
Reginald Pasch, an imported tenor, 
wag billed as from Amsterdam, Hol- 
land, and has an accent that seems 
unmistakably German. He is a fin- 
ished artist and sings delightfully and 
acts beyond the wildest expectdtions 
that a tenor Is supposed to be able 
to do. The Sonia of the revival ia 
Lydia Lipkowska, a striking blonde, 
whose work is remarkable. The bal- 
ance of the cast is well selected and 
the show looks like a sure-fire bet. 

"The Easiest Way** at the Lyceum 
has a limit of eight weeks. 

The resuscitation of the Walter 
play had a genuine first-night audi- 
ence present. All the dramatic critics 
sat through it once more and the re- 
mainder of the spectators listened to 
the unfolding of the story as if they 
had never heard It before. 

It was especially noticeable that 
the balcony and gallery were filled 
with what was undoubtedly c<rflege 
students of both sexes. -This may be 
accounted for by the fact that the 
piece is listed by Prof. Baker of Har- 
vard as one of the five great modern 
plays, and lecturers on the drama in 
all the colleges and universities 
throughout the country mention "The 
Easiest Way" as an especially' fine 
piece of contemporaneous stage tech* 
niqup. 

The play was originally presented 
In New York at what was then the 
Hrlasco theatre and is now the Re- 
public. Jan. 18. 1009. It ran until 
.Tune 5 of that year and r<?opened the 
house the following September, run- 
ning for a further extended period. 

In addition to the star the /.>vival 
has two of the original cast — Joseph 
Kilgour and Laura Nelson Hall. There 
nro two small bits, heard* off stage, 
but never seen, and these were played 
in the initial presentation by Jane 
Cowl, who had never been on the 
stage, but !«ecured the opportunity 
through the Intrrcession of her 
father, who was Rolasco's st^age door- 
keeper at the Republic. 

Surprisingly little of the dialog of 
the play ha.s been changed. The only 
noticeable alterations were the sub- 
stitution of the words "taxi" for 
"cab" and "Montmaitre" for "Rec- 
tor's." 

The "tag' of the piece has nUo been 
altered by the addition of \ cry of 
anguish on the part of the pivotal 
fharncter. In the original nhe flip- 
pantly ord.*r8 her maid to doll her up 
as she i« headed for Reofor'a (changed 
to Montmsrtre) and now supplements 
the flippancy with a cry over the in- 
evitsbloness of her situation with an 
appeal to the Almighty. 



-i 



If 



LEGITIMATE 



PridAy, September 9, 1921 



PHILADELPHIA TOHAYERIYAL 
STOCKS FIRST THE IK YEARS 



■^■^■»^»»^ ^■^>— 



-^— •-■ — ■^•v**^.*^*. ♦- 



Fielder Players Come Into Metropolitan — ^To Have 
Symphony Orchestra — Zimmerman's New G>. in 
Cermantown. 



ANOTHER $2.50 SHOW 
OPENS m CHICAGO 



Fbilwlclpliit, S«pt. 7. 

IMinndcYphia will have rivol stock 
•.companies here for th« first time in 
ytrnrs. 

Tlie Frank Fielder Players, for 
srTcr^l Reanenfl at the Orpheum, iu 
GemiantowD, opened Sept. 4 at the 
Metropolitan Opera Houae in one of 
tiio most darinjc and cloaeat watched 
attempts seen here in a long time. 

I ..<■ t^tmipany will be olnioj»t uu- 
iiiauffod, with Mae Desmond heiding 
t, assisted by Mr. Fielder. Oth»:ra io 
tiie cnst iodode Frank Camp, Tallo 
Webb, J. Jay Mulrey, Sumner Nldi- 
ols, Eleanor Brent, Marie Safford, 
GcorRc Carlyle, Mary D. Stewart, 
Kuthcrinc Deardon, Scmucl Miller 
niul Earl Dwyer. 

The company will open with **Way 
Down East," and the scale will be 15, 
25, 60, 7S cents and $1. for eveniDC^ 
itnd 15-50 cents matinees. A sym- 
phony orchestra wfll be n feature dur- 
ing the "Way Down Blast" enfage- 
tnont. and probably thereafter. 

Taking the place of the Fielder 
players ct the Orpheum, J. Fred Zim- 
merman & Sons have collected a new 
company, to bo cnlled the Orpheum 
Players. They will include Rath Rob- 
inson, Dwight Meade, John I^tt, Les- 
ter Howard. Ekhnund Carroll, William 
Davidgc. Harry Wilgns, Gertrude 
Ritchie. Mollie Fisher, Marie Reels. 
Bessie Maxwell and Adele Saunders. 

Arthur Ritchi will direct the play- 
ers and among the plays underlined 
are "Scandal," "Girl in the Limou- 
sine," "The Arqmtal.'* •Three Faces 
East," "Lombardi, Ltd.,** and ••Out- 
cast" 

The scale of prices will be 25 cents 
to $1 In the evenings and 25-50 cents 
matinees. 



Velma Hinkle and C. Henry Gordon 
are with the Strnnd btock at Snn 
Diego, Cal. Charlotte Treadway is 
the company's leading lady. 



Robert McTx)ughlln'B Stock Com- 
pany at the Ohio theatre, Cleveland, 
will present a new play Labor Day 
week called '•Winding Stairs," writ- 
ten by Robert Ilousum, author of 
•The Gypsy Trail." Henry Hull hal 
been specially engaged for the try- 
out. 

The Henry Jewett Players. Boston, 
wernl Heiisons housed at the Cop- 
ley and which is a company playiuf; 
a repertoire of plays, mostly EdrIIsIi, 
will r?o btisiuesK at the same house 
this season. 

Tilt- i>viIo, NcvVaiK. *'lilrh has been 

;»• iir!e"«'iii|. M !\ l»o(»Ivr i \;i"l!' 
house ior several seasons will dis- 
continiiD that policy. A drninatic 
-Jtor-k is Io hi; I' I if, I. .>;un p ' ' 
fiabor l>ay. The house had been 
menlioncil as a hurlcsij'.:',; i>os.si!jiIity. 
Henry Mi?ier havin;^ sooi:ro<| an op- 

Ste\vnr( lioMiiiis resi;:n<'(l n.> l":iM- 
in«? i.iaii in the Maiidt- IVul.s ^^toi-k 
('oni|t;iriy in ('<i1m:.iIh:m. Ohio, refain- 
in;: iiis inlcrcst in tlie bus'nrss. 

'I'll. Ns'tsi i-!i('s'.M- tli..iir'» (rto'-k) 
it Ml. \'i-rn()n. N. Y., wiil rcop!:: 
for it< '('co'id srnson n#'\l we •!< willi 
R now r-onu'iiiy. Djmny li.!i;;M'il will 
relnin m- 'I'nwtor. I fic o:iIv I'oi nici' 
(('(Hitifiu"*! on pace 17> 

ROPEb:T DOWNING, INC. 

rorthind M.* , S««i»t. 7. 
'■. r; 11 i. a; (■ ol" a now torpor, i- 
;.;•, ro\ri|. It i. the 



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PHILLyS HOT SPELLS 
HURTS OPENINGS 



Three Legit Houses Start- 
ed This Week— *^Cor. 
nered'' WeU Liked 



Philadelphia, SepjL 7. 

The 1021-22 aeoaon swung open 
wide Monday with three legitmate at- 
tractions dividinf the patronage. 

The fourth hoase, the Walnut, will 
open Saturday, the Adelphia atarta 
IVIonday, and the Broad laga to Sept. 
2C. The showa at theae three houaes 
will be ••Love Dreams," "Irish Eyea" 
and •'A Bill of Divorcement" Th« 
first two are nraaiea], the last la the 
first really aeriaua ^aj of the new 
aeason. 

The Cheatnut Street opera house 
again announces, via poaters, it will 
start with Sbnbert vaodeville "aeme- 
time in September." 

The ahowB aa Uncd up ao far are: 

'^Tlie Love Latter''^ (Forrest). 
Opened Monday with indications of 
real success, although much pruning 
needed. Had jainmcd house, but 
warm weather keeping down advance. 
Kxpected to boom towards the end of 
the week, although ran ia Iimite<1. 

*nrtaa Fear Harsamaa" (Garrick). 
Film. Is running heavy, ana stay will 
probablv be extended into October. 
Two-dollar top haa gone over. 

'•Irene" (Shubert). Return of 
popular show drew good house with 
prospects of excellent draw. Some 
of the papers commented on the fact 
that last year's second c<HBpany is 
better than the Vanderbilt cast, bat 
good notices were the mle, and most 
of the critics gave it a full length re- 
view instead of the usual short item 
that repeats get here 

"Cornered" (Lyric). Only non- 
musical show was greeted with fine 
notices, cspe(?ia)ly for Madge Kenne- 
dy. Warm weather will undoubtedly 
hurt this North Broad street bouse, 
but a cool spell ought to boom this 
excellent comedy melodramn. 



HER FAREWELL 

Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 7. 
Lillian Tucker, late of •Three 
Faces East," knows the value ofpuH^ 
licity. Which perhaps explains why 
all of the local papers, aa well as 
others in the vicinity, received mime- 
ographed stories and large cabicet 
photos to illustrate them on the be- 
trothal of ^liss Tucker and CTharles 
H. DucU. trea.surer of the Republican 
State Committee. Miss Tucker's 
sta^e career was prominently men- 
tioned in the story, but emphasis was 
placed upon the statement that she 
would pejrmancntly retire from the 
stage. 



OPENS "LOVE DREAMS" 

Oliver Morosco has finnlly made up 
hi.s n)in<l that he is going to I/0!< 
A iRi'Irs. Oft. 1. In tJie nieantinie 
l:e has 'I.ove Dreams." a melody 
pl.iy, \v(mI under way an<l will open 
at the Waliuit St. theatre, Thiladel- 
phi;i, to;ii wiow nijjlit. 

In The east will t)e lOIsi Alder, 
Marion ^Ii-.^cn. Totn Powers, Maud 
Khiir;i iin 1 l!il,)n P>uto.<. 



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ROONEY'S l^EW THREE 

I*at Kootiey Iimk made only three 
'•li; M;;r.s in "Lovo P.ird^'* now (,n tour 
with !r;'>s'>'f :ind Mj: ion Po nf. Syl- i 
via Kilis. Willliini T;iyl,.i' -an 1 r.eil:) 
Koiner hav<» . re^jpect'xcly r'^phu'ed 
i:il/.:ihct'i IN;-':, Ui.haid" P.oldt and 
l!va I>.vi r.iM.iL Otherwise tlie show 
t(Mii,:i;i-; ■ s f ri l^.roiidway. 

('!..!. P. S.'ili:-!)iiry is in;in;i:;i.is tl',^ 
; it•o(^l••* • o) 



William Harris, Jr., Scales 

.*Bad. Man' at Princess — 

'Love dicr Going Out 

Ckicafo, Sapt 7. 

Buaineaa for the firat week af the 
new season wat remarkablj good, 
even though a terrifle liot spell held 
CO for the entire time. If the 

balance of thia season haa a* good i^ 
break it is likely that this wiU ba a 
record and banner leaaen. With 
in. > of the shows doing better than 
expected, n fe«» changes will be made 
on the botrda within the next few 
weeks. 

*-The Love Chef," witli Leo Oar- 
rillo at the Playhouse, announces it 
will leave Sept 10, and moke room 
for Charles Gilpin iu •'Emperor 
Jones.^ No phow is announced to 
folow the fateful sUy of •'Three Live 
Qhosts" at Shuberts' Central. The 
show received favorable comments 
from some of the local critic/*, but 
this di<! not seem to help busiuess. 

Of the incoming attractions, "The 
Bad Man," a William Harris, Jr., 
production, with Holbrook Blinu, due 
Monday at the Princeaa, Joined the 
rsnks of "Lifhtnin"* and •The Gold 
Diggers" by aakiuf a top price of 
only $2.50. Mrs. Conthoui will han- 
dle 1.50 aeata a night for this show, 
getting $8.60, and being i»erniittcd 
only 10 per cent retam. 

Woods', dark for the summer, 
opened Saturday with the extenaively 
advertised film "uvci the Hill." The 
film is getting $1 top, and on ita pre- 
miet'e Saturday matinee drew $000: 
on its <>) '^'' performance $1,300. 

Florence Reed, in •The Mirage,'* 
inaugurated the Shnberts* Great 
Northern, drswfng all the critics. 

The missing cogs to complete Chi- 
cago's theatrical machinery will de- 
but this week: **Midnlght Rounders,*' 
featuring Eddie Cantor, with Nan 
Hafperin. at the Apollo, Monday. 
•The (Jold niggers,'* »t the Powers*, 
Monday. Florence Reed, in 'The 
Mirage,** Shube»ts* Great Northern, 
Snn<iay. 'The Bad Man,*' Princess, 
Sunday. Cohan's Grand, opens its 
season Sunday, with •'The Bat," 
which moved from the Princess. 

Fstimates for Tnst week: 

"Up In the Cloims^ (Garrick, 0th 
week). Did as good ns most shows 
in town, doing over $10,000. It's n 
local favorite, «nd will continue to be 
during the rest of Its run. 

'Tip Tap" (Colonial. 4th week). 
The nre?»s agent's good standing with 
the dallies ia being shown, aa Stone 
is getting a lot of news spare. With 
its already many weeks* advance sell- 
out, the <^ow pocketed $30,000. 

"Passinq Show" (Apoflo, 13th 
week). Dropped $.3,000, most likely 
due to the many Jncomintr attractions. 
Hosed its run with $17,000. "Mid- 
T'ieht Ronnrfors" Fiabor Dnv matinee. 

"The Champloa" (Cort, Ist week). 
Tooka pood for 12 weeks' run at least. 
Ran to $12,000. 

••Four Horsemen** (LaSalle. 23d 
week). Film. Has competition, al- 
though little distance from Woods. 
Gathered in $8,000. 

••The Bat" (Priaccss, ?,Cth week). 
Finished run at Princess with $2,000 
better tlian last week. Mouth to 
mouth recommendations seem to 
prove deciding factor in this show's 
long run. The props and company 
hai»tize 1021-1922 season at Cohan s 
Grand. Sunday, which leaves "The 
l?nd Man" thi'^ house in which to de- 
but. Gross. $1{).000. 

'•Tho Broken Wing" (Olympic, Ut 
wcek^. AVith irs spcctacnlnr stnrt oT 
a crashing^ aeroplane being harped 
upon \>y llic ;:<U and rrilifs may lii;e- 
ly enjoy a Rood stay in Chica>;o. On 
its first week did .$12,000. Th« 
dailies w.'re very kind to the snow. 

"Broadwny Whiri" (Illinois, 2d 
wfM'Iv). In for limited rnn. Treinen- 
d.Mis 1111(1 unprecedented advriti.sin.^ 
iM-'r-fd to do between .51S.0(H) and 
.'^lI»'tO(). T).)ilies cnn-y "two more 
v.otdvs" notiroa, yyith "Kruiiuie" due 
to r«M»Iacc \t. 

"Tho Love Chef" (Playhouf^e. 2d 
weelO. I'idved up and did .$7,000 
'I'lii-; show js h.'ivinjj a very shori nin. 
' .'iviiii: hilt otif» more we^?k to fjo. De- 
-( rvrs hcftor fate. 

"To To" (Shidebaker, 3<1 week). 
'!''-'-!< \v ."^17. (H^) and •makiujr itself 
'.ill.-d Ml)Oi:r. Tiie star's popularity 
•i^-iuM'S tlie sliow of a worth- while 

•Over the Hill" (Woods). Film 
'^'I'l. Vnx h;(s tahen the house or^r 
' - •wb-'e to I r^^f'tit his fe;ittire pir- 

'■ ' '»" ''i'^ f'v 't driy's rpeeii»t8 of 

>-■!>'•(> ;, T'vrr. 'M.M e:in be made of a 
: I :'• ■: > ■'. '•■«,,',!,, run. 

'•TI:o N'i;-.-(ja' (C.rcnt Northern) 
'"n-iMi -e Itend, its star, wns the hifrl» 
'i '' ' for H»o s''r»n's o'toninjj. heiiic 
,. ill ,, ., >ph;,.f.i of (rsi'us^iou 



L n' 'i In" 



t 1 n> 



IL'. 



t ir. 



(r.I;w !<^t'.Ti(«). rhieo- 

hy stf>riu :ind FranI; 

'? n f'lrore with hi^ a<^t 

u»]\or (rnve Haron nnd 

y T ,p.,„,»,,. pr,f|p(% nnd even rdl- 

, : .1... ..vf-c ('.■•«)f'd to the me'Mr^' of 

'•" vVow. ^ll.f DO thq gross for four 

j.erformjmccs. It i« sure bet that 



Vv-r 
I, 



CHICAGO'S SCALPING PES 

GIVES DISPUY OF POSER 



Induces J* J. Shubert to Re-acale ^^Bfidniglit Roimd* 

3— ""SUpping'* Tickets to Outside Broken 
Treasurer Dismissed Coincideiitally. 



aw" to 



Oblcage, BeiA. 7. 
Mrs. Florence Conthoui, **Queeii of 

the Scfilpcrs," roles oTer the local 

theatres with an iron hand, so far 

as the diatrihution of theatre tickets 
are concerned. l%ia was demon- 
strated Monday when, after a late 
conference Sunday night with J. J. 
Shubert, who waa here to see the 
opening of his newest theatre, the 
Great Northern, Mrs. Cduthoui man- 
ager to get him to onler the reprint- 
ing of tickets for the opening per- 



faimanee ^ Bddie Oaittor*a *'Kld« 
night Roiindera*' at that theatre, ani 
at^aling the houae at $3 top initead 
of |2ii0. The $2.50 tickets for thii 
performance -tad been on aale sinot 
laat Thursday. Mafay patrons and 
otttaJde brokera had grabbed them npw 
ThIa waa not to the liking of *Th^ 
Queen of the Scalpers." When aha 
heard Shubert was in town aha 
sought him put for a conference. At 
1 p. m. Monday about 100 tickeCt 
(Continued on page 40) 



with six weeks' advance sales a year's 
run will be easy. 

*^hraa Ghoato" (Shuberta* Cen- 
tral, 1st week). TM $7»000. which 
iu part aceonnta lor ita immediate 
removal. Nothing announced to fol- 
low here. 



'TICKLE ME' STARTS 
$19,000 WEEK'S GROSS 

Opens Shubert, Boston — 

Other Early Attractions 

There Not Successful 



Boston, Sept 7. 

The Shuberta opened only one of 
their frre first-dasa houaes for Labor 
Dav week. Frank Tinney in "Tickle 
Me^' starting at the Shubert to a 
turaaway. The afaow wiU probably 
do $10,000 for the week, even with 
continued warm weather. 

The Wilbur was dark, *The Dumb 
Bens" having finished its bookings, 
and the Plyroouth, which bad previ- 
ously opened with Walter Bcanlon, 
also having closed the previous week. 

The Majeadc ia being renovated In 
anticipation of vaudeville, Sept. 26. 
and tlie Boaton opera house will open 
Morday with **Mecca." 

Gilda Yaresi in ''Eater. Madame,** 
at the Selwyn (formerly Park 
Square), is on her last week, with 
business not up to expectation and 
a limited film oooking of the Fair- 
banks "The Three Musketeers** film 
will be tried out next week, with 
Fairbanks and hfary Pickford both 
making an appearance to stimulate 
interest. 

The Colonial will have Ned Way- 
burn's "Town Gosain/* next week, the 
closing week for Dillingham's veuture. 
•A Wise Child." with Vivienne Segal, 
which has been toned up creditJioly 
sftcr its rather gloomy opening three 
weeks ago. 

MitTii opened the Tremont Mondsy 
with •*Lady Billy" to capaeity on the 
holiday night, and will probably do 
SIO.CK^'O," <ii'nl Glace Luliuv iu "Deitr 
Vf.'i" is holding up fairly well at the 
Hollis Street. 



AUTHOR'S ROYALTIES 
ON "LISTEN LESTER" 



Injunction Asked Against 

John Cort by Harold 

Orlob 

Harold Orlob, compoHO^, hns b<»- 
gun injunction proceedings agninst 
.lohn Cort and F. K. IVtersoii, r-ro- 
ducers of "Listen Lester" to •'njoin 
tho further prpsentati<;n of the show 
to which Orlob composed the sco.f. 
Ilnrry L. C'trt and (Jrorjjp E. Stol- 
dard 8iip;tliod the libretto, ou«'h 
niithor ♦() rtM eivo two per cent, week- 
ly royjilty. 

Orloh's grievance ia that (!ort 
brp.qfhed his five ycarH* contract n'ith 
t'lc nnth'trs when at tho i*nd of List 
soa*5nn there became owin^ to Orlcb 
two weeks' royalty on onj company 
and one week from anoLher c<iinpaiiy. 
Port'H cor;tentlon is that Lefllor and 
P.rattori to wlM»m he leased tin* :'hr)w 
should vny the authors' riynllicvs. 
Th<'ir coiitract is only witli ('ort. 

T'^tcrson h(d(h the j-tro'lurtion 
riKJitH fo "Listen Lester'' for Mrs s. ;i- 
son hut Oilob, through O'lVyii 
Malevinsky ^ Driscill hn« f.' • ntsl 
nn order from S\ipreme Court .ru<ri(e 
Lyd m for tho d« fen-'ants tf) ^how 
cause Tvhy sn injuncti n Bh( uld no' 
he i3<?ned. The mot'on is rcturnahlo 
Frid ly. 

Orloh'a other grievances Is thr»t 
Cort sonsrht to reduce cneh of the 
three authors' roysltioa to oje per 
cent esch and )atcr to one and o.io- 
half per cent, which waa refused. 



MACGEACHEY'S LIBEL 
SUIT ANSWEREb 

Brady Denies Ailegationi 

In $250,000 Action— 

Canse Arises in 1888 

WDliam A. Brady thia week fflad 
answer to Charles B. A. lI«cGeadiy*4 
quarter million dollar Ubel anit gea« 
erally denying the veteran pohllcity 
man'a aUecationa and for a aepatata 
defense atating 'that the afleged 
cauae of action aet forth in the oom- 
plaint did not accme within two yeara 
next preceding the eo«meneemeat of 
tUa action." The cause for aetioa 
datea from 1888 aa a result of a 
presa-agent etploit by the plalatMf, 
who Wis then, aa now, aaaociated 
with the Frohinana. 

Charles, Guatave and Daniel, ni 
whom the latter is the sole avrvivor. 

The play involved waa "She" pro- 
duced in the east at Nlblo's Qardena 
by WifUam Gillette under the Froh- 
man management. It was adapted 
from H. Rider Haggard's book of 
the same name. As it was not eopy« 
righted in America Brady waa per- 
mitted to start a company from San 
Frandaco. Both companies played 
St Paul and Minneapolis within a 
few daya of each other. MacGeachy 
poblicising the fact the Frohman'e 
show waa the only authorized pro- 
duction by the author. Rider Hag- 
gard. 

Brady had SlacGeachy arrested for 
libel and the plaintiff ia his complaint 
contending he was honorably dis- 
charged. Brady's memoirs published 
in a book issued under tho Bobbs- 
Merrin trade mark title "The Fight- 
ing Man." recounts this episode which 

-A-OnDS tki£: utliiiS of Cue »i'iii ,' ' h'tiiliilif 

that MacGeachy was reTeascd under 
$10,000 bail but wos afraid to return 
and stand trial. MaH^cnchy sets 
forth he picked up this account in 
the public library wheretrom the book 
is also being circulated and estimates 
thcKC alleged libelous stiitements to 
be damaging to the extent of $250,- 
000. 

Natlran Vidavcr is at tin;; for 
Brady. 



ROAD'S FIRST 
CLOSINGS IN CANADA 



•'Enter Madame" 
"Live Ghosts" 
Return 



ind 



The first road closings of t!v» sea- 
son occurred Snfurdav wh'Mi "Kntef 
Madame" teminnfcd 'u tour in To- 
ronto, and "Thrc'^ Liv.-; Clho-fls" 
closed in Montreal. 

IJoth pi«'C('.s were nent on t >.ir hy 
Philip Klein. They had been playing 
tlic ('anadian tiim- 



IN ubadinct role 

Tho Sam II. Harris p];iy of "T/nv- 
ful T.,arf^iiv." w'.-.t tf?i hv S.iin ^■<li|^- 
man, will liavc Marcaret Luwreofe in 
the prinejpiil role. iOlsie Ma'k:'ye haS 
also been enzaperl. 



Norri^, In Hertz Rnlo 

WilliaMi Xorris ha-^ bci'u s '-: ! 'v^ 



the Shnberts for the lead r 'c 'i 
"TlloKSom Tune." th'* '-onw]' '"' 
which the late Rnli>h Hert/- 'i' '• 
scored heavily just bviuro his <u>\- 
dea death, ./ . 



yri<Iay, Soptembor 9, 1021 



LEGITIMATE 



15 



THE SKIRT 

Buffalo, Sept. 7. 

Bes8i« Barriscale opened the local 
■easoD at the Hhubert-Teck with a 
new comedy, -The Skirt." ttichard G. 
Hcrndon produced it creditably. Misx 
Barriscale acted it — charmiDgly. l». 
Dodd Ackerinann uiouDted it^ncatly 
and prettily. Howard Hickman, who 
used to be Mias Barriscalc'n director, 
wrote it — rather hap-hazurdly. The 
author produced it — nicely. Howard 
Hickman acted in it — inoffensively. All 
in all, it was a large eveuing for Mr. 
ilickman. 

.No ov.o will ever nccnsc * The Skirt'' 
of cxoesnive intellectuality. It be- 
longs in the fly-weight division of the 
drama. Billed as a comedy, it is in 
n'fllity pure farce for the most part- 
ami for the rest, pure hoakum. It ii 
n play of situation.s. The plot is 
scarcely worthy of mention and In 
dialogue it is for the most part quite 
drouiy and desolate. Its main theme 
it picture stuff, its treatment ia cam- 
era wise, and even if one did not know 
it, one might readily recognize it as a 
bred-in-the-bone picture man's play. 

The story turns on the time-hon- 
ored wager theme. To win a bet, the 
heroine masquerades as a youth and 
pays a visit to the Arizona ranch of 
a former sweetheart with whom she 
bas quarreled. The young woman de- 
eeives only herself, however, as 
•veryone from the hero down to the 
last cow-puncher recognizes the de- 
ception. Some of the boys plan a 
•*wild-west" party for the tenderfoot's 
benefit and enough shooting ensues to 
titart an amateur war. Of course. 
Miss Barriscale appears in skirts for 
the final close-up. 

Mr. Herndon was on hand for the 
premiere and extensive changes will 
iin(V»ubted1y be made. The show jumps 
to' (Meveland from here and then into 
New York where it is Hfheduled for 
the Belmont. Someone has put some 
real money behind the production and 
It shows it. The success of the piece 
will depend, not on the play, but upon 
the loyalty and strength of Mis:? Bar- 
riscale's following. Burton. 



WINDING STAIRS 

Cleveland, Sept. 7. 

It is not likely "Winding >5taira," 
the new play by liobert Hou.Hman. 
which had its premiere at the <.)!)io 
Monday, will brinj fame to its au- 
thor. The despotic Czars and Grand 
Duki's of Uussi.i. their children, in- 
triguing courtiers, spies, etc., fur- 
ni.sh the motive power for old-fash- 
ionod ir.oUxIrama. 

The whole work is purposojes.s 
and dull, and Ilousman has groat 
cause for thanks to the players who 
gave his work a i)rc.s(»nt:ible ai»i)car- 
unci'. 

In order to give "Winding Stairs" 
a place anion;; our theatri -il litera- 
ture, the audience is forced to draw 
on its iniaginatiun. The CiTort to 
visualize the events is a strain on 
the playgoer that weakens interest 
in the whole production. Itoniancr, 
thrill, love. intri;;ue and youthful im- 
petuosity all find a i)lace during the 
aciion of the play. 

Anieiicans whose automobile has 
stalled in front of a deserted liousi? 
on a lonely rond. and wlii.h is be- 
lieved t«) be haunted. Norman Bullarl 
enters the house to seel; nasoMn". 
He discovers Masldca, dan>jliter rf 
the Czir of Uussia, who is bi'inj; 
held prisoner by some of her father's 
l>oltical eneniies, among whom is 
I*rin<'e Vasiloff. her coi:si:i, who 
Keo'cs her hand in marria;xr. 

Tiillard immediately fa!!> in love 
With the young princess and d<'ter- 
minrs to let his c:)mi>anion proccerl 
on his journey while he stays with 
the princess, Ballard, however, is 
promptly taken prisoner by the con- 
sjiirators. 

The (Irand Duke Monstantin ap- 
pears at the house with a niessuije 
froi.i tlio monarch, but his r.\val 
Li^'l'.noss is murdered in old-fasli!oM<'d 
nndodramatic style. The rin- tali««:i 
froiM the dead duke is made the i)r('- 
te>:t for pressiuK Prince VjisiloiT's 
love suit. By this time, however, 
she has responded to the love of- 
i«»red by Ballard, her American pro- 
tector, bill Va:^ilolT plead; that her 
country needs her and her patriot- 
ism i.s shown !)y a i)roniise t > re- 
nounce ber new l.n'cr an<l return to 
Jli'» countl-y of her fallier with her 
kmsman -Prince VasilolT, 

Ballard h.is been handcufTed to an 
old ehrsf in the attic, Ma.sbkn tells 
nun of her dr»eision. .iiid they are 
closeted in what is pr< simied to be 
ihf'ir fm:il meeting as lovf»rs previ- 
|»us to her marnace to \'as:loff and 
h^r departure. She tells Ballard of 
K'Mne toys In the chest with wliir;! 
yho has nmusH herself in the n\v- 
il^il loneliness and ofTers to show tliem. 
T^hen she dis. overs in the clie.st the 
'>'>dy of the munlered (.rwid Duke. 
tl"<» trickery and unscrupulousness of 
1 rinee Vnsiloff .'ind bis comi>;inion 
^'it<»u Barta is revealed, ami they 
n^;;, for their lives. 

The |,„ik „f fi,^, ^^.^pji fjj,|j^ ,^„ ,1,,, 

•noulders of Henrv Hull a.< \ornian 
*5allard and Sydney Shields as Ma- 



shka. the princess. Edward Arnold 
guve a tlijnitied repreocntHUou ^^ U**- 
(irand Duke, and the work of George 
Farren as Matteo was a feature. 
Kugene Powers as Prince Vasiloff, 
liaymond Van Sickle as Arthur Mor- 
rison, and Henry Hicks aa Anton 
Barta did all that skilled players 
could, lieofge Fox was tho farmer. 
The jilay was staged by George 
Farren and the acttinga were praise- 
worthy. 

Roy. 



BEWARE OF DOGS 

Harriaburf , Pa., Sept 7. 

Author-Actor William Hodge was 
presented last night by Lee Shubert 
in his latest dual effort, "Beware of 
Dogs," programmed "a comedy tale 
in three pieces." With a little mend- 
ing it will prove a delightful comedy, 
occasionally bordarinf on farce. As 
it was at the premiere, the capacity 
audience forgot fana, ice water and 
an 80 decree thermometer long 
enough to break into hearty and 
frequent applanae. 

A young city^ man, George Oliver 
(William Hodge) retires to a coun- 
try home in Greenwich, Conn., on 
account of hia aiater'a health. Here, 
when he takes charge of a dog farm, 
his troubles commence. No human 
could have more worries and humor- 
ous misforluuea than does Ohver, 
who knows nothihg whatever about 
dogs. Nor are all the troublemakers 
canine, for there ia a bootlegging 
cook, an Italian workman who steals 
and sells all the eggs the chickens 
lay, and a husband, who, because his 
wife showers her interest on dogj, 
entertains a show-girl in road house 
fashion. 

Oliver is sued for damages done 
to neighboring goats and sheep by 
his dogs, for feeling hootch and vari- 
ous debts. A Florence Arnold (Ann 
D^vis) brightens life a little, al- 
though even she does not believe 
Oliver at first. The dog-keeper turns 
the tables on his accusers and fixes 
things Qp with the servants, the er- 
rant huiiband and the sheriff. Fin- 
ally, everything turns out nicely for 
Florence and Oliver. 

In addition to Miss Davis, Hst 
seen a.s leading woman in "The 
Guest of Honor," the supporting 
cast includes Julia Bruns, Mrs. 
Charles G. Craig, John Webster, 
George W. Barbier, Leighton Stark, 
Philip Druuing and several others.. 
Not. perhap.s, another ''Alan from 
Home," "Beware of Dugs" may prove 
a much better vehicle than "The 
(iuest of Honor." MiUei 



WAIT TILL WE'RE 
MARRIED 



Kate I.lvorrnore. . , 

Muruliall 

.Jhimos Twt'll:< 

Miiri'in L v»*rinoro. 
Coiini- Ti'Tii j)le. . . . 

William IMuMib 

Aunt Tarrlp 

Aunt Hot.>*y 

Aunt AiemMiin , . . . 

I'nm Katch 

I'n^'l-.* K«'hIit 

I'.-lix 



■ ■ . .Katlicrine Ki'Mrcd 
.Oerald ()l,vor S:nith 

Frank Sylvc'sttr 

MarUin Co.iklcy 

I'»an .S'l.ilby 

Ilpory liufTy 

Lucy Uf-auinont 

I Kato Jopson 

Rdnti May <iii\\:i 

Arthur AUxm t.s m 

Ilaplcy Holmes 

Robert Hawkins 



V>'a.^hin|!;ton, I), C., Sept. 7. 

Afti»r :i .si!iiitner'.s deaifh of things 
theatrical (»ne's judgment may ho- 
conie snine\v!i:it hiise<l, making thing.s 
ipi^<'iir to he ''what tlicy ain't," How- 
ever, this i-T'vI'ir'tion of Oliver Mo- 
rosco's written by Ilutcheson Boyd 
and Undo ph r.unner, and I'tlint 
hnd its first showing ^londay, the 
(ijsrrick does create l;iMglil<'r, liold 
yniir inlcre.'t. present som,' d^vci-ly 
(Irnwn n'< well a.s ron.si.stent cliarac- 
tcvs, .?ntl (lorv^ ;;ll thin without the 
glaiinj; ho'.f.s expected in a i\rA [/cr- 
fovinance. 

Mr, Morosco s^^ill .sticks to !iis 
trade-mark. "A typical Morosr-o cnst." 
To this one hia frade-mnrlc, or s'lo-iM 
if, ))(• "slo;:an." meuns somclhinj:. 
Marion * 'i);iK'!."'y nnd Henry Duffy 
siilcii'lid in the two yootlifiil IcadJJU' 
vol<'s. tin's l»e;»j<j f>nrticnlMrly tree of 
Mr. DiifTy. His transition from tli^ 
hoy wl.'» '• noM'i't accept .$.'00. 000 
froTM Iiis unfile hecanse he l)o!icvo;l 
"iul'» !>a(l v.r\\ earned It honestly, to 
ili.'^ so( i"fy fop hecauso lie tlioii!;!it 
that wa.s \\hif' his sweefhoart want- 
ed, wns cTcellonlly, and what is more 
:»if (Miicontly done. 

.Mes'^r>. T*<»yd nnd Bonnor tell I lie 
vtory of 1 paptnerod society cir; wlio 
saves from drowning a youth who 
it r!(<v(»li)p>< luM heen rni.»<ed hv ihrr«e 
t'riid>'n aiMi'M. Of the'^e ro'itr:'^^-" ia 
rliarni'ter .li'» juithor.s Iiav.» taV.en 
• •very ndvanta^e pracficallv v ■M,r.v» 
tli(> nor'o^^'.itv nf fjje \\<(* of fli<» iar.crl- 
native pov '^rs of the auditor in t 'H 
■fi" flir'i" 1i)Vf ^tory. 

'I'))" Iwiv siv.^ he's n "w'.ris.«r" ; 
.lie f('i>N ri e a mother to Mm. he- 
^aus-e she hnd civen his lif" hack tn 
'tin) in t!ie ••(« . • i<v She hns liun ^'ome 
to Ii««r homi' .-nd noes to work inune 
dial(dy to r.-mcvlcl him into wiia'. she 




TRIXIE FRIGANZA 

THE JOYFUL PEP-TIM 1ST 
III "My LIttU B^n O' Trly" 
By NevilU FI«ttoi aid Albtrt Von 
Tilzer. Playlna only Keith and 
Orpheum Clreuitt. 

wanU him to be. She hua literally 
thrown heraclf at him, and when he 
finds that her allowance, her cTothcii, 
her parties, etc., etc., cost more than 
his yearly income, he calls every- 
Ihidf oflf; but the girl won't have it 
so. 

The final act finds the boy return- 
ing after a h\x months absence Just 
the mat^ the girl had wanted him to 
be. With the uncle's money and tbo 
tutorship of the former butler of th» 
girl, he has become a t.ypic?! society 
man. She finds that the boy's ideas 
of life were about right, that she had 
been a waster, finally returning to the 
home of the three maiden' aunts to 
tell the boy so. 

This is all cleverly told, with plen- 
ty of laughter, and all clean (which \i 
nnother comi>oneat which should 
speak for Kuccess). One of the aunts 
is Kdn I May Oliver, nnd how very 
enjoyable she was. The character is 
another Quaker aunt, such as she did 
'w "Oh. Boy!" 

Lucy Bcjiumont and Kate Jopson 
were excellent OS the other aunts, 
snd Uanlcy TTohnes is n» the unele, 
yiv. Holmes has never given a bad 
tM»rfornionce: tluH xv»s no exception. 
Kntherine K.aclred. Frank S.vlvester. 
.TeTn Shalhv, Arthur Albertson, Qero 
aid Olive»- Smith all did well. 

The thre<» «-'»»:s n^e "'ell don": the 
direction, which ia credited to Frank- 
'rn T^nderwood in conjunction with 
Mr. Morosco. was fairly well attended 
to, although nt times it appeared that 
noints w^re lost by improper handling 
of the si^»ation. 

The !;io«e wifl tried out on the 
Coast bv Mr. Morosco, where it was 
rcTiorted xufvef>ful. 

A word n'.Mvt he s-nd nf flie ri..-^p. 
tion tend'""erl L. Stoddard Tivlor. 
'^'ho for SI i»»any vc"'' h.an'Ucd tlir» 
^^Maweo the tre in Thi«» c'lv. pml 
r'jom now *^e ft'i'iKrtrt«« h 've nla^ed 
'n charj'e of *■^^''>s!l■n1^to'>*•^ drwln? 
■•'•oMi ♦tv»Mtr(»" r»- wonn»(l that ever^ 
i"e (>f tliat jjoodlv si-T^ed hou^e want- 
"d 'o expr.'^v-p ♦o Mr. TVtylo'* the ijrati- 
'^'•nt'on :Mid ?>!en'<u''e thev felt in sec- 
'•'.z hJm here after so mnnv rumors 
•'•at. because of M^^ Bel'-^^o he'n^ 
T'ven over fo the Shubert vaudevi'V. 
''e wotiTd be located in "--«#» ofhcr 

■•!'.v. Meildn. 

OLD "UNCLE TOM" 



Coutts &, Tennis Dragging Him Out 

After 17 Years' 

Rest 



LEGIT BOXOFFICES SUFFER 
FROM CONTINUED HOT WAVE 



Gross in Many flouses'Tails "Below $37000^ — Harrt ^ 
Postpones ^^Eighth Wife'' — Three Closings Tomor- 
row Night — No Hits in T«n Openings. 



IjSiBt week was one of the most dis- 
astrous in years on Broadway. Not 
even the heat wave of early summer 
caused a slump that wtis as wide- 
spread as that of the week just fin- 
ished. There were any number of 
theatres along the street where the 
gross on the week was under $5,000. 
To several of the houses it was so 



bad that it hardly topped half that 
amount 

There were ten openings during tha 
week, and of the ten there wasn't a 
single outstanding hit delivered. This 
week there were five openings, al- 
though six were scheduled. Of the 
five Attractions two were revivals. 
The revivals Nceni to have Igmled, 
(Continued on page 30) 



Coutt.s Sl Tcnni.'H have niTaiijjed for 
a revival of "Uncle Tom's C'ahia" aa a 
I»!i)a<lw.ay attrart'on. [»laaning to j 
brinj? t!ie piece into Now York for a 
ten we(»k.«i' enjjagemcnt With an aM- 
star cast. The iJicrc ha.s not i)layed 
New York a.s a fir-t -class aM ruction 
for 17 years. Hh last revival wa.s by 
\V:lliam A. Brady. 

It is (he intention of t!ie producers 
I (t) make a direct appeal t > tlie schools 
j for the .'••.ui)i)nrt of tlio [u odurf ion, 
' ^^■i:h daily oiatiii •» s. ^iji :;;! .•;,'»I-.or;! 
I tickets w.ll be ;-old. 
j Fidlowing the r.'oadw.ay c;n;a:;e- 
nieiit the revival uiay tour the larger 
<'ities. 



JOYCE AND BRIEN JOIN 

fleori?!' O'Brien and Frank .loyci* 
have formed a hr>o!cing j);irtnersliip. 
Tlie new firm of J'Kcnt.s have o;»ened 
ollices in liie Iloinax huiidint; and 
will boik with ail tho in(Ie,)eiiil«*t)t 
circuit.-^. 

O'Brien is a fornier Keith a^rnt, 
his career comiirisin^; m\ apijrentice- 
nliip in the William Morri.^ and 
Proctor oflices LMer he was r tn- 
iie-lcfl with .loe l*ai{o iSra Hi ami 
Il.irry \VeI):»r, the Keifli . jj-u's 

.loyce is t!ie owner of tlie Hotel 
.Joyce, New York and two rijridi 
hotels. lie is a former v md^ville 
Hrtist nnd brother of Alico Joyce of 
uiotiou l)i^'la^o fame. 



SHOWS IN N. Y. AND COMMENT 



"Back Pay/' Kltinge (2d week). Onla- 
ioQ divided on this Woods' offer- 
ing. Last week, its firsc in New 
York, it got the worst sort of 
weather break and the ciff rent week 
Is Dot proving any better. Bets 
are being made it won't stick until 
Thanksgiving. 

"Bloa Beard's Eighth Wife," Kits 
1st week). Opened last night. 
Tried out of town and stopped by 
the police at New Haven, giving 
strong boost f<*r opening night sale 
here. One offer of $300 was made 
for a pair of seats for the initial 
performance after house was sold 
out 

*'Doa Juan," Garrick (1st week). 
To have opened Monday but post- 
poned until Wednesday. 

"Duicy*" Frazee (4th week). Affected 
with the others by the heat wave, 
but coushlercd next to "Sii Cylin- 
der Love" as the biggest hit of 
new seaaon. 

"Follies." Globe (12th week). Dropped 
frightfully last two weeks. Had 
about seven rows on lower floor 
empty Tuesday night of this week. 
Slump has been such that an effort 
is being made to keep actual fig- 
ures back. 

"First Year." Tattle (47th week). No 
let up in buHiuesH despite boat Hit 
over SLO.OOO aaaiu last week. 

"Got Togothor,^. Hippodrome (2d 
week). Opened last Hsturday with 
$1.60 scale, liooks like it will at- 
tract Home buainess but ballet fea- 
ture'doea not Koem atrong enough 
to last a a draw fo^ entire Hea^on. 

"Getting Gertie's Garter," Uepublic 
Gth week). Siippiug. Around $7,- 
000 la at week. 

"Honora Are Even," Times S(|uare 
5th week). Doe.s not .seeui to have 
much of a diance of cuntiuuiug. 
Just over $0,000. 

"Just Married," Nora BaycH (20th 
week). Getting fair retJirn on roof. 
Not holding the pace net for itaelf 
At Shubert. Around $5,500. 

"Lillom," Fultou (21st week). One 
of real holdover hita. Around 
$10,000. 

"Mimic World," Tromenadn Theatre 
At\\ week). Buy aRcncicH hoM is 
only thius keepinj; it in. Buy iias 
but two weeks to ro and that ijill 
undoubtedly fitii.sh the attract ion. 

'•March Hares," Bi'ou (r)th week). 
Having moved from Bijou, got 
about $4,400 last. week. 

"Nica People," Klaw (2Sth week). 
F'eeling that interest could be re- 
vived with stilT advertising cam- 
paign. $tl.lO0 last week. 

"Nobody's Money," LonKacre (4t!i 
week). Finisiies S.attiid.iy. Laat 
week'a tiiki'iR under .$r»,()(H). 

"Porsonality," IMayhou.e. Fininhed 
after one week. (Jejrge Broud- 
liur.st'a "The I'll on C.iae" to open 
t«)morrow. 

•Put and Take," Town Hall (.Tl 
week). Awful flo[) laat week. In- 
tercut in hoth < olorcul whow.s 
b"i;inninj» to wane. 

•Sally," New Amsterdam (:'.t;f!i 
v.eek). rdl oft verv liitle last 
week, but Kro:->-er| .^.'il .^tX). 

"Sriandals," I.iheiiy ('.>th week). A 
("hop ot ahiioM .•>"•.<>'»') l,i.-«L \se,.',;, 
uro.sn Koia;; to .'!>lS,tMM) uh nj;aiiist 
$2'-* 7fK) I;;- u«rk i-r-viouM. The 
.sIkjw is .s-!ie.lii!e I to j»o out. in four 
•.'.("'kM* time to r'l.aUe r'»om for 
"Tl.e O'Hrien <; rl." 

"Shtiffle Along." CM Sf. acih week). 
Business way olT last, week but 
came hack \\itlj lioliday perfor- 
niaiieeM Monday. 

•'Six Cylinder Love," Sam Harris 
.'t I v.'oek). Aceorded hit hon<>rH of I 
tlie town %\:\,VY) last week. | 

••Sonya,'* •Vn'h St. (4th w-^'k) 

.*»;.'>, (;«H> laHt. week. 

"Sonny," (*.ort (4th week). Finishes 
S:ifurday ni>{ht. Did just under 
.^•'.(HK) IsMt week nee(|ed to play 
t > .$i2.0t)0 for the attraetion to 
to fjet a hr'vik. W'wa to have 
been moved to t'le .\o(Ilo l)ut will 
!('• : !n'Iv<'d iriMtca I 

"Sv^ords," Nation d ('J.| week) 
Not a soul Hceais to have a jjri'* 
on tliiH (uie. Ih hi ld«*n in, a n"«' 
tlie.alr«» on 41st .-^frei-t iliat the 
public have not secuied to have 
av\ukruod to aa :i't. 



"Tangerine^" Casino (5th week). 
The musical hit of new arrivala 
with $18,000 as the grosa agala 
last week. 

"Ttrzai of tha Apoa," Broadhurit 
(1st week). Opened Wednesday. 

"Tho Bat," Morosco (55th week). 
Dropped with rest during last 
week's heat. About $8,800. 

"Tho Detour," BiJou (3d week). 
The move from the Astor affected 
business. All told the attraction 
pulled just over $6,000. 

"Tho Easiest Way," Lyceum (let 
week). Itevlval opened Tuesday. 

"Tho Qrooo Qoddota," Booth (34th 
week. Houte dark foe greater 
part of last week due to iUaeaa 
of George Arliss; resumed ruo 
Monday. 

"Tho GrooBwIch Village Follloa." 
Shubert (2d week). Got away 
to bad start during the middle 
of lust week with weather break 
against it. Show's oomcdj end 
being bolstered. 

"Tho Hero," Belmont (1st week). 
Opened Monday, reported to lipro 
a chance. 

"Tho Laat Waltz," Century (18th 
week). Shuberts have hopes of 
continuing this piece into Novem- 
ber when they will resdy •'The 
Rose of Stamboul" as^ the sue- 
ceoding attraction. Buainess under 

"The Merry Widow," Knickerbocker 
(iHt week). Opened Monday and 
looks like it will dean up for the 
seven weeks it is here for. 

"The Nightcap," ;<Oth Street (4th 
week). Bu.sineKH dropped heavi- 
ly. Not f.ir over $5,000 mark 
laat week. 

"The. Poppy Goi," Hudson (2d 
week). Never had a chance, closea 
Saturday. Attraction to follow not 
yet selected. 

"Tho Silver Fox," Maxine Klliott 
(lat week). Opened .'Monday. 

"Two Blocks Away," Cohan (2d 

week). TW.s piece does not aeem 

to have caught the imblic fan^^. 

<Jot around $8,000 with the opra- 

in;: night Included. 

"Tha y/hc£l," (;aiety CM week). 
\>ont laat. a.n the carda now lay it 
ia ready to move out in another 
three weeks. 1»ii1I.m| $8,700 last 
week, of which $1,700 was the 
opening nishl'H receiiiiH. 

"Triumph of X," Comedy (.Id week) 
Another weak Miafer nntl about 
ready for the c.jniidior. Had 28 
people on the lower floor by ac- 
tual count o:ie nijcht luht wei-k. 

"Whirl of Now York," Winter (;ar- 

den (l.'ltli week). .Tust tot>ped 
$ir>.000 last week. 
"Perjury," Park CM week). This 
Fox i»iclure wan withdiavvn Wed- 
nesday. No busiuesH. 

"No Woman Knows." Central (1st 
wee!:. CniverHnl haw taken over 
the house unci is i)ri>sentin';{ this 
feature while »;et(im< "Foolish 
WivcH" in readinoHd. 0|)ened Sun- 
day ui^iit 

"Three Musketeers/' • T.yric (2d 
v.. k). Will liit $2:t,00()"thi.s week 
afiam altljouRh it i.H heinj; found 
ne e.sNary to force the higher 
priced .seats a little. 



Sallie Fhher in "Choir" Act 

Cliicagi), Sept. 7. 
.Sallie I'islier will njjain tour the 
Keith and Orpheum circuit tliis .sea- 
sou in "Tl>e Chor Iv"Iie,irsal" by 
Clare Kummer. The produ. lion will 
iiMve a.> licr a-">:*iali' pli\r:"s, .r;)liu 
Iveefp, (iilbert C'i),ll'itidt. .I-diri II i^an, 
Tina Bov.es and ISInry I^lli.s m. 

Ramsdoll Going on the Road 

Ciu.'-axo. Sept. 7. 
r.,ou B. Uamsdell, a^ent of ''The 
Bat" during it.s run ut i!ie FritieeMS, 
was rallisl ea-it by Wa^rtiliaks & 
Keinpor to Ro in advarjee of one of 
fh" four roiupjnie.-i «"f (he play which 
ire on tour. 



16 



LEGITIMATE 



Friday, September 9, ID-.'l 



BROADWAY REVIEWS 



HIPPODROME 

jicve-Jili Beuion of his luunaffinrDt oi 
n.o IlippoJrouie Saturday m%h\ 
(S»l>t :U v.ilM the prcsmtutlon of 
•Oet Together,* «n int^nittional me- 
1 into thf title being suggeHtcd through 
uu uttn aiico by PreHident Haruinf. Aa 
,.M.:ii the ^taKm;: of the wi-o'luci^o" 
v.as r.ndcr the direction of IC U. 
i;ii.nni(U«. who, tlli^* season, however, 
ii'friiins from taking ccdit to the 
rM.'M notPd in previous yc^rs. auU 
thereby dodges responHibi'ity or 
Kloiy, as the ease may be, for Ibo 
nrer.Mii pioduetion. 

Tl^c j«Msou for this may have bc««u 
(Ii i rue»e ha>i been a dctir.itc ehangp 
urijoth ihe l)Oi otti.-e anil !>tage polso 
yl liie l!i:> for the present beason. 

A.imisslon prieeH have boon rut lo 
Si toj) for the luatiiiee.s and $1.30 for 
iiio ni;;itt p( rforUianee^, with a $"- 
i«. I s.;iur(ljy« antl holiUaya. 

rv.o onlerlalument presented pORs- 
rs i;p the \i«ual Rpeetacular features 
Mil rolie* thid season ou a ballet ami 
.\ revival of the ice skating to be the 
dtaw. The»:e two i^orlion;* of the 
Khow are presented an the finales to 
the pr.it and se<ond halves of the pr<»- 
Kiam and leading up to tb^ arc u 
lumber of vaudeville turns. 

IJut with all the changea **Get To- 
r^tl'.er' IB a whole hatful of enter- 
tainment for a dollar and a half. 

Sir. l>:Hi;igh:nii h:'.s the playhouse 
of the iiia«'."^e"?. and it*; nrices muat h» 
within reach of the universal pocket- 
I ook. The reduction at this time wa.< 
; not] s>ovvriiiii»hip. AVl'cthcr or not 
the entertainment will prove as aatia- 
lying to iho eronds uh tho.se of prrvi- 
ruq years is a question Hiat time onb 
y\,}\ . nswer. 

It seems rather doubtful whether 
it\e rua*>« of small lowiwrs w!«o are 
liie backbone of the Ilip's box oHice 
V ;11 j'ccept the bfillet as a real b\% 
finlure. To a handful of New York- 
eey. tiinse really high-bro*' xind those 
thai a«iR»Mne that pose, the ballet will 
be hailfd as "wonderful." but they 
will n<»t be RufTieient to fill the houHe 
ilirin? tho rritire Re.ison. Americans 
in general have not been Bufficieutly 
rd\j<aled to aeeept the ballet in the 
K me manner as it is weleonieo 
rI)roa<l. an-l while Mr. Dillinghiun 
I i.'v be lr.ud«Ml for* Mh effort to ♦•tV^- 
f '• mm] (•re:^te :» clienteje To'* thi- 
I'.jllet in thi"? eonntry. records of past 
» frrjivrr- of a liUe niture f jW to show 
I'lM^ titey made money Tru<» tat 
ballet hai^ always been a part of past 
Mippodroroe prodtictionH, but it has 
been presented as incidental to the 
»pe<'t:iole rather than a^ its feature. 

nevivinjc the lec Hnllet, however. 
">ay prove riufficient to pull at the 
H'p. but the prpsent ire pcrformauoe 
d-'c-^ rot: com) Mre wi;h tbot which wa^ 
orir'nally rre.':rrted there. The fea- 
ture performers arc not present io 
c gr« at a number rs they were dur- 
ing the the first neason Dillingham 
had the honpe. and Charlotte now 
fcems to have showed up in her work. 

The three rejl hits scored on ihc 
oi»niiing night went to Howard Nich- 
olson on the ice: Powera* Klrphaut > 
and the Three nob:< in the first pai t 
V a ude y iJ 1 e _ *»ect ion. _ Tlie_ j)e r jonnanee 
ran liko fl«);l. woil;. open'u;^ (it .S:i.'i 
and fmis'iinT at It o'doel; on ihe d^v 

Startin r the hill was a pre relennr' 
jhow of tl'o rivd.' Took eo;«edv. 'The 
Toreador."** wl.if'h his a lot <'f latighs 
peafteve*^ llirous'j it. The Fox i»eo- 
!»lo nadr* r>. cre.it bnrjriiin wi<h Uil- 
Iin;;h''i»i niien t)i*»v hoolied this ho.ise 
to ?.ho\r the series of five of theR<^ 
ron^r-l >•• fo:- a five v.ec'ks' run rav'a 
rt .^l.('.'>0 .t weelc. Vox should l.ave 
hern ^v;i!inJ,• to give \hrxu to T> liin?- 
ham r.>r • .tl^n-r. for tlie ••r'^.';t i,:je il.ni 
IiiK or? n:/jifion '^1 nrt)(]iirt a<'hievo 
f'T.rn t'i'> "oniedio l)Mh;^ |i;in of the 



r«^»rul; 



T i: 



M rl^ow 



1 wo 



'IS 



in;; rorii'«l'i-« .'•.Till »)vovifliii«T )k» m 
jiro>''"!y ;::'M'l'o'l w\]] do,'elo)i 'no one 
uf t^.'- Tor] f-n']' ill r.'Tetvi coirwl/. 
At IT-": * )ii<< pKike n-> 
|t(»sf 'w^ ■ ^ ^^ I 
pin r. -id I^ill! 
lf»nd i>T 1 ■' ' 'i 

t?;" 1 < 

miK^f 1 ' ' • < ' 
if >»;i< 'J';iv;i"n |tei fci-'Mii'j. 

.11 ' 1*1(1. 



M::i;n. an 1 j><-nvr :: :»ii.o- j 

' ■>" ::; ,•.■ r ••• . r> i 
'vei'o iios;ti'.'<- ! 



^elher to meet the boxotfiee price 
rut, and tit the price it cuu be touted 
ui a corking eutertainment. 

Fred. 



POPPY GOD 



»« 



:o ),' 



!^ 



• > .OV !1" 



a? 



V\ 1 ■>■ ;!:• )' f 



temp; 
^lov. '>; r' •• ■ 
<!en»l \\;i;i 
ritli»' • rivT 



in.v'lt \ i?) Tn-o <»i>; i'lv flip 

. !,.!., ;,, or f,r,., J o .< -y ■ on ;» 
Tu O t III OO «.' »'f>t ; fi'i 

"C ." st.in'l ..r I.n's hf'd 
llio fc:;!'"-!-! f;!!)"v hwm- M.ir.li; .- 
;!nd Mo-..n. "•) I'r tii.'> -••!' d ).; ;.J !{ 
rlinri' • I' i> ; ii rl-.,'') wl-'l ■, T)i"'' 
foriin^tl :\ pr^'li'dr to ili(> .■j,,))e raiuc 
ti IIk" 1'»,\\ci;* nc|)!i;iiit i. fill 1,1 iiiiii ^ ) 
.'1 lni:.ii II 1 i 111 , jilMni -ii'mmi*. 1N)\v- 
CfM \M);lvr(j Ii.. ;.i):.:i.il.. <iii:ri<l>. iir.I 
seoiniiiRJ.t witlio'ii ai\, <• .I'iit;. 'riis 
f;:et v.M-; f.'i i.;:'.ii |l^ |! .« ;'i:ilMMi •', wlio 
llpl''. iiJf'l liv;:rt ■!> iill <•; i!..- I; irl:-. 
'I'll.' I>;ll-;u 1 • iio,) Ii! I.'* ill" prui. i..;il i 

l!ir l).l-.-I):i;: j/.;l;,o I 
';r,i:;:r','. 'jlii- r .is;* ,' 
with \vl,i:i: i:;.' r>.J!i)mels rrtii tlirn;i':]i! 
their roiil ;;f s< r.f tl;< :ii ;i\v..y \vi»!ii 
t)»ur«!(;«r; ; ; |i;»|.i;; -e. • ' 

The bun lerrif r kiuI ilie erow ii. ' 
t)ie Tl'rec To*); fuii) u"i«< tlie fwn ' 
Dure (ire tils. Tie Irys g„| ]]i[]r- 



with the i-lub.s until thry worl,<>d ilie 
i]Of ;>v' \^'">i T'"" 'oTir-r w ni ovv 
big early in the aor, and the bit<i wa.<« 
ooikiug elo.sing uiulerial. The uou.se 
fairly went wild over the catehing 
done by the feathered one us pni t ol 
the juggling, und the tiui^l throw^ 
from the audience capped the climax. 
Ferry Corwey, the musical clowu. 
had a f;rcat oiiening hit with n prop 
railroad equii>ped with rnougii hoak 
to get lapghs. Ilis bell rinsing 
pai<se<1 lightly cpplauded, and it was 
not until he went to the musical fenci- 
(it runs from one aide to the otlior 
of the Hip stage) that he received u 
full applause return for bis en- 
deavors. 

^The ft|»puing with the film ran foi^ 
.*i7 minutes, the overture for the bal- 
let starting nt t):14 and the fir-^t sec- 
tion closing at 0:r»0. 

• Tlie Thunder P.ird" is the title be- 
stowed on the brdlet. Vera F'okini 
and Michaef Fokine are the principal 
dancers, and there are about two> 
score dancers sapporting them. Of 
these there are about 20 toe workerii 
and tlie hnlance in the ensemble. 

Verj Fokina is credited with the 
rtory of the dance, founded on at. 
fncient Aztec legend. She and Fokire 
dunce the two principal roles. Tne 
♦""tting is cAlorful and the C0Ktuninj.<. 
slitterinr Fokine ntaged tlie dancing 
nd handled his theme cleverly. He 
and his co-star, however, walked 
awiy with !»11 the bonorn. He is a 
virile d.incer nofl cnrnpelleil attention 
as th« Aatec huntaman. wblle Fokina 
K th<» Princess who, by a spell, has 
been frnnsfonned into a thunder bird 
was dHirhtfnl The eTi.*<pmble worked 
hard, but at th«» conclusion the cur- 
tain rose over the scene without the 
isnnl demonstration that is expected 
fTm th" audience «t th<» eonoliiRion 
"f the Hip first raft on on openint 
nlshf. 

After en intermission of 1.5 min- 
otes the second part wan opened by 
the Five Kaetbs. a quinter.t of ac- 
cordianists. In a frame set iii the 
center of the st^ge. representing a 
scene in Holland, t!»ey offered their 
opening selection, which ran for six 
minute.«:. It was far too long and the 
audience began to get re^tlesH. Com 
'•n«» down to the foots they encored 
with a mcdrev of po])ular airs for 
inothe:- six minutes. wlii«»i got them 
•iway nicely. With more spf^«>d they 
will develop into a standard va^xJe- 
\iMr' ntiractiou. 

Itert Levy, wlm seems a future at 
this house, offered his usual whistlin* 
ind sketching with Harding, Roose- 
velt and Wilson going over as sure 
fire. Trgfther the two acts con- 
snned 'Jf> minuter. 

Just thirty minutes was devoted to 
tJie ice ba let, which closed the per- 
formance. 

The skating is in two scenes, snd 
entitled "The Itcd .Shoes." billed as 
direct from the Admirars palace, 
Kcrlin. 

An exterior showing a IluKsiau 
•hiir'^h is the opening scene. There 
Tre th'^ usual villagers, too. Char- 
'o:(o n.-UMrelly is the star of the ag- 
reg)tion. but on the opening night 
lid no: do herself ju«.rif*e. Perhaps 
Hie fnri liiat Mrt«» had an accident a 
few days before the opening wa.s tho 
rerson for her being handicapj»ed. 
Pnut Kr/»ekow. a new importntioi. 
from .-^briind wh«) was touted as a 
•n.arvol. vorkia* opposito Thnrlotte. 
•j'^o failed to show anyiliin? •<tarmn». 
Tito resiiH wos n.r.t Ilowinl N:..']ioF- 
'O') nf HealyVs Oardfn Ol.'d-':. rot 
so lon?r ago walked away with the 
')ei ro! iirii? hoT)«Mv; of fi)(» fiivlif. Ho 
Ti-ejired in ho^li Ihe Or<.| jn>d R»r. 
■>u(] s « iifs fitr s'du neifonnanf-eis. ani 
(*.'<•'» limo h^: wnrh hrovr,]\f r-'irer'S :V^ 
^' ("11 :n nppIaM-e On |ir.t1i o<^ra>.io'i.- 
Kveikoxv. who f()]lo\\r«l Idm. proveii 
''^ bo Mnn'i!." t"> ofr«r : pv eonpetili.Mi 
-nd toriMv*"! but. pr-rfun* (ory a«-- 
Knowledi-Pievf. 

T'^. th.^ or* .ri>T -■'r-ryr Kntir 
^'fb'r.'dt, opr cf the holdovers fro^n 

th." f.vev'o-.v; ii"- h;;'l(, ^ r)rpvrv!^r,^ r*;.- 
!lrsf 'o'o re;-foMi>.Mi^c. l-rM attention 
"^rd ATM ,'. n'^V'vs'^. '^h'". wn'i It^*- • ' 
^•■I' n>j r-ir.'-Mor p!i»i| the fl'i-l > 
( •;>-i|/,tf,. ]:p,] j,^^ en(rf.n''e work^l 
■]\ h-i' f-'V-T 'o fl-'itv**". Sli-» ' e' in ^ ] 
l.\-vv a'v» «-M*tp.'] in her worlc. Kn- 
iir."!y nii'-sinoj v.-^^- tV.nt > 'ri'rioTisne'^s 
tin* r.i?fl'* ]'.r'' ^/> fro :'.r>T>iln>ji; f| f ;. 
vo:iti> f> fpw y^arv n"n. 



Mrs. Dennett.. 
.Stanley D*nr.«-t 
.".•-,.; U.ii»J<v. 

lllftinii 

KiTcy... 

I<i>lchton 

•Tabby" 

Steward. 



• • • • • 



* • • • 



• •••••••• 



TIop L.*« 

Olng Lwuif.... 
Wo LlnjT Wo.. 
.StAiiley Ucnntt 

Sule Mint 

.1 »»« 

Sadl* 

• Xlck" L«wla.. 

Doc" 

l^.iily Urant. . . . 
l^lai'ffvry Dean. 
F.r»t Toagb. . . . 



rp»loca« 

Marion Qicy 

i Ralbh Mnriran 

J. AJ ^ iC"i<>l J <Jiy .. 

Wallace Fftrd 

K Injr Caitlfr 

Glenn Hopk na 

(Jeorgv* Pembroke 
rtobert Peal 

The Play 

Harold Stton 

Harry Urniayer 

Georre MacQuarrle 

'.^Mlph Morgan 

Kdna lilbbard 

N rk Star!i 

Unrin Alar<iavtte 

..Frank Allworth 

Cunway NVInicfl«t«I 

...R«b«»rt HrlBter 

Ituhy Gordon 

. . .Donald Htrobig 



cups. He made a deft little char- 
ai.i«-t- puiira'i out of what uiight have 
been rrudc "comed.v relief.** Mr 
Alej stayer (who played "Crab" In 
'The Sun-Daucbter") did nlpely yith 
a similar cbaractar, although he doeM 
seem a kindlr aort of person to plot 
devilments of Oriental subtlety. S'o- 
body else mattered, including the 
hero. 

though tne cast of more tnan a score 
would represent a lot of money, if 
the play lasted long. Rush. 



THE WHEEL 



.11. 



lail»:It. 'ill !i<'n;;Ii 
])ro\r(I |;::'lilv 



Th" .St' con I M'l-nc is i;>.- iut^Mior of 
= 1 " i' o p;llr:f(> o** t';o IJn .]:\n pviiv 
V I ,> ;.• u-.'y'.w: (•.••)• t IO <'|;i, lo'je. tl:*^ 
'i"»I^ : r.i ^ I't. Tl.o «"tlMi5: jv ))in«!.^ 
(■■"I'l',.' i\ ,> flifi ii»!i |»iI!.TH of li^lit. 
uli.cli n!.ii«' ) of «>Tpf:i'<iv" iiv.> rol'^r- 
'' '. 'ri"> rliro" '-tar'-. .<11 worked voln* 
Ii' r.'. ;i;id ;i'r:i?) jf \x .i , N^-lioJson \viio 
"<f t|io lioiioj'-^. Af fiio C-nish Jlio i- » 
'.••'] t>;nvod fo he j» l.eniififiil fl.isli. 
■I" ill,' |}i<> sl;ov. In ,\ sl:(,\vfi of .]])■ 

J In' lJi.-.si.;ii li;ii'i I vin] llie ice 
^ 'lii -i finmd Hie (),-4|,rst la under tlie 
;';<'. liiii rf Dr. Asi.-iii (!oet/''|, wlio 
'•:(v«:;> |iaiidl(Ml iln> nui-icians. llin.^ 
11 ? the regular vaiidoviile r.ets A. .1. 
' ; :r r': d'rei-i' d. 

£<!i<n to 



Aside from the rircumsfanoes 
that a t^hincMe play nt this day is 
a good deal of an anti-climax and 
n theme that gots its kiek from 
the 11)14 war spirit in iu the n iture 
of a poftt-script, 'The Poppy Clod," 
o.TCi-eu at the Hudson, is u frank 
melodrama with a few moments of 
effective theatrical contrivance and a 
great many interminable pcssages of 
fruitless and unprofitable talk. 

The Sclwyns present this work 
in a prologue and three acts, writ- 
ten by Thomas flrunt Springer, who 
has attained Kome eminence in the 
.•'hort story field, ass sted by I^on 
Gordon aod LcUoy demons, both 
actors. The play is stagey to the 
last degree. Its lines are stilted 
and bombastic and its mechanics 
positirely naive. The piece is made 
to order for a Fox or Tniversal 
moving picture. As a Broadway 
production it would draw its clien- 
tele from file comparatively re- 
stricted theatre-goers of, soy, the 
h'gh school Junior set, and pretty 
unsophisticated juniors at that for 
this fast stepping generation.. 

The play starts with the presen- 
tation of a moral coward, persuaded 
by his mother to be a slacker, and 
ends up with his violent death in 
delirium brought about by opium 
smoking. It's depressing: jt' nowhere 
strikes anything resembling a hu- 
man note: it does not at any time 
engage any one's sympathies. It 
just makes a futile, harrowing eve- 
ning iu the theatre— a play that 
starts nowhere and momentarily 
gets further astray. It is ju«-t n play 
without beauty, form or puri^os^e, 
another transient incident of the 
younger season. 

The prologue shows Stanley Ben- 
nett's stateroom on the steamer 
Ventura out of Hong Kong for San 
Francisco in November, 1J)14. Ben- 
nett is an artist and is running away 
a la Grover Bergdoll from danger 
of British conscription abetted by 
his mother. Mother and son have a 
locg talk about the situation and 
then a lot of Engli>hmen come to the 
stateroom for good night and a toast 
to "the King," which Bennett doesn't 
drink, but appears strangely to 
arou.-^e nobody's umbrage thereby. 

Mother plants Bennett Jn the house 
of a Chinaman in San Francisco while 
she goes to Kngland to rai.se money 
to support him and Bennett (al- 
thongh he is a moral coword and 
lacking in any spark of enterprise) 
manager to fteal the Chinese mer- 
chant's wife, ,Suie Ming, and elo'c 
with her. 

We are next transported to a low 
San Frnnci.sco water-front dive. 
Local color is smeared all over the 
second act in the form of « rooks, 
dereli.t gentlemen and Bennert. now 
a confrrmed opium j^moker and a be- 
in;: too abject apd pit'able to inspire 
any sympath.v. Suio Ming, it is 
hinte^l. supports the household by 
n.eans left to the imagination and 
her former l«ns'»«ml io hot on the 
trail of (he elojiors witli subtle and 
relentless v« iixennee. hi.>: ton;,' friend 
Cin l.ong (p':;;ed bv Harry Mestay- 
er> beiTv.r ]^i:^ a cent who forces "yrn 
slii' upon IJniuielt. to get hiin deeper 
ill I he ni'r" of "hop."' 

There is a musiral comedy rew^- 
p.-^ner reporter in this pnrt of the 
s«rn:irio. Ho does the waterf -.i.t 
for the I>;iii:;n*»r and is a sartorial 
laarvel. Tlii-; rnonstrosity who Irv 
notliing wh.il'vr-r to «lo* w'-th x]\n 
'^■ory. jiair; off with ,1 vrfyr «i" r}iin'» 
"ill iiiissiuti v.f>rl<«'r wli > i< »'vcii 
liiore rnaolrly rnu. MTiied witii tli«' 

!mm1 ilw.y \i'i?;.i'».;f<l\ inaT'. . Nir 
I'li't if lae.ir'; .irv\ t!i>tif; rp" v.:r- or 
th.> orhf. i:x«««:,i that, r.ft«'r r.-ii- 
rierf has .-r.iirrled with ]iis •^;>;.)o 
nil I IiIm cowaii'Co for Ihrrv >rar.x. 
ho pots orio o.i;,n,.p ,^f j,^.. ci^,,,)^,.! 
int') HU lip^'lish W<»lii!Wrvi pr;i., ryrs,'' 
is tlM« way li«' puts it» aiu) \'r,i"< 
■ov.ai^htwiiy III il|. tipavest Hriiivli 



•til t Tci,' fhcr ' \\.. 



rrcniitinp: offi' /^, wlrrli ;iv ]r>-\ ."fid 
til' playwrif^hr \v.)ii!d hav.' if. iv< ju^i 
nroiiiid the ro u't. 

Bill ()io himI-.m' offi.rr wn? "f hu\r 
hiia. His liini: Is ufr«"to(I liisfrnd 
of hreathini; a sijrh «>f vri;, f at hav- 
iii",' made I ho elToit and tail".| f,,; 

fl" fault nf I. is own. (lie i.r.^i...- 

sfaiices sfi'i] hiio info aM ('i.;';ti! re- 
Ir.j't' and h* (Xf>ires aflrr atfi'i'4 all 
over th(^ -:u.u:' in a highly divapvcr- 
ai le Hiari! V 

Nchody lO'ild ,l)!f.;:(h rtufhiii: yr- 
^enihling life iii|> v.--h a t.i;.'. Kalnh 
Mor;:.?!! I I Heui.ett was a I fic'al. 
How cotiiil any ador h»' ot ^n':'\\ im* ? 
The hon )r^ nf (he evcniii'.; w»'> « to 
II. <'oii\rav \\'i;"rfi('Id i><i a klri-l'v old 
do'lov Mh.) sf'll vrlriru'd siii,;'!inK 
of In- |'r(>f«- -iolial poi.vM; r\<'ii ill hl« 



Throdor*? Morton .... 
Tb«udor« Morton, Jr. 

Ifidward Dak^r 

Harry Parko 

Sum Marks 

StelU WJtlHie n 

Katn O'Hara 

N'orah Roonry. 



• • • • • 



'•••»« 



Bric'orot Rooney 
Jack L^Roy 

Mr. D 

Mr. 8... 
Mr. «J... 

Dave 

Charlie.. 

Pr*d 

Jake. . . . 
Mtfnty... 
Geurc*. . 
Tony .... 



..Frank Burbcck 

Charles Lalte 

.Thoman W. Knsa 

.Stuart Pox 

.Harold Waldrlye 
.Marirut Wllliania 

Ida St. Leun 

. LeMa Bennett 



..Josephine \V II llama 
..J. Francia O'Reilly 

Rlcbard Matchein 

.ll«rb«rt Saundora 

John Clpn)(;rtts 

' Km Ilk Keoff li 

Rodney Thonip.ion 

David flabel 

.0«orga Spelvia 

..Albert Roccardi 

.Jul ua Johnaun 

...Frank Miller 



• « « « • 



I • • • • • 



'•••••••a«»«. 



John (lolden brought "The ^ITieel * 
by Wincbcll Smith to the Gairty Aug. 
20 to replace *'Lif htnin' ." Super- 
ficiaJly It is exasperating because of 
it«» obfious carpentry and coaimer- 
cially its anccess H doobtful because 
of the leBfth Mr. Smith goea to 
achieve efrect.«< calcuhited to draw 
tears or laughter. Laughter it gets, 
bat spottily. The te«rs are another 
matter for. after aU, the addiction of 
a wealthy yoiinf aian to gambling is 
no great matter to tba mass of peo- 
pIc and his cure in Ihia play carries 
hardly any conviction. Dramatically 
it was pointleita and emotiona^V/ op- 
pearcd no real remedy at all. 

Briefly the story ahows Theodore 
Alorton, Jr., marrying the pretty lit- 
tle proprietor of a hat shop, much 
aiainat his family's wishes. After 
the marrtate their happiness is some- 
what marred by the occasional 
spurts at the roulette table by which 
the young man reduces his fortune. 
Apparently he is imabte to cure him- 
self, so his young wife persuades a 
professional gambFer she knows to 
set up a place for her. To this place 
Morton comca and loses all he has 
left to his yoong wife. Tou are 
asked to believe that this cured bim 
and they live happily ever after. 

The acting was more interesting 
than the play. It brought Thomas 
\y. Ross back as the gambler, with 
his assured method and reserve force, 
and the blonde Ida St. Leon as Kate 
O'Hara. Either yon like the nnusnal 
and unvarying fiber of Miss St. T^eon's 
voice or you do not. Certainly in 
other respects she is qualified. 
Standing out in the show was the 
gambling room scene, and .1. Francis 
OReilly's savve. nnttions work a^ 
the manager. This was the high 
light of the performance, though the 
colored waiters were deft in their 
portrayals. 

As an ineidentftl moral the play 
ernlains bow little chance an out- 
sider has to beat the wheel. 

Leed. 



DADDY'S OONE-A-HUNTINO 

ifi'i/tf f.'*'**?; '"'••"»' Conroy 

BUHh, hta wife Marjorle Rambeau 

Janet, thair child FrancG!i Victory 

Wultar O raeaouff h Lee Baker 

Theodora «?t«^wnrt, h.l- coUflT), 

-, , , . Hugh Dlllman 

.Mra. Dahlsran Halen Robbini 

Mm. Price Winifred AVellinKton 

Oacr.r , Manart KIppon 

*j*'f * 0!i;a Olonova 

*-'*ara Jean Wardli>y 

Knight John Robb 



"God knows," exclaimed Marjorie 
Rambcau to her stage child for the 
first aet curtain-line, as she crooned, 
"Sleep Raby Hunting, Daddy's <;one 
a-Huuting" and the child atked 
"Where ?^' This was after her stage 
ftftJier. Frank Conroy, left the room 
of thoir ilarlem flat in n flare be- 
cause bis wife objected to his bo- 
heniian ways. 

^ "iJod Knows," exclaimed Frank 
Conroy for the second aet curtain- 
line when his wife left their Wa.vli- 
in^ton .Squar<^ domicile after she had 
»>rovod to herself one year later 
her hushand had become so iudiffe •- 
ent he did not care whether or not 
«<he wa.s i^r^true to him und re"»'iv«'d 
gifts from auother, one "Walter 
CJreeiiougli,'* Conroy saying simply, 
• V.'liaf«< •iauce for the goose is sauce 
for tlie gander." 

"tJod Knows," excla'med Miss 
Ramheau for the third aet curtain 



line 



of the finished artist than the trained 
player, with absolute undei-Htanding 
of her part. 

Ed th is confronted in the first act 
with her changed artist-husbund 
Julian, who has been a year abroad 
through the kindly interest of a beo- 
efacireSN and who return!* n vhangej 

* •' ■'. >.^' t •rrr^ Tx.ioTv bo- 

hemians back with him and ih ir ab- 
andoned sang-froid only u.ore for- 
clbly denotes the artists tempennVi.- 
Ul change To Julian, lore mein, 
^lothinf. Nor is he wedded to hil 
work either. He i^ only a aocd 
natured shftless product of X 
Paris Qiiartier that had tiius mould 

of tlme^ ^''**^^*'' '" ""^** '*****'"^ ''P*'^ 

From the Harlem flat scene, the 
^^"VL* ,•'• ^»««>^«wd one year later 
in their Waahmgton Square garret 
<artiNtJculIy devoid of any too much 
interior decorations or Id other 
words a simple Robert Kdmond 
Jones setting) where Greenough. the 
wealUiy friend of the famil,-. 'pro! 
fesscs his love to Edith. She re- 
fuses stating that her faith in her 
changed husband can never be shak- 
en; that in his own way he is try* 
ing to make her* understand some- 
thing which she is mentally incapable 
of comprehending. To test Green- 
ough's jibe that Julian has lost all 
interest in her. she disphtvs the 
brackets he (Greenough) had pre- 
sented her with, and when Julian pro- 
fesses rank disinterest sh? rushes 
shriekuig frmn the room. 

In truth this has driven all of her 
l6ve for Julian from her heart and 
she finds happiness with Greenough 
for five years when the action is re- 
sumed in a Centra] Park West apart- 
ment. The Jahberina friend of the 
family says ''eTerybody knows he haa 
kept her here, etc./' although in 
truth he means to marry her aa soon 
as she is free fropn Julian. The 
evidence has long been at hand and 
she could secure her freedom when- 
ever so desired. Edith is agreeable, 
that is after littl<> Janet gets over 
her serious illness. But Janet dies 
and Hdith in her loneliness sends for 
Julian, wants him to comfort her and 
feels he needs her comfort, etc. — and 
the "unhappy" emling really proves to 
be the only realist 'eallv human eondu- 
sion from what otherwise might have 
developed into a mere sentimental 
curtain. 

The staging the casting and the* 
mounting were worthy of the best 
of Mr. riopkins* preceding endeav- 
ors and that speaks for itself. Con- 
roy ran the star second honors with 
T^e Baker distingu'shing himself 
also. Little Miss Victory was a 
pleasant surprise. She w«8 quite 
natural, a relief from the usual stage 
children. The balance of the support 
was on a high level. 

It's a specs "buy" attraction, no 
doubt about that, which ought to 
get special following from the wo- 
men matinee audiences. Abel. 

THE MERRY WIDOW 

Raoul de St. Urioche Ralph Soule 

^'•''^»» « Dorothy Fruncla 

(Chica;;o Grand Opera <:onipany> 

Camilla da Jolidon Frank Webster 

(O'Oyley Carte Op-ra Company. London) 

'^'»»<'J» Charlea Anvelo 

Nova Kovlch William H. White 

Olca. hti wife Marie Wella 

^*"^ •-. . Jaffaraon tfa Anr^ Ha 

PopofT ^ Raymond Cranu 

Prince Danllo Rsfhiald Paach 

(Rembrandt Themtr«. Anif^tertlanO 

Sonta, a young widow.. Lydla LIpkowsha 

(It tperlal Opara. Prtroarrad) 

Marqulfl Ca^cada Georrea Dufrnnno 

(Oalto Lyrique. rarl.**) 
Melltza. wife of KhadjM. 

Marsrar'^t S-^hlilinjr 
..Blanche Srymour 

We»»»yn Hull 

J.ilin Tor'K'^ 



Pra^lfovlp 

Little Wlll>.... 

Head Walter 

OrcheBtra Leader 

7.oZn 

r;.pi 

I jO - 1 .o ........... 

Do - Do , 

Jnu- Jnu 

Frou-Frou 

rto-rio 

Mars-ot 



Bert V. Ellas 

..Tvett" Dm Pols 
. . .PeKtry A'^thur 
.Qwyn .•'tr.Tlfor'l 

Kvelyn Dorn 

.Dorothy llilhfit 
. . .;MarBory Wfill 

.Francs Ror'^ana 
. . .EfftJier Morr's 



It's time to diiPt off thn time 
worn adjeeiives "perennially populai" 
and "effervescentjy evergreen" and 
tack them on to the Franz I.eliar 
Vienesp's masterpiece "The Merry 
Widoiv"' if the demonstiation that was 
ae.orded the strains of the score and 
tlie east of the present prodJiciion 
at iTl ' Kiiiekrrbocker. Sept. ."», '\^ t" 
be arcfpted as a criterion. 

It was 14 years ago that Ilniry 
W. Savage first pre>enlcd the oper- 
etta ot the New Amsterdam theatre 

- - ; •■- V .......... where it ran for In^re than a year. 

to tho Uind friend's qurry ofiAt that time the eountrv wenL waltz 
what will become of her (five yenrw | mad over tlie s:t:aiiis that I.ehar coin- 
later) when she has sont (IreenonKh i posed. Donald Hrian w.is the <»ri^ 



away, although he hii<l "kept" her 
all this while, and wanted her first 
htishnnd bark but who in turn re 
fus«'d to »'<tnd(ine and be <'ond'»ned. 

And this in substance is the only 
fj.iilt of Zoe Akinn newest vehirlr in 
whieh Mi«s lUmbeau is ^tar^ed. X'j 



inal Dan Io and th<' yonuK widow 
>^onin was phiyi'd by Ethel .Ia<*k.»<»>it. 
* liast Monday ni^ht I)..iiaid I'rian 
sat in the audimce at the Knirko- 
bofker theatre ;in<l saw Reginald 
Tasrlj from the Rembrandt tJie;itrc. 
Amsterdam, HoII.".nd, receive an «'va 



andijiue if, left in the dark, i)arti» - i tion at the conelusioi'i of his bi^' s.« 'n* 



iilarly on ronclusion, as to what will 
happMi to the heroine. 



in the secomi net that ha.< lieon 
eqnaN'd in the lipht opera thejiin 



Daiiilo 



1 nldte Miss Akins' "Derhisse." I in this country in Ii.' years. iNtii." 
""J* J*^ ':t''»''tly an Amrriean pi'^ce j was responsihle for the elevation of 
j»nd had it Rustained and maintained | Ilrian Io stardom, it should (Io mor< 
the tempo of that first art rnrtaio, ! t l.an that for Tasih. for there U i'<> 
It wowld probably have br-en w ritt.-n ' ,.ne in this country that could h;r • 
down an assured succes-. And Kueh plnve<l and sunt; the lole of I>i 
effort rculd not be bli's^ed with n Trince in th manner in whirh he <li.' 
f.iier pinrvonalify than Ms^ K.Ti.ibrnii. True I'as.-h sMffer^' from an n.'.'".t 
M)e w;is rtrikinfly hr.Ti,! fid. mor" (Coiilinurd on Tagr IIO 



FriJay, Septombcr 9, 1921 



LEGITIMATE 



17 



JACK LAIT'S REVIEWS 



GREENWICH VILLAGE 
FOLLIES 



tUgrd and doHixncd bjr John Murray 
AndorsoD, music by ("arey Mofkud, 
lyrics by Ailbur SwauBtroni, roKtumer^ 
by liocber, Hingle hccumi by lilanclio 
Merrill. H. F. Maltby, (Jrotrhcu Kust- 
mau, II. I. rbil ips; Irciio FrunkliirH 
BuuK^ by horHpIf and Kurton (irccn. 

i*riiietpal»: Irrno Frunklin. .JninoH 
Watts, Ted Lewis, (irotclion lOiiHtinan, 
Donald Kerr, Itird Millinan, Fluronor 
Noriuand. Uobert Pitkin, Al Horinnn, 
Jlobcrt Castleton, llaiui tun Condon, 
|)orp, Kvelyn Darviilo, Addle Kolfc, 
nicliard Bold. Hooslind Fuller, I'ogx.v 
Hope. HaHil Hmith, Ilami ton London^ 
Charlen KdniondH, Ada Formau. 

The third of the Village revues is a 
cocktail of color, liKbts, scenes and 
dress. Blanche Merrill gives it the 
only touch of brightness in idea that it 
has, and (iretchen Eastman supplied 
the wallop of the performance as both 
the star and the pantomime author of 
the t.hrill-bit. The idea of it is not 
sew across the water, but it was here, 
and it banged the smart overflow first 
night audience between the eyes, com- 
ing as the meat of a sandwich which 
was otherwise all mayonnaise and let- 
tuce leaves. Irene Franklin contribut- 
ed several songs of her own and of her 
own kind. Otherwise the show it 
devoid of wit and is smeary^ with smut. 

There is a popular impression that 
anything smacking of the **Villidge" 
must be at least "blue," and that Is 
the color which predominates in this 
kaleidoscope of shades. James Watts, 
always a little rude in his talk and 
cavortions, outdoes himsolf. And Al 
Herman on the opening night was so 
disgustingly dirty in his talk that this 
wise aet, who wouldn't mifis any kind 
of a "Follies" at a premiere, talked 
right up and said it audibly without 
flowers. 

Such wretched taste as Herman 
here disp'ayed should not be lightly 
disuuHseo. He revived for the occa- 
sion the delectable bit iu which he 
describes with moist lips and much 
gusto how he peeped through the key- 
hole into his married sister's bed- 
room. Other equally stomach-distres- 
sing monolog surrounded it. To punc- 
tuate it, he pointed with the wet end 
of the cigar stub that he uses as a 
prop. His single was as a wet and 
dirty blanket on a show which was at 
least optically beautiful if not as pure 
as it might be, and he died on his 
feet. His efforts to chide the audience 
by asking it subtly if he were keeping 
anyone awake went lame. The au- 
dience was awake — but it was sick. 

Herman kil'ed the artistic finale, 
leaving the audience in no humor for 
light prettiness. Even n girl with two 
jet stars placed with marve'ous 
marksmanship just where they would 
excite the most attention on a tsn 
triqunt waist that fitted like her skin 
about her sensational curvllhears, 
failed to rouse the nauseated first- 
nighters. That finale, with a frenzy 
of colors streaking and streaming in 
from everywhere, was a thing to 
marvel over. 

Miss Eastman's dance, which drew 
the heaviest recognition of the exhibit, 
had the able sunport of Dona'd Kerr, 
who here and elsewhere showed him- 
self a dancer of great skill and per- 
sonality. This was an apache concep- 
tion in which, just before the climax, 
his girl i.4 shot dead bv a jealous lover. 
The po ice storm in. Kerr picks up the 
dend girl and goes through the motions 
of a dance and the police see business 
as usual and depart. The dance was 
such a dramatic sensation in Paris it 
was described in A.ssociated Press 
cables when first put on over there. 
It is doubtful whether it was as well 
done there. Miss Eastman was su- 
perb, both in the animation of a pa.i- 
sionate dcnii-mnnde and limp in the 
embrace of death and reception. Kerr 
was as splendid. 

MIk.s Frank'in, looking roUy-poUy 
and working without strain, reached 
the top whenever she appeared alone. 
Irene Franklin in "one" did not wait 
to 1)0 fjiscovered by revues. Her songs 
Hve zippy and liave kick lines Avherc 
the Ivicks are needed. In a scene by 
*] F. Maltby. one of the most sala- 
cious bits ever served with a cold nt- 
tj^nipf af comedy, sho suffered from 
Ine (lictales of th:it trying job — tiving 
to stay clean amidst niire. A less nhle 
eoni.Mlienne wouM liave brought in the 
|»o ico. 'Pile piece de resistance of the 
cute little plot is an exchaiipe of 
frouMers betv.een the stranj»er whom 
slie liiis in her flat and the Inisband 
who cotnes home unexpectedly, the 
comedy «limnx" coming in tbe 
Jti-ingcr walking off wearing the luis- 
band's pants. To the credit of the di- 
rplor it must he set down that hix 
'^I'uMail was n«»t hanging out. a loinli 
f^f reprossion for which gratilmle 
sli'.iild not go unspoken. 

ynfts again nrsumes groJo^iine fe- 

TnMlc ro OS llnongliont. Some of h'i 

l>e:irls nf retort c;niie from oysters no 

longer fresh, and some Iin<l other odors 

<'';»' iiiii.v be typical of (;cen\vich Vil- 

•U'e l>iil not savory in any other vil- 

iiiTo. ^ Me was lang!iid)Ie. of course. 

'•'!.] Millinnn lia<l p s<'rne :ind a song 

".'•I lor 1,0,. She siifTered ;mi ac. ident. 

•'"■"- ..fr the wire before ^he had 

i.iv.r^.d it the first lime. The finis 

"N "lo <i,.,,^ „,„i j^],p ^^.„^ in ^ |,|f „f 

^'•'•>"!iia until on(j inlellisent actor 



came forth and gave her a hoist. After 
that she tied up the show. A punl- 
ing specialty with girls in the audience 
ho ding violins which played "re 



some wireleMS telephone aiiparatus. 
did not "go" with any enthusiasm, de- 
spite the sycophantic strivings of 
t'harles Edmonds, the inventor and 
spokesman of the turn. 

A little one named Peggy Hope 
shone forth with a fetching figure and 
no little dancing ability of the floppcr- 
sonbret order. Richard Bod sang 
himself to several mild triumphs by 
vitrue ot a clean tenor voice, lie has 
a negative personality which may be 
due to nature or to an imitation (per- 
haps unconscious) of the easy grace 
of John Steel, foremost of his kind in 
that btyle of ballads iu that style of 
shows. 

In an episode on too early. Miss 
Merrill's witty lines stood forth like 
gems against the mud and muck which 
slopped over the rest of what script 
there was. Miss Merrill is naughty, 
too; but she is smart: she Is wise; she 
is a satirist, not a uirty-story teller. 
If she had written the show, with that 
staging and those clothes and those 
settings around her brilliant ideas and 
brilliant expressions of those ideas, 
this would have been a great "Fol- 
lies." As it was, it may draw and 
draw and draw. But, somehow, it 
must alienate millions of people whose 
presence such barroom farces as the 
early morning apartment mix-up and 
■uch a'ley garbage as Herman's mono- 
logue make imposalble. 

Ted Lewis did his last season's act 
almost without change. He used shoo- 
worn nnmbers and strutted and made 
much of himself for no apparent rea- 
son most of the time. He did not 
rattle any seats loose the opening 
night, either. 

It was whispered that Jimmy Duf- 
fy, late of Duffy and Sweeny, was to 
be added to the show. He will be a 
welcome relief. Duffy is "low,*' but 
he has always been reasonably de- 
cent. 

This show needs both rcasonability 
and decency. It has everything else 
that a great show needs. Lait, 



THE SILVER FOX 

Frankle Turner Vivienno Osborne 

Edmund Quitter Lawrenc* Orossmith 

Christopher Stanley . .William Favershara 

Helen Kullter Violet Kemble Cooper 

Capt. Bclgrave Ian KeXh 



keen chick. Perhaps Hamilton gave 
her the pro name of Erankie after 
he saw her do a rehearsal in skirts 
as brief as those she wears in the 
performance. The curves undulated 
all about her and she did Justice to 
the part of the iucenuous vamp who 
stole an<l stormeu her way into n 
phlegmatic writer's life. A phlegmatic 
writer at't!''<4 moment is saying so, 
therefore ' \ is the verdict of an 

^ ■ . ' .■tf. l' .ML ' . 
was not as ripiding. but equally effcc 
tive. in a r.ew character: lens dilficult 
to play than the sweet and nimple 
(not too simple) minister's chee-iUI, 
but far more inviting to over-exertioU' 
She, like the withers, held herbelf 
in almost perfect check. 

Mr. Keith had but a bit. He en me 
on with prejudice against blm by the 

fdot. But he swept it away by man- 
iness uud that square-shouldered 
presence that, on tbe stage, requires 
more than talent — it can come only 
with breciiing. 

*'The Silver Eox" again wipes out 
that popular fallacy that a play dare 
not be *'talky." This one is all talk. 
A play may be deaf and dumb, or it 
may be all done in the dark, or it may 
be in a foreign tongue — 'if it is good 
enough and is done well enough. 

This one is so good and is done so 
well that it outdistances ordinary 
carping. Its main elements of delight 
and success, similarly, run away from 
commonplace analysis. It may only 
be said that it does everything better 
than others of its kind And. after 
aU, isn't that saying everything? 

Lait, 



T!ie sm&rtest comedy New York has 
seen since (Tlyde Fitch died before 
his time, this. Cosmo Hamilton, au- 
thor of 'Scandal,'* adapted it from the 
original of Frana Herczeg. One of 

them is a great playwright. There Is 
enough glory in this to establish them 
both. Hamilton does not exactly need 
establishing. But 'The Silver Fox" 
is so far superior to anything that 
had hitherto borne his name that he 
may better rest on half of it than 
on the very superior but scarcely im- 
portant fluff he had sold before. 

Here is a gem of epigram, satire 
and human interest, dealt with skep- 
tically — almost cynically — yet ringing 
true and hitting clean though it nt 
times becomes delicious farce*. Life 
at times becomes farces — and happy 
the life if that farce is delicious. 

The stcry? There isn't much. 
There in almost none that the blunt 
pencil oi th»^ Itrtr-rjcd re"i.v-':^ir_c«<»i 
transmit. It is just a sketch of re- 
lations between men and women, be- 
tween women and men. between men 
and men. Shakespeare's finest drama 
(Joethe's crudest tragedy. Wagner'.s 
roaringcst opera, Schnltzler's most 
a<id comedy, was no more than that. 

William Faversham stars. He di- 
rected '"Hie Silver Fox." For both 
he should be given the croi.x dc the- 
atre, and is herewith smacked on 
eitl'.er cheek. The same elegant re- 
pression, the same honest expres.sion, 
the .same gentlemanly trust in the iu- 
telligence of American audiences, the 
same magniticcntly open and above \ 
board tactics with his public that 
have always marked his services to 
his puMic are aRoin the slarif and 
sliipc^ of his flag and apaiu he is a 
hero and a conqueror. 

Only n Faversham would pick for 
himself the leanest role of a ^reat 
|)Iay and let his support drink of 
the pravy while lie fed si/diiiigly bi:t 
ihanninKly on the pristlc. Artists 
are rarely gluttons; and gbittons so 
rarely become artists. 

To Lawrence (Irossmith falls the 
Brac<«fnl comedy role of an indiilRcnt 
novelist who c;in love an iceherp and 
a volcano in onf> play and be cinially 
true to both. Here again perliaiis 
lli;iril<s to yiv. Faverslinm's direriirwi 
and p«»vlinps tlianks to Mr. (Jros- 
MiiiiU's \Vv>ll Known tact as a i)liivcr 
-- ijiei'e 1^ til it rc^isfan'-e :it';iiiist 
1 ( iiipt at ion to overdo f(» (ireaiM-n to 
vult,'arize. 

>ii' i ('iM>i)er has her nfTeeralioiis. 
Her lole calls for many. Hut she lias 
;i iirii!!;ri' tli:il si'i-ins to ii;-lif_\ ;iliii''-r 
;iny ec'ciit ricities of deport merit and 

;.(' his a \>ii<r tli:ii must )•!• swcci j 
m'lsic to an author's ear. T.iTie^ .arc | 
liopefiilly written for snrh voices, j 
Ml\va>s, Imt they find tliem s'-ldom. 
In tr.uHinility with under the -nif.icr 
s|priiii;.s in eruption an«l, (inally. in 
full outhur-t. Mis?< t'uopcr is l>ril- 
liint. Ilifou^'ioiit. 

Miss O.shorTie is refre.^jiinj; as the j 



THE TRIUMPH OF X 

Carlos Wupperman's name is on 
this as the author. Lee Shubert's and 
Jessie Bonstelle present. Wupper- 
mtn Is dead. He was murdered in 

Coblents after the armistice, having 
been a U. S. secret service man with 
a brilliant record in the war. Frank 
Morgan, who plaj's the male lead, was 
his brother. Ralph Morgan is an- 
otper brother. Frank tried it out in 
Miss Bonstelle's stock last season, in 
Detroit. It was a success. Miss 
Bonstlle had parts of it rewritten. 
It may yet be a success, despite her 
meddling. 

It is now a weird hybrid of the 
poetical work of Wupperman and the 
clumsy hand of some pottering hack 
who, after as great a central inter- 
est and human suspense had been 
created as has been known at tbe 
end of a second act in months of 
playgoing, it becomes distorted, di- 
verted, distracted and ail but de- 
stroyed: The name of George 
Scarborough is privately whispered 
as the fixer. Surely an experienced 
and sane playwright like Scarborough, 
who has done some good things, could 
not have single handed so brutally 
mauled so pretty a manuscript. There 
must have been an accomplice, at 
least. 

. Morgan's role becomes very broad 
after the switch. Can it be that an 
effort was made at the eleventh 
hour to exploit him as an actor by 
jiujitsuing the theme of a lovely 
drama? As he gets broader he gets 
worse. It is no favor to him. Sing- 
song, monotonous, anticlimactic, he 
drools along and monopolizes the 
stage when the interest is solely with 
the girl, who is at times .shelved en- 
tirely and ot times sentenced to phony 
and progressless hokum supposed to 
be "inside uuderworld atmoKpbere," 
meanwhile. 

The girl is Helen Menken. Like a 
b eautifu l bolt out of a high sky she 
TJfHinnrrTitnr ~(in'' - ri/ <.-.irr;-.i- • -.rlif : •• t r : k " ■ 
everything sizzles. Not extroordiuarily 
beautiful — as the namby pamby iti- 
gcuue beauty of the stage is usually 
measure<l up — she becomes idealized 
in the unafraid and unashamed a.t 
of acting n real girl like a real girl 
— and a remarkable real girl «iud n 
remarkably real girl. 

Whatever becomes of ''The Triumph 
of X," Miss Menken will not be for- 
gotten by those who saw lier play 
those lirst two acts— thoae^ two real 
acts. After that s!ie is almost in- 
credibly aixl certainly unforgivably 
sidetracked and warped by the dis- 
tastes of the pervertetl scenes that 
follow. An attempt to start, a new 
furore (»ver Morgan when everyone 
is yefirninj; to have tnore of and know 
about her, n)uk<>s him imi)ossihle and 
wastes her- wastes her when shi' has 
b(;comcs potentially nt the second 
curtain n million dollar asset, not to 
mention altruistic art at all. 

The st(n\v is of a fjirl whose father 
was a httm and whose mother was 
a tramp. The iirofessor raises her 
to down the hereditary traits he 
fears may crop out. They do when 
slio tastes ch.'impaKiic at a party 
given to honor her eiiKagement to a 
nincompooj) juvenile. She gets a 
sweet slew ami mamma crops o-.t 
and she proiuMly sla|)s his face. The 
pr(»fcssor takes her home. She dis- 
appears in the night. 'I'he boy comes 
iiack like :i wiiip|>ed pup ;iii<] with- 
draws. The piofes.-or !:i'| ^ a letter 
that slie left saying she jcfi l)e<'ause 
she love.-! him. the hoy lia\i;ig told her 
in the drunk scr'rie that it v.asy't 
her real fatlier. 

The girl goes out Info fl.e v.orld 

(here ain't no such world, hut 0»e 
fnids it. 'I'll'" profcs-rii' Iii'c.niM*-' a 

\eiy Inlld and \r\\ ;i f;:il I :" , . t llive aiul 

\'"r\ lilillierin; !)oo/.> lioMiid :in I !:;i'is 
.iway what r;ii'.iiit ha\'e l.nii ;i ela'-'ir. 
It Nsonld lake mudi lo ruin what 
llioso fir.it two acts !ert\i'. 'D.c-r is 
•iliiiost ( nr»iit;!i in what f»l!oA'.M to ru"ii 



it — or anything. I'ut it is a close 
test between I lie good of the first 
two and the trash of the third. If 
the start witis, "The Triumph of 
X" will be indeed a triumph of x, 
the unknown quantity — that being the 
problem of how luuch liands with live 
thumbs can do to .a-tists' concepUons 
and still make moiicy. 

Lait, 



Not enough comedy. The Broad- 
way audience is Just between a wise 
and skeptical Palace bunch and a 
wide eyed Harlem aggregation of 
yawi)ing yaps. It craves uubstantial 
vau(leville, luugh-acts preferred. And 
it rises to uuything that has merit. 
x\ny turn that thinks it has anything 
and wants to show it where on audi- 
ence will help should whisper to its 
agent that an opening at the Brood- 
way is the first choice. It is close 
to "home" where bookers can easily 
bo induced to run in, and it provides 
an ideal admixture of Broadwoy 
strays to dig up the deep Htuff, out- 
of-town visitors to be in the right 
humor for amusement, and regulars 
of tbo fan order who always respond 
to the goods because they are enthu- 
siastic over vaudeville. 

The bill Monday was not quite up 
to what such a collection deserved. 
And the orchestra Jimmed up what 
there was of it almost without ex- 
ception. The girls in the pit sawed 
and blew and hammered out as weird 
a flock of sour notes and bum tem- 
pos as ever drove penformers to 
profanity. Betty Washington, a little 
cutis in the Nun>ber 2 spot, suffered 
most from the orchestral vagaries, 
and only by quick thinking and ready 
showmanship that included repeating 
bars to cover orchestra gaps and 
by eluding notes and bridging chasms, 
was she able to finish her fiddling 
at all. Miss Washington, by the 
way, is a little peach, aU dimples and 
curves and talent, and she took a hit 
despite the pit. 

The opening act did buaines.s with 
the audience, also. Walthous and 
Princeton, cydiats. started off the 
bill with speed and spirit. liou and 
Jeaa Archer, also bitterly crimped 
by the rausician.s, missed their accus- 
tomed putover until tbe finish, when 
they closed well. Duval and Little, 
a neat light comedy double, seemed 
spotted wrong and couldn't wring the 
laughs. The talk is good and the 
turn is clean and classy; the Broad- 
way likes just a little more hokum 
than they provided, however. The 
earlier portions of their material are 
especially devoid of punctuating 
punches. 

''Sawing a Woman in Two" is the 
unsubtle title of the headline feature, 
which runs about 7 minutes. It 
seems that a billing which would 
leave the climax as a surprise would 
be preferable, but perhaps it draws 
by telling the story in advance. It 
is Horace Goldin's illusion (and it 
is claimed it wAsn't his first, at tbatj, 
anyway, the lecturer, who operates 
the trick, credits Goldin. Tbe stage 
committee was obviously composed of 
plants. The deception, quite simple 
to insiders, gave the audience a gasp- 
ing thrill, and was as deftly executed 
as always. Tbe applause was not 
spectacular. 

Anger and Packer, in their talk and 
son^c act, which has been seen re- 
peatedly, drew intermittent laughs* 
Anger is a comic who is seldom idle, 
and Miss Packer looks gre:it and 
works a wicked straight. Some of 
the gags are aged and' one or two 
might be dry-cleaned. They ended 
with a whole skin, and that won 
-.r..:.r:'>'.y~^..:a.JLk;..-.i:lLi^^.. iu.,. « l^.m 

I>einons (Slayman'i Arabs) closed 
the show with a lot of whooping and 
acrobatic activity, moking a very ac- 
ceptable blowolT. Owen Mcfiiveny 
was not seen af this show. 

Lfjit. 



LINCOLN .SQ. 

The easy-going Lew Cooper head- 
lined, lie did the name act as at the 
opening of the Strife, even to the in- 
troductory gag: "Miller may be th^ 
governor, Imt Loew runs the State." 
1 1 got nothing here, as the liincoin 
Squareheads didn't know Loew had 
the State, or probably any other the- 
atre except the one in which tiiey 
stretched their legs and .>|»rawlcd, 
ha f-awake, with set jaws and hard- 
boiled exlerir)rs. 

Loi'w introduced a songplugger in a 
box. It called for more than tint to 
arotise enthu.-'i«iniii .^a the rickcly .•>;;!- 
lad he pulled. When a silvery-ilii o.j; - 
ed ienor in a box with a spot on him, 
f atting a bit at the emotional (juiver 
of an M^ghth avenue s.-ntiiuent s.t to 
Jcr.soy ('ity poetry can't get CMjijgh 
to let him sliii ")V('r an encore rhorus, 
something is sour. Mxcopt for this 
episode, ('oapcr w,.rk(Ml his fhwiit in- 
dolence and lii-< .^iiappy m.'iterial to 
gorxl advantage. IIi' walked away from 
tiio re ,| of the show, ('ooy)er isn't the 
tojijiirsf .single in the world, ImjI he 
can give ilie average hig timer ol hi;< 
sort les^.in-i. 

l>oM<I.is I" int pot lauulis !»y iiiii:Ii»v 
Ii;i-d '.^ork i'l the sketch ^ipof. A>-,-s(- 
ed l>y a feeh'.e vfticod !ind rdiri-ig mun 
aiid a ! lUf )us girl with an I .a.i ;ir- 
<eiit Mtid a l)o:'er-wori:s d':;\f:y. he 

swung fuiioM-. Miuj U'iM, ;i)l 1 tl rw .\:\-\ 

I !ien he I'it ^oj ..m jjng ,\t the ri:i;-!i 
he VM-^ I'lli'iiiu' r:;oMIl^|Ji(!(' i:i !i: ^ li.iir 
v.'ifli "lie Laud, vv.-niu;,' lo ili.- aU'lieti. c 
V. itii il;e o(}i"r- ;iiid in.)t;"ui!ig t'i> n ;• 

I'i'itiT to !;<<•], \Y\(» ciirt:!;;) '^n'l,- ,'it1| 

\\. ^ r e.t. f iiii' is all r:^!-! 1 >;■ liie 



time.- He is a laborious comedian who 
shouts and throws his hands about and 
fights for laughs. When Bert Baker 
gets through plsyinj^ "Prevarication,** 
Flint should Toase it, and they wilt 
both make inMcy. The grouch thing 
he has now is not essentially fuuuy, 
and Flint defeats his talents by the 
neccHsity of overdoing underdone 
lines, devoid of any situations. 

Joe and Clara Nathan opened. The 
girl is short of the stuff that gets to 
' U 'S L ' l. i JlJJ.L '! *" ' : *f^'' -- r rii-inT\Vj-T_ 
too. Between his ditties and hers, 
some ten minutes are bur;?ed up. Then 
he ^oe.i into his cartooning with chalk, 
which be works for hands iu most ua- 
ashamed frankness, even asking out- 
right for applause. .Miss Nathan ro- 
appears, dressed a-lu studio, and. she 
"assists." 

Jack Martin Trio closed. Martin is 
a neat monopede dancer who does two 
fast numbers without a wasted move 
or a false one. The rest of the turn is 
apple sauce: two girls sing, ono a'so 
toying with tbe piano. The soubret 
docs two full single numbers that 
would be better and might go better 
if rendered by a Viotrola. The au- 
dience was brutal to her. La Beige 
Duo opened. Lait. 



STOCKS 

(Continued from page 14) 
player to return. "Civilian Clothes" 
opening, followed with "Scandal." 
Corinno Cantwell succcds Gertrude 
Jevona as leading lady and Smyths 
Wallace replaces Barry Townsloy iu 
the male leads. Guimes & Ilughca 
operate the house. 



Jack Ball has concluded a deal 
whereby he obtains an iuterest with 
tbe Hawkins-Webb Co., and the Jack 
Ball Co. will be merged with tiiis or- 
ganization, which has been playing at 
Muskegon, Mich., ending its summer 
run there Saturday, Aug. 27. The 
company moves to Little Rock, Ark., 
to play all winter at the Kemper 
theatre. 



Dallas. Sept. ?. 

The Capitol will be opened Septem- 
ber 18tb with stock, according to a 
recent announcpment of the S:>uthern 
Enterprises, Inc., lessees of tbe prop- 
erty. Allen T. Morrison, assistant 
general manager of the corporation, 
is in New York selecting a company 
at tbe present time. 

It is expected that Carl Ps^ra, 
formerly of the Jefferson (Loew 
vaudeville) will manage the stock 
theatre. The Capitol in the old "le- 
git" days was part of the Oreenwald- 
Welss circuit. 



Toledo, Sept. 7. 
Stock season opened at the Toledo 
Theatre Monday, ^ept. fJ, with •The 
Pipes of Pan," three act comedy by 
Rdward Childs Carpenter. This la 
the second season of stock In this city. 
Spring Byington. I^sie Bnrtlett, Ade- 
laide Hibbard, Mary Stephens, Bar- 
bara Bevett, Laurra Lovett, John 
Sears Storey, Carroll Ashburn, Ald- 
rlcch Bowkcr and Neill Pratt are in 
the company this season. 



The Liberty Players at Dayton, O., 
led by Henry Hull, has close<l, leaving 
the city in stock to the Mabel Brown- 
ell <'ompnny. Both stocks ran all 
summer, causing an admission fighA 
and (he ex tra expense of local fea- 
tures. 



The Lynch Brothers will play 
their annual stock at the CapltoU 
Dallas, opening Sept. IS. 

Stock companies will open Labor 
D.iy in Montreal, Ottawa, Halifax. 
Canada; Lowell, Lynn, Haverhill, 
Brockton, Mass.; Wilkesbarre, Pa.; 
Newark, N. J., and Bridgeport, 
(!onn. Harry Clay and Charles 
lllaney will open .'•toek coinpajiies at 
the C >tha:n, Brooklyn; Pro'spect, 
New York, and Orriheum, Newark, 
ou Labor Day. 



The t wer;ty-fir>l con-^ 'euiiv"* "season 
of the Baker Stock (^nnp.Tny the re- 
orgarii/ed east presented ff>r the first 
time 'Tiie Wonleifid Thing." Selmar 
.T«' I;K,»n, leading man, has been re- 
L'lrned. tjlaving o;>[>r)site Marjorle 
I 'osier. Other ne',/ menil)erH are those 
of .lane (iilroy, Hccond woman; Kan- 
••: n Mansfi-ld, juvenile, and (leorge 
l\ileieo, character mm. Wal.er B. 
Cil^Tt again directed. 

Oil the same dale trie I.yric re- 
•^'pened for ils \?,*h ^e.l.l^on of 
musical coiri'dy .s^ock with Al Frank."*, 
t'T inf ':);il e')i>,'>d'.ni, direr^Min for 
Ke.i'iiig n\)(\ Flood. 



\;- '1 T;' 'OH- •,'"! .T'»'.ri ^Tr:'',,be 

;,Mv,. ; , .,,.j .',,. r',,i ,•;.,! i» .,y,..- , r'-tM 

field, M 1.^.!., til" f"*ir. 'T J'^ leadinR 
lidv. T'le ^le I; . .■;,;. ;'- v/iM • lake 
an aMi':;p» f-) cvn »!.') .at t!ie ''''ocial 
''irmigli Ih" ui'.lT. 

\\';;!l, I ! 0^»er o-eiied f;i;-« N\eol 
\y\} i t ',n' ^I !;■• • ■• I" ; v •-■i i!i Ffica 
N V. 

'!-i'^ r..l.»ni'<| l»| iv.TM PiM.sfield 

!^ ' , •« w il. n .•;■;. .a iu'i.'.'iuJt -.'ly. 



18 



NEW ACTS THIS WEEK 



Friday, September 9, 1^)21 



"^ 



INSIDE STUFF 



ON VAUDEVILLE 



Contrary to a report that found somo crcdrnce, 
l^laiiagerK* Protective Association had nothing to do 

member of the V. M. P. A. The resignation 
the mana;;ers' aRsociation mutt have 



^.1 »..■«»» 



<« 



the VamU'vllI-! 
with tho open 






of the Columhiii from 
^_ started the reporl. Tho Co- 
in mblareTiKned from all managerial affiliations upon going into the 
closed shop movement, when it looked likely the Columbia would c« 
through with its attempt. The Columbia also notittcd its resident 
managers In all cUles to resign from local organizations. The Co 
I jmhla had been a member of the V. M. P. A. since it wa« formed, 
paying dues and assessments without receiving during that timo any 
Rdual benefit from ita vaudeville brethren in the association. 

Sam Scribner, general manager of the Columbia, solely directed 
tLo open shop policy. He was assisted by Charles Waldron and 
iom Henry. Others of the Columbia, with perhaps Bill Camrbel. 
excepted, and including the American burlesque wheel, of wh'clv 
I. H. Hcrk is preBident, did not appear much In sympathy with tho 
i.pen shop thing. Most of them anticipated Scribner would go so 
fur. then .'-ottlo with the unions. 

As a matter of fact, and based on the very best of Information, 
ji.i; htuds of the unions had decided among themselvjes at a secret 
conference that when the burlesque people came to them with de- 
mands for a wage reduction they would agree to a decrease of 12 1-2 
vvr con«., but would stop at that tlgure. On the settlement the 
imion.^ ihd not decrease at all, though burlesque managers figure that 
in tho privilege agreed upon of the burlesque shows dropping off one 
man of the crew, that the $62.50 eaved weekly thereby is equivalent 
to iheni, on the whole, of a salary reduction. 

At the settlement there were present representing the stage hands' 
union President James Lemke. Dick Green, the international vfr*p- 
presldent for Chicago, and Harry Spencer, while the musicians' 
\»nion's contingent was headed by Joseph Webber. Mr. Herk was 
iimong the burlesque representatives. It Is said that through Ht-rk's 
endeavor.^ the truce was brought about. 

One of the clauses In the acreenlent calls for the burlesque people 
to restore the stage hands and musicians to work. Through thi.s It 
eeemed doubtful early In the week If Scribner's letter to Feiber & 
Shea notifying the firm the Columbia would not play its shows at 
Yonnfstown and Akron, would stand up. It was then said the unions 
n^ii^rht insist the shows go Into the towns on the wheel as at first 
intended. This would affect the Wilmer & Vincent Gayety at Utloa, 
N. Y., that also dropped out when the Columbia declared for an 
open shop. 

There seems to be a question about the Majestic, Scranton, on the 
American wheel, that also dropped out of its own volition. Its Dian- 
figeraent has no other theatre, but claimed the unions of Scranton 
(iomandcd It retire. The American may secure another theat»"e in 
Scranton to play its shows. 

Some of the burlesque people thought following the settleiM<»nt 
that even so, there might remain a sentimental feeling in st.-ong 
union communities that would not help burlesque attendance at lea. t 
tor th'^ start of the eeason. Vp to date there has been no opporu^ity 
to obtain a line on that angle. 



MAKER aatf BEDFORD. 

•Colleoe CbMint" (Skit). 
17 MiM.; Twd. (Sutclal). 
Chateau, Ckicaoo. 

Chicago, S«pt. 7. 

Maker and Redford art> a neat, 

elaMKj and attractive apppuring couple, 

both oudowed with unuMual personality 

and versati ity, used to very good ad- 

ttf »m ' ' ><< M i " ' w ii' ^ * i\^r 

comedy skit. ••Coll«»ge Chuuia." by 



(4). 



******* 
Bkit." -Coll^^ge 
JaA l.nit. ThJM off«»nnf is 



a novelty 

due to its originality of material and 
lyriey. 

The art opens with the young man 
in a student's graduating gown ap- 
pearing on the Kcen^ with u parchment 
roll (supposedly a diploma) in his 
hand and the girl coming on to con- 
gratulate him on his mntriculation. 
Tho youth sets her mind at rest with 
a long speech of a humorous nature, 
saying it is not a diploma but the blue-, 
prints for a bridge which he coutem- 
platrs erecting over the Atlantic 
Ocenn. 

The dialogue which ensues is of a 
crisp and smart nature with an abun- 
dance of sure-fire comedy talk. The 
entire dialogue evo'vcs about this 
theme and is carried out in substance 
during tlic entire action. 

Minn Redford sings a special num- 
ber, "I'm BO Scared of the Wide, Wide 
World," very appropriate for her 
sweet and winsome manner and gets it 
over in major league fashion. She 
also executes several dance numbers, 
one of the most prominent being her 
toe dancing specialty. Maker has two 
exclusive singing numbers. "The End 
qf the Romance of My Solitaire** is a 
song story of a man's love experience 
illustrated with the use of playing 
cards denoting the various situations, 
which has both humane appeal and 
comedy elements. 

The scenic investures are simple 
but very attractive. This turn has 
big time propensities and will be able 
to acquit itself there. 



"THE FOURFLUSHERS" 

Mustoal. 

15 Mies.; Four (Special). 

23d 8t. 

Two couples comprise thv caat of 
this offering billed in the lobby as 
William Wayne, Frank Robertson, 
Ruth Williamson and Maude Drury. 
The boys have a Vt.OOO wager be- 
■>V;. «<» ■» • ■ > «44y *»?> ■ •< h ;i r /;<; m th< oLuiu" 
wi I remain on the lonely island In 
which the piece is get without mak- 
ing love to a wotnan. One is a mil- 
lionaire's son and. the otker the heir 
of some influential public official. 
Twenty-nine days have elapsed but 
the entrance of the two girls on tho 
scene causes each to flpp and when 
both demand their bets it deve'ops 
neither is at all wealthy. One in 
a pugilist and the other 
of Rarney Oldfield, who 
a little money and were 
Ritxy splurge in this Flor- 
However. tho girls are 
r.eally well fixed and since both 
couples have decided to marry as 
soon as they reach Tampa, it makes 
for a rosy curtain. 

The action is interspersed with 
some telling comedy and neat song 
ami dance doub'e numbers which, 
coupled with the excellent interpret- 
ing cast, qu:.!ifie8 the turn for a 
spot on big time bills. AbcL 



reality is 
a disciple 
had saved 
enjoying a 
ida locale. 



HOWARD and DROWN ^ 

8oii|« Mtf Daiocs. 
14 MIn.; Oat. 
Aaorlcan Roof. 

Howard of this mixed two act waa 
formerly of Howard and Craddoek 
a colore<l team. The new coniblaa' 
tion which has Howard with a youai 
woman partner Hhould Bucc.'rd eo-vii 
\> \\i4.. ii.c oiMflTiig IK u (Ig'uLU 
number rendered while dancing, foj. 
lowed by straight dancing by tbi 
man. Hiss Brown changes for t 
single Hawaiian song, after which th* 
does a ligb^ hula-huUi made effeetivt 
by her arm work. 

The competition idea from tka 
Howard and Craddoek act \h uaci 
with a jazz number, Howard daiic. 
ing, with his partner using it voai|. 
ly. It is a good idea with both mei^ 
bers gathering applause. A fait 
doub'e with stepping doses tbtt turn, 
A corking combination. 

Miss Brown is an attractive look* 
ing girl, well dressed and forti6«i 
with an abundance of personalitj, 
Howord can always be ' 
for surefire dancing. 

A colored team that 
the list and good for 
bouses. 






relied upon 

should top 
the biggett 



According to understanding, the contracts being issued by the 
'^huberts for their vaudeville provide for the usual office commission 
of five per cent, on salaries. The agent's commission is additional. 
While the Shubert? never made the statement official, at one time it 
vaA said their vaudeville agency would not charge commission. 

The Shuberts have stopped paying more salary than acts formerly 
received. At first when engaging vaudeville acts the Shubert agency 
paid from $50 to $100 over the recognized salary of the turn. The;5e 
p.nyments were In instances when the salary was known. When 
unknown the Shuberts have paid as much as $200 a week more 
They probably felt In most cases the increase wa« Justified through 
the necessity of starting acts Shubertward, owing to their 20 in 21 
voeks' contracts. Now the Shubert booking office says it must see 
prior contracts for the amount of salary, as giving an act a complGto 
route without cut or split weeks is more than equalizing an increase 
over the gros.s of the same length of time elsewhere. 

The big time booking offices have no positive information about 
Siiubert signed acts. Acts engaged by the Shuberts are even now 
playing on the big timo. Only the other day it was said In a big timn 
office that a certain act must be signed, whereas the act had alrealy 
held a Shubert contract, although It had denied that fact. 

Recently at the Riverside, Nonotte, as a rule the headline or bot- 
tom line of any bill, had tho opening act'c type on the billing, on l.'u; 
..^A!.UXcJ.'.r J . £> . < . < . . s\} r - F S-:-^UQ«-44i-£rr-?^frfc^hr-hti d-stgired- »A idl fue SlroTO^n-: 



ALVIN and KENNY. 

Comedy Ring- 

9 Mins.; Full Stage. 

A con>cdy ring turn with comcd.v 
bits tho main idea. Most of the busi- 
ness has been cho.s'en. 

The comic has borrowed the dan- 
gling cuff of .loe J.*4cksou's and iMutch 
Landorf's short leg "step." At the 
finale the straight swings back and 
forth, the comic pat^ninfl; to and fro, 
just mi-^sring the flier. This served its 
full purpose in getting laughs, but it 
is not new. 

Tho blindfolded stunt of the ring 
worker i«« good, while the men have 
workc<l out an excellent feat that 
may be their own. Thin has the comic 
sealed on a chair, with the ringman 
swin;;in',' out to him and attaining a 
haridbalunce on the comic's shoulders. 
The turn opened the show well. 

Ihce. 



Tho return of Hlan<in» Merrill to Ihoadway and vaudeville has 
!)• (II particularly noticfablo within tho past week throtigh that youni? 
voiiian's aiithorod efforts ha^ ing been reported as extremely fiuc- 
(f'Hsful in all thr^o events. Miss Morrill contributed the product of 
hor hriniant and imaginative mind to the "dreenwlch Village Fol- 
lies." a> the llroadway portion, and for the entire vaudeville acts of 
Anna (.'hunrllfr and Sydney Laridriold. both sinple turns who sine. 

Mi?s Morrill has boon dormant for 
l.^cn through her unfortunate loss of 
the sta;;(' nood.r '.vritors of the Merrill 
her abscnc(? ha;^ locii felt, especially in 



nearly a year. It may have 
a near and dear relative, but 
calibre, who pen freshly, and 
vaudeville. 



STANLEY and ELVA. 
Wiro Act. 
10 Mins.; Full. 
American Roof. (Sept. I). 

Pretty well-formed girl and man 
wire WiUker. The latter wears loo«e 
baggy attire, red nose and mustAche. 
After a pantomime opening with the 
^l•ll*l..doi^g_.a... drunk, the girl enters 
a.** the waitress in a "restaurant" bit 
of pantomime. 

The man mounts the wire for some 
excelenf walking and stunt stuff, \Vith 
the girl reappearing after a change 
to pretty i urple short dress for so.me 
contortion and acrobatics. The man 
docs a strip change on the wire to 
K.vni suit for the balance of the rou- 
tine with the girl assisting. 

Ij's a strong interesting novelty 
o[)eniiig or closing turn for the three- 
u-day. bills. Con. 



"MOONLIGHT" (5). 

Playlet With Mutlc. 

15 Mins.; Threa (Speoia! Interior St.) 

Jofftrsoii. 

Marie Holly la the featured mem- 
ber of this live people skit with music 
by Thomas Swift. Mi;is Holly is the 
flirt who wins her ma'e following un- 
der the spell of the moonlight by tell- 
ing them what beautiful big eyes each 
has. In the playlet she has three of 
them ranging from the calow youth 
of 2i) to the matured man of forty. 
The- third man is the eligible one 
whom she favors but who after a 
lapse of some weeks tells her there is 
another and that he was only inter- 
ested in her to while away the time. 
This is the twist of the skit when 
he returns after a month's ansence. 
Another girl, playing Miss Holy's 
"kid" sister completes the cast. 

There is a sentimental "sad" end- 
ing to the skit after the parting of 
the leading pair, when Miss Holly calls 
up Carlos Sebastian, the Spanish 
suitor (not appearing persona'ly). 
telling him she is sorry she could not 
answer his calls these past few 
weeks but that she will see him at the 
Lakes' party next week where she will 
sing to him the "Moonlight" song 
that is the theme of this playlet. 

It's a flossy little skit, that should 
please the family audiences and some 
of the small big time audiences suf- 
ficiently to warrant the bookmgs. It 
was handicapped here by poor cueing 
and lighting effects. That can be im- 
proved upon. The interpreting cast 
is capable, particularly the featured 
player who is a viyacious miss with a 
powerfully pleasing soprano voice. 

Abel 



FEIFER TRIO. 

Dancing. 

10 Mint.; Fill Stagt (Spec. Drap«). 

Loow's State. 

William B. Friedlander staidi 
sponsor for this threesome of tifai 
and youthful dancers, offering a 
spirited routine of steps in a sightly 
apecial stage setting. 

The two boys and a girl are dis- 
closed at the rising of a gorge -^oa 
drop made of cloth of gold edged with 
black velvet, posed gracefully before 
a secondary hanging of pale yeflow. 
They are in Russian costume and go 
immediately into a series of livclj 
steps in the dance of that nation- 
ality. 

One of the boys follows with a solo, 
then the girl does a sample of toe 
dancing, the boy aiding her in grace- 
ful poses. The feature of the torn ia 
an inebriated dance by the other boj, 
a slim graceful figure in evesiag 
c'othes. The second boy joins after 
a minute and they go through several 
minutes of semi-acrobatic stuff, alaf- 
gering and swaying in rythm, a novel 
and interesting performance. A fait 
trio number makes the finish, the girl, 
changing to short skirted dress. 

The turn has plenty of class and it 
a straightway specialty of the cleaa 
cut order, always a valuable kind ef 
material for a vaudeville bill. 

Rush. 



A Chic'i'^o agon* who recently got a New Yorlx connection walked 
iiito one of the bu^y smr Her time booking offices for the lirst time. 
Tl.e apenrs were gathered tiiroo deep around the booker's desk. Thv-» 
Lhi'-aaoaii heard loud talk and m-ich discuf^sion of money and thou^I.t 
It wa> a crap game. The hooker was dickering for an act. ".Make 
If a hundred and a quarter," he shouted. •Til take fifty of it," called 
the fhicagoan from tlie rear. 

Qtuie romo inter« >t apperired to lie excited of late on flr.«t ni.f»li! ^ 
rf Hroa(hvay plays, when amon.t; the audience were noticed Frai:!; 
F;iy and FraiK e'; \\'hite. who accompanied each other to the thoatr.>'. 
Ihe coupl*^ set'med on the he.sl of terms. At one time they wcTv- 
PMiTied, but lat^^r i-cj'arated. 



NEW ACTS 



.T;{rlc riar(!i!\. icvii' 



P 



aini 



10 



poo 



■ Xrrirly n riincc."' c:'\v 

I'iiil (J'tldm d'axjiKilc ami <iul(l(!,i 
uilii Al l»nrt«»ii. t\vii-;i(t. 

r.'iiiiMic i I;:j;tr:il"(! n'oiiii"" i'i;mis(f 
f«.i' Malifl Siiermain in a piiiiolog. 

M •• . r.i!:-' Ml I'.'.- ;;- >i--tf.l ly llo- 
1>,|| II i<'.\ :ili'l ll:ll I 1 i(I-->i!,. 

.l(tS(|i!i Sfi I ItMiKiytM , ( 'iiiiiim.iti or- 
jjani^t ar'ii riiti-i(i;;ii 

Il'^lrii lli;:^!"^ ( fi'.'iini ly lIi;:L'iti^' 
nrnl h;il''^l Jiinl I'eify liiaiiii (tdniur- 
jy niih William Scabii ry an I t'u,), 
tun a<t. 

rharlottc W:!!!;* T in a Kk(>t< h. Sl.c 
recently appc.'ue<l in the ill-fattMl 



1( ifiiim.ifo iirojliK'tion of "Tho Sky- 
hiik" jit tilt' lirlmoat. 

William Seaburys rcviic with ILI 

.f«fl: Wjil<li(»n fln<l I'otfy Winslow. 
t w -I ;Ht . 

I ,.iwroii('t> :in<l Hoajr^lcy. two ummi. 

NV;.iy .liiiii';.^ and <>livc raliiuT. 

I):in Casl'^r, who for y<';fs \va.-< tlie' 

l»aii«i lra<i»'r at Kcisouwclx r"s and 

'.-list ilic rii<'l"\ !ia It'iulcc for tlif 

I hviii;: Itj'rlin li*Mriii> I i'l'>n sIm)\v i'< 

I K'»i''f; iiitd vaud^'villf. Ill Avill" have 

j with him Jhc Tl",M-»y T^viti-. Vieirt lijid 

.May. The formri- viii'i«'''(lc>l Nuiottc 

in IJjc Arf!)iir Iliitinn. i si< in ;>iod\i('- 

lioii, *'Som»'hody'H Swc( thr.irt." 

l.Jrovtr Lal><)>c i fi.rnHTly J/aHoiic 



DONOVAN and HASKELL. 
Sonos and Talk. 
12 Mins.; One. 
American Roof. 

•V No. L' si>i»t mixed toam using the 
<n-'i'»>iiary published song and talk 
routine. The boy opens with a solo 
follow*', I hy <Toss fire talk, a double 
niimhrr. parody on ".lohn Brown's 
l^ody". uial a double soiik and dance 
finish. The male member is the out- 
standing hit of tho turn, lie displnvs 
al»i ily which should ho worked up. 
His ])ersonulity is in his favor, with 
tho penernl .^tngo deportment sur^ of 
Rainin;: him scint thinj; better. Only 
Hniall 1 lois al. yireseut. 



EAST AND WEST. 

Acrobatics. 

10 Mins.; Three. 

Jefferson. 

Two men, one wearing Tux. and 
the other also dres.sed neat'y, minus 
jacket, however, and plus a sombrero, 
evidently to plant the western atmos- 
phere, lie does a little rope spin- 
ning and employs this business 
throughout in combination with other 
stunts such as topmounting. hand 
balancing, etc. Both men alternate 
as understanders, the western chap 
topmounting chiefly although he 
pulled an applause raiser when he 
supported his partner with one hand 
a la the Statue of Liberty pose. It 
was done unassumingly and its very 
nonchalance commanded the applause 
barrago. 

Some iron jaw work concluded. The 
men are good showmen and can fore 

or aft any bil! of the Jefferson grade. 

If » 
oec. 



Tunis in n 
It" in one 



new 

•A-ith 



and I-nn'^i and Kay 
act entitled "(Jo To 
n .vpcciul (licp. 

'i"ie Shnherts have enc:n;j''d the 
I)M^":;! Sisters, the F'r.-ink Si*<iers nod 
Al Sr.\i(«;i f'»i' II produttion «<•!. 

Sammy Weston has joined the Rena 
.Arnold ;i(( \vhi<-h was written hy 'I'om 
Swift. Additional inuterial has been 
added by Chuck Kcisnei and Pryan 
Foy. 

Wilbur and Pifule are now rehears- 
ing a new act. 

Pisnno and J»inglinm, t-ingiiie and 
talking 



DAVE QUIXANO and Co. (1). 
Sonos and Piano. 
10 Min.; One. 
Fifth Ave. 

Dave Quixano is a baritone doing a 
straight song routine with a mule 
piano accompanist. A series of stand- 
ard numbers with one popular baUad 
comprise the turn. Quixano displays 
suflicient voice to carry each of the 
compositions along handily. A weak- 
ness is noticeable in the di<-tion of 
this chap. This should bo remedied 
immediately as it detracts noticeably 
from tho effectiveness of the vocaliz- 
ing. The final syilables of the words 
'•needed" and "flying" were badly 
butchered, the former being pro- 
nounced as 'id' with the "g" droj'ped 
entirely from flying. Quixano is but 
a small time offering at the pre.seDt 
time, but appears to have the natural 
ability to progrr«.s. 



ARMSTRONG and TYSON. 
8«Bee aai Daice. 
1 6* Mine.; Om. 
Amorioaii Roof. (Sept. I). 

Toung couple. The boy works in 
Tux. throughout. . Tho girl a short 
b!onde looks well in nil her changes 
and can hoof. Harmony singing and 
character songs with the girl handling 
the latter portion, complete the of* 
fering. 

In on? number she does "Dutch.'* 
Irish and a kind applause "Girl from 
U. S. A." each character being in- 
troduced through the medium of bin 
song which is poorly constructed and 
badly written. 

Most of the strength of the turn is 
in her work. The boy, seemingly a 
recent graduate from the amateur 
ranks, should correct a tendency to 
work at the audience instead of to 
his partner. The girl "wop" was well 
handled as a dialect. 

For a finish she does a good lively 
jazz dance which he accompanies on s 
"zobo" concealed in the handle of • 
cane. On the roof they landed strong- 
ly, the turn building up mainly 
through the girl's comedy clu^racter- 
izations. They have the makings of 
a standard team and will improve with 
wo^k nnd ir^elligent direction. 

Con. 



ANDRE and COTTER. 
Comedy Talk, Songs, Acrobatics. 
15 Mine.; One. 
American Roof. 

This is a mixed team, the girl af- 
fecting a Swedish character with the 
man an eocentrie "nut." He \^ pa|' 
apably a graduate from the acrobatic 
ranks. 

There are a few laughs at interval'^, 
but most of the crossfire and comed.T 
efforts pas.s mildly. Tor the lini<h the 
man does a dive over four chairs to a 
haml.'^tand on a table. This is aip> 
crabbed through stalling and y^'j^^y 
ing for laughs that don't material /<'• 

With the present material th'^ cou- 
ple wi 1 have hard work qualir>>r')t 
for tho early Kpots on the pop !"■ 'J- 
Speed and new jiiaterijil a" ''•'"'* 
needed. (_o>t' 



j^W- 



Friday, September 9, 1921 



NEW ACTS THIS WEEK 



19 



ANNA CHANDLER. 

IS Mint-: Ol*. 

(Mad in • beautiful erratue rape 
ABBt Chandler enters bewailing the 



SIDNEY LANDFIELD. 

Songs. 

15 Mint.; Ono. 

Royal. 

Sidney Landfield wag" formerlj 
pinnist for Anna Chandler in their 



^rt that Of all poop o^ bhe m»«t Pl^doublejict together, but ii now doing and his wife who contribute, a bit of 



BERT ERROL (2). 
FoMtU Imptrtoaattr. 
14 Mint.; Full, Sptclal. 
RivortMo. 

Bert Brrol has one or two new 
touLiK-b in this jLeason's offering. They 
are a male pianiKt, a new cylcoaram 



field* her former piano aecompimiHt. 
And the wa/ be knocked her a short 
while ago! Well, she must do her act, 
she opines, but certainly will never 
play this theatre again. 

The orchestra TiSinps a tune and 
IfiM Chnndler wiggles in accompani< 
ment, the frenzied tempo changiug 
the wiggle into a coocU under her 
cape. This is repeated three times, 
Hiss Chandler asking for a i^Iower 
tempo, until finally the musicians quit 
in disgust. She attempts her own 
piano accompanying, after she orders 
the gr.ind brought o'.it for her. but is 
saved tho ignominy of betroylog Ihnt 
ilcficiency by the appearance of Land- 
fiold entering in business suit lefu 
She permits him to accompany hor 
for a 'I rVdn't Mean to Be ^!(>au" j 
iit>(ib)e number that squares matters j 
for the duo. Miss Chandler 4hen kocs \ 
into her exclusive Hong cycle, each j 
nrti*»er n gem for which she owe«i j 
Hianche Merill considerable. The first j 
\% a plaint about "Ive Dug All 1 Could. 
B'Jt See What l«i (letting,'' ovldoutly 
])roving to herself nhe's a bad ^old 
digger. A couple of lines in that 
number require editing. She remarks 
that even though she told her milJion- 
nire friends she did not mind figuring 
in their divorce suits, she gets noth- 
ing for her pains, and then follows it 
up vith a line that her Ritzy mala 
acquaintances give their female 
friends a horse and groom when th<:-y 
go to th^ Btabic, hut, to quote Miss 
Chandler, "when I go to the stables 
^wi'U. use your own judgment." 

A diilect song and a "Camile" song 
about a chorus girl paved the way 
sweetly fol what proved to be two 
extra recalls. One was a *'dog*s tale 
of love" and tlic other a "Zulu Zoo" 
song nntl dance thing. Each of the 
Merrill songs is 2 comedy gem. and 
Mi»3 Chandler's ability to exact the 
most out of such ditties has long sine 
been proven. The only suggestion is 
that she tones down some of it, and 
the incidental business as well. 

The joint booking of both acts may 
satisfy a financial (thortcoming or a 
personal vanity, but the fact remains 
the idea is a vaudeville asset as far 
as this particular combination is con- 
rerned. It Is really a sort of three- 
in-ono idea, each doing solos and then 
combining for wh-it may be termed a 
sort of afterpiece, although the after- 
piece consumes the major time allot- 
ment of Miss Chandler's "bingle" of- 
fering. 

Ahrl. 



doing a uii:s;!p offering, and both acts 
are booked jointly, Landfield presiding 
at the grand for Miss Chandler in her 
turn. Blanche Merrill authored both 
acts. . 

Mr. Landfield enters with a clever 



and two othci' dances while Krrol is 
changing costume. 

Some new wardrobe and a change to 
ma'e attire followed by a so!o in nat- 
ural barytona is also a departure from 
last season. Brrol is unique among 



ditty about the baby grand being his impersonators in that he makes no 
grand baby, which idea is developed | attempt to disguiao his sex but de 



punningly and spankingly as onif 
Blanche Merrill can do it. He does a 
line of chatter later, panning Misa 
Chandler for how she mistreated him, 
etc., which to a couple of "wise" onej 
nearby i^oiinded more or less of a 
burlesque, because of the.* paradox. 

A "Stop, liOok and liisten" topical 
song made n granH ante-climax for 
T !'M'1( number about "Mr. Jazz 

and Mr. Opera," in which he tr«ces 
the source of several musiical comedy 
and popular song hits to opera 
"steals." Jlb^ idea has been done 
before in vaudeville, and also in mus- 
ical comedy, but its development here 
tackles the subject in the fullest de- 
tail yet. And any musician will in- 
form one that the field is not at i»>i 
exhausted, ^hera are dozens of son^ 
hits that can be similarly traced to 
the classic;^. 

Landfield sold the number for 
heavy toll, and throughout proved 
himself to be a thorough showman, 
capabla ol doing a big time "Angle" 
turn on his merits, irrespective <»f 
joint booking with Miss Chandler. 

Abel. 



stroys the illusion on his first en- 
trance for comedy effect. 

lie has a splendid natural barytone 
and an equally good fa'setto. Ue uses 
both in two double voiced numbers 
and the former in one in male attire. 

Mrs. Krrol adds a bit of color to the 
picture and plugs up the stage wait 
acceptably with her dance contribu* 
tious the first in Oriental costume, an 
Kgyptian dance, the latter in ballet 
dresB, a buck and skirt dance. Both 
got over. 

P>rol la showing considerable new 
wardrobe, the flash being the closing 
costume of cloth of silver and im- 
mense ostrich feathered head dress. 

4.t the finish in a brief speech he 
introduces his wife as his partner and 
as the designer of his coHluutes which 
is »tticLi:« an American copyright. He 
went strong y at the Riverside before 
intermission. Con. 



DIAMOND aad McMAHON. 

Slnoing and Daaoiio Revae. 

IS Miat.; Ona (4), Fall Stage (12). 

Spaaial Drop aai Cya. 

Alhambra. 

Maurice Dianoad asd Helen Mc- 
Mnhou. assisted by Florence Oast. 



4C 



••-i.t.'wjJiiv ♦^'•i«,. P*. :*nfi, 






JOHN ELLIOTT and GIRLS (3). 

Song and Daace. 

15 Mint.; One and Four (Special { "^''^"^ 
Set). 

Here's a dance revue that should 
make the regular house.9. Mr. El- 
liott has assembled as capable a quar- 
tet of singers and steppers ' as could 
be desired, each a worthy soloist, fur- 
ther fortified with appearances and 
something of a singing voice, the sum 
total of which spells an enterlainiu,; 
dance revue. The onlj' semblance of 
similarity is the dance stud:^ ofieriug, 
where Klliott changes the sign "old- 
fashion dauccs taught" to "jazz 
dances." 

That brings on a quartet of "pu- 
pils." Thi^ reminds one oC George 
White's old vaudeville "dance doc- 
tor" opening, but for the rest it's 
all different. The girls each have a 
solo in the following order: a Hose 



CHARLIE LANE and JOHN FREE- 
MAN. 
Songs aad Talk. 
20 Mins.; One. 

Andy Uice is credited with the au- 
thorship of Lane and Freeman's 
present two-act. I^ane is a rotund 
(omedian with Freeman a corkiug 
straight man. The combination is 
and the pair should easily 
prove a strong next to closing turn 
on the Loew books. 

The opening brings forth the fa- 



Mahon are recently of **8oap Shots 
mid before that were a vaudeville 
trio, McMahon, Diamond and Chap- 
low. 

l>iamond is an eccentric dancer. 
Miss McMahon (Mrs. Diamond) is fa- 
nious as the rag doll girl and does her 
specialty, a boneless bit, with Dia- 
mond throwing her about the stage, 
while Miss Oast, a pretty b'onde 
youthful miss, handles the vocalizjng 
aiui a graceful toe dance of merit in 
ft dazr.ling black short -skirted cos- 
tume. She is there vocally and vis- 
ual y and adds a heap of class to the 
offering. 

The turn opens in "one" with a 
double song ani dance, then goes to 
full stage with Alias Oast offerin;; her 
first solo. ])iamond enters as a mes- 
senger boy lugging a large box which 
is opened. A rag doll (Helen ^Ic- 
Mahon) tumb'es eut. Diamond and 
McMahon then do their spedolty in 
which he tosses her about in impos- 
sible position. It was good for big 
laughs. 

Miss Gast*8 toe dance follows with 
Diamond's "hoch" specialty next stop- 
ping the act. For the finish Miss 
<• ' lends a number with Diamond 
and McMahon joining her In a whirl- 
v.iud dancing finale. Miai McMahon 
is costumed similar'y in this number, 
which resembles the old finish of the 
original trio. 

Mr.. Diamond has constructed a 
strong and interesting vaudeville ve- 
hiclo which is ideally suited to the in- 
dividual ta'ents of the three prinei- 
pnlM. It landed one of the hits of 
the bill at this house in the before in- 
termission spot. 



ARTGRAFT REVUE (6). 
Oparatia Siaotro. 

18 Miat.; Oaa aad Full Stage (Spec.) 
Koeney'tp Brooklya. 

Three men and three women in a 
repertoire of operatic solos, trios and 
concerted numbers. A special drop in 
one, and a pretty blue eye, supple - 
•.'iVir*'*^ *^ ' vMr ied^yn or tnifnt <»f 
scenic backings, a differeni . uc beiug 
placed in the centre f'^- <••♦ H ^^^e^eed- 
ing number, lead color to tho ringing. 
and gives to each the added asset of a 
pretty stage picture. 

The repertoire includes selectlona 
from the best of the standard operas, 
w^ith appropriate costumes for each, 
and with the ever popular "Misereri" 
from "II Trovatore" and "8o dlers' 
Chorus"* from "Faust," coming at the 
finish. The six have good voicea, in- 
divldually and "collectively. The turn 
got over for an unqualified hit at 
Keeney's. It ahould do that in any 
of the neighborhood houses. 

Bell. 



miliar bit of the splitting of the act, 

the men ck'ciding which of the gags GEORGE ALEXANDER & CO. (2). 
to each. The comedian 



belonged 

takes tho.«K» which secure laughs. A 
published number nud a comedy .song 
follow. The straight puts the former 
over in clever style, with the comedy 
double sure of returns. 

Although the material is credited 
to Uice, many of the gags have been 
used from here and there. They 
have, however, beeu n*isembled with 
dLscretion and are productive. A 
travesty on "Ilro.adwuy Uose* aa a 
double closes the turn. On the Roof 
next to closing tlie.oe boya had little 
difficulty, with Lan? planting his 
comedy easily. Freeman is a straight 



O Grady ('.ance, au impression «' I man xvell above the general run. A 
Dorothy Dickson, Ann IVnn.ngton j ^^^^.^^^^^ ^^^^^^ j,,^^ ^^^^^y^ ^^,^^^ ^^^, 

and Marilyn Miller. Ad very good. ( ^i,fp„(iv, ^iii,pr featured in the three- 



X. L. O. TRIO. 

Xylophoae. 
15 Mins.; One. 

The act title cuej^ the son of work 
perfore.ic.l. The male trio employs 
two instruments. oue son»«nvh.it 
larger tliin the other with two of 
the meu doubling on the larger xylo- 
phone. The routine is the conven- 
tional classic opener, soft hammer 
solo in the amber calcium and the 
I»op getaway. The b:dlad solo got the 
most on the straight in.strui:ieiital:/.a- 
tion nlthoush some attf'inpts at com- 
edy did not brodie exact y though not 
overly strciig. The pop medley fitiisjli 
Kent thein off well although that last 



They finish ensemble folh»wiiig n 
neotly executed unison dance thril 
won a spontaneous hand. A previ- 
ously executed one-le;? combination 
dnnce in the middle section of the 
offering also won considerable, the 
compositi" routine impressing as good 
ii.;ib«T for big time booUius. 

AbcL 



a-day or in an e.:rly spot in the big- 
ger houses. 



FIDDLER and PERRY. 
Singers .'ind Piano. 
17 Mins.; One. 

Colored iu!xed singiu;; 
double. Tlie man is liali of tlie for- 
mer ri(Mier and Sheltou tinn. 'J'iu' 
girl is i>!.'2inly an amateur. Slu' ac- 



anJ i»ian<> 



^ J n-i t ^r.«,i eomi>ani«'s on tl'.e i>iano ; \\'\ ts not up 

•'ueore was forced. Tire act opened i""m-»'' ,„.. i' ,.,i , ..^ « m..Qj< J'li 

the rather hefty six act bill bore and : to v"|;cU^.ile «: • •<>-y^>> ^ ";"'',;" *^- 
.an hold down a .S>ot on bi Is of rouUdvAtnv^ l.ttle to l..e tu.n bU o 
• •! , neat : t'noirutf •»*. 

smulur graJ... Fi,ldler hninlirs most of the he iv^ 

The men are dres.Kod in white dnrks ' ^^^.jy .r^.ttin;; v.ry liUle with scvera! 



and brown jackets. The wardrobe eaii 
stand some sprucing up. Abel. 



GENE METCALF. 

Songs. 

13 Mins.; One (Special Drop) 

Fifth A%[#. 

Oene Metcalf is making a bid for 
recognition along the same lines as 
Cecil (Jrey. who showed a similar act 
at the same house a short time ago. 
Miss Metcalf opens with a nnmber 
f:iirly good, being propelled to the 
footlights on a truck with a man in 
b!a( kf:ice as guide. There is some i 
comedy attempted here which takes 
the attention from the ainging. An- 
other number and then into a cutout 
in the drop where u chuuge is made 
in vi«'w of the audience with the man 
in blaekfaee :i((ing as maid. It i.^ 
a S(»rry bit, for Mi^s Metcalf tries 
to give the audience a glance ut the 



"Preferred Stock" (Playlet). 
18 Mins.; Fall Staoa. 

Upeiiiug cold here, this three a day 
edition of Harry Holmai^'s "Hard 
Itoilod Hampton" immediately showed 
to advantage. The title was changed, 
that it might be identified from the 
original but it ia plainly Holman'i. 
ripping comedy playlet. The billing Is 
said to have first been planned as 
Harry Holman's Players, but the work 
of Alexander in the role of "Hamp- 
ton** probably lead to personal bill- 
lug of the latter. 

"Hard Boiled Hampton" with Hoi 
man is a fixed vaudeville property. It 
can play an indefinite number of sea- 
sons in the big houses and possessing 
the property of standing repeat en- 
gagements without losing- value, the 
idea of a number two company for 
the other time appears the right idea. 

It is not to be expected that "IVe- 
ferred Stock" measures entirely up to 
Ilolraairs own presentation. Judged 
from the third performance, however. 
it is likely to take as fixed a place in 
the three a day an '*Hard I{o:!;'d 
Hampton" has in the twice daily. 
Fewer laughs attain right now in the 
Alexander turn but with playing the 
comedy |)oints will be worked up for 
i the "htiifT" is there, as is the throb 
at the rinalc. The support i.s fair, both 
girls nt'eding direction. "Preferred 
Stoek" looks like a cinch and v. ill 
probably rate with the very best of 
playlets offered off the big path>«. 



JAMES DOYLE and LAURA HAM* 
ILTON. 

Song, Dance aad Talk. 

15 Mins.; Two (Special Drops). 

' Mr. Doyle and Kliss Hamilton be- 
speak musical comedy rearing. Their 
routine runs all to "class," performed 
unassumingly, airily with an almost 
rupcr9tltoua daintiness that is most 
effective. The opening is a varia- 
tion on the flirtation introduced with 
both people colliding at the entrance 
to the apartment elevator as each 
moves to press the puahbuttom. Mr. 
Doyle, remarking that the "el" ia 
running true to schedule and won't 
Jie down for another ten minutes, in- 
vites Miss Hamilton for the ensuing 
bench number. This leads into the 
fast proposal thing thUt is dealt with 
differeutiy, devoid of the serious "will 
you be mine" slush, but more on the 
superficial, airy persiflage order de- 
noting eoth takes the other none too 
seriously as yet, and thus more ap- 
proaching reali.sm. 

When she spurns bis eager at- 
tempts at being a "fast worker," ahe 
parries that the hallway is no place 
for courting — the spooning is more 
appropriate to the parlor. Which is 
the cue for the duplex drop cMltin 
to disclose what purports to he a 
parlor set. From then on o love 
nest number with prop blue print 
plans, for the thcmc-dc-song follow*, 
also differently dealt with. Inter- 
spersed in this routine of song aad 
dance are i couple or three dance 
numbers nattily executed and all mak- 
ing for a first-rote send-off. 

Tlie turn is ready for an early spot 
in the better houses. Abfl. ' 



, songs. 
! Fidiller 



time bi!l<. 



Con. 



COLLINS and PILLARD. 

Cemedy Talk and Songs. 

14 Mi«*.; One. 

Aaierlc^n Roof. (Sept. I). 

CtiUins i.s an experienced eoniedian 
of the "mit* 'type. He is working op- 
po>-.ite .Inek Pillard, recently of biir- 
>sque and a brother of lltta Tillard 

(Stone and Pi!!ard). ...-^ «.,--,- /rv 

i.n , . r , V. , , 1 1, I IGOR'S BA?.LET RU.>»E. (5), 

rillnrd is one of tlie likeliest look- I . 

i>»g HtriiKht men developed in soa- i Dancing. 
»«'Mis. i'oiiins uM'ls thorn on his first | ^ Mm.: Full, 
''titranee with his ••iinl" romedy a: \J Pal3C0. 

»iever lets j;,». Th.- routine follows i Two men -u .1 Mircc ::irl'^ coiniM-ise 
f'HMiliur litjc". with some new inid ' ttie p'M-oii.'llr» ol" fliis :j' t 
«f>jne (»ld nnteri:il used. The comedy t-traiglit (i,«i>-iiK,' aK^r. •}:!•. ion 
is derived mostlv throui^h the delivorv. i maJiigrs to put ovor s^me rather 
A travesty reritation "The Kid's ' nifty fhxT stuf!". The tno of Kirls 
I-ast Tight" was ono high light v.ith " 

Collin' 



I'ljo r.ialenal is v.cak until i under dres.sitig and creates an inipres- 

(lons <liine'e wi.v a!id siH< | sion of being "naughty," and this with 
coat for a Cliiuk diuracteri/.atioii j a male dresser. 

with tiie girl similarly attired, doing a | The act from then or is poor. 
!»rif»f violin bit Tliis rescuiblos the Two songs attempred we.'-e woefully 

material of the formed two mt ami is j treated :.::.l the hon..e was j.i.vt about ! th«V .cots a l.tt e "lore^ and ^^!"»«':»K 
he apox of their offort. I ready to "go after" hor. N\iirn slic 



CONROY and HOWE. 

Siaatng. Talking and Dancing. 
14 Mins.; One. 

A tvpienl two-man dauejng ait. do- 
ing talk whleh gets very little, singing 



t.. -. . « . , . 

On the American showing tho turn fmi>lio<l and pimcii off a ui;:. .'^lio.\i!ig 

will need eon.>iiderahle i^'visr-aont to ! Imir <rop|»<'«l <los."ly to thr head with 

qualify for an early spot o:« t!io small i\<\ evidonr jntrntion of trying to nii.l.l 

{ tiM-m licrMMc it was :i fciuule iiuper- 

j sot)aii<»n. 

Th" art is imt>o:.;< = !>Io. If it woro 

;i foinule iniprsomtiou the sinking was 

HO bad it <c»iilfln't get ovit arid as 

if st;iiuN it is worse, for tli** trick 

d-M's iiKi fool iin»'one. 



that docs not n"ite get them over. The 
tjilk i> not there or it has been hoard 
too often to be of real value, l iify 
had a g(»od (•har\ee at the American, 
being the first act to talk ond try for 
laughs, but this end fell. The (omedy 
wii: have to be strengthened bf»forc 
ti. ry can hold next to closing on 
lhe!«e ImIIh. 



It 



1^ a ' 

that ' 



f> cornet .v.olo anjjth^^r 



, . - il- 

l:<rds showiuanshif* helped thin bit 
^■lion ho ".sliilbvl" for the top note. 
»»akiny it :i;>poar twice as effocf'vc 

The pair were forced to a spec !j 
""<! an iinrchoarscd gng before t!ie 
*"'"'f crow.l would let them go. Tiiey 
"re sttoti}: ne\f to cl(»^ers for t'le pop 
■uuses 



ixvr r.'tth 
;i t'Vl»si^ 

fill til,' pi'lMV* 

c.M-l.'.iiX l':*'l^^- '>'••' ^'"' ''••*' '"'•^■'- '*''■' 
f ;li- two tilcn is the l».'>t 

,ylrv f..r hi- -I'lIT^ i- 

>i«i;>'''li:i;:. 'II'" 

I) iiit I'l roll 

I"i>r }»" oiteii 



V/ILLISH. 

Ju.jgling. 

12 Mins.: Full St.-^no. 

N\i!li>li f'Minorly woi'I.cd with 
woiii.'Mi as. distant uiiilor tKe n.'ime 
NNiilisli .Mid Anita. 'Jho j':;:; in>r 



"PUT AND TAKE." 

Singing and Danelng. 
15 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set- 
tings). 

This is the latest of the Lew Can- 
tor ond Irving Yates productiona and 
it easily holds Its place with their 
other efforts. A girl and four boys 
are utilised. 0|»cninK in two. fhvre is 
a little comedy ncenc that will develop 
in laughs as it plays. At present t'jey 
got quite n few cbnckles. but good* 
big laughs should be the reward after 
they get it in shape. ' Following the 
opening the act becomes solely a Hing- 
ing and dancing arrangement, and 
moves speedi'y from the girls first 
number on. There are two very good 
production numbers, equalling any- 
thing in Ihi.s line that has been shown 
in the pop bouses. 

The medley is a corking bit of mn- 
slcal comedy production. The girl 
looks and dresses very well, but seems 
a bit afraid of herse f. This lack of 
confidence ufTects her singing and 
makes her look awkward at times, but 
Hhoulil wear ofT with playing. One of 
tho boys, the tallest, who does a single 
dance, Stands out. Tlie net finished 
to very healthy applause and makes 
good. pleaHing entertainment for any 
of the popu'nr priced houses. Heslde«* 
t?:e entertainment, it adds a real flaKli 
iu the good looking settings. 



r nretly. hot no s('ll-^:lt ion in 
i. ri«:in sciiso. yet mrinrge to 

Tiicely and form :i ; ji,^ most i>art romains the .•imo. with 



n 

of 

for 



ri little co'oody of (he t-tr:ii;;!if "r orde 



'Ijiii'.''. 
v.i;i«lev 'If \^ 

an 1 :ii':' 

■ 'lip 

..V. ;im! tl:>':i. 



,.<-,. 



h!iO\\ y 
liloti !'• 
>f«'PP 11^: 



AW- 



\'A\.- 



\\\ I •! 



— *- - 



Con. 



ing spot the a'-t ansAcrs. 



I'rr^i. 



J 1 ■^■iliW 



;i! f ciiio'ed. The man w »rl,>j in 
nine r!»»flies ;is n s(Mni-'lin:,'v .'Mrl f;'ie> 
tlM*»iifTli Hi(« ii^nnl routine <f .iii:it:Ii«)R 
nn.l l.rilaceio;,'. - I retrliii::: til. -pciiilty 
out toft iori„' .\s a i^hf « o- !1'T for 
the three \ day li..nse^ lie v\iU p.i>-. 

ri my Mb 



GENE MARTINI. 

Accordionist. 
12 Mins.: Ono. 

.Mr. .'^iaftiiii'H accordion routine 
iMii-; fine to vaudeville form in its 
solccti'tn. slatting with the nsir.ii 
ri;i:;-;'ai niiMiber and into ll:e i»o|i 
medley •vt.iwr.v. Martini wears eyc- 
oiii,'; diess. and performs ulth cn'i- 
iii.iiiia'e :if)i;ity and sliowman>.lii!> to 
juit the pop lioiise audiences. 

He < pe;;ed I lie show at this I'ox 
JKtM' f. ijiit li »;il<l deuce it sati^fyiii';- 



lU 



I i I ' 1 



.,f 



iinil.tr grndt . 

Abel. 



HARRY and ANNA SCRANTON. 

Songs, Dances and Wire-walking. 
8 MIn.; One :.r.d Full Stage. 

With wire-walking the principle 
achievement of this couple they have 
i « lio-tcn A song and dance routine for 
tho opeiilii;;. The turn in its general 
i*raUc-up is framed for a No. 1 posi- 
tion. 

The song and dance In "one" to 
open fi'i s to give them I lie necessary 
>.tait. Their real w<»rk starts on the 
\\ire in full stiige. In this they <li.s 
play adept iiess. The man h.as several 
Hieps (til the wire that are nov«d, with 
hin |»arlner doing her idiare to carry 
I lie act alori;;. Due leiaark and the 
•,;af> by the man at the liniBh should 
be elimlnril ed. 

,\;i opening nt't for tho pop Ikmisch 
llmf Marts s'owly but blio.vs prom- 
ise UH it pioi;rasses. 



■•^ 



.^Ml^tttf*! 



^i^b«.MI^ 



'JiMaidBtfi^l^UttiA.k.^^a.11.. 



- •" — • 



20 



VARIETY 



Friday, f?f||iteml)cr 9, l!)Ji 



I 



FOREIGN REVIEWS 



I 
v^-- 



THE TRIMP CARD 






II > ' 

At 



l<I;.l 1<tl frt'iii ti.r yroiirli ft" Mi;Mr 
1 l.iiiii' M'l.n ninl (Jroi»;r l)iiv.*l. tlii> 
. ( di,' tly finiii tli«* pen v)f Aftlmi 



not imrtioiiJr.rly sim c s-^fiil «1up doubt- 
le^'s ti> tbeir openly uv<>w«'<i MverMibn 
t«i v.ctrk n:i«l tli<*ii' i)uit:;r tv foe mix- 



rrr 



»>*riwm 






i:^ 



1 till k 



4«« 
till 



- — ;,^ the Knickerbocker Btaje for the short 
period of hovcu weeks. The booklDf 
of a run of such short duration is 
ii)dicativ<' of the fact that Mr. Say- 
ago did not poaseas overwheiming 

. fnifli in the success of hid revival. 

I After Monday uight any such fear-< 
that niny have ponsejsed hiin must 
huvp been eliminated. 

The (juebtion of the ncalo of prices 



^^•*«* 



lie autli( r s-hows 'J 'w tinii- | 



lirti-'!'. iMMVver, ^shfii niii.«li .inivi-s 
It II visit Iwiiijrin? wiHi Vvx the Ht- 
iiiti>»|.»)M«' t,f Mnyfiiir and :» liirjre stock 
of tiic lati'st I*nris.;iM pown*; nnd whnt 
r 



Kiven greater consideration to. With 
a top of ;^{.85 for the regular per- 
fornjuute and $4.4() for the Satur- 
d:\v nightK it may ho a little strong 



I lie I. MHO hnhit hns' gt't l:< M o! 

TI,'- pl.iy i.N full of (Uii'ti rpi 

;:;.iii^ :nul smart sMyiiiijN, \.vA i;ii it- 

;.•■ 1(1 olTtiisi'. ;in(i even if sotur v\ ihr 

iii;.!(>i;uf docv ;jt times ;:<". near llic 

bivii* r l;:* i! ;:l\v;iys in;ni;i;i»'s !•. i.cfji 

w iu.iii l)oi:ii(i-<. ' 'i'iio Tr. tiiji "i'ard" 

^i.« ... J lio ^^ ly I'oj.ula:- v.itli cviiv 

li. ■ - vi t iic.ii rt''};<ior. 'i'li;* , (»i. tin 

(»i » iii; ;: nifjiif t'lrro \v;i>> a noslil^ 

<i;.:..'';isi ration \v^ \\\<\ Aiiiiiir I'.ku- 
tl; ;•:. w :.(j \vu j rini pla.^iny. ti.c ^.ti'.iii 



)ot M... s,>iM'd:!v revolut:onizrs tliC [V'^ *''•" ^^'V '* '^'"^ ^''^.^^ i- ' ,*"'r J 

K iKi.a..! hous.lo Id and takrs .loxr. i^ ri-^n.l .rl^rVJv'V ^ ^p^J^^^^^^^ 

nrtisf.x may create may be sufficient 



l...a: 



a 



I 






|1 



1> 



.!'• aii'ii.tw vMi 

ia.;c a Cdi;— ;; l.'.llr itil of biisi- 

\.i,iih was (luitc ijiiiM'tT^snry — 

piobably t,> soiiu- 

s up to iJlt'll tiic 



l>r. li 

<o < 

l:i 

I'll'. !i.is was ilia 

|.r;v.'ii;il f((>!iti;^. 

pa l.((l liMi-~c i'ad rci'oivcij llie picco 

V. il.. » ij'l.iisasiii. I'rtor lia^-sott, u 

yo.Mig t'.titl'.n;.!!! Aviilj J murky past 

iiiifl a yci::ii wife wIhiso fatbor liiip- 

|>(M.< (I t(. \\y tl.o ;< (' xvli.) lin;| hl'.il 

rc!ir iUi 1« r ( ; o.ss-<'j..ininairon on an 

o<-(;:^;<,.n wiirii lie tiinird \\\ .]>* I'lP* 

Co r » .spt.ndrnt in a notorious divorcp t!''.H*ii 

<«!' ; '!'::• :.. •;:.'»!,> t)f tiic I'.'j.i, iiow- 

cvf-v. inalus i.!,o K. ('. t.'it.-ons as to 

liiv so!i-ii--ia\v".- ir(.s(i;i Modo of life, 

.'; l^)!;l>tf.l:..(•^ s uliiii !.■. sI'aiM'd by 

T>';.na S:i!ii'y(iii, \\ i.o is on :i visit to 

tlio joiinx CO. ::.](•. As a matter of 

f.cf. IV'tr:- is l>. iiii; blaf'kh;a;i.(l l»j 

till' lady cf tl:«» divorce, wlio holiN 

fi'j.io inn iMiiiu:t:ng lMtt«T«= <.f his. To 

pro;((l liimself. therefore, lie invent.' 

a (louhlr. f(,T- \\1;<».;<. sins, he, Die vii - 

tiKiiis one. i--: foivver hoing bla4n«'d. 

'i iiis plan uo;ks well ar li ^t, h\\\ 
I.e siion bej,'.!!- to l)<^ u ('v:-!,Mi inoi"e 



tb:n the',, ai.tj i..- prts j.i.-ofhfr b.ifeli; 
idea. 'J\t;is in To appear n^ \\\< doiil)k. 
His luek lifld^ ;:oo'l. and he is ae- 
• eitod in his ;.^.^ jmed eharaefer bv 
every one bi^t Piana. I'nfortunMlely. 
le is- seizf I 'vith illiirss nnd is hii.s 
tied into bed by his friend Sinipvon. 
V. lu> is a «Io< toi-. ]..Tt( r 111 < o^ifes.xes 
lh»> inii>osli:'-e to Sniips-oii an'! I)eg> 
Iiiv help. He want.s to ro to tlie fl.it 
of a notorif.us dancer, the (Jroat dar- 
iii'ii. w'A wliiie helping him to achieve 
Hi"- S .'ii;.s'.:: lije.ve'f jjets under sns- 
I'i ion : lid into t.oubie with Diartu. 
Tlo evidence looi^s so blat !•: rgainst 
boHi men that tl.cir two wives look 
tl eir bedroofj'i doors aira'inst them 
In the mornii;p Diana plots with lit- 
tle Mrs. IWissett. with the resnlt thai 
ll " i:iifor{;;n .f. Petei ;^ tidd that hi<- 
wife relen-ed after nil ami let him 
'"•'= ••'•I" !'■-.; ". i'i:i hi' reinrned in 
:ii:.;'. ]*( ti'r stretnoj).^ - 
.^'l : letnrtMMi. and l/n* 
•^ 1 ••* if he dida't tiis 



n lat'y wit'; a brutal lnKl>and 
leaning toward a b.and-<;ni;> 

d 'Cf^r. under her pro»c .tii':; 

She also falls in l»»ve witli tin' 
Adcris, a farmer. So far so 
^'o i.i. bat Dinah's love is n.»t «piite 
't'otjL' enough to Rtand veldt life s) 
shr iiaeks Lji her fashionab'c ward- 
rr)!.;- and departs from L(Tudon. How- 
(ver she retarns on hearing of the 
<Ieath of Joyce (Jrant's baby. Ctrrtut 
iy hn kily killed by a mule. (other\vi"«t 
the "hnv'^^' ending" sneh plays f'o- 
Uiaril woiid haKlly have been reached) 
\\w\ .1 vce :-ct;'r:.> home to Kticland 
wit)) hci- dfc-tor prev.nnnbly to have 
atuther try nt matrimony, vhile 
Disaji makes up her mind to adhere to 
her farmer lover. Throngliout the 
netin^r is excellent. The great s-iecc^s 
of the t»roduction is the iierformauo** 
of D^ris Lloyd as Joyce Grant, her 
oMt!»nrst on hearins of her cliild'^ 
de-\ih beiji.*: one of the true.^t anl 
i:i' t emotional pieces (jf acting to be 
se . in the V, ejtt Knd to'ay. Uuby 
Mill.:- as Dinah took advantage of 
evc-v lit* and situation and made 
of an elaborate wardrobe. The 
thiee irrespon.sible amateur fQrmer« 
were well played by Mart '91 Tyewis 
Wilfred JJegrim and Ant>)ny Holies. 
P.a>il Kathbone managed to in.«5t!ll 
Ron)e life into the penny novelette 
hero. Dr. Lawson. The jtiece is well 
mounted and Tvhen cut nnd frenerally 
I iiHeil together shonld !» » eert.ji-i of 
mu' ll patronape from p1ay;:,>.-rs wlio 
like their dramatic faro heavily saqir- 
I'oated. 

Gore. 



where with the most gripping of playf^. 
Hecause An-SI-y wrote so many page.n 
or' talk, it must cll be used, even ih*; 
result is none the best. 

The producer plays two role^. Vn- 
der the name of Bar Oalilee he acts 
ChoDon ami then later takes the part 
of a sajre. The audience never recog- 
nizes hiiu in the latter role. Miss 
I Adler did n good n?e<'«» '^ijKork Juyt 
Kiiia Abrnm«twftK 'distinguinhe^ her 
self HS Leah's nurse. The balance of 
the cast wa>« adequate evidently in lit- 
tii.g complinnec with the hectic inter- 
pretation of the linet*. Abcl 



th»> e ( !■ I 
I.v «^ n C 

W:f, (!(•.•!.. 

• looMe (lid. 

!'"i"' ;;ip( 

ol I.. ;• , 'r";l 






,.0' 



prji.d ' 

exi lanM •m ;,.. \ 

ftorri the d I'.'c: 

hnpi-v tc-a. n, 'i 

J.o'.. ni|ch.;i; ii' 

sett wvA f""r>ve<- 
r 



't tlie lliDuehl 

■' I'efer is (om- 

1 



.1 



an ill, 
fa;' t,, 

\\ ''♦"'■ V. !■ '1 T 
of t} c I r •' 

fi"" . ;! 



ai:(l 
■ tlie ivnth. ru;: aii 
'" I*<^?,' -'s itn o en' e 

' '^f f!e mix III' 

i'; ex«'e!'cn? as r.;:«« 

Jiat he is i-apabi' 

\ . 1 idn.. •• ih M g(M:ei;i;;'\ 



I't .1. -«a!< f Lanne; - 
'•erv zi>. ll as the yotin-: 
I K ^ ! 'e r,.'r,M. . - k.». "rmi.i 
•'■' '. fbe Crerit f'arinm. A 

'■''• ■' vf. ' !:i,.|, ;• ,.!;,(p. 

• ;: ( K. r.. we-'; i,':r \ 
ar.d V'l; f essfuriN . 



Got 



r. 



THE EDGE OF BEYOND 

Loi,(!,n, An^: 2S. 
ThiM )dav .Mdapfrd [y \\^yy H,,,.,.,- 
ni.iM and Ruby Miller from a novel by 
(..'I'.'^t. ..(le l'ag«'. I .mnot be classed a^ 
an exam. ;i tf th»' best in play writ- 
i£)g However, with nil its faults, it 
hjis iilrcj.riv hud a .vueeessfnl trin] run 
in the pin^inces nnd there is no rea 
Kon why It hhouid not pirxve a s )und 
in... . ii.i ( (iirjir.si ; ,011 III i^Miiditn. " iV 
IK diania. w.ili n leavening of souic- 
what tot»('<! and artificial etanedy, of 
tb( eor vei tiicial .sentimental type. A 
tyi)e V. l.icli r;!ay not snit the critical 
but whi<'h has an enonnons f(diowiug 
among count ly e<»i.sins nnd the in- 
habilants of siiuibia. At tifnes the 



nes 
pentinniit doe.s n;)t . ing tr\ie aiai there 
in a distinct a. t ifi' iality ub.-nt seme 
of the .'^Iiar.'irti'is Nitt !h the main it 
itt [x-rfectly wholec-orne and is as 
harmle.'s as an Ltiiei M. Dell novel 
The perpetual sex ipiestion creeps in 
here and iliere but the "iiroblem" \y 
not al ow( (J cover everything, wljich if^ 
it«elf a relief in lh<\se day.s when IT) 
per eenl. »,f onr aiithors Keem in- 
«ai'i.bl«' of eon.structing a play unless 
they mix nii two men and a wunian, or 
two w<»men and a man, in an em 
bro>;lio f»f marital infidelity whi< ii pro- 
vi(K s them with plenty of seo|)e for 
act after act of moralizing ui»on the 
unhealthy ehaos they have created. 

In Khodenia, the edge of beyond, 
three men Itnown to their intimates 
as lieauty liilly. and the Ugly Pug 
arc running a farm. The venture ia 



LEGIT REVIEWS 

(Coutinuert From Page 10) 

but this he will undoubtedly over- 
come in time, and he docs not dance 
with the grace nnd ease of Hriin or 
even Charlie Meakins, w!io followed 
r>:ian. but his waltzing is of the C'on- 
tii!(nt;"»I school and perhaps he will 
be able to adapt himself to the Am- 
eri<an method, lie is first and fore- 
most pn aetor. one p(»:se.s!?ed of a 
true dramatie tenor voice and un 
artist to his finder tips. 

The Honia presented by Lydia 
Lipkowskn is a marvel of artistry. 
Her c<inecption of the role brings the 
realization that Sonia was never 
playcil and sung in this country be- 
fore. In the first aet when her won- 
derfully blond<' person dawned on the 
nudience there was a noticeable trace 
of nervousness, but by the time tlie 
Reeond act arrived she had conquered 
this and from that point to the finale 
it was a triumphnal procession for 
he;-. !!cr voice which at first seemed 
i to lack timbre seemed to round out 
anfl tier notes sounded full and true 
and sweet. 

On this pair of artists the honors 
of the evenim; are besVcvefl with- 
01! r ipialifieation. Miss Lipkowska 
s riys i'lal dances with charm and de- 

.ii.iC. i-!''''L'ii^ ..f'.PJl *-^?_£°" .^^^ • ^'''^ 
i beiiii: so slie :s a rara arvis in this 

I ihv of the light opera stage. 

Next in the east to shan in the 
hii:.;,is of the night are Dorothy 
Kran< is nnd Frank Webster, Their 
dnet in the second aet was wonder- 
ful eh. "in and haniiony. 

Tims far in the cast of the piece 
did Ilciiry W. Savage walk in the 
f):i}'ri f>f inck. Rnt when he came to 
s« !e I I, IS ('t-medians he did n<H fare 
as V. ell for Jtcymond Crane who 
p!a\ed I'epoff. failed to achieve the 
fiilii' -V of the role as did the Ameri- 
eai, < r< ntor, the le.te Rob firnhani, 
lioi <1 d Jefferson de Angelis score as 
eomoleiely in laugh making as his 
prei''""('--';r. 

Of !l.( minor itrincipals that stood 
out there were Ralph Sojde, ('harles 
An;:eIo. William H. White. Marie 
\\eli- fJcorges Dufranne, Marcaret 
S<hiiiinK. nianehe Seymore and Peggy 
Arthii.. who was the Fi I'i of the 

'".sraxirrr gTiTsT ' 

There is a forking sin<;ing and danc- 
ing thorns with 1(» girls and a like 
number of men who make the en- 
semble numbers real mus-cal treats. 

Of the three acts the production 
lacks somewhat in massivcue.ss as 
compared to the original nnd although 
done by Urban it bears the earmarks 
of h.'iving been mnde witii a view 
to the road. That the real balcony 
in the Maxim scene will be missed 
by those who ?aw the original pro- 
duction ih- a certainty. The costum- 
ing is elaborate and decidedly dis- 
tinctive. 

After giving consideration to the 
final act it must be admitted that 
one uiissed the faces of Pauline Wu- 
te Polly Marshall and dear old 
"Freckles" Dunn. Hut of course the 
style in chorus girls changes in 14 
years and the new Maxim girls, while 
they may not have the vivacity of 
those of yesteryear certainly do man- 
age to fling, but lavage choruses 
were always note<l for vocal ability. 

The revival ia acbcduled to bold 



'■■■ \\\\\ 'em despite the high tariff. 
Put it would have been .«5ure fire for 
overflowing capacity with $2.7G for 
Uie niglits and $M.W Saturdays, 

He that as it may "The Merry 
V.'idow" gives indication of being "the 
different revival" inasmuch as it will 
'undoubtedly repeat the country over. 

Fred, 



THE DIBBUK 

I'^rat "lUllpn" ... .Alexander Tancnholtr 

Si-i_j.ini '-Hatlcn*' A. L.ut^.ky 

ThiiM "liatk-n* Jehudah Uleich 

Tti« "Meshulach** Julius Xdlcr 

Ch.onon Bar Galileo 

.A'uycT. Ilyman Meiael 

Chann-Biither Anna Appcl 

Henoch Irving Oonikinan 

Leah Celia Adler 

Frade Blna Abramewitz 

Oittel Beiuilu MoguIonUy 

Unher Juseph KosenbcrK 

Sender Jachlel Goldsmith 

naFF«h Sarah Jacknln 

MenaRfloh Joneph Jichoolcr 

Nachnian Carl Fell 

Mendel Jacob Sobel 

Asrlelke Miropoler Waurico Swartz 

Michlel Israel Schein 

ShlriiBhin. A Rav Mark Schweld 



This, the first of the Yiddish Art 
Theatre's uew season productions, un- 
folded to an erormons attemhinee 
Sept, 1 at the (dd Garden theatre, ia 
featured as a Ma'iriee Schwartz, pro- 
duction and any discrepancies (nnd 
tl-.erc were .^^cveralJ j'.r.ist be laid r^t 
tlie impresario's doormat. Mr. 
S( hwart/, laay be (v'teiin;; tv) a spe- 
i;^l p.'roui'.ge a<i:.iit*cdiy in serilie- 
in^ dramatic action an 1 drainatic s.is- 
pense in favor of monotonous realism. 
i»n.t all things considered tliere is vo 
denying he overdid tlie I>eIaseonn nt- 
tempt.s at realism. The i):eee at its 
oremiere lacked tempo, was lifclesv 
out for intermediary strel«hes. nnd 
transplanted to an audi; n 'c train. -d in 
the ways of Ameriivn stage manTler^ 
would have met with pro:n|)t exodus. 
Put then again, in due justice, the 
management explained privately that 
several contributory incidents in tlie 
way of th'' labor unions had to be 
contended with for week'* i)rior to the 
premiere. 

**Der Dibbuk" means the Evil Spir- 
it, The pi :y is a bgend written by 
!lie late TtMs*-.ian novelist S. An-Rky. 
who hter took to ptayrighting. lie 
d'ed a year ago. and some of the 
Times S.^uare intcTlegenzia present 
at til's \ id'lish fir^'if r.igh* \v>re r'nthu- 
siastic in their prai.se of the original 
srript. The same cannot be said for 
the adapted version. 

The pfay itself was a shock to one 
\\}\^^ t>rofessed some slight understainl- 
ing of the siioken language in its jar- 
'ion f.jshion, but the lexicology of the 
jday was too "deep" for this reviewer. 
who owes knowledge of the tale to th'' 
!)rinted Fri^li<=h synopsis to be pur- 
ehnsrd in the lobby, 'J'his l.ick of un- 
iii>rst sliding may have been due t<^the 
iiitermitlejit lapses in what may bave 
been H«'br(>w i<li»mis and quotations, 
r irther handic?.pped by the play's set- 
ting in a small Polish viilge. 

In brief, the [.ieee opens in an old 
v';i.ipe synagogue nhere Chonon. n 
religious fanr.fie (played by Mr, 
S?«'hwart7,) :s in love with Leah (Celia 
.Adler). e.nd for some unfathomable 
reason feels her to be his destined 
•bride, ordnincd by a power higher 
I linn mortal. Put Leah'<? father has 
another man picked for her be- 
trothed, and rhonon. who appears to 
liave been ailing nil the while, ex- 
pires for the first net enrtain, Tho- 
Mon's evil spirit for the rest of the 
• lay tnke-< possession of Leah, and nt 
I lie wedding ceremony she renouiiees 
her fianee. the action developing (nc- 
"ording to the printed synopsis) that 
becaus'-' they werej-oth born on the 
Slime day tFTev wore" destined to n dual 
evistenee on this earth. T/e.ih dies in 
the Inst aet. nnd her st»irit joins her 
r»re-ordairied mate in another world. 

It is rdivloijs the action is on the 
spiritual order that would require 
tight and eompaet development to sus- 
tain the tempo. This was wholely 
lacking the first evening, the second 
"ct being over at after 11 and the 
fourth HQi well after midnight. The 
management promises improvement 
with time. As it stands it smacks of 
the nn.ttcnr theatrical genera with no 
iden of suspense or dramatic. 

The orchestra, conducted by Joseph 
C!hernyavsky, who composed the inci- 
dental music, felt presumably that be- 
cause the compo.ser-condiictor wrote 
St) many bars of music all of it should 
be Tendered, It mattered not if there 
was too much of it and did not suit 
the action; it simply had to be all 
played. As for the dramatic action, 
they thooght nothing of leaving the 
stage bare for a full minnte in several 
instances. That spells suicide any- 



TWO BLOCKS AWAY 



Jane , 

Captain Mat:vie. . 

Robert Ives 

Hill Lewia 

Nato PomineraDtx 
Nora Finnt'Kan . . . 
Jimmy P.nn<.ffaD. 

Tom Roland 

Guiseppc 

Martin 

Mrs. W.itRon. . . 
Molly Finn'^^ran 
Officer Dor-ovan 



•••••• 



Sfarle Carroll 

Alice BndrcHii 

..John Rutherford 

.lohn Cope 

...Barnoy Bernard 

Kste Morgan 

Clyde Dilson 

Robert CraiK 

. . , .William Morlln 

..Wallace Rrnkino 

loHMie Nai^le 

..Hope .Sutherland 
Cbark-R IIcnd'TJion 



There was unu^uial enthusiasm at 
the Cohau Aug, JU), when Charles 
Dillingha.i) presented Barney Per- 
nanl in the new three-aet plav. by 
Aaron Iloflfman, entitled "Two Block's 
Away," despite a terrific humid tem- 
perature thnt made sitting iu the the- 
ntro almost unbearable. The audi- 
ence was one that was attracted 
through the coupling of the names of 
Barney Bernard and Aaron Hoffman 
rather than by the name of the pro- 
ducer. That in itself ia unusual at a 
Dillingham opening. 

"Two Blocks Away," however, will 
have its greatest appeal through the 
characterization that Mr. Bernard 
gives to Nate Pommerant rather 
than through Mr. Hoffman's plav it- 
self, rlthough the author has "done 
about as neat nnd »-lever a r>iece of 
playwrighting to onler as could b« 
expected for this .star, Aaron Hoff- 
mcu has no peer when it comes to 
turning a line in n play, and in this 
he h's been farsighted enough to pass 
up the obvious puns that were too 
easily possible, 

Mr. Hoffmaa has taken as his theme 
the mornl that "a re-ular guy is a 
regular gu^, whether he be broke or 
wealthy," and tries hard to drive 
home the fact that riches do not make 
for happiness, and that the greatest 
things in life are those that we get 
for nothing— the sunshine, the air and 
the songs of the birds. He docs man- 
sge to tell his story in a simple, 
straightforward manner tliat com- 
binei te.:rs with laughter, and with 
Mr. Bernard t«> play the leading role 
the piece is sure of a certain quota 
of r,ti« -ess on Broadway, even though 
it is not a couipleli? kiioekont that will 
rank with the same author's "Wel- 
come, Stranger," 

The scene of action is l.iid on the 
East Side, where Barney Bernard, as 
the kindly old shoemaker. Nate Pom- 
merantz. lives in hfs little shop iu a 
basement with an adoj)ted daughter. 
He and Bill I>ewis r.ToJm Cope) are 
both equal partners in the little girl's 
afreetions. and are both her "daddies," 
liiil is a carpenter by fade, but has 
always longed to be a copper. He 
hangs around the station house nnd 
1.^ a friend to every harness bull that 
pound.s a beat. Though Bill is Irish 
he married a giri n.imed Greenb.Tum, 
and thus is a distant relative of Pom- 
merant/, a fact that nlw ys bring'^ 
thnn together when they have their 
petty bickerings, Mrs, I^wis has 
long since pns.sed on her way. Nate 
though is not aware of the fact she 
was really his cousin. 

A .voung lawyer, who is with one 
of the big firms, approaches Nate and 
ii'forms him tJiat he has fallen heir to 
$2r)0.000, through the death of his 
uncle, through the fact that his rela- 
tive had died without Lssue. This 
uncle bod adopted the name of 
Orange, and so when Nate gets the 
dough he also changes his monicker. 
He places himself under the guidance 
of tlie young lawyer, and eventually 
moves into the mansion on the square 
"two blocks away" from his little Sec- 
ond avenue shop,. 

The second net shows him a man of 
weiilth through the operation of a 
huge shoe factory, which turns out 
fr»otwear for "an honest price," $3. 
The little i»irl *»«• -b??B- -ccrt Rbrcad 
with a tutor, suggested by the lawver" 
and Nate has foresworn all his old- 
time friends. The day is the girl's 
birthday, nnd according to schedule 
she should be in Venice, but she has 
changed her plans and comes home to 
surtirise her "daddy." Of course, 
"Daddy Bill" is in on the secret, and 
there is a party arranged among the 
old fnond" on the avenue. But Nate 
Orange won't go, niid he won't per- 
mit the girl to attend, accomplishing 
this through a sympathy appeal rather 
than force. 

At this point the young lawyer 
shows in his true light. He is a 
crook who has been invoNed in sev- 
eral stock thefts from bank messen- 
gers, and was planning to clean up on 
the old man and marry the girl. When 
the old man ia about to turn him out 
he turns on THm and informs him that 
the Oreenbnnm girl that was mar- 
ried to Bill Lewis was really the 
daughter of his uncle, and liill in 
reality is entitled to the entire for- 
tune; indee<l. Bill is to get all the 
profits that Nat« baa piled ap since 



having the inheritance in his po.sscs- 



Mon 



son. 



The sets were designed by Living- 
ston PIntt and executed by Oden Wal- 
ler. Clifford Brooke directed the 
stnging of the play. 

Fred 



THE HERO 



Andrew Lane 
Hester I.ane. 
Saruli L;»ne. 
Andrew I.nnc 
Dawald l^ane. . 
Mrtrthe Roche. 



Richard Dennett 

Alma Belwia 

Blanche Frldericl 

Jr Joneph Depew 

Hubert Amei 

Fania Marlnoff 



"The Hero" was originally pro- 
duced at the Lon;:aere for g serierj of 
four niiitinecs lust March. Sam H. 
Harris thought so well of the play at 
thnt time that he withdrew th«' mati- 
nees with a view to putting it on at 
a regular attraction. The current 
presentation nt the Belmont, which 
ni)eued Mondav night, is the result. 
It's n decidedly human little tragedy. 
As Hi:har(1 B' ntiett stated in a cur- 
iain speech at the couclu.-iioji, had it 
been written by Ibsen it would be 
considered a real da.ssic. Reg.irdless 
of Mr. Bennett'H refcrene#» to Ibsen, 
The Hero," whieh is in three nets 
and written by Gilbert Pinery, is se 
different from the usuil riin of 
dramas, as to be truly remarh.nble. 

The story concerns two brothers. 
One is a returned soldier, who al- 
' hough having won several de. 'ora- 
tions for bravery in battle, is an un- 
mitignted liar, a thief and nil round 
Tortd fov nofhin?. The other brother 
fulfills the popular conception of a 
'nil grown "s;»p." easily impoiicd 
Moon, unselfish and devoted to his 
w'fe nnd f.imily. The blaek sheep 
brother, it seems, had even enlisted 
'luder a cloud, the easy-going brother 
i.'ving to .f^qimre n scrape for him 
ivfo-fi ho p'.u.'d return to his native 
city after the war. 

The licro is t-^Uen into the goo<l 
brother's ho»r-'ehold. and maile Tniieh 
of bv exervone. The good brother's 
wife, a natural hero-\vorshi|),''er, goes 
^■» far fts to carry on a, pretty stronf 
niit.TtioM with the adventurer. Not- 
wltl.'t.inding the manner in which he 
h'ls been r'^eeiyed and cared ^*o-. (he 
unprincipled brother steals ?10(1 the 
goo<l brother has be<n givr'i charge 
of bv the minister of Wm* chureh. 

Am if to pile it on. the bad brother 
(the hero) carries on nn a fair with' 
a young Belci.Tn jrirl. a maid ^n his 
bj other's household, which winds* np 
with the girl iu trouble. P.tit desnite 
}\\A shortcomings, he's n hero. j<*»lnf 
his life attempting to save the life of 
a child at n fire. This gives the 
play nn nnhnppy ending. 

Mr. Bennett plays the self-s'.crific- 
'ng brother, nnd makes him idioto- 
grnphically true. Numerous little 
touches of character brought instant 
recognition from the first night nudl- 
-rnce. The vole will g<» »lown In the- 
atHcal history, regardless of hotr 
long or »»hort the life of the jilay it- 
self may be. as one of Mr, Bennetra 
best eharacterirations. Robert Ames, 
however, ns the conscienceless hero, 
has the "fat" of the piny, nnd makes 
it stnnd out like a house nfire. Ills 
performance Is a remarkable study. 
«o aecnrate and convincing ns to be 
startling. 

Panin Msrinoff plays the Belgian 
girl, n faithful nortrnvnl in every de- 
tail. Blanche Frederici ns n Yankee 
type of mother shares honors with 
Messrs. Bennett nnd Ames. To Miss 
Frederic! is allotted the comedy re- 
lief, handled perfectly. .Joseph Dp- 
pew. a boy of eight or nine, mnkes a 
child part natural, and Alma Belwin 
is convincing as the romantic wife of 
{he "sap" brother. 

The production is up to the best 
standard". There are two interior 
sets, both correct in the matter of 
detail. Rom Forrest staged the play. 
•Th- Hero" looks like a real - -"'^. 

Bfll. 



The adopted daughter appeals to 
him, and asks him to be the real XaU 
Poinmeriiiitx that he was before tht 
fortune rttiiic uiid do the right thine 
In this 'j-he in finally succes.sfni jj* 
after a terrific scene played by biB. 
self before u minor i>t the finish of 
the ^econ<l act. P ommer anty. t \l d^\ 
VCf^.IIrt if! • "TTTi 1 7t iru5Tr!riMr"snalve oilf the ^ 
guise of Orange. With the inevitabit 
reKult thnt there is a huppy e,„iij. 
and the girl gets the boy who xvas be* 
first love in the days of the eobble* 
shop. ' 

Mr.* Dillingham has given the piec* 
a splendid production as to ssettinn, 
nnd supplied a cast thJt is a delifbt 
III support of .Mr. Bernard, >rr. Cop« 
gnve a splendid perfoimame, as dS 
nlso Robert Craig us the juvenile lead. 
John Rutherford as the heavy carried 
the role with a subdued tone and fin- 
ish that spelled class. Wallace Br- 
skine us Martin a butler, but really t 
retired secret service man. was aQ 
sufficient, and ti tremendous factor ia 
the list two ads of the piece. Ma- 
rie Carroll as the adopted daughter 
fell rather short in putting her Haei 
over. Those nt the bnck of the house 
had a hard time catching what she 
said, but her performance otherwise 
was perfect. Kate Morgan in n char- 
acter role was also "there." Othen 
in the cast were Alice Endres, Clyde 
Dilson. Willinm Morlin. .Tessie \ugel, 
Hope Sutherland and Chiilos I lender- 



Friday, September 9, 1921 



NEW SHOWS IHIS WELK 




-•j»-^>5^'— ^ i^» 



PALACE 

Ijibor Vny being the final hoHilaj 
Af the summer uenuon, dodc of the 
itroodwav houwH look for unuHual 
kQgisieM at the matloee performancea. 
Almost everyone takes advanUge of 
• tk« opportunity to pwt In the lant 
extra length week-end out of town, 
and therefore it waa aurprising tiiat 
1^ Palace held almost a cnpacity au- 
fM^M for tha Mo nday matinee. It 

the audience appearing to be transir 
enta that were in town for the day. 
Bacanse o' that there was a lot of 
appUuae handed out that would have 
been missing if the regular crowd luid 
been on deck. 

Too big acts on the bill stretched 
out the show until after 5:30, with 
the majority of the crowd sticking 
(0 the final trick thnt the Alexander 
Itrothers and Evelyn, who were as- 
sisted by Joe Cook for laughs, pulled. 
^at interpolation of Cook in the 
turn makes a sure fire 'liold 'em" 
closing: net.. 

Igor's Uallet Russc (Xew Acts) 
opened the show, following the Newd. 
The house >v««> pro<^'tirflny empty for 
the act. but the quintet tnanngpd to 
pull some applause as they worked 
along. 

Dave Roth on second did not seem 
to hold enouph class for the I'oIrcc 
bill. There i? no novelty in an imi- 
tation of Paderewski. which he uses 
to open, or in the Violinsky piano 
player nt the picture show, which i» 
his second bit. nor in the playing 
of a single string cigar box violin. 
That washed him up in the musical 
end. after which he went to stepping 
with Georgia White and Pat Uooney 
imitations not any too good. This 
does not look like big time booking 
for the bii;sest nni best of New 
York's vaudeville houses. 

Harry Carroll ami Co. Oield over) 
was the clas;^ of the bill, and al- 
though the turn consumed 4.1 minutes 
they passed like 20. The applause 
was genuine, and seut the act a\va> 
with the first real honors of the aft- 
ernoon. 

Ben Welch wa.s tendered a recep- 
tion, and he wa.s worthy of it from 
every angle. The manner in which 
he works despite his affliction i.s 
worthy of a monument in .show busi- 
ness. He makes no capital of his in- 
firmities, and. in fact, tries most skill- 
fully to cover them up. but the show- 
manship is there at all times during 
his offering. His w...s the applause 
bit of the afternoon. 

Closing the first half of the hill 
Miss Marriet Remple presented the 
delightful sketch novelty. "The Story 
of a picture." It nleased the holl- 
diir crowd immcnselv. 

The second section of the whew 
contained The Pour Marx Brothers, 
who opened and held the stage for 
30 minutes with an offerinc that is 
miles behind the act whi*»h they oris- 
inally presented here. The boys have 
been ploving this act for some time 
now. and it nhould bo in better shapr 
than ifr is. Tf they con't improve It 
they had better go back to their 
oPTinal ofTerinff, 

.Toe Cook failed to got over 'n the 
next to dosinsr spot. He did not 
seem to be workinT at his best, anil 
may have been d'sconr.Tged at the 
mnnnec in which the forenart of his 
offering went over and ''just laid." 
without tt responsive ripnle from the 
aumenee. Later, however, he A\<\ 
mansge to pet, to the .'»"dienr»e. and 
finallT n'b'»u h** worV'»'l w'^h the dosr- 
fnu trio he was pulling lan'^h e'ter 
laugh from the hoii^o Vrcd. 

RIVERSIDE 

rVespitc the opposition of the Wil- 
son-Downey fight in Jersey, a double 
header at the Polo Grounds, the lure 
of the beaches and the conniving of 
the weather man, the Riverside got 
away to three-quarters capacity turn 
out for the Labor Day matinee. 

A holiday spirit pervaded the 
house which waxed enthusiastic over 
each and every act on the bill. Hits 
followed hits with nearly all ruuning 
to speeches. 

Patricola. opening after intermis- 
Rton, and Jack Donahue closing the 
show divided the comedy honors but 
were just a breath ahead of Fen- 
ton and Fields, who wowed them in 
the fourth spot. 

Julius Lensburg, back at his for- 
mer post, labored valiantly with his 
pit mates but the orchestra can stand 
• lot of rehearsing on the Monday 
showing. The drummer seemed to 
have forgotten that cymbals accom- 
pany the dancers and had to be ver- 
bal y cued by the leader when the 
Kolfe Hevuc appeared. Patricola 
also had to shout, from the fast en- 
trance before she made her initial 
appearance, following which there 
^ns much shifting of music sheets and 
o» entirely different introduction 
played. Patricola hos a couple of 
»>«w numbers that are pips. They 
JN^ere "Rimoney Ray," a clever lyrical 
l!'^* with a play on beverage, and 

I Dulu't Understand," played to her 
J-ioUn nccompMniment. She exhousted 
iier repertoire and was forced to en- 
core vith -Casey's" song reminiscent 
f'f * Hns Anybody Here Hcen Kelly." 

.lack Donahue closed the show and 
"'.'"K "P two distinct hits. The first 
^^»th his rxcellent monologue, the sec" 
^^ With his clover dancing. Donn- 
""P «s pnradoxicul, oK-oIling «t each 



specialty. He held them in like a vise 
and took down one of the afternoon 
ovations. 

Rolfe's Revue sandwiched in be- 
tween the female and male singles 
pleaaed and duplicated the Palace 
Hhowina. The program is now billing 
the pei^le in the cast which iaa 11 
strong with the aarvicca of tha afore- 
mentioned above. Walter Blorriaon, 
a Juvenile f radaatc from burleaqne, 
l:]Unort Uarte, tha soprano and Jean 
Berkeley were the non-muaical mem- 

1RR ^trcifei^.* !"•??? 



or single and double vocal niiaibera, 
two solo dancing apecialtles, a violin 
aolo and a female quartet broken up 
by a mixed i>raBs sextette staged in 
the Rolfe style. It held entertain- 
ment and pleased the customers 
throughout. 

8ylvia Loyal and her plgeona 
opened the snow. It is one of the 
pettiest aight acta in vaudeville. The 
Frenh poodle who retrieves every- 
thing that is dropped during tha turn, 
merits individual mention. 

Bpeucer and Williams were second. 
They are a mixed singing and talk- 
ing duo who have been plaving around 
the intermediate circuits for seasons. 
The man works in a manner remin- 
iscent of Al Herman, shoutina his 
points, repeating gags that don t get 
over and manipulating a cigar 
throughout. The girl opposite bandies 
a solo in clever style. She haa^ an 
unfortunate speaking voice, enunciat- 
ing indistinctly and crabbing several 
gags. His cfforta to overcome it by 
exaggerated imitation of her pipes 
doesn't quite cover up the deficien- 
cies. They went very well at this 
house, considering the spot. 

Frances Pritchard, assisted by two 
of the cleverest male dancera in 
vaudeville, held down the third spot. 
Edward Tierney and Jamea Donnelly 
were the dancers. The turn is the 
same ns last season, framed around 
the dancing "duel" idea, with Tier- 
ney and Donnelly hoofing for the 
ladies' favor. Their travesty on Ruth 
St. Denis is u classic. The encore 
in "one' is an anti-climax. The trio 
should remain back of the apron to 
acknowledge the applause. I^Iiss 
Pritchard is a pleasing; dancer but the 
boTH deserve equal billinir on ability. 

Fcnton Fields, next with loads of 
hokum, found a home hero. The old 
stand-bys were greeted like new- 
born infants by the Riverside crowd 
with gales of laughter sweeping the 
house at the "iutermption" bit and 
the other familiars of the double 
blackface comedian'a routine. For 
vaudeville thia pair hare the right 
formula. 

Bert Errol (New Acts) closed the 
first half. Billed as a single, this 
season, the Enallshman is working 
with his wife and a male pianist. He 
is probably the only female imper- 
sonator before the pOblic who is 
doing a "family" act. They liked the 
new offering at this house. 

Con, 



ALHAMBRA 



They cleaned up a generous slice of 
the universal approt>ation. 

Stan Stanley went strongly fourth 
move<l up from next to closing to 
avoid conflict with the Jean Grunese 
act. closing the show. The latter 
trio subbed for Rome and Gant who 
were off the bill. The Italians 
doubled down from the Royal hence 
the lute spot. Rome ond Gaut were 
spotted fourth. 

Stanley always a favorite at this 
house caught on immediately with his 

at the tfjdttoaed monologist. Tne 
latter is a Hew mUn thia season and 
a big improvement over the former 
incumbenL Betty Maurice ia the 
other member of the trio, handling 
the former role of May Standley. 
The crosnfire after Stanley ascends 
the stage could be brightened up. 
Some of the gaga arc not only aged 
but humorless and slow up the turn 
momentarily. The re.it of act went 
like the wind, hittiug uu all cjlin- 
dera and giving the show a comedy 
punch just in- the right spot 

June and Irene Ilelva opened with' 
an interesting double xylophone frame- 
up. Both of the girls are good 
musicians and have the right reper- 
toire for vaudeville. A comedy touch 
was the playing of an conglomerate 
assortment of liquor bottles filled 
with water. Many a mouth watered 
sympathetically as the- pair hammered- 
out a sweet assortment of melody 
from tlie wraiths. 

Jack Le Vier a mouologing comedy 
acrobat with talk and comedy 
business erected around his ascend- 
ing a trapeeze and the performance 
of a chhir balancing stunt upon the 
bar. Ia Vier has a funny line of 
old anl new chatter and gets con- 
siderable out of his efforts to balance 
the chair. The audience react to the 
near falls psychologically as they do 
to ^he Melrose fall. His finish is a 
drop to a heel catch. He makes a 
good deucer for the big time bills 
and will improve the conversational 
part of his routine with material and 
ex|)erience. 

Frank Burt and Rosedale in a 
hodge iMMlge of kokura, music and 
dancing made the grade following. 
Burt is an experienced comic being 
a former partner of Bob Hawthorne. 
His present turn lacks consistency 
but gets by on the eccentric dnneing 
of Burt and his "nance" Hebrew 
mannerisms. He is nearly dialectless 
but .ido[>ts a comedy hair part that 
is effective. IMore this "soft" 
hunol) he had no trouble but the 
material doesn't give him the scope 
he reeds to capitalize his abilities as 
a come<lian. 

Erford's Oddities Avas sacrificed 
in the closing position, getting on 
the stage alxNit 11:15. The whirl- 
ing apparatus averted the walkout 
for a few revolutions but after the 
first series of gymnastics the house 
left in a body. 

Maurice Diamond aud lle»en Mc- 
I Mahon (New Acts) back in vaudeville 
I from a recent engagement ib "Snap 
Shots" were a eensation, closing the 
first half. Con. 



years, and if that be true maybe that 
account (i for it. 

The Ford Sisters <lance revue closed 
the first section, and made the third 
act of a five-act stanza to use the 
piano once more, iWxa time for the 
jazz band pianist, lire giria have a 
splendiforously costumed offering 
that is fully deserving of this sui>er- 
lative description. The act commands 
attention on its drtessing alone. Their 
iissiatiug company, though subsidiary 
to the dancers, are exceeilingly aupe- 
riorin their own lines of endeavor. 
7i naTuanjUlfig fltly ^ ' T V 'a^*f?»p L '*wi' 
instrument, and Is fully deserving of 
taking tbe final curtaina with the 
sisters. 

Sidney Landfield (New Acts), re- 
opening after intermission, made the 
fifth piano act on the bill, and Anna 
Chandler (New Acts), billed to next- 
to-shut, though in reality closing the 
show, was the sixth pe<Ial turn. 

The Treuucll Trio opened with a 
hybrid acrobatic rout'ne that falls 
below par even for an opening act 
for the Royal. The understander, a 
good looking young chap of leading 
man stage presence, is the sole capa- 
ble performer of the trio. The ec- 
centric comedian ns unfunny and the 
gal topmounter has no business sport- 
ing bare knees. She would make a 
better appearance in tights. The 
combination is pop house in speed. 
John Boyle and Virginia Bennett 
deuced it with their straight dance 
ofTcring. Both are hard and vigor- 
ous workers. The only other act 
unaccounted for on this bill is Bert 
Baker and Co., with their "Prevarica- 
tion" comedy classic, to which may 
be accorded the hit and comedy hon- 
ors. The sketch is a howl from cur- 
tain, and though Baker has played 
this farcelet for more than one sea- 
son, he still inserts that *pep" to his 
lines, as does the balance of the cast 
for thnt matter, as if it was only 
new. The house yelled, nothinjc else. 
Baker seemc<l to be toying with hia 
audience in the style in which he 
stalled until the denouncement, fur he 
knew they were impatiently waitiny; 
for that situation when he'd be caught 
with the goods. Baker also authored 
this piece, and in baseball parlance 
"won his own game" when he as- 
sumed the leading role. 

The Palace Trio, billed to close, did 
not show Tuewlay night. Pathe Newt 
closed. Abtl, 



introductory singing and closing with 
his double -jointed specialty. 
A feature film closed. Ahtl. 



The new season 'opened auspicious- 
ly nt Harlem's oldest big time stand 
with a wow of a crowd and a yow 
of a bill. The house was just a trifle 
short of capacity which was a re- 
markable turn out' considering the 
holiday 'and weather. 

A nine act bill containing all the 
elements tbat^ the vaudeville re(;u!ar 
insists upon in his national amuse- 
ment, played well despite "names". 

The most pretentious turn on the 
program and incidentally the head- 
liner was -Klick Klick" with Florrie 
Millership and Al Gerrard in the lead- 
ing roles which were last season al- 
lotted to Joseph Santley and Ivy 
Sawyer. The ne^v leaders have 
detracted nothing from tlie net's 
strength. The production remains 
the same, also the book and num- 
bers. The turn -seems to have gained 
a bit of speed with the recasting. 
Gerrard while not up to the juvenile 
standards set by Santley either vocal- 
ly or satorially, is a dancer of 
parts and showman of the first water. 
He was given an enthusiastic recep- 
tion by Paisely Noon and a party 
from the front of the house, upon 
his first entrance. Miss Millersnop 
!is as charming as ever radiatinc 
personality and looking chic and 
fetching in her costume changes. 
"Klick Klick" Is a pleasing pretty 
punchless revue that will pass the 
(onsorH. The lighting and color ef- 
fects are a new note for vaudeville. 
It was spotted next to closing. 

The hit of the bill went to an 
added starter in the Jean Granrse act. 
Tiic male singer and pianist arc plant- 
ed in the audience and ut-^rt n 
"wpp" argument that breaks up the 
girls opening song That's all of the 
plot but when the "wop" climbs on 
the stage for a solo and his partner 
begins coaching him from the front, 
the Harlem crowd went wild. Later 
a ballad delivered in a stentorious 
t«'nor with exquisite showmanship and 
knowledge of values tore the place 
down. Tliey did cvervthing but throw 
up their « hairs. The girls should 
refrain from smearing up her eyes 
so heavily and all of the trio K-hould 
be billed. The solo billing may be 
an effort to disguise the nature of 
(he turn but the day when the 
"au'lience" entrance can fool a gang 
oi" vaudeville regulars has passed be- 
yond recall. 

Olher comedy bangs were De 
Hiven and Nice opening after inter- 
mission with their clever and funny 
dance travesties. The "bubble" dance 
i.s a Htire k. o. with the ronjjh cc 
/i'utric '."^ap" doublo a closo second. 



ROYAL 

Ten acts were programed, nine 
showed and six used the piano. Pad- 
erewski's favorite instrument was 
never so much overworked. Jean 
(iraneso in the trey poaitiou, was the 
first to en;iploy the baby grand for 
her vocal calisthenics. Her "brother 
Charlie" is allowed sub billing honors 
(there is a third member to the act) 
and his singing attempts also scored 
on a par with Miss Granese's and 
were really rcspousible for the extra 

recall. 

Th Wilton Sisters immediately fol- 
lowing had the grand brought down 
from "three" into "one," and they. 
too, performed thereon as part of 
their offering. The girls are still 
sporting the sox rigout, although 
they appear to liuve outgrown it. 
However, the wardrobe did not hin- 
der them from walking off with a 
sweet hit. The "blues*' double num- 
bers minus orchestral accompaniment 
scored heaviest for them, although 
the straight fore section was none 
the less pleasing nnri effcctivr. 

To vary matters, Joe Towle. No. T% 
on the program, drp.frg«'d out the un- 
liretentious ui)riKlit and got more re.il 
music out of that box than the others 
did on the aristocratic iiistrummt. 
Towle wisely has eliminated the com- 
monplace punning, billing as "a clean 
net." and thfe program nicrcly pre- 
sents him "in his own peculiar en- 
tertainment." And "pQCulinr" is f^r- 
word. Ii'b v»tv o<]xlity :;;:.'! rr.rcloj-j 
abandon are all the more efTiTtivo. 
flippantly nonchalant, as if applause 
and arclamation ar»» tlio la.st thing he 
desires, it is literally thrust on hinj 
by the enthusiastic uudionce. That's 
siiouraanship for you, and if other 
artists would gauge their attempts at 
nppl«use-coi)ping simil.irly and ana- 
lyze this study in mob psvrliology 
inaybe the hand to hand music wotild 
not be so elusive after all. Towle's 
stylo of working is very "intimate" 

nnd chummy, and he swings every ^ . ,, .^.,^„^. 

h^^art with him Hccordin-ly. One su^- ' versrat.onal hnM.ness 
gcstion to Towle would bo to edit his 
(hatter about the locil hoard nnd 
w.ir stulT. It is a past issue, and 
he-^ides the talk as to how he re- 
ceived a card mnrked "CJreetings" 
and tl>e f'la.^sifjcation A-1 thereon, 
with the ensuing <lescript.ion of the 
fthy.-tical examination, is familiar and 
hn8 f»receded him locally by (juitf a 
fow months. Towlo ad lihbod ho 
hasn't plsyed the Uoynl for threo 



JEFFERSON 

Judging from I^abor Day matinee'a 
attendance at this house ther6 is no 
doubt something new must again be 
resorted to in order to boost the bos 
office percentage. Maybe the '^State 
Lake*' policy, which goes into effect 
next Monday, will prove aa beneficial 
for this house as at the Broadway. 
As it was, this week, the gaping 
areas of vacant seats waa disheart- 
ening. 

East and West (new) opened, fol- 
lowed by Combe and Nevins, a 
two-man piano act that got consid- 
erable out of its repertoire of pub- 
lished numbers. Some of them are 
quite up to date and one somewhat 
antiquated, but all were spankiogly 
sold for good value. "Moonlight" 
(new) topTined. Pearson, Newport 
aud Pearson showed a lively collec- 
tion of acrobatic steps to interesting 
attention. The trio have improved 
considerable since last seen, the 
change from straight to eccentric get- 
up enhancing the stepping soloes 
muchly. The woman presides at the 
grand soloing with a "Choo Choo 
JUues" number nnd accompanying 
very ably otherwise. 

Mack and Lane, man and woman, 
crossfired in "one" for fifteen miuutes 
to good purpose although the burden 
of the team's labors rested with the 
man who was chiefly responsible for 
the act's scoring. The resultant 
stopping of the show may be as- 
cribed solely to his efforts. Mist 
Lane Joes little else than wear tf few 
expensive wardrobe changes. Her 
solo effort on the vocalizing end re- 
ceiving charitable attention rather 
than on its merits. The shivery 
tremble in her voice does not belong 
on the professional stage and as a 
singer she is a far better gag 
"feeder." 

The r.ernivici Brothers and Co. 
showed their musical skit in front of 
the special Venetian sotting to strict 
attention. The "Co." has changed 
his ballad number which appears to 
ho a change for the better judgin;; 
from the returns while the Bernivicis 
as before .<oll their tlioir violin stuff 
interestingly. 

Ilibbitt and Mnllo, two boys with a 
Southern drawl, wore a howl from en 
trance to exit with tlioir ( rosstalk 
anent their "womon," the comedian 
tl.ishing an irresistahly non.^.cnsical 
(loiitifrice smile at just the right mo- 
nioiits whi-n the g.-igging let down. The 
ijoys hnvo drc^sod up the .net for 
cor.trnst inri)f)sos since last seen, the 
roMiorlian caressing a stogie during 
the course f>f his session for the con- 



FRANKUN 

'Die initial bUI the first half at tha 
neW B. a Moss Franklin at ifilat 
street and Prospect avenue (Bronx) 
consisted of six acta, a feature pic- 
ture, and tha Pathe and 'Tbplca" 
short reels. 

Tha vaudeville program conitioad 

|M>p iiuU interine<liate housei wtih 
Dave Harris and Band the bcadliaer. 
Harris ia an ex-single who probably 
took a peek at Henry Santrey's rec- 
ord and decided upon hia present w> 
hide. He has surrounded hiuself 
with seven good jaaists acd leads 
them vocally and musically. The com- 
tdy heading wtli the baaay viol !t in.iy 
be original with Harris but the Whitij 
Kuhna have been doing it in vaude- 
ville and cabaret for a decade. Har- 
ris has framed an offering that will 
"flash" for the split week house.j. 
Harris cloacd the vaudeville portion. 
The hit of the bill was pulled down 
by WcUa, Virginia and West in sec- 
ond. The boy In the turn ia the best 
all around hoofer veen since Fred 
Stone first flashed across the terpsi- 
chorean horizon. He is a wix at 
buck, eccentric, achobatic and Rua^ 
-Mffll stepping, tyiug up the act eacn 
time he cut loose and also showing a 
comedy flare in handling dialog. The. 
turn consists of * hoke" and rcleused 
gags that will hold it down despite the 
youngater'a talenta. The trio are 
great prospects for some author pro- 
ducer. 

The Iloyal Gaacoynes opened. Gas- 
Coyne's juggling and ad tibbing caught 
on strongly and gave the show a 
punch that helped every act following. 
The De Wolff Girls, thiH with their 
last season's rcvne, also caught on 
with their dancing and production. 
Tliey are "personality" misses and 
clever dances with a neatly con- 
structed singing and dancing specialty 
that was built for the boat of the 
housea. The turn will go anywhere. 
Uandia and Miller and more danc- 
ing fourth. The male team b«*ked 
them with their "nutting** and hat 
juggling. The bandllng o! the lida is 
rcmlsiscent of Chris Richards. 8top 
time dancing and crossfire hokum 
complete the turn which la a good 
comedy bet They were well Uked 
here. 

Jimmy Lucas and Francene were 
fifth. Lucas bailt up hia oflarlng 
from an ordinary a tart into a ipOiefc 
puller. All of hia fanfllar chnmlaff 
cot roars but ha klHad than w1i#b 
he and Francene PQlled a traveralty 
melodrama in ^'Tlddiah." 

Harria cloaed a «>o4 ▼aaderflla 
show to be followed altar a ahort Is- 
termlflsion by the f^atura ptctara. 

Tha attendance Tueaday night waa 
heavy, about thrae-qaartera of tha 
lower floor being rapadty with tha 
balcony nnd boxaa In proportion. Tha 
capacity is 3,000. C&n 



GREELEY SQ. 

The first half Ml at thia rx)ew's 
Sixth avehue house quite outdid any 
of the programs displayed here within 
the past alx montha. While confined 
to six acta there waa sufficient enter- 
tainment to be well worth the ad- 
mission. Warden and La Coste opened 
the show. The turn by its general 
makeup was not framed for an open- 
ing spot but did exceedingly well. 
Warden with his baseball dance bit 
handles one of the best assets with 
the couple topping their work off in 
good style with a fast double dance. 

Al Carpe. No. 2. with his fiddling 
had little trouble placing the stand- 
ard numbers as well as the rafa 
across the footlidif^ Carpe works 
with apparent case making straight 
paying stand up without any frills. 
Ills musicai ability is pronounced and 
gained recognition. 

Challis and liambert. No. 8. were 
credited with the fir/it big applause 
hit. The young woman is a second 
Irene Franklin. With the closing of 
one's eyes it would seem Miss Frank- 
lin was singing. This is especially 
true of the kid number. This coup'e 
had no trouble selling their wares and 
landed safely. Herbert Denton and 
To. in a familiar comedy sketch had 
little difficulty in garnering the laughs. 
The Denton vchic'e has seen much 
service but held up nicely in the No. 
4 spot at the Greeley. 

Moris and Shaw took the real com- 
edy honors next to closing. This two- 
m.in team is a sure fire bet for any 
of the Loew houses. The boya have 
a vehicle bristling with humor thot I4 
handled in tip top shape. 

The ('asting I/loyds, a clever bi'l 
closer, topped off the evening. 

FIFTH AVE. 

For the first show of I-ahor Day 
week the Fifth Avenue held a fair 
(juota Monday afternoon. The 
greater portion of the patronage filed 
ill well aftor the sliow had started, 
the botlor j-art of the house haidluj; 
over for tijo supper sliow. DnIIaii 
Walk or. with a diversified olTorinsf, 
oponcd the show. Miss Walker dis- 
[days consi<lorahlo jd)ility as a rot»e 
Itundlor. the loturUi) not coming up 
to expcctnlions considering die ef- 
fort ivenoss of this girl's work. A 
lator spot would ei«sily have placed 
thrcMiRhoMt ou ndlcrs. inaUiu',' t liro.> ' I lii"< spcio In the hit column. Dart 
rli.'iiiRfH. til" man mixing ii uj» with (t'ontiuurd on Tage 'JC> 



James and Hessi*' Aitken olosed tlio 
show and exhibited a hybrid sUntins- 
dnnr-ing - singing. - cruiLorf i(niistic act 
tliut otherwise might he d«*sorihod as 
moroly a closing turn. TliayUs to a 
j»orgeous peacock r(Mun sol t inn, i^i- 
tonded to doiiict a (al>arot Iftcile, tho 
offoring is wo:(liy of l/iiliiig as a 
"nasli." The wfunati [x-rforms 



22 



VARIETY 



F riday, SepFemter 9, 1021 ^ 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (Sept. 12) 

IN VAUDEVlM.Ii TllKATUi:« 
(All hou»e« oprn for the wft-k with M«)n«lay n.at nrw. wljon not othorv»liKi 

•nV bllln below are BrdUprd In dlvmlonn, according lo tlic booking ofTlcca they 

•riu' .Mi.nntT In whl<)> xh^ff bills are T>rlnt«'.l dors Mot di nolo tbe relative 
Inirmiamf of ai li nor tluir ^riKrain p.-B'.tW.na. r«„.,„^„rlnff after 

•lefuro nai.M. liMli».t.H n<.t ih now .loinc n^-w turn, or •"enppraring after 
abaon..- tunu vaudrviiU-. or app-ariug n city where listed for Ibe flri«t time. 



KEITH'S CIRCUIT 



K^illi'M I'lihifc 

Fcltl S :St< I .>< Oo 

V Ai F; Staiil.. I ('«, 
(');;(M \". ltli< VH ('(I 
))ui'I.i.< l'>>!l;iid 
AV * .1 MHn.l. 1 
J (>»• I ».i t i y 
*At>ral.aiit I.!i)C(>1ji 
(T\s.i to fil'.j 
. Kei(ir»< KlverMdc 
(it*. !l.".jr!i» ! t*.- Shea:: 
IJutl Sr> <U r Cj 

" 1 lU 1 ; 1 M K ' 

T ; ... % I „ \«' . '. • I ^ ■■*<f 

llii)'. If t'l.fll. \- (' 

Ko. ■! S ■■" li. M .V I' 

• He ; I '. \V.iKl:!nit< ^ 



^'i . "j^^ < *' t '^1^' ni'll 
( >ak« H A l>< lui 
Mary Kurty & 

I'art Tit r 

KH.IiV II O II 

::(i i;aif (>* n< 

Roy l-Hl'rarl To 
1-'4HK * Vrrntn 
SldiMy lMi:ll;is 
Kay Nrll:in 
Waril Ar ],< oiiar<l 
M 't III < N lu ;\!: > 

Ut half il^ 14) 
"TaiU'D S'::i rs ■ 

• ^i»ik»i- V )i V I'l i>\ y 

(1 It ii' IS !•- !i ;i > 

rror(or% li.'itli >^t 
I'd half (K 11) 

• <; Cii ( (TIC t\) 

T.iiM K. :.^ 

SI.;. I ;.' \ !:■ t»: .^- AV 



I liK'U — 



— uosi: 



YORK ancJ KING 

>.-. i.t 'Tin: OM> FAMILY TINTYrK" 
Til .. U>ck (Srpt. ft) Mo:»re*»*. Sonttle 
ItTMuml Direction l-KK KTKUAKT 



K< ;• ':•' A: W'hlt m y 
\\'li.;i'l.' \- ll'ivtcr, 

till,..!*' A Wil- 

liains 
("la :a il.vv.trd 
F 1 rll<hHr<t Co 
Holanl Tv.tvHrg Co 
<M-v I •> ,M> r.irlano 
b'ylv.a l.oy.il » 'u 
((iiu- t< fill" 
Keitli'N A'liiuiibra 
DoiHon 

licit rit/.cibbi'n.H 
r Sr V I .viier 
Wilt'.ti Six 
R«-l;iia liii.. I/. 
•:< Little I'iMH 
EvI t II < ';.isp< r Co 

N'tit'.ian Hn 8 
(('III til fiil> 

Momh' Itroad^vtiy 

I Ar .1 Kaufman 
l)(ir, .\ait Ac I.if 
J« .III < Ji arn s«' Co 
Mid<ll<li.n & Sprll 

1 1 11- > • r 
•AM hi'iiy 
(t't'iMrs to fill) 

Moss' TolUrum 
Y\«Mo Rup»>l 
•Hob .NVls*!.:! 
Ala. art A: Hrudfor.: 
4 .la.iss .1 (ju«M I. 

J A.- K Mit< 1.. 11 
(C)iu to U\'. I 
21 half 
Kdtlr Huzz'll Co 
J van HankiifT Co 
1>b1c Ar Pun)) 
(Othrrw to nil) 
Keltira Fonlham 
Mllhr A Mack 
Ivan I'.'inViiff Co 
Tarzaii 

A mold A Lambert 
.tiMk HanUy 

(due to nin 

2d half 

II T.M.hf TK «o 
Yv(tfr Kutrl 
Ma-;. It A* Bradford 
.1 f. F: Mlti-h«-ll 
(Tw. to fill > 

Moss' FrnnkHn 
4 M..'* Hri.M Co 
A nu* r »Vj I'acK' r 
l«av. H«Mh 
I't'ft'')' Clifford 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
4 M.Tni Brnn 
V..l)»vUt Kelly A 

Q 

11« ward X. Padlor 



•■'Ft ur lMu.«-lw s" 
Mi:r..y V •« '.it 
(One t . till) 

Isl l-.alf (lJ-14 
Jimmy l.uias (\) 
Una tlayt^in I'o 

I'roctor'N r>Mth St 
Nrd Norv.i.rtli 
Van t'lcvc At I'cto 
Kay Nei'.tii 
lliaic !>r.>-!.(ii> Co 
Jo!>«-ic til ',>.sf;le 
Venetian L 
Han lev i*i t'affery 

2<1 half 
SM.ldH .^- Kar.r 
Murray «;irlB 
Herboi t Lh.yd Co 
Ch cf Hl'.u- «'!. ud 
The Cron.wcl^?^ 
Clark At Vcrdl 
I'roctor'n fttli .Axe 

2<1 half (8-11) 
Hobby ( )\el| Co 
lU nc- H<.b<rt Co 
Frank .lolitipon 
Clinton A: Capp» lie 
X L < > Trio 
Cffpdt ), Af 1 >a\ !«» 
((tthtTH to flll) 

iHt half (KM) 
.T t.' M.'i'k Co 
Murray ("• rN 
Ferran & Drnis 
(OtlH i.-< to fill t 
I'roctor'K 2M\ St 
2d half (J m 
Nc«l Nori\f»r*)i C«. 
•"iSehlnd Sc» ncp" 
Flo Lev.-1J> 
Jfarry Trau\ Co 
Cioorpe AVilpf n 
i: nounc«-i«« I'ir- u* 

iPt half (12-14) 
Let>n Stant( n Co 
Hut>> Af Cifdd 
Perk A: Sa.vn 
Vnu\ A Paulitie 
(<»t):erH to fi'd) 

i:d half (15-18 
•"S:^.^■ r by Trixy" 
"Tar.jjo Sh< "y" 
F.\R U<»C|\ AW AY. 
1. I 
rc.liinih'a 
Wni * Ci I»i oh f Co 
J,,e Toxvle 
ArtlKth- Trfat 
F>pc f' Tiut'on 
M:<i ricnp lIURhcP 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Franklin Ardcll Co 
.lark I-ivnre 



I> Humphrey Co 
Cnit< H I'ro** 
John>on hit k» r A .1 
« I ' .•■- io i.'i', I 

Kcitli'H (•rrciipoint 

:;d half (>-ll) 
F A: T Ha bin: Co 
Hr< wnlee (o 
(iold ^, h\\\.,y<\n 
l.ob I'eli.s 

(Tv.-.-, ;.. •.i'l) 

1 •' ! ! I ■ • "^ ' I .' - H ) 
It lotji' < : ^ I'l . u^ 
It.:, I ' ■ ' ."" m. II 

\i ■ i !■ • • y^ i 1 • f : i I ( 

i'\ !!.,;f 1 1.' Ill) 

.1 . 1.1 :.. ;, I .Kc .1 P Co 
I.ei • I S ' ii 1.1,1 Ci I 
'I '! :.. IS : o till) 
A I, It ANY 
I'rortor'a 
(Troy pplit ) 

]9t half 
I>a\ I .V I.'i. an 
I<:ii : < n ^ Lui t 
Alex; ndria 
Ja<'k Traiiior Co 
4 Fnterl .!i.< rs 
I'rrez Ar .%'ai pu<"ri:e 
ALLKNTOWN, TA 

Orplieiim 
Ppymoijr's Family 
}<.>n S nlth 
C. luml'.a .•;• Victor 
IIii:!.l toi. \- nial:e 
C lIoH' V Lov."* 

2d half 
N'cveltv Clint.^ns 
jr.irt AV.jjrn. r A E 
Lover.beri; Sis A N 
I'riruro.Kr :i 
Hi er ii Family 
ALTOONA, PA 
Urplicuin 
T.,canfirc Kern 
UoKCT Orey Co 
Elnlf & Paul.>4on 
(Two to nil) 
2d h.ilf 
C.ihsun A Frlce 
Ch is Tobln 
1> A .1 Archer 
(.Two t«> till) 
ATLANTA 
I.yric 
( HlrmlnKhj!.ii\ 

Kplit) 
l5t half 



JOHN J. KEMP 
Theatrical Insurance 

»B .10IIN KTRKET, NEW VOHK <IT¥ 

I'hone Howllnr (Jreen 3100 



\Vyl e A llartman 
J a el'. Ha:iWy 
(One to flll) 
Keiili's Iluinilton 

Harry WatKon Co 
TS»rr'avcn A Nirr 
Plan St.mhy Co 
Solly AVard Co 
Owen MiCJivncy 
Melva Sin 
Lowiv ^- P: ince 

)l'l< to 

KrIili'N .lefTrrMtn 

.lay VHli*- < "o 
Blily Clanon 
Ftfer HroP A GlrMe 
V Herr»Te Co 
Chief Hlue Cloud 
(Others to ri!> 

2d half 
Pa'e It( th 



Huth j;oye 

R( yal Craf'OKnes 

(Two to f 1!) 

HROOKLYN 
Kri;li'«< ltir^v>kk 
p. n Welc'i 
Hert Krvoi 
H.lly Kei.' Co 
Rome A C.M'-.f 
Hay Hay ;if 'i 1 
.tune !•,<•< • "o 
Clauda Ci>i.;>ian 
The .loanro" 
KeWirK Orpheuin 
Richard Kcan Co 
Ff^ntcn A Fielda 
Roll' A Royce 
Holfe B Rev 
Ppcnrer A AVil 

llai.iP 
H^^rt Hak»r Co 



ChiroDractic for Health 

I»K. FDITli \%\ KKIIARI»S 
C'hlropnietor 

Clrrlc Studc HhlR- Suite :< ; 6 

r. ColuTohuH Ciiflc at r.^th St. 

IMume Col 12h: 



Xtupiilil llljiiters 

<;re»it Lfi'P 
Btanley A Caff^iv 
<ot'>i-rH to fill) 
^Io«m' Kerent 
H Timherp Co 
Royal C.a>".<i:Mep 
•r> Klrlit;.ond <'o 
((niirrn to fill) 

2d half 
Brtfv Hond 
Mrn C.ene MuFhen 
Ani;»r A I'.tencr 
•Fifer Hion A Olrl 
(Two to t iM 
KcifliH Sift Street 
Adl«T A (tunliar 
•"The <'iil\ Ciil" 
Handei- A \:tri« 



lifford 
f 11) 

niitiMivh 

p ; 1 1 ■ •• Ct 
iii;i .' 



Sherwiri K« lly 
(One to t'lil I 
Keilira lloro I'ltrk 

K Hii;'.:'.eli Co 
Wvl.e A llartman 
l!<.w,ird A Sadh, 
.'a'- 1; L<<..iie 
Musi hi 1 tlillt* rp 
<« >lie lo fill I 

2d l,;.:f 
Hurt A Ft<sod:il» 
Arnold A I.air.berl 
I^illy Cla^on 
Kapp A Ivitton 
HepKir < 
(f>nc to 
Monk' 
St. I lie F 
Sid'i' \ I 



Loolty A Sales 
Hli.K"is M «lKet» 
<'IJ-:VKLAM) 

liij;podroiiif 
Toney A CieorK* 

Co 
^::i'v A .lanea 
"Lovr Kai it" 
Mop. Hdt II 
Sylvi.i Clai'te 
H< Viilds .•< 

I oii'Mitrs 

i: K Ueitli'H 

S ah. 

t: , . » o .'; Myi i 
I'ii « r .V I'oinrl.t.i 
Ml!! « . i,t .Mov.ir 

i^ .1 i ^ ■« .1 I I O %f i ( M 

Whitth :<1 A Iro 

land 
Eddie Ro;!i 

I)KTI:'»IT 
Temple 
Scotch LaUH A 

LaP5i 
"Wonurr Girl" 
Olcoti A Ann 
Harbaii /i C.roh.^ 
Edwin CiiTKO 
Va'i A Eiiu rnon 
Lu-^iM ■ A Co«-Kt y 
KASTON. I'A 
Opera lloiiwe 
Ni ve!' • i.iiton t 
Hart \V..t;iirr .»:• K 
L(verii.,'r< Si3 A N 
Frlmrot^c '^ 
Preen Fariily 

2d half 
S'^ym«nir Fam ly 
Hen Smith 
Columbia A Vic'oi 
Hampton A Hlake 
7 Honoy Hoys 

ERIE 

roloninl 

Pftllaf Walker 
GAP Valentine 

Tenr»>ppec Ten 
Tra<fy A McHrido 
M«>4>re A Jane 
Jennlrr Prr.!^ 

GRAND RAriDN 
Kmprefta 

P.cddinpton A 
Grant 
Ri:s«ell A Devltt 



Jt F Keith 'a 

Mr A Mrii C Mar- 
tin 
Bpoor A Pardona 
Claude A Marlon 
McHae A TleKt 
Larry Ilarkliia Co 
Marahall A Wil- 

llaiiin 
J J Mot ton 

MOBILE 
I^yrlc 
(New Orliunn 

split) 

Ut half 
A A 1. Pari' w 
•I'ieri <.<v.v...a •-**" 

p. < itie Suxon A 

Fla 

Elm CItv 4 

Tc.iiervilh Tootcin 

MONTREAL 

PriiMT-.H 

f^'.uii.l.c. : >".,-i !:;:,') 

Pli.ck A AVhlta 
McParland A lal 

Jice 
?"i;;nK \V:!roK Co 
Fred Ellmtt 
"Step Llv"!y" 
Fold A Rue 
Joe T.nuri'' < 'o 
NORFOLK 
Aeailemy 



lat half 

Qreen A Lafell 

E F Hawley Co 

FroKknl 

Pell A Eva 

(One to nil) 
|>OHTL.ANl> 
B r Krltli'a 

Cooper A Lane 

McCoy A Walton 

Delyona 

Allen A Cantor 

Rajah 

Foley A l.aTure 

rRovinKXCB 

R r Albe« 

•r»<«» Kte -lln^w 

Huth Hudd 
PreaaT A Kla** 
"huwiiiK Woman" 
llealy A Crosa 
Edith Talliafero Co 
Tonev A Norman 
QIEIIEC. CAN 
Andilorlum 
Jimmy Gallon 
Mclroy Sia 
Saianoff A Ponla 
Cai.My A Rose 
Paul iicvan A Mil- 
ler 
KK'imOM) 
Lyrie 

(Norfolk Bplit> 



WANTED 

YOUNG MAN fully ecqualnted with 
vaudeville performers to enter an agent's 
office In the capacity of acout One who 
has been a performer picforrcd. Good 
opportunity for live man. Writ* or wire 
fall particulars. 
Addrci^q Hex i:.2. V.iriety, N-'.v York. 



Let Us Represent 

You For 

Broadivay 

Productions 

and 

Shubert Vaudeville 

1401 Rrondwnj. Tel. Brynr.t R4 1-843 



1 



Robert .V Kobe! I 

l>or.i Hilt«>n 

Wa\ nc Murx'.;all A 

C 
Murray Hf nne'.t 
Melody Gard- M 
IIALTIMORR 
MHr.> la ml 
Mllrr A Capman 
Mem ail A S)ilrlty 
Harthy A Patter 

Hon 
Mra Wfllington 

Co 
F'rank Ward 
Hsll. t ? 
Rac Saiiiu*'!* 
Johi.ny P.ui he 
Harlx'tt A I>eli.iat 

Itf V 

UIKMINtillAM 

l.vrle 

(Atlanta split) 

Inl halt 
Norvellea 

C.irroll A GoMii.ir 
( (ld» A EimH 
Hob Mlllken 
WerTK I" A inoros 3 
BOSTON 
U F Keith '» 
I»are Hro« 
Stepiiena A HoT.i^ 

ter 

Nrlla Webb 

Pill Robln«i<«n 

Harry Carroll Co 

Joe Hollf-y <'o 

Reynolds A r>onc- 
Ban 

Bl FFALO 
Slieu 

Josie « >Me. rs 

prince A <;off 

lltnry H Roomer 
Co 

Jack McGowan 

Fishr-r A (Jihnore 

Ml'.lership & Ger- 
ard 
H« van A Flint 

KItaros 3 

CIIFSTLR. r.V 
l-:4l(:einrnt 

.V A M Ropers 

,\;>k'nonette Kokin 

Marie Grnsp« r 

Lew Ross Co 

(One 1.. fill) 
2d half 

Lorimer A Hudson 

\' iletit ine Vox 

P.iie .'. 

"rii.eton A W:it- 
son 

Ja' K Levy Co 
flNt INNATI 
It F Keitirs 

\'alila C.i 

Swot A 

Lanr A 

\'ii u^-hii 
Co 



\\ • Mtbro<'k 
Harper 

( 'omfoi't 



Hurry Hulmun Co 
JennmgM & How- 

land 
Muslcl.ind 
Frank (Jaby 
Cam lla'H Pirds 
HAMILT«»\. CAN 

L.vr,e 
W A H Hr.wn 
P'gKv Carhart 
Lloyd A Kubin 
Franklin Cas C.i 
L«iiiair Haytn Co 
Thoa Hcier Co 
Leipric 

IIAKRIHBl RC; 
Mujewtic 
Glb.s.)i» Ar Pi ce 
Chas Tobin 
L A J Archer 
(Two to fill) 
2d half 
L^anore Kern 
Hoifer Grey Co 
Elsie A Paulson 
(Two to fill) 
HAZKLTON, PA 
Fceley'a 
J A G Gllfoyle 
Frazr r A Runce 
H A J Grey 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Fleld'iiK A Hoomrr 
Rli.ton A HoyU' 
(Two to mil 
INOI.INArOLIH 
B F Kritli'H 
Arthur Purat 
Furman A Naah 
Ames A- Winthrop 
Alan Iior< r*« 
Jack Hfoay 
^!eehnn's Ai.im.ils 

JACKKONYILLE 

Area4le 

(Savannah split) 

Ipt hair 
Juirglin.;; LcLiKlc 
4 U row 11 (LilH 
Vic Plant Co 
Lloyd Nevada Co 
Billy Shone 

JOilNSTOlVN 

Mttje*.tiu 

(Plttshurgh splU) 

1st half 
JAP Page 
Wm Morrow Co 
Jean Melcalf Co 
Dalton A CralK 
l^NC'AHTKK. PA 

C'oIoh'hJ 
Kafka A Stanley 
Johnson A Hardy 
"TiOOk- 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Carpns Pros 
A A N Dumont 
LKtIe JIni 
(One to fiin 



(R.^'hiiu.nd split) 

ls( half 
Polly A oz 
Max Bloom Co 
Wflia Viitinia A 

W 
Bison City 4 
(One to nil) 

2d half (8-11> 
Muoic A FleldH 
Macnrty A Brad- 
ford 
Burke A 
Donrvun 
' Shadowland ' 
(OthiTs to nil) 
NEWARK, N J 
Ist half (12-14) 
Alex Bros 
Joe Cook 
"A Press 

sal" 
Sharkey Roth 

W 
(Cthers to fill) 

2d half (IL-IS) 
J C Mack Co 
Pobby O Nell Ct. 
(Others to hll) 
NEW ORLE.ANS 

I.yrle 
(Mobile split) 
lat half 
Elaine Si;< A Hurd 
Jean Mlddh ton 
Pearls Gypsy Rev 
Mullen A Francs 
"Current rf Fun" 
PATTERSON 
MaJe»it!C 
Chas Keating 
Lynn «:o 
HolKWorth 



Durkln 
A Lee 



A Eve 

Rehcar- 
A 



Hasil 

Saxie 
Co 
(Two 



to flll) 

2d half 

P.yan Ritchnrld 

Ned Norwoith Ct 

(Two to fill) 

rill!.AI)ELPHJA 

B F Ke.tli'n 

3 l.ordins 
Clinton A Rooni-y 
Piof.teeruip 

TTora e Goldin 
Wellington Cross 
Corrad.ni's Ani- 
mal*^ 

4 Fo'-.!" 



Ut half 
Golde A Ward 
Jewell A Raymond 
Heney Lewis A O 
MoTKiin A Binder 
Belnionts 
KOANOKK. VA 
Koiinok« 
Musical Geralds 
Howard A Nor- 
wood 
Harry Holman 
Denno Sis Thibault 

A C 
Devoe A Statzer 

2d half 
Overholt A Younn 
Cecil Gray 
Frank Stafford Co 
Wilson Pros 
A A F: Fra belle 
ROrllRSTEK 
Templr 
Vernon Stiles 
Taylor Howard A 

T 
IjH Heinicia 
Silbrr A T-'orth 
Paul I)ecl<»r 
H A (J Ellsworth 
Roy A Arthur 
Doris Pum an Co 
READINti 
Ilippotlrume 
Donald Sis 
Pabcock A Dolly 
Stnnton Co 
Ed Morton 
Creole C:ockla:i 

2d hair 
Clown Seal 
Margaret Paduln 
"Dress Rehearsal" 
King A Irwin 
Amaranth Sis 
BAY ANN All 
Bijou 
(JacUronville split) 

Ivt half 
Redford A Wiii- 

« liest» I 
Merritt A Hrldwrll 
Haves Lyn<h Co 
Alexand*»r A Fields 
Wyo'iine :i 
SCII'''NK'f'TAI)Y 
Proetor'a 
FolhtteM Monkeys 
Poyle A H<n;iett 



F. llE^niKNBINGER. In*- 



.iFWFiRY DIAMONPSKt^'"''^'^'^'' 



PLATINIM _ 

Tel 971 .lohn 4.". .lOIlN KT. 



...:SfOI>ELINr. 
New York City 



Emily Darrell 
Helen MorettI 

Girnril 
Carpop Hr )S 
Lew HawUinw 
LUtle Jill 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Kafka A Stanley 
Pardo A Ar«liei 
Chus Ktatln-: Co 
Johns >n A Haidy 
(One to till) 

Keyslona 
Gerard H Monkey* 
Rappi 

Duffy A Keller 
Frank S.ibin Co 
7 Military Girls 

Wm Penn 
L.-rlmer A Hudson 

P K 3 
V.-Ocntlne Vox 



Co 



Co 



Mab4l I'urke 
D D H t 

"FllrtHt on" 

;;d half 
Fil Cleve 
Harry Jidson 
Frank lyn ArtlcU 

(Tw«. lo fill) 
SHENANDOAH, 

PA 

Htriin«1 

Fielding A Hoomer 
Pinto A Moyle 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
JAG Gllfoyle 
Fraaer A Bunce 
PAP C.rey 
(One to nil) 
HYRACl SE 
B F Keith'H 
Teresa A Wiley 
Harry Lester Ma- 



Melissa __ i<»« 

TEN EYCK and WEILY 

with "Ip In The CloodV Co 
Now GArrIek Thentre. I'h earo 



Pr.nceton A Wat- 
son 

Jack Levy Co 
"lid half 

W A M Rogers 

Marie Gasper 

Frank Dobson Co 

(Two to nil) 
PITTSBURG II 
Davla 



Maxine 

Pob 
Pernard 
Clayton 
Newhoff 



Pros A 



A Garry 
White Co 
A Phelps 
Lee Kids 
Olson A Johnson 
Walter C Kelly 
EIRey fls 
KhrridHn Hqnor* 
(Johnstown split) 



son 
McLellan A Carsou 
II A A Seymour 
Henry Hantry Cu 

Proctor's 
Ed Hill 
Jerome A Albright 
Harry Jolson 
Follettes Monkeys 
20th Century Rev 
H)nf> to nil) 

2d half 
Follettes Alonkeys 
Corrlnne Arbucklc 
20th Century Rev 
(Two to nil) 
TOLEDO 
B F Kelth'N 
Ren Peycr 
Walsh A Edwards 
Bully A Houghton 



IF YOU WANT VAUDEVILLE, MUSICAL COMEDY OR DRAMA 



»V,K 



JUK &, 





a, nc^ ti 



Milton Pollock Co 

Frisco 

Glenn A Jenk.na 

Unuusual 2 

TORONTO 
lllppadrome 
Alice Do Garmo 
Jerome A Prancia 
Wllaon A Wllaou 
Fred Llndaay 
<Othera to nil) 

Shea's 
Blly 

Ernie A Ernie 
Will Mahoney 
Dillon A Parker 
Francis Kennedy 

»CTV»TVji ..<.« 

Lady Alice Peta 
TROY. N ¥ 
Proctor'a 

(Albany split) 

Ist half 
Roode A Franc'* 
Mildred Parker 
Dt-nny A Parry 
Purt Walton 
Pogtocks School 
(One to nil) 
ITIfA. N Y 
(•alety 
The Fayn**H 
Pollard Sis 
Harry Hayden Co 
El Cleve 
In Argentina 
(On to till) 

2.1 half 
Boyle A Bennett 
Flirtation 
D D II T 
(Two to nil) 
WASinNGTON 
B F Kelth'a 
Herberts Doga 
Miller Sistera 



Wm Brack Co 
Lloyd A Chrlatle 
Josephine Victor 

Co 
Jfd Dnoley Co 
Chic Sale 
"Shadowland" 
YONKEBB. N Y 
Frvctor'a 
Buckrldf e ^ Caaey 

Co 
Clark A Verdi 
flhlelda A Kane 
Alfred Forrell 
(Two to nil) 
Sd half 
Baail Lynn Co 

Vanetlan ft 
Kay Nellan 
(Two to flll) 

YORK. PA 
OperH Houae 

Clown Seal 
Margaret Padula 
•'Dresi liehearBul" 
King A Xrwin 
Amaranth Sis 

2d half 
Donald Sis 
Pabcock A Dolly 
Stanton Co 
Ed Morton 
Creole Cocktail 
YOl'NGSTOWN 

Hippodrome 

Raymond Wllbert 

Co 
B A E Gorman 
Seed A Austin 
JAB Morgan 
Parlor Bcdrooiu A 

Davis A Darnell 
Wilson Aubrey S 



JOE BHCHAELS 

BOOKING BAST AND WE.ST 
QUICK ACTION— RRMABLK NKKVICR 

Wire. Write or Call SUITE 40'» 
LOKW ANNKX RLIMi.. 1«0 Wrat 46 
NEW YORK CITY 



St, 



LBWISTON 

Mwl« Hall 

Shapiro A Jordan 
Reed A Tucker 
Chaa L Fletcher 
La Dora A Deck- 

man 
(One to flll) 



POLI'S CIRCUIT 



BRID<iKPORT 

Poli'a 

Perclval Oirla 
FAM Dale 
"Marrlape ve D9- 

vorce" 
Heath A Sperling 
Evelyn Phllllpa Co 

2d half 
Tuck & Claire 
Maaon A Cole Co 
Bigelow A Clinton 
D Schooler Co 
(One to nil) 

PIJIA 

O'Donnell Co 
Maaon A Dixon 
Maxlno A Verga 
L Huit Co 

2d half 
Lynch A Zeller 
Gertie DeMllt 
Pender Troupe 
(One to nil) 



PA 



B Shaw Co 
SCRANTON, 
Pdi'a 

(Wllkes-Barre 

split) 

let half 
Sheldon A Sheldon 
Rene A Florence 
Brazil A Allen 
Bryant A Stewart 
J A Johns.>n Co 

SPRINGFIELD 
Palnce 
Cuba Crutchneld 
Doyle A Hamilton 
Ming Kee 4 
B Show Co 
(One to flll) 

2d half 
I.Awton 
Ilaxel Mann 
W Flahter Co 
Basil Frablto 
"Money la Money" 



If you want Time in the 
West communicate with 
the Largest Independent 
Vaudeville Agency in the 
World. 

ERNIE YOUNG 

AGENCY 

1312-13 Masonic Temple 

cancAGo 



HARTFORD 

(Hpitol 

Marcella Fallette 
Mason A (^ole 
Bus 1 A Frabeto 
l»en<ler Troupe 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Gene A Whlf 
Dolly DumpI n 
Cartwell A Harris 
Eddie Ftiyer 
"Can Man Love" 

I'alnce 

Lynch A Zeller 
Grace Leonard 
M KtHsen Co 
Warren A o'Hritn 
Royal 6 

2d half 

FelCiv,!! GIiIm 

1x)ney Haskell 
"Marriage vs Di- 
vorce" 
Pletro 
A Millpr Co 

NEW HAVEN 

Bijon 

Dell A GUs" 
Gerle D»».M'U 
P rlow A- ciintcm 
A Millar (^> 
(One to nil> 

2d half 
O'Donnell Co 
Mason A Dixon 
AndTson A Hurt 
M Romalne (To 
Lewis Hart Co 

Palace 

Story A Clark 
Lelghtner Ele« Rev 
Eddie Foyer 
Gene A White 
(One to nil) 
2il half 
Melnotte 2 
FAM Dale 
E Phillips <'o 
Marino A V- rr" 



WATER Rl'KY 

Poll's 

O'Connor A McCor- 

n.lck 
Luck A Claire 
W Fishier Co 
Dolly Dumplln 
"Cave Man laive" 
2d half 
2d half 
Davo Johnson 
Grace Leoii.ird Co 
Doyle A Hamilton 
Heath A Sperling 
Roval I 

WILKES ILYRKK. 
PA 

Poll'M 

(Scranton spL.t) 
1st half 

T.-.rr!o::'.i!to 

Pla/.o .1 

Carson A Kano 

"Cocktail Ro- 

mance" 
WORCESTER 
Poll's 

Dave Johnson 

TLT7el .Mann 

An«lerson A Hurt 

Piet ro 

"Money Ls Money" 
2d half 

Cuba Crutchneld 

Marseil Folett 

Silver Duval Co 

Ming Kee 4 

Leighlner A Alex 
Co 

Plain 

Lawton 

Loney Haskell 

"RubevUle" 

M Romalne Co 

Melnotte 2 

2d half 

Df'll A Gllps 

Stevens A Kinff 

M KlFsen Co 

T layman Co 

(V)nr to fill) 



BOSTON— KEITH'S 



I 



Room 803 Loew Builtfinq 
1540 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



Bryant 7403-04 
4783-4 



BOSTON 
Boat4in 

Charles Ledegar 
Bennett A Shepard 
Mct^'ormack A 

Wallace 
The Lelghtons 
Sabbott A Brooks 
Oorflon's Olympla 

Hrollay Sq 
Regal A Mack 
Ray Perklna 
6 Macl^arens 
Uordon'i* Olympla 

WaalUncton 8t 
EckhofT A Gordon 
Tom Kelly 
VIsser Co 

BANGOR. MB 
Illjoo 
Musical Alvlnna 
Gertrude Morgan 
M A A Royce 
Joe AriMStronff 
Gypay Songstera 
Ward Broa. 
(One to nil) 
td half 
Mob I • 



Bneen Sh^ldan 
Maaon A Gwvnn 
(Othera to flll) 

LYNN. MASS 

Oordon'a Olympla 

Weber A Ridnor 

(One to flll) 

Klutlng'a Anlmala 

SI half 
i Halsey Sis 



MANCHESTER 
Palare 

Dancing McDon- 

alda 
Jean La Crosse 
T P Jackson Co 
Anthony A Arnold 
Oarcenetti Pros 

2d half 
Aeroplane Girls 
Jack McAullffe 
Robert Retlly (!o 
Lowe Feeley A H 
Klutlng'a Aikknala 
NEWPORT. R 1 

Colonial 
Jack McAullffe 
Kenny A Hollia 
Chong A Moey 

2d half 
Harry Hayden Co 
Grant Gardner 
Teschow's Animals 



Kenny A Hollls 
J Hlondy .% Sla 

CHICAGO— KEITH CIRCUIT 

CINCINNATI I^FAYETTE, IND 

Paltt«e New Mara 

Rosa Ellla A R J A J Giha 



MATTY WHITE 

Tho Singing Peptlmlst 

With JACOBS * JKR.MON, 19SI-S2 
"HTKOLTJNG Pl^YERS." 

This Week (Sept ft) Hortig 4 SeuKin'g. N.Y. 



Sully A Thoniaa 
Chas I Fletcher 
Shapiro A Jordan 
Reed A Tucker 
La Dora A Beck 

man 
(One to flll) 

CAMBRIDGR 
Gordon'a Cent 8q 
I Haley Sa 
Williams A Taylor 
Teschow'a Anlmala 

td half 
Weber A Ridnor 
Joe Armstrong 
Welch Mealy A M 
LAWRENCE 

Empire 
AWa Lloyd 
Lowe Feelev A S 
Robert Rellly Co 
Maaon A Gwynn 
Aeroplane Glrln 

2d half 
Chnng A Moey 
Williams A Taylor 
T P Jackson Co 
Anthony A Arnold 
Oarcenetti Broa 



Knowlea 

Clifford A Leslile 
rraooy Palmer A T 
Dunlay A Merrill 
MardI Graa Rev 
Newport A Stirk 
DANVILLE. ILL 

Terrac« 
Georgia Howard 
King A Wise 
'fascination" 
Aloha A G2rlle 
Geo Dovett Cu 

Sd half 
Austin A Delaney 
"Pinched" 
Zelaya 
(Two to nil) 
DAYTON 

Keltlin 
Billy Watson 
Juvenility 
Ainallman Sisters 
(Two to nil) 

ad half 
O Wallace A Boys 
"Rice Pudding" 
Howard Manley 
J A J Gibson 
(One to nil) 
DETROIT 
LaSalle Gardenn 
Jones A Cnimhley 
Tllyou A Rogers 
Oren Drew 
Capp^ Family 
Lancton SmHh A 
L 

2d half 
The Nagfys 
Marcelle Hardy 
Jean Chnse 
W.hter Garden 4 
Monroe Bros 
FIJNT. MICH 
Palnce 
Watsika A l*nd->r- 

st ud y 
Cook A Vernon 
•Touch In Tli1i»"" 
Baldwin Austin A 

G 
Joe Fanton Co 

2d half 
Nippon Duo 
Goetx A Duffy 
Mllo Dance 
Jack George 2 
A A F Sf«*dman 
FT WAYNE. IND 
Palace 

Naefys 
.Tji>>n <1<'ii;i>r 



The Standards 
M HamiltoM Co 
Priscoo A Uau;;h 
Steeds Sextet 

2d half 
I<ea KelU>rH 
Georgia Howard 
(ireat Howard 
Laplne A Emery 
"District School'* 
LANSING. MICH 

Strand 
Byron Bros 
Winter Garden 4 
Noel Lester 
Jo Jo Horr won 
Jack Gregoiy Co 

Id half 
3 Leea 
The Dorans 
Minstrel Monarcha 
Tilyou Rogers 
Fenwlck Girls 
LEXINGTON. KT 

ncn— All 
Les Kellor 
O Wallace A Pova 
Mr A Mrs flelgfrled 
Howard A Manly 
(One to nil) 

2<1 h Uf 
Nash A Thompson 
Mack Si Stanton 
P Wllso.i (■'> 
P Earl .t (iirls 
Joe Jennv 
l^lllv Van Ho.-n 
MARION. IND 
Orpheum 
Les Raymond 
Mack A Stanton 
"Rice PudHnj;' 

21 hnif 

Ans.dfian Sis 

>!ul!''n A Renn 

Mr A Mrs S-'R fried 

MT CLEMENTS. 

MICH 

Mn4*omh 
Hylnnd Grant A H 
Monro.' Bros 
Lynn A l^ray 

:<l half 
Mslor J All-n 
Carps FaiMlly 
John A P>4rso-iB 
OWASSO. Midi 
St m I'd 
Poldin Austin A O 
Hylsnd Grany A H 

Lester POIT'TS Co 

PONTIAC. MICH 

Onkli>nJ 



BOB 



CARRIE 



AUSTIN and ALLtN 

"BROADWAY TO THE ORIENT" 



H J Chase Co 
Rose Valyda 
S Avolons 

2d half 
King A Wise 
W A G Aahe 
Leo A Crr.nston 
Adams A Burnett 
Jnek Gregory 
HAMMOND. IND 

Panthemon 
Valentine A Bell 
Adams A Burnett 
I..ee A Cranston 
Phlna A Picks 

2d half 
F A C LaTour 
"Fasclnat'bn" 
Rose Valyda 
ft Avalnnn 

KALAMAZOO. 
MICH 

Regent 



IND 



Marcella Hardy 
F A C LaTour 
Major All«*n 
Coates- <'r.i-'; 
Jacks 

2d ha!' 
Orren A I»t / 
Wall -t- I).\'. r 
Phlna A Ca 
(One to niM 
RICHMOND. 
Mnmi.T 
Mullen A R.^nn 
Nash A ThoL.pson 
P Ea'-I Olris 
Bobby Van Horn 

2d half 
Valentine A P^ll 
M Hamilton Co 
Lancton Smith A 

L 
Jones A Crumbley 
SAGINAW. MICH 



li 



■^!f 



il 



DENTIST 

MeVICKER'S THEATRE BLDG. 

Dr. M. G. GARY 



Special 



CHICAGO 
Ratea to the 



Profession. 



.1 Lees 
The Dorans 
M'nstrel Monarchs 
Knapp A Cornelia 
Fenwlck Girls 

2d half 
Noel Lester Co 
John Gelger 
Byron Pros Band 
Jo Jo Harrlaon 
Coates A Cracker- 
Jack 



Jeflra^-HI rand 

Nippon Duo 
Goetx A Duffy 
Mllo Dance 
Jack George Duo 
A A F Stedman 

Id half 
r?ook A Vernon 
Wats'kn 

•Touch In Time" 
Lynn A Larry 
Joe Fanlon <"<» 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



CHICAGO 

Majeatia 

Trixle FrlganCa 



On Fifth Avenue 
Weeks A Parron 
Kramer A Hovie 



Mart Fall«r 



Frank II. 



GOLDEN and WARE 

Romas BIdg.. 24ft West 4Tth Ht. 

Phone: Bryant 2ri7n 

Bookfnr exclusively with p. F. K«-ith and 
affiliated circuits. 

Our Acta are all working. 
If you want quick aervlce w us at on«-e. 



Fridny, September 9, 1921 



VAEIETT 



'^ 



23 



BILLY GLASON 

••JII8T 80NOS AND HAYINGS" 



Tom PatrlcoU 
Wllll« Bol%r 
Th6 WJntona 
Tuflcano Droa 
TtdmM 
Wilbur * X«M. 

Held 
Z>orlB Humphrey 

Co 
Lyon* A Yoaoo 
Carl McCuIlouch 
Martha Pryor 
K»nam A O'Dara 
B«rt M«lro8«- 
The Rozcllaa 
PeKR-y nrennon 

flt»tp.l4lllC* 

Doree'a CelebrltiM 
Gene Oreen* 
Bryoa A Haic 
Na«h A O'Donnell 
IfCoody A Duncan 
Chas Howard Co 
Xrans A Whit* 
]>orI* A Slain* 
Frear Bairsrett A F 
IIKN'VBR 
Hlpftodrom* 
Ou8 Edward* Co 
Jack Incli* 
Xiady Tbcb 1(*1 
Sfnrton A NlchoN 

■on 
Sandy 

■ani*t*d A Ifarloa 
I Rotnanoa 

nxB Momma 



tarry Comer 
RuKti H*rb«rt Co 
Bailey & Cowan 
Tempest A Qua- 

shtno 
Wllllains A Wolfu* 
Sfanir A Rnyder 
PfTT.rTH 
Orph«um 
Van Celloa 
Dootey & Storoy 
Birlft A Kellr 
llarcar«t Ford 
Pearl Refay Co 
Jaok Roao 
Oaatl^rVToy Shoo 
BDMONTON, CAN 
Ornhemm 
(12-14) 
(Same bill Calgary 

15-17) 
Rurhos 2 
Wood A Wydo 
All«*n BtanUy 
9*he Cansinos 
Adler A Ro*« 
Bawer*-Walt*ni A 

C 
Ifallnre Calvfn 

KANSAS CITT 
Orphrvaa 
Rultan 
Pall of Rv* 
BAB Conrad 
Geo Tooman 
Kitty Doner Co 



SohMiU Oa 
Adanaa A QrMtk 
"Indoor SpartT* 
Oraaa Malaas 
Maraa A Maak 



Molara Rovu* 
(Oa* tv iiio 

Sd half 
NBW ORUCANS 

Ortihonm 
Laura Plerponl €9a 
Beth Berl Co 
fllir Frlaco* 
Clifford A Johnaon 
Charles Harrlaon 
Stavpol* A Splro 
i^age tiack A U 

OMAHA 

Orplienm 
Plelert A Scofleld 
Frank Browne 
Wilfred Clarko Co 
Ayey A O'Noll 
Rita Gould 
Van Horn A In*B 
Vadle A Cygi 
PORTLAND. OBB 

"■ 'hrnm 
Bualiraaa A Bayne 
Watt* A HawUy 
York A King 
GalettI Monkeys 
Henry A lloora 
ClVTord Wayao Co 
Barbetto 

ST. LOUIS 

Orpheom 
Mary Hayne* 
Norton A Melnotte 
Mailer A Stanley 
Lew A Paul Mur- 

doek 
HAD K*llooa 

RlaMa 
Flashes 
Fall of Br* 
Dolly Kay 
Barry A Whitledge 
Waimen A Berry 
BonnlagtOB A 
Scott 

ST. PAUL 



Mtohoa Brea 
Follls sta 
Anderson A Oraves 
B* Vo* A Rooford 
Corlnne Tlltoa Co 
Bob Hall 
Aaderann A Tval 
SALT LAKB 
Orpheaan 
Ona Munaon Oo 
J^an Adair 
Jean Barrloa 
Butler A Parker 
Gordon A Rica 
Mantell Co 
KItner A Reaney 
BAN FRANCISCO 

Oi pnoaui 
Wilbur Mack Co 
Frank Farron 
Ford A Cunnktg- 



UOIXn WILUAMS. •'Comedle* of IDJl" 

•2r!^ ^"^^ «-. ^P*- 4. Book moale 
•ml lyriea by 

'Mk Clarcaeo J. Norah Laa 

Stern, Marks & Raymond 

19B9 B'way (g|gt St.) N. Y. Clrele O'iVj 



liunth A Nino 
Kramer A Boyle 
LINCOLN. NKB 
Orpli««aai 
Tom Wla* Co 
Bronson A Bald- 
win 
Vera Berliner 
Wanicr A Palmer 
Zuhn A Drie* 
Clinton 81* 
Cavano 2 
LOS ANGELES 
Orpboam 
Wm II Crane Co 
Kcanlon Denno A 8 
Gallagher A Mar- 
tin 
Caraon A W I Hard 
Dreader A Gardner 
4 Lamy* 

Ford A Cunning- 
ham 
Gibson A Connelll 
Frawl^y A Lnulae 
MRUPHIS 
Qrpheaaa 
Bubbloa 
Jack Joyc)> 
Leo Zarrell 2 
Rodero A Marconi 
Bartram A Sazton 
Bobble Gnrdoao 
Mn.WAUKEB 

Trip to Hitland 
Clark A Urrgman 
Morrl* A Campbell 
Wilson A Wlleon 
H^rry L(\ng4on Co 
Roy A Pox 

HLNNKAPOfJS 
Orphoam 
Bd Mm shall 

ham 
f^rah P.'idden Co 
Hanon Welsh Co 



BJdith Clifford 
Harry Caotlel Co 

WEATTLB 

Orphoam 

Gautler'* Brick- 
layer* 
Tho Illos 
F & M Britton 

Palace 
Bradley A Anline 
Al Wohlmnn 
Jo© Dennett 
Lou A Pay Dubelle 
Miliard A Marlin 
Sammy Lee Co 
Wm Halllgan Co 
The Sharrock* 
Ton.-y QTfy Co 
SIOI X CITY, S D 

Orplieum 
TexHs Walker 
Matthews A Ayres 
UlOBHom Seeley Co 
Joe Drowning 
Hoi>»er RAmlne 
Sydney Grant 
Kara 
VAXrOUVEB, B C 

Orphrtim 
Carlylc Ulackwcll 

Co 
McKay A Ardlne 
Bennett Sis 
Neal Abel 
Quixev Four 
JuKffling Nelsons 
Carlton A Ballew 

WINNIPEG 

Orphenm 

Helen Keller 
Mel Klee 
The Uell > 
MarJ(»rle nrirracks 
Bob I.a Hallo Co 
Harry Conloy Co 
O & 'T Le Kreve 



tOBW'S CIRCUIT 



NEW yoAK CITY. 

Stnt^ * 

Jack A Korris 
Flsk^ ft Vnllon 
itome A X. uiien 
G Atnnioy A SI* 
Fr«nk Pay 
Uealy i >. 
Jack Lee 

Bhaw'n Dog Revue 
Kubnnoff 

Bry*nt A Stowart 
Bob Perns A Co 
Frank Pgy 
A Kiuntty A Co 
Amerlcaa 



Hurloy & Hurley 
Fred Werner 
Uotfs Seals 
C * T Harvey 
rulaii»tlr, P.cvi't 
O A L Oarden 
Mr A Mrs D Clark 
Rule A OUrlen 
Ilorl A Nagaml 

2d half 
Murray A Irwin 
I^ A O Harvey 
Prevost A Ooelet 
"Ilehtnd Scenes" 
Al Curpe 
J Bannister Co 



FRED P. NOSS 

Sik Mintoal Nosses 

t2e Yf. ODth street. New York City. 



The WatPfBon. Helm & Snydor 
V.O., and Hcnny Davin nnd Jnck Sliil* 
*ret, reHi)«»ctivcly piibliHliers and au- 
Jhorii of the recent son;; hit, "Mnkc 
^liovp" are named dofondants !n 
FedernI C'otirt procpedinnH by Chnrlea 
N. I>anlel8, the *, better 

known trnder blfl nome-de plume of 
Noil Moret." The plnintiff alleges 
ki*' *^^ **oug iH aa infiingetncnl of 
ii^mfi I ^^ fj il l l lif* comj;>oaition, "i^e* 



Wcbcr A Klllott 
(Two to fill) 

Victoria 
Suttor A Doll 
Johnny Dovo 
N Samuel* Ca 
Raoe A Bdf* 
Mme Rlalta Oa 

Id half 
Beit's Seal* 
Norton A Wltaoa 
Footer A Ray 
Clayton A Lennlo 
Caettng I'oyd* 
Liacokn <k| 
Stanley A Blva 
Al Carp* 

"Business Is Bus" 
Mallon A Case 
Iraaer A Lawlor 

2d half 
Brown's Dogs 
Craddock A Shad: 

ney 
Duk*'* Mtxtnro 
Race A Edge 
IIuHey A Hurley 

Greotoy Sq 
Hashl A Osal 
Tlowtird A BroWB 
E Emmett Co 
Fox A Kelly 
Clayton A Lennlo 
Pcp-O-MInt ReT 

2d half 
Butter A Dell 
G A li Garden 
GAB V-rlrn 

B I^aTour Co 
CAT Harvey 
Kallalahl'* Hawai- 
ian* 



2d half 
Ernesto 

Tallmaa A Kertnln 
Hall A O' Br lea 
TVIld A Sldalya 
(One to All) 
BALnNORB 
111 ppod rosea 
Musical llowellya 
Dugal A Leary 
J A a Nathaa 
Jim Roynolda 
H Dockrill A Co 
RKINGHAM 

McMahon A Ade- 
laide 
Roo* A Flyna 
Murray A Lane 
Berry A Nlckor- 
Aerlal Macka 
2d half 
Glenn A Rlekarda 
A Lloyd 

Royal Harmony I 
Kevnedy A Martla 
<ano to mi) 
BOSTON 



la tha «. T. A. 

■UJLi. JULIAN oiiUUHiub 
I4ts Broa4iw4i^ U'ui^um BMg.) Now Yark 



A DeVoy Ce 
Goody A Beott 
Doloe Bia Co 
KANSAS CITY 
CkMrdon 
Aaatraliaa Delaoa 
Fletohor A Terry 
C 8 Keith Co 

W Baker Go 
2d halt 
Carltoa A Book 
Thanka A Kelly 
II Berry A Mte* 
Al Tyler 
Aerial I^VaU* 
KNOXYILLB 



Hart A Holon* 
Rainbow A Mo- 
hawk 
Duke** Mixturo 
Martin A Court- 
ney 
rrank Tarry 
Shaw'a Dot 
Id halt 
Boll A Bva 
Holly A Loo 
Play A Caotletaa 
4 Jack* A Qoaaa 
Annie Kent 
Stanley A Blva 

KatiaMl 
Billy KInkaft 
Craddook A 8h4d- 

Bor 

GAB Park* 
Rolhtnd A Ray 
Jack Martin I 

Sd half - 
Burrell Bro* 
FIske A Falloa 
Fox A Kelly 
Frank Terry 
Pop-O-Mlnt Rot 

Orplieain 
We*t A Van Stck- 
Jimmy Dunn 
J Bannlater Co 

len 
Weber A Elliott 
Castlni; Tiloyd* 

td half 
Horl A NavamI 
Cumby A Browa 
The Chattel 
Jimmy Lyons 
Graxer A Lawlor 

Boulevard 

Bell A l?y* 

Murray A Irwin 

AAA KnlKht 

Huahle Clark 

Knllnluhi* HaWot- 
iani» 

2d half 

F.rjrotti A Herman 

Rainbow A Mo- 
hawk 

■M SamuHs Co 

Mallon A Case 

Mme Rlalta A Co 
Avenue B 

Plunkett A Ro- 
nalne 

Tollninn A Kerwlu 

"Put A T'Ue" 

Fi«^Ms fr Fink 
One to fill) 
2d half 

IT A L Steven* 

Chas Martin 

Rolland A Ray 

4 Danubem 

(One to All) 

BROOKLYN 

Metropolitan 
Prevost A Goelet 
«rhairti A T.aml»ert 
B Jarvis Co 
Jimmy I^yons 
"Dance FoMIe*" 

2d half 
Jack A Fori* 
Kucene Emmett 
"nunlneHH Is Bus" 
Driscnll T>on«r A H 
Lali'onotte Co 

Fnlton 
■ Brown's Dogs 
Play ft Castleton 
Plavmal<^s 
A Abbott Co 
4 Jack"* A Queen 

:d half 
West A Van Sick- 

len 
.Tohniiy T)ov<» 
Martin A Courtney 
Tlul'' fi- rj'Brlen 
J Martin ?. 

Palace 
Harry A I-ola Sto- 

vons 
Gertrude Oeorge 
LaFollette Co 
4 Danub<« 
(One to nil 

2d half 
.Tonnlnes A Mack 
Put A Take 
VtoMa Sr Wells 
(T\vo to nil) 

Wnrwirk 
Oco Krerett 
"Fr^lay 1.1th" 
Maley A O'Brien 
M Tollnion Co 
(One to nil) 

2tl half 
Plunkctt A Ro 

malne 
Jack Plu-Ipa 
(Three to All) 
ATLANTA. GA 
(irand 
Glenn ft Richards 

A Lloyd 
Royal Harmony 5 
Kennedy A Martin 
(One to nil) 



Little YoshI Co 
Gaynell A Maok 
Eddie Cassldy 
Count's Dancer* 
Lambert A Fl*h 
Blcyele Rider* 

Sd half 
Snell A Vernoa 
Carroll Baker A 

Co 
Phil Davis 
Waldron A Wlno- 

low 
Guy Bartlett 2 
Bicycle Riders 
CHICAGO 
MoVlokera 
Tiller Sister* 
Tripoli 2 
(Four to All) 
CLEVELAND 
Hippodrome 
Palernto'* Dog* 
Johnson Bros A J 
Skeily A Holt Rot 
Wm Dick 
Mykoff A Vanity 
DALLAS 
JefTenton 
Wlkl Bird A Baa- 

*on a ' 

DuTiel A CoT«7 
Gulllnnl 8 
Bayes & Field* 
Krcmka Bro* 
2d half 
Polla 

Hilton 81a 
Roof Oardon 2 
Lubin A Lewi* 
2 Baltn* 

DAYTON 
Daytaa 
Pollyana 

Bingham A Myers 
Bock A Stone 
2d half 
Zeldn Bro* 
Keeftf A Lilllaa 
Doll Frolic*. 
Palmer A Hou*toa 
DKTBOIT 
C4»Ualal 
Willie Knrbo 
Rceder A Arm- 

* trong 
Rounder of B'way 
Mumford A Stan- 

Icy 
Virginia Belles 
FALI. RIYEB 
Rmplro 
Rnell A Vernon 
Phil Davis 
Chattel 
G Bartlett 8 
Waldron A Wla*- 
low 

2d half 
Little Yonhi Co 
Gaynell A Mack 
Lambert A Fish 
Bddle Caa.l'ly 
Collnl's Dancers 

FKKSNO, CAL 

Hippo<1rome 

King A Cody 
Hamilton Walton 
Flen A Tennyson 
Mark A Dean 
The Oftbberts 

2d half 
Marco Oo 
Allen A Moore 
Chapman A Ring 
Gordon A Healy 
• InHplratlnn" 
IIAWILTON. CAN 

lUng St 
GenV A Menette 
Downinfr A Jean 
"Breakfast (or 2" 
Morris A Towne 
"Sweetlea" 

ad half 
Maxon A Morris 
Gordon «^ Gordon 
Crrtorlon Four 
Dancers De Luxe 

nODOKCN. N J 
I/oew 

N Jane Co 
KelHO A Leo 
Billy Barlow 
Holland fie Ray 
Drlncoll Lonff A II 
"SnapTiv Bits" 

2d liulf 
Ahearn A Peter- 
son 
"Playmates" 
Collins A rlllar^ 
V»<e A Tully 
rOne to fill) 
IIOLYOKK, MASS 

liOew 
Errottl A Herman 
Cliff &. Green 
1' Weber Co 
(;illrn A Mulculiy 
C Hartf Co 

2d hair 
Ilaahl A 0»al 
DeLea & Orma 
Chase A LaTour 
Wilson A McAvoy 
B'way Boys A 
Girls 

IIOITHTON 
Frinco 
Slnclalo- A Gray 
V.'heeler A Mark 
Leila Shaw A Co 
Robinson McCabe 8 
Dun.iiiR Surprise 

2d half 
Illcknoll 
Fox & Voii'tfa 



Brnesto 

Hall A CBtma 

(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Bollinger A 

nolds * 
kcKenna A FlU- 

Patrick 
Kddie A Ramoden 
Salle A Roblea 

LONDON, CAN 
Loew 
MoBtambo A Nap 
Jack Ooldlo 
Kibel A Kane 
Sd halt 
Paramo 

Johnson A Craao 
Ro** Revue 

Ua BBAOH ,CAL 

State 
CaaaoB Btj^b 



td half 
Mont* A Parti 
DeLtght A Mannoa 
Gordoa A Jolloo 
Luclana A Lucca 
Dura A Fooley 
OTTAWA. CAM 



otto 

Patrloo A Sulllvaa 
"Nine O'clock" 
Monte A Lyons 
Lockhart A Lad- 
die 

PITT8BVBOH 
Lyceaas 
Wilbur A Girito 
Boyd A King 
M Russell Co 
Arthur Deagon 
Wheeler 3 

PBOVIDBNCB 
Emery 
H A A ScrantoB 
FAB Burke 
Carroll Baker A C 
J Kennedy Co 
Rucker A Winifred 
Wilson A Larson 

2d half 
Alvln A Kenny 
Fraxer A Mao 
Leo Mason A Co 
"Welcome Homo" 
Foley A O'Neill 
Dance Creation* 
SACBAMBNTO 
State 
V A H Crawford 



FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN 



BEVERLY BAYNE 

is "THE POOR RICH MAN" 

ORPHEUM, PORTLAND 
Next Week (Sept. 11) 



Gordon Duo 
Cosy Revue 
Moher A BIdrldge 
"Katland" 

Id half 
(Samo a* Laa Aa- 

gelea Ist half) 
LOS ANGBLBS 

lUppodraaaa 
Work A Mack 
LIndaay A Haaol 
Connora A Boyn* * 
Waltera Hopklna A 
C 

B Musical Buda 

2d half 
King A Cody 
Hamilton Walton 
Flen A Tennyaon 
The Gabberta 

BnSMFHIS 

Loew 

Mllo A Blum 
Col I hi* A Dunbar 
Gofnrth Brockway 
Frank Bunh 
"Girl In Baakat" 

2d half 
Summer* Duo 
Donnell A 8t Joha 
"Love" 

MaMe DeLonC 
"Tld Bit*" 

MODESTO. CAL 
8tnui4 

( 11-12) 
Marco Co 
Allen A Moor* 
C^hapman A Ring 
Gordon A Ilealy 
"Inaplrntlon" 
(16-17) 
Stutx Bros 
Reed A I^dcey 



Curt Oallowa|r 
Jean DoCJoada Ca 
Moor* A Shy 
LaTemplo Co 

2d half 
Roder A Doaa 
Tom Dooley 
"Tho Criala" 
Du*ll A Woody 
Lon* Star 4 
SAN ANTONIO 

Priacaaa 
Hart* A Bvaaa 
Jack Lyle 
Hammell'a Mlaaoa 
MorrUaey A Young 
G Ayrea A Bro 

2d half 
Sinclair A Gray 
Wheeler A Maok 
Leila Sh*n A Ca 
R McDabo 2 
Danckig Burprlao 
SAN DIBOO 



DeAlbert A Martla 
J A K Arnold 
Link A Philllpa 
Chaa Olbba 
"Rubetowa Fol- 

lllea" 
BAN mANCIBOO 
nippodrome * 
Flying Howarda 
Zolar A Knox 
T A H Speck 
Ward A Wllaoa 
DeMarIa Five 
2d half 
Hip Raymond 
G A K King 
J Rosen Co 
Granville A FSolda 
"Mixtures" 

IVIgwam 
Galloway A Gar- 



UNUSUAL DUO 

FRANK FIVBK and GFi>. ^TBNNT 
Week Sept. S. Rmpreaa. Grand Itaplda. 
Booked Solid I0tl-t2. DIr. Frank Krans 



P Randall Co 
Frank Roaers 
Mme Verobello Co 

MONTRRAL 
liOew 
Stanley Broa 
Helen Vincent 
Wm Morris 
Danny SImmona 
B LaBarr A Beaux 

NEW ORLKANS 

Crescent 
Blcknell 
Fox A VInetta 
A DeVoy Co 
Goody A Scott 
I>oIce Kis Co 
2d half 
Mllo A Blum 
Coli:n« t^-. Dur.bar 
Goforth Brockway 
Viank Bush 
"Girl In Basket" 

OAKLAND. CAL 

8tnU 
Stulx l?ro» 
Heed A Luccy 
(l P UHndull Co 
l-'rank n«>jrer^ 
Mme Vorob<-llo Co 

2d half 
Appier A Appier 
rut a Shlrl''y 
Tiiirke A I'.urke 
Frank Khopard 
Royal Trio 
GKLAIf03IA CITY 

L'berty 
ITaynoffs 
Jean A Shayne 

1 Mfller Co 
George Heather 
Pierre Trio 



rette 
Francea A Day 
Burton A Dyer 
"Fortune Queen" 

2d half 
Flying Howarda 
F A H Speck 
Ward A Wilaon 
DcMarIn Five 
SAN JOSE. OAL 

Hlpp<»droino 
Appier A Appier 
Rita Shirley 
Burke A Burko 
Frank Sliepard 
Royal Trio 

2d half 
fltryker 
Galloway A Gar- 

rettc 
Frances A Day 
Burton A Dyer 
"Foi-tunf Queon" 
SPR'fJF'LD, MASS 

Broadway 
Alvln A .Kenny 
L Mason Co 
Welcome Home 
Foley A O'Neill 
Dance Creation 

24l half 
H A A Scrnnton 
F A K Burke 
J fvennedy Co 
Rurker A Wini- 
fred 
WllHon A Larson 
STOCKTON 
Stato 
Hip Raymond 
OAK King 
J Rosen Co 
Granville A Fields 



BOB BAKEB 

Booking Acts of Merit My Specialty 

COAST TO COAST 

sec Loew'a Annex Balg. 160 W. 46th St., 
New York 



"Mixtures" 

2 dhalf 
V A M Crawford 
Curt Galloway 
J DoConde Co 
Moore A Shy 
LaTompl* Co 
TORONTO 
Loow 
Woader Seal 
Margaret Merlo 
Timely Revue 
WeotoB A Blalae 
Brower Trio 
WACO. TBX 

Poliu 

Hilton 8**tera 
Roof Garden • 
Lubtn A Lewla 
a Baitu* 

2d half 



Harts A Bvaaa 
Jack Lyle 
Hainineirs Misses 
Morrlssey A Young 
G Ayres A Bro 

WASHINGTON 
Strand 
Kennedy A Nelaoa 
Wlllll* Smith 
Rawles A Vaa 

Kauffman 
Lane A Froomaa 
Chalfonte Sta 

WINDSOR. CAN 
Loow 

JCTjcr.«r— 

Johnson A Craaa 
Roae Revue 

2d half 
Mantambo A Nap 
Jack Goldie 
Kibel A Kane 



If Ta« Wlah 



Bagagemeate 



CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



IS 



BB08SBL8 



WESTEBN VAUDEVILLE 



BLOOMINGTON, 
ILL 

Majeailo 
Kennedy A DavUs 
Chas Semen 
Marlette's Monl- 
klns 

2d half 
Orvlll* Stamm 
Marston A Manley 
"Gonoentratlon" 

OBAND RAPIDS, 
lA. 

Majootl* 

Homer Ron\aln* 
Nala A Rlzzio 
FAG Walters 
Bell A Belgrade 
Geo Morton 

Id half 
Graig A Catto 
Permane A Shelley < 
B Arlington Co 
Holi:-n* Sis 
Foil I* Family 

CAMPAIGN, nX 

Orphean* 

Wilbur A Adam* 
Austin* A Delaney 
Golden Bird 
"Summertime" 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
W Hale A Bra 
Transfleld 81* 
Jimmy Fox Ca 
Harry Cooper 
Reo A Helmar 
(Une to All) 

CHICAGO 

American 
Yule A Richard* 
J Fox Co 
R Clark Co 
Stone A Haye* 
Four Cameron* 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
P Curley <'o 
Minstrel RfT«a 
7 , ,v X Hill 

(Thra* All) 

Avenue 
Rago 

Milton A Lehmaa 
Clofford A Kramar 
Johnooo A Pataoa 

2d half 
Allmaa A Norlaa 
"DowB Yondor^ 
Anderaon A Oola** 



Ford A I'vice 
Delbrldge A Crem- 

mer 
McdUy A Dupr*o 
Khyam 
Tlio BroghtOB* 

Id half 
Cliff A DalUy 
Khyam 

Fagg A Whlfta 
Ballyhoo 3 

Kcdate 
Cliff A Bailey 1 
Laplno A Emory 
Fagg A White 
Blossoms 
Sandy Shaw 
Hong Kong Mys- 
teries 

2d half 
Clifton A Kramer 
Delbrldge A Cram- 
mer 
J B Bernard (3o 
Kono Keyes A IC 
Steeds Septet 

Lincoln 
Coecia A Verdi 
Billy Do** R*V 
Alf Ripon 
■p Curley 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 
F A O Walter* 
Ilufford A Craven 
"The Question" 
G Morton 
Meriftn's Dog* 
(One to All) 
DAVENPORT. lA 

Colunsbia 
LInd Bros 
Ovondo Duo 
Kelson A Madison 
11 Arlinxton Co 
Jack Osterman 
Hlggins A Braun 

2d half 
Billy Broad 
Santo* A Hayes 

Rev 
(Two to nil) 
DECATirR. IIX 

Empress 
W Hall A Bro 
Corrlnno Co 
"DlHtrlct School" 
W Gilbert Co 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 
I<uras A Inei 
Coscia A Verdi 
Hal Johnson Co 
Sandy Shaw 
Van A Vernon 
(Ona to nil) 
DEHMOINES, lA 

Mujehtic 
MrCormack A Lor- 

r'ta 
B Miller Co 
Marian GIbney 

Cd half 
Al Abbott 
McOowan A Knox 
Hanson A Burton 

Sis 
E ST LOUIS. ILL 

Erber* 
Dancing L Barbes 



Cleveland A Fay 
Ray Conlins 
Carnival of Ventoe 

2d half 
JAB Burko 
Kid Kabaret Rev 
Williams A Haw* 
ard 

ELGIN, ILL 

Rlalta 
Bally Hoo 2 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Slack A Dean 
B Morrelle Sextette 
(One to nn> 

. BVANSVILUL 
IND 
Grand 

Rosa A Fo** 

Fl*her A Lloy4, 

Lorrala* SI* 

Bronoon A Ed- 
ward*. 

(Two to All) 
Id half 

Klnxo 

Carlisle A LaMal 

Benaee A Baird 

Ha ward A Clark 

Mllt Ck>llln* 

"Smiles" 

GAIJ>:SBrBO, ILL 
Orphenm 

Girls of Altitude 

Shrtncr A Fltaolm- 
mon* 

Kalama A Kao 
2d half 

Flanders A Butler 

B J Moore 

"Cotton Picker*" 
JOUKT. ILL 
Orphenm 

Van A Vernon 

K*ao KeyM A M 

(Ob* to nil) 
2d half 

Saxton A Farrell 

Marietta'* Mani- 
kins 

(One to All) 

KANSAS omr 

Globe 
Rhlnchart A Dvff 
Sol Berns 
Kid ICAbaret 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Peters A West 
Almond A Haaol 
ITolly 

Rboda Blephanta 
(One to nil) 

LINCOLN, NKB 
Liberty 

Monahan A Co 
Kale A Indetta 
Harry Hayward CJo 
Zematar A Smith 
Nifty Trio 

2d half 
Wilfred Dubola 
Chamherla^ne A 

JSarl 
McGrnth A Deed* 
G V Bowors Rev 
J Fat" Thompson 
(One to nil) 

llAriNK. WIS 
Empress 
Ross Kinpr 3 
Maureen Knglea 
Rivereid* 2 
Hill'* CIrcu* 
2d halT 
Sullivnn A Mask 
LAM Hartt 
Davo Manly 
Maxweh Quintal 

i*Fx>RiA, nx 

Orpheaai 

M Montgomery 
I3d JanI* Rev 
Ma rat on A Manley 
Orvllle Stamm 
Lucas A Inet 
2d half 
L Worth Co 
Kennedy A Davioa 
Chas F SemoB 
"BloHHoms" 
Kervlilo Family 
(One to nil) 

qUINCV, ILL 
Orphenm 
Flanders A Butlor 
K J Moore 
"Cotton Picker*" 

2d half 
Girls of Altltud* 
Shrlncr A Fitxnim- 

mon* 
Kaloina A Kao 

RACINE. WIS 
Rialto 
Mystic Gardea 
J K Bernard Co 
B Lighten* Rev 

2d half 
Marks A Wilson 
ROCKFOIID, ILl. 

Palac* 
Wilfred Dubol* 
ChamDorialii* A 

Earl 
M&Grath A Deeds 
F V Dowers Rev 
J "Fat" Thompson 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Nacarro A Darllag* 
Naiarro A Bvb- 

bte* 
Melville A RaU 
(Three to All) 
ST JOE. MO 
Cryotal 
Peter* A Woat 
Almond A Haiol 
Holly 
Rhoda R Ble- 



phanta 
(Oae to All) 
td half 
Moaabaa A Oa 
Kale A ladetU 
H Hayward Ca 
NHty Trio 
Zamatar A ••allli 

CalaMhto 

J A B Barkr 
wl** Song Bird* 
LaFrance A Harria 
Shara Rulowa Bal- 
lot 

td half 
Violet A Lewla 
Cleveland A Fay 
Carnival of Venio* 

Grand 
Peak*'* Blook- 

heod* 
Helen Staple* 
FAG Domoat 
Tyler A St Clair 
Browning A Davie* 
Hir*choff'* Revue 
Piske A Lloy<X 
Yip Yap Yapfaank- 

era 
(Two to nil) 
SIOUK CITY, lA 

Orpheam 
Matthews A Ayros 
B Seeley Co 
J L Browning 
Frasler A CeoK 
(Two to All) 
2d half 
Homer Romalna 
B Seeley Co 
Sidney Grant 
Kara 

(Two to All) 
SIOUX VAIAS, 
8 D 
OrpheuBS 
Warner A Cole 
LAM Hart 
Dave Manly 
Maxwell Quintet 

Id half 
MoCormack A Lar- 

Ota 
B Miller Co 
Marlon GIbaey 
(One to All) 
SO BEND. DTD 
Orphouaa 
Billy Broad 
Hall A Baxter 
Mertan** Dog* 
(Three to llll) 



td half 
Ford A Priea 
Alf Rlpon 
Billy LlghUlla 
Jack Oatennaa 
(Two to All) 
Bl'B^OF'LD, nx 



Mai JohnooB Oa 
Sax ion A Fi*rroU 
Min*tr*l Revua 
Harry Cooper 
Roo A Helroar 

2d half 
"Summertime^ 
Corrlnne Co 
Ray Conlin 
Wills Gilbert Ca 
(Two to All) 
TBRKE IIAUTlk 
IND 
Hlppodrom* 
Klnzo 

Carlisle A LaMal 
Bensoe A Baird 
Howand A Clark 
Milt Collin* 
"Smiles" 

2d half 
Rosa A Fo** 
FAber A Lloyd 
Lorraine 81* 
Bronson A Bd- 
ward* ^ 

(Two to All) 
TOPKKA. KAN 

Novelty 
H Berry A Miss 
Williams A Culv*r 
J Gordon Player* 
Akin Ambro** A L 
Two BdWard* 

2d half 
Rlnehard A Daff 
Sol Bern* 
Hiir* S Clroae 
(Two to Ail) 
WATBBIiOO, lA 

MaJ«*tlo 
Sullivan *A Mack 
MaoGowan A Knoa 
B Fraderiolia Co 
Permalne A Shelly 
Hanson A Burton 
Sh 

2d half 
The Brlghtons 
Mitchell A Mark- 

hara 
Bell A Bellgrave 
Nolaon A Madiaoa 
(One to All) 



.'<a 



PANTAaSB cntouiT 

BUTTE, MONT Pantagos 



Pantagoa 
(16-12) 
(Same bill plava 
Anaconda 14; 
Mlaaoula II) 
Georgalis 2 
Lister A Moor* 
Bthei Clifton oa 
Chody Dot A M 
Al Shayne 
2 Kanasawa Boya 
DBNVBB 



Amoro* A Ab«r 
Haye* A Lloyd 
Anita Arils* Ca 
Lilian Ruby 
Japane** Ro- 
mance 

OT FALLS. Momr 

Fantagea 

(1314) 
(Sam* bill play* 

Helena II) 
Rekoma 

Little Caruoo Co 
Walton A Brandt 
Kan* Morey A M 
Jerome North 
O'Hara A Nooley 
(One to All) 
LG nEAOH, OAL 

Pantagoa 
2 Deeley Girl* 
Avalon 3 
Lydla McMillan 
Bobby Henshaw 
Willie Bros 
"Springtime" 
LOS ANC.^IJBS 
Pan tag e* 
Dorothy Morris Co 



(15-lt) 
Henry A Adelalda 
Perry A Pepplao 
"CrcatlOB" 
Danc:itg Daveg 
Greenwich VtU 
Eva Tanguay 
POBTLAND, OBB 

Pantagas 
King Saul 
Ara SI* 
Rose Wys* 
Pantage* Opflpi Oa 
Joe Whitehead 
CI*meB*o Betlinga 
SALT LAKE 

Paatago^ 
Harmony Lan* 
Maaon A Ballay 
Adonis A Dog 
t Le Groha 
Gay Little Horn* 
•AN DIBOO 
Savoy 
Raggett A Sheldoa 
Murdoch A Ken* 

nedy 
Richard Fraaela 
Jarvis Revue 
Judson Colo 
Melody Ma'^s 
SAN FBANCISOO 

Pantage* 
(Sunday Opening) 
Wire A Walker 
Lew Hoffman 
Gloria Joy Co 
Davis A McCToy 
Haaky Panky 

SBATTUI 

Faatagaa 



'Edg 



e of Wortd" 



MAY and HILL 

DtrMtlan: JACK LEWIS— RBITH. 

liORWlTZ-KRAVS— LOBW. 



Pantz«r Sytva 

Canary Opera 

Dixie 4 

Good Night Lon- 
don 

Gus Ellnore Co 
MINNEAPOLIS 
Pantagoa 

(Sunday Opening) 

Norrls Collies 

Cunningham A 
Ferguson 

Stafford A Daroas 

Harmony 4 

80 Pink Toea 

(One to All) 
OAKLABTD 
Faatagaa 

(Sunday opening) 

JAM Gray 

Carl Emmy's Pata 

flhelton Brooks 

SantuccI 

Flying Ballet 
OGBEN 

fionia De Calve 

Amoros A Jeanette 

Tale of 2 Cities 

Garry Owen 



8POKANK 

Pantagoa 
Paul Sydeli 
Cart«ton A Bel' 

munt 
Mary Riley 
Petite Revue 
Waiter A Walter 
Powell Tr.oupe 
TORONTO 

Pantagoa 
J R Gordon Co 
"Maple Leafs" 
(Threo to nil) 
VAN<X>liVEIi, B O 

Pantage* 
Gilbert A Saul 
"Stateroom If" 
IA^w Wilson 
Little Cafe 
Little Piplfax 
WINNIPEG 

Pantagoa 
Humberto Broa 
Ann Sutter 
Braxlllar Helroaa 
Jun'.ta Hansen 
Will MorrJsey 
Kennedy A RooaOJf 
tOne ii» Tiii) 



Pekinese Trnup»« 

MILES-PANTAGES 

CLEVELAND 

The Hennlnga 
Al Ricardo 
Creole Fashion 
Chung Ilwn 4 



Jupiter Throe 

DETROIT 
Morley A Black 
Kennedy A Bert 
Dobba C\f*TK A D 



1 



(CoctiDu*d on past *21) 



Palaeo. New York, thl* week (A*, tS) 

EDYTHE MAYE ^ 



Feetared In "ITwa IJ«<lo Pal*** m Ja!l*« 
MafTluad. BmUl^ Ihla wook (Aag. tt) 



crotH" (lyric by Tx>ui8 Weslyn) niao 
piiblisliod flbout tlir hqipp time by the 
WatoiKon Hcrlin-Snyder firm. 

Daniels until lunt year lM'ndr(l tho 
Son FrflnriBOO musio publishing houpe 
of DtnielH & Wilson which is Htill 
ID cxiMlcncc. He signed l«Ht winter 
to write exnluaivcly tor W. I>. »• 
Mr. DanlcU ■old oat hU Interest in 

his -.:. I . H<: *""****.»?!!!! 

to the defenUaul sercri (HwnpoaiUoM 



iooluding thi« "SccrctH" number and 
charges (bat Davis nnd Shilkret (the 
latter conductor of the Little Club 
oroheBfrn) adapt<Hl the melody for 

their own uHe under the "Make Be* 
lieve" title. 

DanielH Metn forth Is his petition, 
filed through Clark. Prentice ic Roul- 
fitone that he baa been deprirgd of 
profits upwards of |85,000 vhkk Is 



his eptlmsted ysluo of his own com* 
positiona, ond prays for an injunc* 
tion and an accounting of the sheet 
music and mechanical royalties since 
accrued on "Malce Believe." 

No answer baa been filed as 7et 
to this bill In eqolty. 



Cliff Hess, w'^0 bas been sway 



from the Waterson-Berlin-Snydeff 
fold for gome time, will again help 
write the nation's sonfs at his former 
stamping ground. 



I 



Low Pollock and 



-_ SMlney Mitchen 

are collaborating exclusively for tbs 
Broadway Music Qorf oration's cats- 
log. Both were last associated witk 
Uemick. 



VARIETY 

._ ... I 



Friday, September 9, 192^ 



I 



i 



e Sensational 



VlyseJf 



llJL.n'^'^l 



tional 
"Hit 



The 
Sensa- 



tional 



r.V .'»! 



'r-'V*^, ■■ "f^ • 



" Hit 









.«!V-?? 






^•^rvirfMamrnf ^ scri<i if)r tlils one 



a greater song for you than ''(Vlamrny 
great double versions, and obligatto. 



Words by 

JOE YOUNG 
>*- and 
SAM M. LEWIS 




ARTIST' COPY 

Tuck Me To Sleep 



(In My Old Tucky Home^ 



i- 



Music by^ 
GEO.W.MEtKR 



Moderate con espressione 



% 



^^^^B 




M 



I 



I f H'f iif 



^ 





Old Ken • toe .ky cr»-dle,d iaeT'witott 
Old Ken-tuo-kySmlleTip-OB • 




<: 



W 



1 




vf>--- 


■ • ". 


• ■ • - 




V -■ 




"*■ . 




:■>';>••' 


4 






* 

«*■.•. • 

, .3 ■ 






1 






i*^* 






«v.- — ^ -^ - ^ I "^^^® '^ 70^' fields 
Dear old Tnc . ky^ keep tt bright till I ' 



of 




Nlgtt time vhenri get to bed 
Make tbe shad-ows stay'a. way 



ffif 



toss iny head I'll weep ^ 
did and gray She d wcop 



d'o raoreiJ— * Tm g< 




How I weep and 
Prom my Mam .my 



^ 



f 



w 



so more 



I'm go In back In r stead 
If sne could hear me say 



i '' ^'IJ^ i.,iJ'i iJ i Uujui'JJ.JJ ii^iii ' 



$ 




Tuck me to sleep In my ^ old^ Tucky home Cov-erme with Dlx-ieskles and 



le ave me there a - 16 ne 






riij.ij i>^iiJiiiJ RiiihM\i 



Just letthcsun, klssmycheeks ev-rymorn, IBto .the 



kiss- In Tve been miss, in', from my Mam. my since Vm gone 



ilvm 



^ 




I aint had a 





^ 



mr^. 




bit of rest 



Since I left my mam-iny\j nest 




I can al ways' rest the beet 




In her lov. in' arms 



||iiiiiWi>WWli 




3<^P 




TUck me to sleep In my old Tn c-kyhome 
T — ^"^ 



ni iM^f h 



^^ 




r f #w f 

)am. < I [ 




roam 



lay there,8tay there ne.verco more to roam. 

^Coxorright MCMXXI by Irving Berlin, Inc. 1587 Broadway N.Y. City. 



Internal 



ed 



A'^-A-^ 



i. 



^^'^■*^ Wi-:i^ ^ 



"Hit 






■j^.'Jii.u"-'^ 



J:f-^^'k^. 



» 



m^ b 






>f > 



;f;,^ji:'s.'.W..*.p> 



.*•..' .V v>'^ ^". t. rw -,»■ •■•;• •■ •• . ."-* 



,^»-^ - ■ i^'^.f*-'; ^Tlm-. 




imm-m 






BWfWppp 


Ilm 






I 






■..:A^2Song{^ith\^tof:MHm(ir(laii(ih 



';.r:-;' 









ratlaili 



CHICAGO 



. I, 



JM Sensational 



^'>i^ 



fT^1«rti 



Bv tht 



■M 


1 

3E 


ON 
LPH 


N 

A 


[G ; 


B 



Myself 



^^ 



»Kfay, September 9, 1921 



V ARIETY 



The Sensational 






IVly^l^ 



tm^ 






I 



If >T>u sarrg "Sriooky Ookums" net this' 
one — a double with a howl in each line, 






business 



..-,..r ^. 



any mc 



^Words^bv ^., 
JOB YOUNG l^v 
SAM^M.: LEWIS 



YOU 
i.:I 

IfoderatcTcon moto 




ARTIST COPY? 

Cry Baby Bluies 



Music 7 b 



MUSIC 7 DY 

GEO.vW. MEYER 




^^ 





yotiVe thir ba - by ^ iVe been call- iii* mv 'own^ 

Yovk must think your^ kiss is^ma^e qut of ^ gold/ 



Oh 






■;■?>-.■ 




^me|-*Oh'inyy ,YouVe'^a^;bout5the .,>. mean-estlbaY-]|%jiVe< known; .-^i^ 
itef^Oh^my)' They wont' do you ^ . / ^an - y^good'Swhen youVe^old^' 



Fnd 
and 




herein Just whyj When I ^w^-na kiss 
hera^ Just why/ When ros-es areVed.'^ ' 






you an-swir no ^ 
bees hanga-round 



^TO^ 



ni tell you this 
When they are dead 




Im gonna go — ^ Ahd ba-bies al-ways cry when iheVe left ' a - lone 
bees can\ be found There^ll be no bees a ^ roundwben you're love grows cold 
•CHORUS ^ — ^ r : ^ y w 



ihWkr 



^ (Youir get those) 
(You^l get those) 




Ciy^ ba-by'blues_youVe gon-na. j cry ba-by 

i 



Ciy^^^bya -by blu*js^ just means good-; 




ba-by Su-gar'o^ mine 



^iJci'V^i ^iJd^ 



You'*re'so re-fine «» 



You wont do this wont do that 




WhatVon your mind 



Cry .ba-by blues You're gon- na 



die 



ba-l>y 




Kiss - es you^l lose ^ ; as sweet as 

X 



pie ba-by Ask most an- yT sweet - ie rat: the 




,, 3 ^' 3 



can-dy shop^ 




What good is^a lol -ly. with -out an - y pop 

/ n 




*j[^i( ^ 'khi\i^Ulitiffi 



I skid-does you^re gon-na cry ba-by ThoseTcry ba-by blues., blues.N 

Copyright MCMXXl by Irving Berlin,' Inc. 1387 Broadjvay N.Y. City 
Intftrnationat Copi^rigM Sernrtd Ali Rights Aesen^fd 



m 



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-'-<*= 









When lie Sun iQt^es 






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■•■r \ ' -/ 



« * V .', i 



'"»•*•■■ »• ■ '^.:f-; 



^v-.y:'- 



The\danciesttdance tiine in towp. 



'V- •*. . '**i'^''"' 



t» .»v 



-^i 



1 



. '^^^^^^ BROApWAY 

AN Vii^ tsef -: New Ybrk 



UTiMORE'v: 



^t^^ 



^ J.DETBOIT 
^^INCINNATi 






»•?.%• r 



.#• 



The SenkUhliaT " Hit 



feT'ifl^ 



■^ "sie, 



I^HKi^Jli 



26 



VAftlSTT 



gVi<fay, September 9 1921 



PA 



Producing De^^ 

Stuaio 

ENTIRE TOP kLMOK 

232 West 46th Street 

Opposite the N. V. A. Club 

Phone Bryant 2187 



WRITING, REVISING, 
DIRECTING and PRODUCING 



SPECIAL SONGS and 
MUSIC TO ORDER 



REHEARSAL HALLS FOR RENT 



'' . 



CALL AND SEE 



E. K. NADEL 
HARRY CRAWFORD 
JAMES L. SHEARER 
HARRY STORIN 

and 

PAUL GERARD SMITH 

Who Has Written "HIT" Material For 

STELUV BLWIIEW. NFXLIE V. NH'lIOI*S, ALIC K HAMILTON, WELI^ 
INCiTON CKOHS. PUIL DAKER, KUISCOE & KAllI, POWKKS ft WAL.- 
I.A<K, POTTER & IIAKTU'EIJ'. MAKIK tiASPKIl, HTKVEXS A BttU- 
NKLLE. FULTON * lIlIliT, DUELL I; WOODY. MAIIION CilltNEY. UAIN- 
MOW ft MOHAWK, BEATTY ft EVELYN, PAT I5AUIIETT, DKBELL ft 
WATEI18, llAUKY HAW, ADAMS ft BAKNEIT, ANDERSON ft BURT, 
NEWPORT ft 8TIRK, ARNOLD ft HORNER, DUNHAM ft O'MALLEY. 




KsAgf g^^ ^-^ Ifc^^ WvV» «^ ^ 

3 



,:-A •i- 







.,\v 




Do you realize what it is the bookers and agents mean 
when they say "if is a classy acf* or **t1iere is no class 
to the act?** Let us enlighten you; in nine cases out 
of ten an act gains its class from its dressing. Unless 
you are properly dressed you may be put doym as lack- 
ing class, and class alone has booked many an act. 
|We are in a position to advise you regarding the dress- 
ing of your act. We are always willing to catch your 
act and give you the benefit of our experience without 
binding you in any way to purchase froni this shop, 

AMELIA CAIRE, Inc. 

102 W. 57th St., New York City. Phone Circle 8840. 

V J ; Costumes and Millinery ; ' 

Stage Wear . - ' /^ • Street Wear 

Individuality Our Aim 

Special Nofct 

This estahlishment has no connection with any shop 
operating under a similar name. 



>\T ^^^T i^>x>L^^ &:-gLk^ 



FIFTH AVE. 

(Continued From Tago 21) 

Quixano nnd Co. (New Acts) No. 2. 

Mocnrt nnd Ilrndford gave the show 
n comedy start iu the No. 3 spot. 
The fust laughs of -the day were 
Itrought forth with Murcart's btew 
hit, the act being worked up to c 
liigh^ comedy ]>itch with u good souu 
off at the finish. 'Tango Shoes," n 
novel comedy turn, picked up the 
bhow where Mar.irt and Hrudford 



COLOURED 

HAND 
SHADOWS 

The Origination 
of 

MAXWELL HOLDEN 

OF 

Holden and Graham 



Proceedings will be taken 
against any 

INFRINGEMENT 

or any 

MANAGER 
Playing an infringement 



The coincdjr hit tlint Rtoppcd the 

ahow wne the epced uni fun of the 

I Nifty Trlo^-a cJrrrii clown the kida 

'I sbonld aee. k rlrl who wore — Oh my. 

oil mcl nothing at all up here you 
. Ictiow, and lonir thin allU onaa down 
I bf>k>w ' and wJlh a ainccr of popular 

stra the three proved vorltuL.. ■. a«ijt- 
, ifUla bear& Tli« cIowd ia clever andi 

ifiUym with MM a trick .Jms n4dl« 



left off, nnd rnrriod it along with a 

s('rie.s of lauKhs. This offoring lias 

bceu intich ^iervicc and coiitinucH as 
a strong comedy vehicle. As a neigh- 
borhood house net it can be counted 
on for sure returns regardless of it3 
age. 

In spite of the fibundnnce of ((tin- 
edy preceding them, liUng and Ver- 
non steiM)ed in nnd hanked over an- 
other comedy hit. This couple sliow 
considernblc ability in handling fjsi 
cross fire talk. An Improvement in 
the material would make them n sure 
two-a-dav liet. Tiicir present ungle 
of the ohl What St. idea gathcrcu in 
inntnner;ihle InugliH with newer n»a- 
terial delivered iu this speedy man- 
ner Hure of even greater returns. 

t'arlos Seba.stian and the Myrn Sis- 
ters, due to it being the first show, 
rxiorion'-iwl f<.T)t;i»h'rnl»lv diffiriiltv 



with the orchestra. The musicianji 
were unable to pick ud the cues, with 
the act Buffering to a large extent 
on this account Sebastian is sup- 
ported by ^two clever girls, with the 
I general hiy*but of the act making it a 
good flash dance offering. Donovan 
find liCe next to closing stei)ped out 
and took uway the applau.sc honors 
of the day. The two-act was given 
a good Jitart by Miss I.ee, with the 
Donov.nn gags to follow up, hitting 
the right comedy angle. Cross and 
Sartorius. a two-man acrobatic of- 
fering, closed the show capablj. 




LOEWS STATE 

I/oow's State's future is secure, if 
the showing of Monday (Labor Day) 
matinee is any standard. Weatlior 
was ideal for holiday tripping out of 
town. There was a double-header ut 
the l*oIo Orouids, nnd the inetro;ioli- 
tiui rnrd of sporting events was a 
record for length and variety. Nev- 
ertheless the new house waH packed 
right up to the picture operator's 
booth by the time the vaudcvillt sec- 
tion started around 3:30. 

A little over an hour of films pre- 



fodod 



the 



sMorinltv hill. *Wed<liiic 



Hells/' a' Constance Talmadge pic- 
ture, began about LMu, and it was 
3:30 before the News Topical \*a8 
over and the way was clear for tho 
specialty interlude. The bill wa.^* 
lii;ht, \yith flinging and dancing the 
[Hcdominating elements. It made a 
fairly even layout, of medium cost 
and without a drawing feature. Ap- 
parently the Ivoew management does 
not propose to get itself tied up with 
n i)olicy of advertising costly fe«^ 
Hires. Just ordinary vaudeville ai)- 
pears to be ample to draw the crowd 
to the big phiyhouse anyway. Ca- 
pacity on a holiday afternoon of per- 
fect weather ought to make that 
plain. 

Lew and Ornc** Harvey opened the 
vaudeville bill following the News 
Tc'i'al. Tt\ f^ ne.if '^ineine offorinir 



with plenty of rariety in oostumt 
changes and numbers, lacking in jait 
one detail. A aprightlj danco at tbt 
finiuh would have giren the routiae t 
touch of n«oded speed. As it ia tbt 
four or so songs arc rather Mv>notoD- 
ouu. although they are picked to give 
variety in style. Tlie first is a num- 
ber soDg with the two pnncipars, ris- 
ible only as to their honils stuck 
through a drop in one. The second 
brings them out in Chinese costume. 
The man follows in a solo wearing a 
Tuxedo, joined (rresently b.v the worn- 
in a soubretto dress of yellow, for • 
wedding Fong handled in patter sijle 
with a lively rag air. Won fair 
measure of applause from an efpf* 
cially friendly audience. 

Curtis and Fitzgerald have a typi* 
'•al Krnall tune Rnecisltr. but canittllf 




H. HICKS & SON 

675 Fifth Avenue, at 53d Street 

Have a little fruit delivered to your home or 
your friends— take it to your week-end outiaf 




WHAT THE PAPERS SAID ABOUTTHE 

NIFTY TRIO 



A welcome trio of three entertAt** 
Inir pereona c!\m« next. The Ntf»# ^ 
Trio conalsUi of a comie on the €!«•• 
order, a fellow who h«n<1lee pop •»"•"* ^ 
bere an<|^a girl who wear* cood war^ 
*ct wa« a Uuebinf b» 



per* and^a gt 
vobe. The a 
»-VARllBTr. 



J 



If T?! 



""^V WJ^'^^f^'^'T'-" *■ ' 



Fr id ay, September 9, 1921 



VARIETY 



27 



miagcd. The fwo men do imitations 
of all manner of Houndj', sucU as. 
borstfii' DoightH, eats, dofH, steamboat 
sirens and stage cat fights, chickon 
crows, and finally a whiMling flirta- 
tion by birds. The turn never getH a 
cbaDce to become monotonous, mov- 
ing from one neatly turned detail to 
another swiftly. There i» very liitU- 
talk to halt the going, always uu ai<! 
to a specialty. 

The Futuristic Ilcvue, hcvou sing- 
ers (four women and two men) wus 
the longest act ou the bill, taking up 
18 minutes. One of tho (Hsi'hi;;ui>h 
ittg feature.** of the bill is its spcod; 
there never is too nuwh <»f anything. 
In that short time they put. ovor four 
operatic numbor.s nnd :t violin s(ii(>. 
The act has a wealth of hpccini set- 
tings and Romo sumptuous rostuiuin;; 
for a turn of its kind and radiates 
class, both in the Htnging and in the 
fingiug. AH the singers (tliero arc 
aix besides the woman viornti.st) arc 
well trained, and their ensembles are 
distinctly enjoyable. They were per- 
haps the applause winner of the nff- 
ernonn. The ambitious numbers all 
end in a high note, and Miia probably 
helped to draw the applause. Tbe 
itriking atnge picture helped as. wpII. 

Callahan and BHss (-'Attaboy 
Petey") creates a laughable type i" 
their "Two Si-orts from Micliigan.'* 
It is not the old-fashioned stnge 
••Rube," buf rftther the modern "smiU 
Emart Guy." Their dances and busi- 
ness is ca]iital, but at times the talk 
is stretched out and drags, although 
it Is nn intermittent laugh getter of 
the substantial sort. They were on a 
little more than 15 minutes, half 
again as long as on.r of t*'^ other 
ietim^. Rush, 



23rd ST. 

Absolute capacity with a fair 
sprinkling of atandeeit Labor Day 
night at this house by the time the 
first act came on although a good 
percentage were the overflow from 
the supper show erowd^ about a quar- 
ter of the house ezitine gradually 
vith each succeeding act. The audien- 
ce was in a holid-ay mood and ac- 
cordingly welcomed everything in full- 
est measure resulting in extra en- 
cores and therefore a late show. 

The Lecardo Brothers, a two-man - 
acrobatic team workini; in baktMs' 
.costume and a bakery settin;; showed 
a violent routine of lea[»s and tum- 
bles that were none the less effec- 
tive. As for their atttsnpted comedy 
by-play, they were really funny for 
an acrobatic £eam. Kay Xeilan in 
the deuce opened in iuvenUe sox 
get-up for her kid specialty and went 
through her ehd^acter numbers 
iwimmingly. They accepted a coupe 
recalls. Herbert Ashley assisted oy 
Joe Dorney and an unbille<l wonuin 
showed the old Ashley and Dietrich 
act in which the woman, "Mme. Le 
Vonce" enters to a *'Madame Butter- 
fly" overture for her supposed act 
opening only to be interrupted by 
the other two men. Some argumen- 
tative talk follows following which 
that end of the "plot" is utterly 
abandoned and as Asnl«*y sotto-voced. 
"There's nothing else to do so let's 
give 'em the old song and parody 
standby." Ashley has a couple of new 
parodies on current songs that scored 
heavily following Dorney's straight 
rendition. Dorney by the way is 
eajmble vocalist who t-akes his ef- 
forts in the calcium seriously enough 
to raise a spontaneous applause bar- 
rajte on his own account. 

(Jreen and Bennett, a two man 
co'ored team proved entertaining 
with a hybrid collection of <omedy 
business, unadulterated nonsense and 
serious singinj;. In bricklayers* pet- 
up the te.'un travesties an operatic 
air to th" dialog plaint. "I'm gonna 
quit my job" and the other dissuad 
ing his partner from that i<lea. At- 
tracted by the advertisement that 
the neighboring booking agent >\ants 
two trombone players, wliich one of 
the hungry boys interprets as "bniu- 
bonc", they get out their instrumeuts. 
in reality oamouflaged kazctos and 

S' into their session of jazzing on 
em. 

•Thp Fourflusher.s" (New Acts) 
topped the vaudeville section. Shar- 
key, Both and Witt, a straining rath- 
•keller trio held down the next to 
abut spot capably although sonie- 
"what handicapped by the late hour 
•nd part of the exiting crowd. Once 
■tarted however, they held 'cm in or 
«Pt 'em Htanding in the rear. 

Nlobe, closing the show en 'oun- 
tered similar difficulties but once star- 
ted the too had them interested and 
on seats' edge. Niobe is the aquatic 
njtnrel she bills herself. Her under 
toe water feats were effective if 
Ik*'* ^^^^^ reason than that they fur- 
Jnahed food for conver^atlor ou ejit 
••to "how does she do it'^'. Niobe 
••ta food under water, *ings "Yankee 
V<>odle", and answers Queries l>^' 
Writing on a slate while submergen 
•Jjong other things. She's a doMing 
torn that should Iwive no fear of per- 
lonning to vacant seats no matter 
■ow late the hour. 

Ahrl 



ACTION ~ ACTION ~ ACTION -.riCTION ~ ACTION ~ ACTION - ACTION 



Coming Agents for Comers 



m •* ^«— ■■i n ii»wo^^*.*s«i— 



GEORGE 



FRANK C. 






BOOKING WITH ALL INDEPENDENT CIRCUITS 



Vaudevifle-Productions-Pictures 



CAN ROUTE DESIRABLE ACTS IMMEDIATELY 



Call At Once 



Room 508, 



ROMAX B'LDG. 



245 W. 47th St, N. Y. C. 



ACTION ~ ACTION ~ ACTION ~ ACTION - ACTION - ACTION ~ ACTION 



AMERICAN ROOF 

The Roof held ita largest attendance 
il "*^"n' months Monday (Labor 
J/ay) evening. The entire lower 
floor wa« filled with the fringe of 
«, .* *>o'dmf an exceptionaJly large 
quota. The customary ten act bill 
mil ^ J^nture picture comprised the 
•ntertainment. 

West and Van Siclen, musical turn, 



opened the show. This combination 
is «• sure lire opener far the smaljer 
houses. Both members disp ay ability 
which aided by their neat appearance 
brings the turn up to the necessary 
renuirements. Donovan and Haskell 
(New Acts) No. 1! were the usual 
second spot mixed team with a male 
member who shows promise. Wil- 
son and Larsen a two-man senu- 
acrobatic team No. 3 took down a 
comedv hit. These boys sUrted like 
a whirlwind with their comedy but 
^I(^wed the good impression to 
dwindle largely due to an overdose 
of the same stuff. For small time 
comedv the.se men have the requir- 
ements. Curtail the turn a bit and it 
shouhl be surefire in any three-a-day 
house. 

Jimmy Lyons with », "J «n^log lar- 
gely about the war held forth No. 4. 
Lyons has securefl good material al- 
though some of the war talk is a bit 
passe at this timv It appealed to 
the American audience that guve the 
boy considerable recognition. "Dan- 
cv^ Creations," a fant stepping turn, 
closed the 6r8t ha»f. The Tone male 



member of this turn is a capable 
Kussiun dancer. The tamborine num- 
ber as executed by the girls furni- 
shes a corking bit. entirely different 
from the average routine of dancing 
turns. 

Howard and Brown fNew Acts) 
opened after intermission banging 
over a hit from the start. This 
colored couple set a pa'-e which was 
difficult for the following turns to 
follow. Grace and Kddie Parks in 
a light singing and talking turn 

f fathered a fair Amount of applause 
argely due to the winaomeness of 
the couple. The turn provUles light 
entertainment that <an be fitted into 
any bill. 

Clayton and Lennie with a orons- 
fire talk routine |cathered in the 
kiughs next to dositifr. Tlie combi- 
nation is a strong one for the next 
to closing spot in the Loew house". 
Depnon and Clifton closed the show. 

BILLS NEXT WEEK 

(Continued from page 23) 

(Two fo All) y.*-T 

Regent I Bugfr^ n*>nnrt 

Ray tc l[«len Wal- ' t)al> A Btrlov 



A. T 



Bernard A Fcrrta 
Keavlllr Kanillr 
Orplicam 

Kitaniura Japa 



Oohirn Oate Co 
Terminal 4 
Doral nialr Co 



INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 



DALLAS 
Majectle 

The hfctora 
DunlftU A Waltera 
ailfoyle A X^nga 
Huriy Ellla 
Vera Gordon Co 
"Sunnhine Olria" 
A<lp)iil«le Bell Co 
FT WORTH. TKX 

Majeatic 
Kfttr A Wiley 
LrwlR A Hender- 
son 
Geo Damarel Co 
Rayriiond A 

Pehram 
"\Vln.p Tour "Wife" 
Clara Morton 
ITnll Rrmlnfl A B 
IIOrWTON, TKX 



Majaailo 
P A J I^avollo 
8arK<^nt A Marvin 
J Kennedy <'o 
Buddy Walton 
Juulor A Terrta 
8wor Broa 
Choy I.lnir Hee Tr 
OALVCNTON. TEX 

Majeatle 

(12-14) 
(ffarne hill plays 

Auntln lB-17) 
Rinlth Barker Co 
Mart A Dymnnd 
Mattylee I^lpfmrd 
Bobby Rftntlall 
Bpie A Hpan 
Bamea A Wornley 
Parker Broa 



McNIchol in "Pinched* 
Roy MeNichol heads the cnf:t of n 
new dramati(» playlet cnllcd 
"Pinched." Ijewin and (lordon are 
producing it for vaudeville. 



WitmaiK A. Sons have acquire 1 the 
Americtin pu!ilisi)ing righta to "T k* 
Violet Song" by Maurice Yvain, beat 
linr)wn m France an the author of 
"Mon Homme." The Witmarlca ob- 
tained the Western Uemiaphere rights 
from West & Co., Britinh pnbliaherH 
who issued the song under the title 
of "Golden Butterly," although the 
Ameriian music house has decided to 
retain the original "Violet Song ' title- 
Beginning,- ^©ct 1, all music 
printed in tb« United States and 
shipped to Canada must have im- 
printed upon it the words "Printed in 
the U. 8. A." The Music Publishers 
Protective Association wan so noti- 
fied in a letter secured from the 
("anadian Department of (?ustomR 
and Inland Kevenue. 

Arthur Freed and Joe Meyer, the 
Frisco Hongwritiu/ team, have, plated 
a new "Hugs and Kis«es" song with 
lianas, inc. nn<l ns \at Handers, pro- 
ft^sioia' manager lor Ilarms, statei: 
'I nm giving 'Hu;,'s end Kisses' rj all 
th« new burlesque (ompani«s now 
in i.^learsnl." It is Harms' prime 
"plug* Bong. 



f,* ,!•. ■■ ^nr 1 f" ■" " 



»^— i w .i- _ri 



28 



' ''•^'f^V^^^-<"i^-M. x\ .W ^' i .f " ■ ■'■ 



i«^sraB3im3a 



V AEIETT 



Fridav, Scptcmher !>, Vi2'', 




Restore 

Those 

Silver 



Threads . 



TI»r«o «li«inKur\iB Cray *trcHKi» whtih 

ot'inb ll!»":u uxvay \»iili Mury T. «"ii)M- 
inHa'a llair ('ok>r lUnt<ici MmII tou- 
l>on fcr free Iriaf boiilf and tP»l on 
H Psrio li.cl;. This proves it. 

No d:ins« r of Ht r<'a aiiii; or dlwaJora- 
I inn - nctiilnir tj waKh «»r rub off. 
l,» Kvos jeur lu-.lr noil. tlufTy. Uivrly to 
turl uiul dr(5v. Ht-.xlora ti<>n c.»mu>1oIv> 
ill 4 to 8 <la>.i. wli thtr your eray 
liair!< uvc iiiiiny or few. 

Kill out <oui>ifn ciirpfully^f^n'^losr 
! . k if poss.btc. Tilal boiiir :ttA .i|> 
plii.itlon roiub coino by return m;*!! 
I'ull sl/>d bottlt lit y.>ur dru»;'; .- ( or 
(lir»tt from UN. Don't r.s:; ruining 
\.n;i I :iir with rln>H> f»ii»>.>^l it ut ♦« 
tlury T. (Goldman. #*» iioldmaii lUilir.. 

>i. ruiil. Minn. 

^!;>ry T. i;nltlninn, ",1)4 Coltlnian l»l<lz.. . 
.S(. I>:,iil. Minn. 

ri' ..s.> iond nio \ .tur I'!IKC tr nl • 
Idiilr of M:ny 'iV (;i»l liiiMn'5 Hair" 
• < Icr i:rtttor(r with spi'< ml comb. 1 " 

•.111 i:, t t l)iif;-'il<''l '" :"'.^ ^^''-^ ^y ''^' • 
. tilt (,.L' t iiis f :(.f I'ffiT. 

'Ill r.iiturxl <•> lor of ii;y hair is • 
, ,rt. K i -t bl;uU . .dark brown... • 
• id.ir.k brown .liRlit brown... 



Arthur 



Eva 



SiLBER and 




•" •■■• :■% ••*•»'••« «#(i«>aK«MI 



I*— ■^♦i wi mim ii n a Ml I iifc 1,^1 




ashfoolery 



99 



( o 



.Tow 
Kl;\t. 



CALGARY 

By FRANK MORTON 

i'he Orpliriiiii season opened Auf. 

_'."> with Uushmnii and IWiynf hcad- 

::iiinjt rn nl tractive bill. The house 

I ;isit«rcd capacity btu^^iiuv'^s at $1 top. 

Willard Mack arrived in the city 
r.iiit week, und after vi.^^iting relatives 
itere will commence work on a new 
i<lay, thr plot nnd characters o»* which 
v.ili he typical of the northwest. 
Kalph Kendall, author of sereral 
!i(M!ivS of the Koyal CanadiiU Mounted 
I'olicc, will ass;.>.t the playwright in 
tl.c pri\iaraiioM of the work. 



^ " '"r- 



Booked Solid, B. F. Keith Circuit 



Opening This Week 
(Sept. 5), Temple, Detroit 



Direction 



HARRY WEBER 



•'oiter Warficld, formerly comedian 
Willi the l*rim.'e««s company, is in the 
Holy Cross hospital here. 



The annual performance for the 
l»enetit of the Tuxis Itoys will be pre- 
.-.onted at the Grand during the last 
week of Keptemher. "Nothing Hut 
the Truth" has been selected as the 
:<1 traction. 



r>ill I'oslinj; Co., leave.s for a \i-^it to { stick protluctioa in this city iu 4»o;nt 
reUilives in Australia. of returns and attendance. 



Krnrst Willis, n former legitimate 
jiclur. and now owner of the Calgary 



WARDROBE PROP. 
TRUNKS, $10.00 

\^',1i rturrain^. ITava bef^n used. Itlso a 
few .St pond Hand Innovation and Flbr« 
Wardrob* Trunha. $20 and $25. A few 
"strii l.-ire*> Prop'-Tty Trunks. Also old 
I'ltylor 7nd Dal Trunks. 2* West Slat 
StrrtM. M<>tween Droudway and iith Ave., 
N>w York City. 



U. .1. C. Stead was the Kue^t of t!io 
Can.ulian Club, Women's Canadian 
Club and Canadian Authors' Associa- 
tion at a luncheon at the Palliser ho- 
tel on Hlonday. Mr. Stead is one of 
the be-t known of the Canadian writ- 
ers of fiction. 

The musicians' union has demanded 
an increase iu scale for the coming 
seaRon, with the operators asking the 
same scale as is already in force. 
Managers are asking for a reduction 
(n scale in both cases. 



CLEVELAND 

By J. WILSON ROY 

With the closing last week of the 
engagement of "My Lady Friends*' at 
the Ohio, after a brilliant three weeks* 
run, all records were broken for a 



CHICAGO BOOKERS, ATTENTION 



"The Peer of All Mental Masters" 

K H AY M 



Will HEADLINE the Bill 
at the 



EMPRESS—CHICAGO 

Full Week Opening Sept. 12 

SEE THIS 

BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION 

THEN SEE 

TOM POWELL FOR OPEN TIME 



Iturlesque resumed at tiie Star, 
Moudiiy, with "Knick Knack.v." and 
the Kmpire schedules "11 »rum Scnr- 
um." Hilly Hextcr. after a yei«r'» 
sojourn in Hetroit. is back at the 
Empire's managerial switch. 

This weel:. Ohio, "Winding Stairs"; 
next. "Krminie"; Ilanna. Hessie I'ar- 
riscale iu "The Skirt"; next, William 
Hodge in "lleware of Dogs." 

I.una l*:jrk closed for the season 
Labor Day. 

Paul Gusdanovic. of the Orpheum 
and Strand, has taken over the for- 
mer Hoffman I'alace. The house rc- 
• o^ieaed S:Jturday. 

New policy will be inaugurated at 
the Marvel. Gordon Square and Cap- 
itol this season — vaudeville and pic- 
tures — .'^ulit weeks. 



sociated with the Arts and Crafts 

theatre, Detroit, the Greek theatre ol 

the I'niver.ity of California, and the 

Guild rinyers, IMtteburgh, will guide 

tlie de.5liiiie.s of the i*lay House this 

season. The initial offering will be 

"The Importance of Iteing Karuest " 
and Kugene O'Xcill's "Hcyond the 
Horizon" is also listed. 

Films— Allen. "Th« Black Pan- 
ther's Cub"; Kuclid, "At the End of 
the World"; State. 'The Hell Dig- 
gers"; Stillman. "The Four Ilorse- 
n.en'; Circle and Strand. "The Cup 
of Life": Park and Mall. •Passing 
Through": Knickerbocker, "Too Wi.^«■ 
Wives": Metropolitan. "The Night 



ll«r"<(nian": Orpheum. 'The Cooquettt 
of Canaan." 



Louis Rich, musical director for 
several years at the Opera House, will 
wield the baton at th« Hanna this 
(ContinutHl on page 30) 



AT LIBERTY 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSY 

Irish Union Pip«>. Scotch H^hlaad 
Piper. Scotch lUfflilzvnd Fllna Dancer. 
Iristi IStop Dancer. Staga Step and Mod- 
ern Ball Room Dancer, Violinist (Musi- 
cian). PLAY PART.S — VAUDKVILLB. 
Would be ptenaod to Join Muacal Act. 
Burloaqua ur Irish ' Comedian or Co- 
inedirnne Partner (oldtliuer preferred). 
Affents, keep my addreaa. Car« Variety, 
New Torli. 



Frederick McCcnuell. formerlv as. 



AT LIBERTY 

HAND BALANCER. Amateur for afght years; height 5 ft. 4 Inches, 
weight 120 lbs. Good appearance. Wishes to Join recognized understander 
or act. Willing and anxious worlier. 

Address WTTLIAM E. VAN NORDEN, Jr. 

310 Grant Ave.. PUinfield, M. J. 



Hs 



IN BOSTON 





Can now be had at ST. LOUIS FACTORY PRICES. 
All Trunks in Stock for Immediate Shipment. Trunks Repaired and Ex- 
changed. Mail Orders Filled. 

NEW ENGLAND AGENCY 

HERKERT & MEISEL TRUNK CO otxxw Building 

illLlxrVEirxJ. iX iUrilOXZilj llXUnJV K^K). 453 WASHINGTON STREET. BOSTON, MASS 

In the Heart of the Theatrical District ^ 

NOTE-THIS IS A DIRECT BRANCH OF THE HERKERT & MELSEl TRUNK CO., OF ST LOUIS 



ii 



THE GREATEST FOX-TROT BALLAD IN YEARS 

IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT 



?? 



WORDS AND MUSIC BY FRANK ^HUBERT, THE NEWEST FIND' OF THE SONG-WRITING WORLD, WHO IS BEING PROCLAIMED 

IRVING BERLIN 



A GREAT 
SlN(;i.E i\l MIir'T 

(;RE\T FOR DITT 

A GREAT 
QIARTETTE SONG 

ORCHESTRAT[(>^S 
IN ALL KEYS 



CHORUS 

WHILE THE WORLD IS A-SLEEPING, IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT 

WHILE THE SHADOWS ARE CREEPING. IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT 

OH. HOW i MISS YOU, DEAR, OH, HOW I WANT YOU HERE, 

I SEE YOUR FACE APPEAR IN THE SILV'RY MOONLIGHT 

AS THE HOURS GO BY, DEAR, IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT. 

HOW MY HEART SEEMS TO CRY, DEAR, IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT 

THE MORNING DRAWS NEAR AND THE BIRDS START TO SING. 

AND I CAN'T HELP BUT WONDER WHAT THE NEW DAY WILL BRING 

AS I SIT BY MY WINDOW, IN THE STILL OF THE NIGHT. 



EMPIRE CITY MUSIC 

GAIETY THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK 



CO 



BY CRITICS AS ANOTHER 

-A WONDERFUL 
LYRIC 



HAUNTING 
MELODY 

A RIOT 
WITH ANY ACT 



Send for Your 
Profeaaional Copy 



hrilMy, Srj}trnil)Pr J». l:»21 



VARIETY 



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t'^'-^i- 



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^IMOiis 



1HIIIIIUIIIIIIIHII /^ f 



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JACK NORWOftTH'S OREAT SONO HIT 



(■ 



MY 



DADDY 

by NOIlWORJH,SlflWNSrR0M&-MORGAN 



A GREAT NOVELTY S0N6 

SATURDAY 

ty 

MITCHEU 6^ BROOKS 



A SONG FOR HIGH CLASS SIMGERS 

TEA LEAVES 

i^ffie Hftihtsof-yAfVINESErAnDtlAN'' 
E6AN 9X WHITING 




BROOKLVN ^56C>ruLT0tirTQ££T 

BOSTON 223 TQ9M0NT ^Q££r, mwlUPmATt[MKlC0mC£INmm[myT0WNYOUPlAy^mWAITm 

PUILADELPWIA- 5l^ouru 9wfmn. £V[mif1(iltUI)fmY0U0lfamATimii(O£.m£S:SPmimAmM£m 

PITTSBURO WV ^05 3V:w/oTflZD 6 1 . . : 

>^kSUm(i\0li'9Tu6DSrmn.NW t\gV WOlKK' 219 W ^6tu SrftHJ D^TUO\T '457 foQ? Srff££7 U/. 

CLEVtlAMD" A///)PO/>;?aw/ Bwiom CU\Cl^Ci0'654 ^at£ LAHi BiDo CINNCINATI • 3/i W£sr6ruSrff££F 

f St ATTLC • JP' PiH£ SrPL£T bf^umO^^'SffWApfs Musk D£Pi MIMNLAPOLIS • 218 Pantaqbs Bloc 



TODOhTO-/27 yo/iO£ Sri?r£7 
PORTLAMO 0UV322 WA^mNoroN Sr. 
SAMCRAMCISCO 90SMark£T St. 
ST LOUIS - T^£ Qramo LiADiR 
LOS ^mll^^' 427 South BROAomi 
BurtALO • 4gS Maim STR£&r 
AKROfi.OWIO • yvi O'liBiLL Co 



»' 



VARIETY 



Friday, SeptoniWr 9, l*>i1 




CORRESPONDENCE 

(TonLiaucd from pag« 2S) 
si^ason. He started in liin new sur- 
roundJJi^!* Mondttj. 



DETROIT 

By JACOB SMITH 

•Take it From Me, ' Garrick; nert, 
"Af.-ar." 



SIiubort-Michigan opf'iu Sept. 18 
>vith WiHhtm Ilodxe. 



Shubert-Detroit being completely 
r.uovated for Shubori vaiidevilU. 

O'JUien'a Afiiiitrels opened season 
at New Detroit. 



Harry Sommers, who operates the 
Towers in Grand Rapids, hus com- 
pleted plans for a new the it re cost- 
ing %SO0,Q00 that will open Sept. 1, 

W. S. Butterficld baa abandoned 
vaiideviOe this year at the Majestic, 
Battle Croek. and the Orpbeum, Jack- 



BiUy 



Edna 



FRAWLEY and LOUISE 



sou, and in^itead v, ill play f<'ature 
pictures. 



Th« Liberty. Detroit, has added 
vaudeville to its pictiiroe. making two 
changes weekly. 

The wage agreement between the 
]>etroit exhibitors and the operators 
and musicians for the coming Beason 
has been settled. Under the new ar- 
rangement wages remain exactly as 
they have been tiie past year. 



The Jew Croswell theatre, Adrian, 
reopened 8ept 1. after having bad 
$30,()00 spent on it for repaira An- 
gell & Codd are the owners. 



Industrial conditions are Imorov- 
ing in Detroit and the outlook for a 
splendid theatrioal season, with any 
kind of a good break in the weather. 



in 



a 



9J 



IT'S ALL A FAKE 

by 
TOM DUGAN and BILLY FRAWLEY 



OiMMIEI'M, SAN rK\\\(*ISC< ), Al'C. '20, 1921, 

l>K() FITZGERALD, 

245 WHST 47TH STRKIiTP, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

DEAR LEO:— 

OUR NEW ACT IS A BIG HIT IIKKE. THEY K1U*T 
US IN FIVTU SPOT ON OlfR SECOND WEEK AND WE 
ARE GOING BIGGER THAN IjAST WEEK. TE^LL TOM 
DUGAN EVERYBODY IS TICKLED TO DEATH 
WITH OUR MATERIAL AND IT LOOKS LIKE THE 
WORLD'S (GREATEST ACiENT WILL BE ABLE TO SHOW 
THEM A PRETTY SLICK PAIR OF ENTERTAINERS 
WHR\ YOU BRING US BACK TO NEW YORK. 

' JJED • HAS A IX>T OF NEW WARDROBE AND I'VE 
STII>L GOT ^JILVT GREEN STRIPED *^SILK SHIRT" 
Vor HELPED ME PK^K OU'i'. HOPE IT LASTS UNTIL 
WK GET TO SIOUX CITY. 

IF YOU WANT TO JUMP OUT 'm SEE L^S ANY PLACE 
r.NROUTK WE OriilJT TO HAVE A LOTTA FUN, 
'<A( SK I JI^ST met a FEUF/)W WHO KNOWS A GUY 
THAT HAS A SJSTER AVIIO ^L\RRTED A DOCTOR AND 
1IF>; SON IM'NS A DRUG STORE IN LOS AN(;ELES. 

• im:i>' sends U)Ve to you. and you know me, 

i::M4h. best on earth to you and TOM. 

YOURS, 

DIM. FRAWLEY. 



Williams and I^anraster are going 
tn build a 2,000 seat honae in Fern- 
d.tle, a suburb of Detroit. 



.T. O. Brooks has been ani>ointed 
vpfsident nianacer for the F. B. War- 
ren corporation. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

By VOLNEY B. FOWLER 

Season opened this week with "The 
Passing Show of 1921," jus*t out of 
I'hirago, at the Murat. and "Shav- 
ings" at Kngli.'ili's. Keith's also 
opened. Burlcsqiie came back Satur- 
day, when Lena Daley and her "Kan- 
dy Kids" opejfed the season. The 
Daley show bad been rehearsing nt 
tiie Park for three weeks. 



tlicir season at the Murat Saturaa>. 
Mr. Walker had IS prohtable weeks 
during this, his fifth summer season 
iu Indianapolis. The company not 
only made money fo^ Mr. Walker 
ttis year, it is said, but nls.) won 
national fame. The three premieres 
given by the organization were im- 
portant. The Bbuberts are to pro- 
duce in New York "Artists* I^ife" and 
"Main Street," two of the plays 
brought to life by Mr. Walker. 
Walker is to direct the Gothnm ap- 
pearance of both ft was announced 
before he left Indianapolia. lle- 
liearsals for "Artists' I<ife" were to 
open Tuesday and its premiere bein^r 
Kct at a hous« yet to be picked on or 
about Sept. 15. Immediately follow- 
ing this work on "Muin Street" will 
be begun it wan stated here. 



Work will start this month ii[)oii 
the new "Terrace" picture theatrr .nr 
17 ^nd 19 North Illinois streets. The 
house will 'seat 1.200 and will rost 
around ?175,000. Slcgemeier Broth- 
ers, who have conducted a cafe on 
the site for 25 years or more, own 
the 'ttulTdini;, intending to establish a 
new eating place in the basement, an>l 
to lease the theatre to the Central 
Amusement Co. 



Welter Whitworth in the new dra- 



Stuart Walker and his clau U ft 
r.nrl.T this wefk after the close of 




niatic critic of the Indiatiapolis News. 
News. 



KANSAS CITY 

By WUL R. HuQhes 

Sept. 4 — Grand, '^'win R«di." 
Empress, "Saucy Babies." Ifbusicsl 
Ptock, Gayety, "Girls de Looks," 
Century, "llccord Breakers," Or- 
pheum, Pantages. Globe and irarden, 
vaudeville. 



Ijast week was a spotted oue with 
th« vaudeville houses, nothing else, 
outside of picturea, being open. The 
Orpheum, Pantagea and Loew's Gar- 
den all got away to big business, but 
the heat killed it and all droppel ter- 
ribly the early part of the week. The 
(>lobc, western vaudeville, got into 
the running Thursday, with the house 
(lolled up with new paint, upholster- 
ing and fixings. It will continue itH t 
old policy of five acts aud a feature 
picture and two bills a wee4k: The 
prices. ir>-cent matinees and 25-ccnt 

(Continued on page 32) 



TO LEASE— GRAND THEATRE, CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Splendidly equipped for Stock, Vaudeville and Moring Pictures. 

1400 scats. Corner East Ninth Street and Bolivar. Apply,: 

L. J. Halls, Treas-, 29 Broadway, New York. 



H&MTRUNKS 

AT FACTORY PRICES 
From the Foll*wl»o A|«iita 

S. NATHANS 

531 7th Av«, Ntw York 

M. SUOABMAN 

453 WashlAgtoB 8t^ BottoR 

BARNES TRUNK CO. 
75 W. Randolph St., Chioaso 

J. M. SCHWEIO 
12 5th AvOn Pittsbargh 

BOOKS TRUNK CO. 
901 Main St., Kansas City 

FT. WORTH TRUNK CO. 

1105 Main St.. Ft. Worth, Tox. 



Herker-t&AIeiselT.Co. 



910 Washington St. 



St. Lonit 



' 1,. 



IGOR'S 
BALLET RUSSE 

This Week (Sept 5) Keith's Palace, New York 

Direction PAUL DURAND 







A P O L L O N ^^^E^ 5F^^ 

WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS MANDOLINIST, AND THE ONLY SOLOIST WHO APPEARED 

WITH THE RUSSIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Ibis Week (Sopt. 5) B. F. Keith's Royal, New York Next Week (Sept. 12) B. F. Keith's Palace, New Y^ik 

N. Y, GLOBE (Brighton Theatre) 

The bookinjc rtportn of (lie TnlBro Tln^atre mlRia il.» v •*'! 
to eniulaJp Ocor-e Ilohini^oii of the New Uriffhton Thv n-, 
who in controst to tho l';iluce has beou iiivinj; U\h rustoin n 
<»T(>ol!pnt vnudoville fiiK^ ihoso j.Mst few w(M'ks. Ap.lloh, Mi^i 
inarvflloufl mandolini.Ml. ,i„Miii stopped thr sh »vv List iiis'lil. <•!> 
s'^urcd though ho i.-* iu tlK- im Ut of the I'ord S.-(."V 
"Frolics" 



CLIPPER (5th Ave.) 
«>n.» of i!ie lilts of the sliow was n voun;: Kussinn. David 
Apollon. who piny* with thr Ford Si.srrrs, II- wns n licf. 
llraidos plnyinn the banjo in t'no t-aiul. he plava n inniidolin 
with Huch speod that it provi's fho saving th.it tho hand ii 
Mulrkcr than the eye. Tho hoti^p wouMn't let hini slop. He 
mIh) liaa a novelty, playinc the pi.Kin with on'^ Irmd wliila 
with hi« mouth and olhrt hand he inwiiiiilatos tho nj;iiulo!ii 
'Jhe Ford RiBters are clevrr. j.«; usual, with (hoir toHtuminic 
and tlioir dancing, and Hcorcd their ukumI hit. If»* got hii* niM- 
Hiral education in the Rnssiaa Syiii[diouy Unhcstra. 



Friday, S<*ptember 9. 1921 



V A R I B T / 



at 



•«• :.v*.' • ■'.' 






,»>i--V i. i 



Jl tj SlG PtT Bl:IS H ERS ' i.^i^:Ji> bN^^TKi^n. ; i>.T,i<i«rt 



'• ^^.irtf \v/--"- ';--.v ^>'^i:;v^» ••• .;: ^•''':-.''^ : /. jV:^-*; ;'> 




This iifw fox trot l)allaii h\ llir hoys who <:av(v ua-'iieautiiul l)hip./ VLove Bml'-jjiul a <l('>zriji hi-: snrcrss^sr 



Twa 




wm 






Bv MAKY EARL aiHl ted ITORno 



It's a smashing. sucyrss thf* lirsl liinr it's reiUAM^d hy a pi.Tfornirr. jii^t \r\ it once an(l yoii wilT.^till he sin<i;ni^ it lH^vt.summ^r 
lt*s"th^' Kind ot a so!i|i that \\ill iu!L\ntr <rpt >(> i'qniinon a> to nuikr thr |>i^ 



A new \lNh' iio\t'lt\ iivj. >oni: lor ra^ >in<rrr>. halhul sin^rcrs and no\(*ltv <ini;ers: 



kV MC A^n^Hri 



The h(>ys.;\v|io art^the ('()ini)o'j!'^^^^^^ "Ilriiiht Evrs" and inan\ oan\ oihers. and 

whcU tht'V «ra>e>^oiiTiil t^i^i^ (>ther t -V' 



V^>i 



il*\ \<' JIlVtMl VOU IKM'O 



.;?^?*'^''»--. ^f^" 



•f ' - • . • .... 

V i^ollei:;^ hoS'novehv ronirdx rnhV* nnnd>er. \\ ith male or ientale ver^-ioii : 



mSr^f^^oL 



Id acra iiu ijiKaiMi 



15v KF.MKR HI (;HKS and ROHKRT Kl.\(, 

A son«i wliieh is hoconiinii a lrenit'n(h>u> iiit hefore hein;: stin^ on the <ta<:(' 

ii,\rc {'\u\)< liave tak<Mi it np'and mad»* made it a <raze. 



K^'^'>'^''^i^^^:^:^idm, 


■JO^^^ 


"^F 


P 


Hie collff:*' 


** ' : 


1 



^ 



1 wo iiieat "hhie-" -^enouiih said : 




BvW IEMA5ITRA(:E\ aiiil MACEO ]MM\ \UI) 



and 




\\y FltANKjKILEEN: AKTHl^R BEHIM and WALTER HIRSCH 



i^^i^ 



These two 'hhies** will lake the place of an>; ''l)lue// son^ that \Vas"ever written in the \Xorld*s historj' 



/.--' 




NEW YORK 
.•p K UQU FORDAN . 
Professional Manager 

CHI G AGO 

bilIy^stonehaM 

^rand Opera House Building 



B roadway and 4 7th ^Street; Nq,w .Yoi-l^ City 



PHILADELPHIA 

HENNIE CORMACK 

25 South 9th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

FRANK SriQW-OFN 

Pantaqt's "»^heatfe fiujld.na 



BOSTON * 
JAMES X5ALLAGHER 

240 Trpihont Street 

■■■ ^'■•-•v*. ■ . . . ■ • ' 

baltimore 
'.. samTtujUin^ 

*I465 MadKo^f Avenue 



LOS ANGELES 
^ Barney Weber 
■320 Siipcrba Theatre .Buildmy 

MINNEAPOLJ^ 

WALTERrMrGjf^ATH 

' Lindtoy.Sklles BuUding 



V 



A 



' A..»<^.^^r 



32 



( — 



V ARIET Y 



Friday, S opte mbo r 0, 1{)J^ 




I 



I 






^f^f-^'A 




rOX TROT SOWe^ ^^ f«r dumb, DANCIN& 
reeeNTPIQWC |p\ AND MWrif AL ACTS 

A- GREAT /NVMBER II FOR PRODUCTIONS 

BY KENDIjS .&, DROGKA^ANJ^^-J 1 AND 5ROWN ..EASTWOOD S WESLYN 



/•;.-^j- V 



Moderato 






P'iM'f ' i-rf-^^'i^^^i^.'i-^^^^ 



once r«ll a - tlepp and ih* was dream - U(,' ^^'hrA Uia a - woke «h« start -ed aoream-Io;^ filled with fricht; 

!.aw man-y ttcht»that wtra a - mut • fof, ' But they wei* aw- fal - Ij con -fas - tn^, %9 ■* the tard-, _ 




^mm 




E5^e 



^a -r^r^-p- f .^ I y.E£ry.Eg:i^:g=f^ 



'A ; • nee, 
A * . Ilea 
REFRAIN 



your dreamt of Woo-der- land na*fold^ .them',' 
could not make out if aht\l .b« land • inf 



ti nrF'i ^r^^M 



"iVaslUtr a bias dcr.laad','ah« told them, lata that 
V^ . oa her feat or aooa b« ttamd-ioc M. ^*t 




Just ple.> tar* 





^^w^ \ ^:Krv ^ ^ m 



has no sease oor do the y ca re , 



Not a Jail or a ' cop, 



oh ftfi,*' la- a .^iae Dowa 



,— Dowo where bUckUwhit^andgreeaia brown ^ ^ " Each cot- turn* ' tsllke a eras -T patch, Eachhoucea boob-y 

_ — _ , I . I , , — , ,. — > — I * ' .,„ » ■ - ■ ■- ■ ' 



lafua-ay Jat-ber-wock-y town 



hatch^ Ev-'ry-bod-y it a 



'^^^^. ri i iW mti^^W ^i'^dA^T^S^BT^ 



i lafao-ay Jab-bf/.wxk-j town. _j» 



Juitpic-ture Strtt thrm wAlk-y, Ilear them ^ talk < y, ^ Jak • ber - wovk- y town.^ 



Copyright MCMXXI by M Witinark & Soat IatrniJition.il C^pyriKht Secured 



PROF; copy Asib ORGHESTRATIONS NOW READY 



M. WITMARK & SONS 



THOS. J. QUIGLEY 

Garrick Theatre BIdg., 

Chicago, III. 

DOC HOWARD 

21 E. Gth St., Cincinnati, O. 

AL HOWARD 

150 W. Larned St., Detroit, 

Mich. 



ED EDWARDS 
33 S. 9th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SYDNEY KLEIN 

430 Kuster Ter, Salt Lak» 

City, Utah 

JOS. L. MANN 
424 Barth Block, Denver, Colo. 



JACK LAHEY 

213 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

H. ROSS McCLURE 

Emporium Mercantile Co., 

St. Paul, Minn. 

FRANK FOSS. 

827 Hamilton Terraco 

Baltimore, Md. 



AL COOK NEW YORK 

1562 Broadway}.^,ac!i Theatre) MORT NATHAN 

BAftNEY HAGAN 207 Superba Theatre Bldg^ 

Pantages Bo,San Francisco, Gal Los Angeles, Cai. 

ROBERT EDGAR ELMER HOXIE 

500 Montellus BIdg., Gaiety Theatre Bldg^ 

Seattle, Wash. Kansas City, Mo. 

ARTHUR WHITE J. J. GERLACH 

406 LIndley Building, 312 Savoy Theatre BIdg. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Pittsburgh, Pa. 




ALBERT J. LINDSEY. 1213 No. Tacoma St.. Indianapolis, Ind. JACK CROWLEY. «8 Belknap St., Providence. R. I. CHAS. WARREN, 7-A Soho So., London, W. L Eng. 



CORRESPONDEiNCE 

(('o:ii imu'd fr4)in pa^f oO) 
toji at iii^lit are the lowest in the 
ci4y. 



"Twin PxmIs" t!in ()i)nninj? :ittrac- 
tion at liio (J rand this ^onson per- 



form od 
two pr( 

UttlM't i' 

SP( IIIS t 

s(>;isitn 1 



(•(vrniouy at 



^)r 



tli»' 
tlie 



t!io 

'\i MIS 

III in 
> Ijo 
;i>> >>;iowii uu :nrioasi» in tlie 



saaio 

last .s(>nson and 

yrars wna the sivond 
the h')us(*. The old bi'l 
Ijo a pop'.:!ar on<» as facli 




week's bu-sinrss. 



ft 



The Shubert looks like a million 
(Joilars, fairly blazing with gold loaf, 
opens S^-pt. 11, when the 'Four 
IIorNcnicn" film will show a single 
week at $1 top for the matinees and 
$l.r>0 at nighL 



Tlie managers of the legitimate ;ind 
hiirli'sijiK! houses overlo.)kr(l one liiis 
w.M>l<. ^ With >i>oine 40.0(H) visiting 
(»(Ifl I''<-I!.)\'.s h«^re to jjttend tiie an- 
nual rond'.ive of lodges from s x 
states, not a liousc other tluin va'ide- 
r.nd photojiiays was open. The man- 
ngers of tlie loi^nl f);irlrs |ui* lioii.sos. 
wanted to open Saturday night, and 
had tl!" whons in and ready to gi» 
hut wtTO under positive orders not 
to ()[)en until the matinee Sunday. 



Manager William (iray, of 
(Continued ou page '58) 



the 



WARDELL and LaCOSTE 

A Shot, A Kiss and A Song 

On Opening Bill Loew's State Theatre, New York 



Direction ABE I. FEINBERG 



Kin/( Lrar takes off hia 
HTJnkks ntmost as ea.iily as 
his rrown when he usci 

ALBOLENE 

If you are still bcinp annoyed by 
sticky or watery creams, just try 
ALBOLENK— you will (ind it a 
joy ('uls the ,'jrease instantly and 
keeps the face smootli and soft, 
preventinfl: make-up poisoning. 

In I and t ni. tiihrt for the make- 

tp bnx: hUo in S Ih and I lb. 

c^iii for i\\e dresainff tattle. 



At all ^rvffgtJtt and fUnltft 
SompU fW( OK RtquMt 



McKESSON * ROBBINS, Inc. 

F»tt>hl\iihf<l ;■(■>•< ^•'^" York 






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LIGHTELLE REVUE 



Booked Solid— VV. V. M, A. and B. F. Keith (Western) 



Exclusive Agent, BERNARD BLKKE 



Vri dav. September 9, 1921 




VARIETY 



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n and Mail at 



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MAX HALPERIN AGENCY 



402 Woods Theatre Building 

Phone Randolph 1786 



CHICAGO 



you are authorized to book the undersigned for routine; or to fdl open lime with the Western Vaudeville Man- 
agers'' Association, B. l\ Keith Vaudeville Exrhans,e( Western), Orpheum Circuit or any of their nfJUinted 
circuits, ^'-..^'"^ • "^ '■• ',•."■. * 



tkji um*i.i •■•••••••••«•••••••••••••%•••••• •••••••••««••««« 



Permanent addi 

^ ■ • ■ I,, . 

Date 



(This authorization Imlds good for 30 days nhen si^inrc is at liherty to tamvl this agreomoni and secure another 
representative.) 



33 



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34 



w ARIETT 



Friday, Septemhor 9, M)2] 




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ANNOUNCINQ 



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L Lawrence Weber and William B. Friedlander 



INCORPORATED 



DRAMATIC 



•• 



MUSICAL :: VAUDEVILLE 



Attractions 



Executive Office: 

Longacre Theatro 



Producing Office: 

140 West 42d St 



NEW YORK CITY 






I 




NEWS OF THE DAILIES 



With the closing of the Hooth for 
raotiiK"* iiud cvoniii,; Am;. 31, thp re- 
port F;'>t aroun.'l that (i;'orj;c Arliss 
was Nciioiisly ill of heart trouble. 
Wiiitlirop Ames deuied this was so. 
saying a s-witfli had blown out in the 
lioiisc, iii.ilcing a [MMformnnee iniiios 
sihlc. Mr. Arlis.s rcsiiMit'd Liibor Day. 

.T:'.rl; J.)Im.son w:js Ktoppod from 

iiialcitin .) spiM'ch nt a nejcro KHlherini; 
ill N'",vjrk S('j)r. r» by tlie police be- 
• •liu-^** of pi\'\!<»;is titteraii •cH r»*- 
;:ard<' 1 ms i;iflaimiiatoiy. Kii Khix 
Ivlnii 'iiterf'T'Mice is liinted. 



l'(»iir in<li<'tni'-iits i li Mniii^ larceny 



On 34th Street 

A. RAlWSKY 

Inc. 

The O'd-Faoluonod 
Furriers 

FURS 

Advanced Models 

('■•aloes, Slolcs. S'Mrfs and | 
\o\'c!ty I'm'- Pk'C'. Miat iirc 
t :i • •.•-•ly l:ii '' >' f.i>li.«i;i.-i. All 
;ii'> .ifK" r<\ .-it. t li<» pi-ire .\ (Ml 
\V'>;I(| have to pay \vli(»l'>s:ili'. 

We ili;iliilf;ict IIIC n\w oWll 1 

rih.i'i- ruid ;ib()Ii.-ih l!ie wliole- ' 
s,;!" .;i)d re;;»il pioti'. I 

Si)e(i;il Di.seoiml to the I*ro { 
fes-^ioii I 

I'urs St'ipi'd. IJepaired and ' 
l{eiiif>d''!e I ; 



Jrtcquc.^ R. Cibrario, Soviet film 
agent, charginjj larceny. 



Raymond Hitchcock gave three 
note', for hi.H .$G,r»00 motor ear. litid 
.To!:n F. Beiber. Inc., att.-uh' p it 1 *sl 
weel; ;i -4 Hit'hcock bad g«Mic into 
Saukrnptcy. 

rredcriek E. (ioldHmith ii now .sning 
C'hiirles ('hai)liri for $1(MHK) sail to 
be leijal fee.s dne on account of the 
(unedian's former wife. Mildred Ilar- 

i-i.^. 



Tucker, the actrcHs, will wed, it is 
antiounced. Duell is a former Repub- 
lican stat*' treasurer and head of In- 
H[*initiuu i'ielures. 



Kva Puck la^t w<'ek obtained her 
divorce from Aaron Kessler. being 
given the custody of their <hil<l. 

Clrieving over the dejith of her 
molher, l>ois lieigh. the dance;-. l;ist 
week commit t(>d .sui« ide by drinking 
ly.^ol. 



♦Only ;w.'^ by A. K. Thoraa.s, wiU 
be pr«'Hented Sept. 12 at the Cort by 
Sam H, llarri.**. 



Kthel Ilallor has again left home 
and her mother aayK she suspects she 
is with her sister, Kdith. 



.linimy (rallivan. Jr.. son of the 
eongressman. has defied his father and 
is sticking to the chorus of *'TI»e 
OHrien Ciirl." 



After threatening injun(ti«)n pro- 
• eeditus William Harris, Jr. a:ul the 
Sliiibeits were allowed to ronrinue 
wi!h • Ulaebeard's Kightli Wife" in 
New liaveii. 

CltarleM ?T. Dnell and Tiilli-ni 



Tom y\'\x as a result of an nuto 
crash faces rrrest on a charge of 
f«»lonv. Tho warrant was sworn out 
by Charles (). Sayre. 

The .\[etliOilis!s now I'roposes to 
i:ave ilieir own s>il)stitnte for dancing 
antl c.;il it "mutual :ithl(>l ics." 

"\"ver again," ."^aid Charlie Chap- 
lin, ::s lie v.:'.s about to sail for Mng- 
l.ind. K<'|)oi-(ei-s had asked him if he 
■\"re yuine to remarrv. 



The Capitol this week installed a 
new .'►()-|)iefo orchestra recruited out- 
sid' the union. lOrno Uapee will con- 
linne to conduct. 



AVIiile flying to Atlantic City, 
Theda r»aru had to descend outside 
.\sbnry and was picked up by u nio- 
lor i)oat. 



The phyKicnl superiority of Caru- 
so's throat and vocal chords was tes- 
tified to this week by Or. Willia.m 

I.iovd. 



OONNICK'S SUCCESSOR 

Speculation continues to be rife u 
to the successor to H. K. H. (^uunick 
as Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee of Famous IMayers. 

Kluk J. Ludvigh, chief counsel and 

secretary of the corporation, is the 

most likely candi(^ate, with Emu 
Sbauer, in charge of the foreign de- 
partment, and Ralph Kohn, of the 
legal d<»i)artment, also mentioned. 

The appointment will be announced 
shortlv. 



Qutrrini A C«4 

Tkt Lt«4i«| u^ i 
LarHtt 
ACCORDION 
FACTORY 

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bamL 
t77'tn C«lMk« I 

AVMM , 

tM FraaaltM. Orf.1 




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'i-.'^-i-WHITT! 



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THREE KEENA SISTERS 



This Week (Sep t. 5) McVirkcra, Cliicago- 



SIMiiyc, A^'D DANCING TRIPLETS 
-Next Wo. k (Sept. 12) Miller's, Milwaukee 



Direction MARK I-KW 



F riday, Scomber 9, 19gl 



CHICAGO SHOWS 

r^.-K (CoDtinued from page 0) 
it«kly. WiHie Kmbe, started the bill. 
5th au upnide down routine. Karbe 
JEts just BH coiufortably Ktandcnf: on 
tfg head as most of ns do standing 
X our undcrpinions. His first Rtunt 
^ally sliowH his cudurauce iu head 
lidanciogf and then be do«8 the same 
Sag on a swinging trapese. It's a 
Jftogeroua elouing stont but served its 
Mrpose of bringing Karbe back for 
gree bows. Taylor, Macey and 
Hawkes are a dandy harmonizing com- 
l^tion. The three men enter in 
trening dress and go into fast num- 
ItrSt no attempt is made to stick to 
Ae conreiitional harmony routine, an<1 
Aey just touch upoii clasBicel wid bal* 
Mdi. The heavy set man of the trio 
forks the comedy situations to n high 
flitch. The act went well because no 
lusiness is overdone. 

Wild and Sidelia, man and woman, 
ceold revamp their offering to much 
idvantage and thereby strengthen it. 
The woman enters first and sings, 
then she announces she will offer her 
hapression of one of her sex out shop- 
ping. The olio goes op, showing a 
special department store drop. A 
man walks out of a doorway, flirts 
with the ivonan, exchanges talk with 
her, some funny, most of it unfunny. 
The drop goes down aarain and the 
man goes into imitation!, mentioning 
France fi White's famous charac- 
terisation of the school girl singing 
**lii88issippi." The duo then go into 
a double yodeling number. The ex- 
pense of the special drop is misdirect- 
td, and brighter talk and more of it 
should be done before the drop. 

Marshall and O'Connor, two colored 
Bicn, were first to curve their names 
into the minds of the cro^d. One fel- 
low is a wonder at the piano, and ac- 
companies the other's, singing bih\ 
whirlwind dancing. They enter with 
Hghtning speed, with the man's danc- 
ing drawing rounds of appUnsc. 
He exits to let the piano coaxer play 
• chimes selection, and after that they 
do all double numbers. Both ara good 
performers and clever in dieir lines. 

Arthur Sullivan and eompany (a 
woman) garnered the honse for 
laughs. Sullivan does Bot act hia part 
any more, he li* "^ '' and when an ac- 
tor lives hU part no one can do it lif ^ 
t«r than he. SalOvan, it ia tme, has 
tsed this vdiide for a long time, but 

fch time sem, he is jnat as good. 
. Mabel Blondell should stop and 
vonder, and alalyae the cause of her 
formerly knock-ou